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1.
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science ; 22(1):154-162, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2198597

ABSTRACT

Purpose - The purpose of this study is to examine the economic impact of COVID-19 and analyse how the corporate social responsibility (CSR) initiatives of Islami banks (IBs) can contribute to reducing the adverse economic impact in the context of Bangladesh. Design/Methodology/approach: Currently eight full-fledged IBs are functioning in Bangladesh adhering to the underlying principles of Shariah;among them, seven are actively engaged in CSR activities to help the underprivileged segments of its citizens. This study, through employing a content analysis method examined the information available from these IBs as well as other government sources and published materials to address the COVID-19 economic impacts, specially the role of these IBs. Finding(s): This study finds that along the line with national and international funds, IBs' CSR funds can also help address the economic downturn in Bangladesh caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. The study further identified that if IBs develop a consortium among themselves, the CSR funds can be better utilised for the socio-economic development of Bangladesh. Research limitations/implications: The scope of this study is somehow limited, as it has only considered the impact of CSR funds by IBs in Bangladesh. Further research can be conducted in future considering the total CSR funds by all banks, i.e., conventional and Islamic banks. Practical implications: This study demonstrated that IBs spend USD 83.30 million annually, which means USD 417 in five years period. Based on the recommendations of this study, all IBs may work together to develop a joint CSR strategy for the socio-economic development of Bangladesh. Considering Bangladesh's poverty level, such a joint CSR strategy would be helpful for the vulnerable population of the country. Originality/value: This study is unique in the sense that it seeks to address the economic challenges of COVID-19 in the context of Bangladesh with support from the CSR initiatives of IBs. This study has created a new insight for IBs into developing an integrated CSR strategy, which is expected to bring significant contributions to the livelihood of the susceptible citizens of this country. Copyright © 2023, Ibn Sina Trust. All rights reserved.

2.
World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development ; 19(1/2):92-119, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2197276

ABSTRACT

Tourism is the deed of every individual who loves to travel for leisure, entertainment, sports, or other purpose and usually stay in places outside their environment. It involves hospitality, health, sports, education, or entertainment. Tourism is often connected with the individual intentions to discover the facts and findings of the environment. But, the COVID-19 pandemic contamination has furiously affected the kind of tourism industry across the world and waiting for the biggest downfall ever in the history of tourism. It not only affected the common inter and intraregional travel but also badly hit the global tourism sectors. In this article, an impact study of COVID-19 on tourism sustainability is performed with an in-depth discussion on various issues and challenges. Further, an effective analytical perspective is presented on the applications of intelligent computing techniques to meet the challenges of tourism concerning COVID-19. This study will be helpful for effective analysis on different tourism sectors in a post-pandemic scenario along with a special focus towards the enhancement of domain knowledge of different stakeholders, industries, and government organisations.

3.
World Review of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development ; 19(1/2):40-54, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2197275

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic has lead to societal transformation in terms of economic, social, and environmental behaviours. Like other countries, Turkey has suffered from the pandemic. The aim of this study was to investigate the impacts of COVID-19 on the following major indicators: total hours worked by employees, number of employees, labour compensation, capital compensation, gross value added and nominal capital stock at current basic prices, and carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Throughout the study, an extended input-output (EIO) analysis was employed. The scope of the study was based on the decline in economic activities in the restricted sectors such as accommodation and food services, travel agencies, tour operators and other reservation and related services, air transport, land tourism, water transport, and leisure activities. Three main scenarios, i.e., fast recovery scenario, continuing slowdown scenario, and economic recession scenario, were set to analyse the effects of COVID-19 on the Turkish economy and CO2 emissions.

4.
Environmental Sciences Europe ; 35(1):6, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2196030

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had many deep social and economic impacts that go beyond health issues. One consequence is that the pandemic has made it even harder to mobilize the financial resources needed to pursue SDG 13 (Climate Action) as a whole and to fund climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts in particular. This is especially acute in respect of the efforts to achieve the targets set by the Paris Agreement and by the recent decisions in Glasgow. This paper looks at how the COVID-19 pandemic has accelerated poverty and undermined climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts, as a result of the switches in priorities and funding. Using a review of the recent literature, an analysis of international trends, and a survey among climate scientists, it identifies some of the impacts of the pandemic on climate change mitigation and adaptation efforts and discusses their implications. The findings indicate a decrease in funding to climate change research since the pandemic crisis. The bibliometric analysis reveals that a greater emphasis has been placed on the relationship between COVID-19 and poverty when compared to the interrelations between COVID-19 and climate change. Addressing climate change is as urgent now as it was before the pandemic crisis started, and efforts need to be made to upkeep the levels of funding needed to support research in this field.

5.
Revitalising ASEAN Economies in a Post-COVID-19 World: Socioeconomic Issues in the New Normal ; : 1-30, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2193991

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 highlighted the fragility of the sectors and the economies, tested by lockdowns and quarantines. This chapter aims to provide a comprehensive analysis of the impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on the Brunei Darussalam economy and its key sectors. Further, it explores the policy responses undertaken and their impact to control the COVID-19 transmission within Brunei. This analysis identifies the social and economic policy responses to COVID-19 and summarises the invaluable lessons learnt in the context of businesses, sectors, and the economy. It is observed that Brunei economy had a positive growth during the pandemic due to its effort to enhance economic diversification to overcome the challenges faced by high dependence on the oil and gas sector. It facilitated the growth of agriculture, forestry, and fisheries sectors, wholesale and retail sectors, communication sector, and non-oil and gas sector despite the restrictions of the pandemic. The outbreak underscored the opportunity for businesses, sectors, and government to prioritise dynamic policies to facilitate and operationalise new growth prospects, which were among the reasons for the growth of Brunei amidst the COVID-19. © 2022 by World Scientific Publishing Co. Pte. Ltd.

6.
Managerial Finance ; 49(1):1-12, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2191586

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The paper aims to highlight differences in bank performance based on state politics during the onset of the Covid pandemic. The response to Covid pandemic created an unusual opportunity for an investigation of how politics impacts banking due to the initial response to the pandemic being heavily impacted by political affiliation states' governors and dominant parties in state legislatures. Previous research looked at impact of elections on the federal level (both executive and legislative branches) on bank risk and performance. The response to the Covid pandemic in 2020 allows for an investigation on how political influence on the state level impacted banks performance.Design/methodology/approach>The Covid pandemic was an unexpected storm that entered the United States with a vengeance in 2020, taking countless lives and ravaging the economic landscape. The response to the pandemic quickly took a political spin as republican governors showed greater reluctance to shutter business activity in hopes of slowing down the spread of the virus than their democratic counterparts. This paper examines the impact of the two Americas created along the lines of political influence as it impacted bank performance over four-quarters beginning with the fourth quarter of 2019. All US banks are split into groups based on the political affiliation of state governors and the dominant party in state legislatures to measure impact of politics on bank performance and risk.Findings>This research finds that banks operating in states with republican governors produced greater profits and exhibited higher liquidity levels. The same results held for banks in states where both the governorship and the legislature were controlled by republicans versus banks in states where both the governor and the legislature were democratic. Interestingly, the findings present a reversal when examining banks in states led by republican governors and democratic legislatures versus banks in states with democratic governors and republican legislatures. In those instances of mixed leadership, banks in states with democratic governors tend to show greater profits, greater liquidity while demonstrating lower asset quality.Originality/value>A paper published in Managerial Finance in 2018 discussed the impact of the parties in control of the White house and the legislative branch on bank performance and risk. There have been no studies, to the author's knowledge, that look at how states' political leadership (gubernatorial and legislative) impact on bank performance. Because the response to the Covid pandemic became a politically polarized issue, the onset of the crisis allowed for measurement of how different responses by republican and democratic state leadership impacted bank performance and risk.

7.
International Journal of Social Economics ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2191453

ABSTRACT

PurposeThe purpose of this paper is to explore the impact of earthquakes on the labor market. The authors try to estimate the impact of two major earthquakes (Izmir and Elazig) in Turkey.Design/methodology/approachIn order to analyze the effects of devastating earthquakes in the nearby regions of the province where the earthquake took place, on the labor market, monthly and annual data from the TUIK and ISKUR database will be used. For this purpose, the authors consider the earthquake a natural experiment and employ a Synthetic Control Method (SCM). In addition, the analysis will be carried out using seasonally adjusted data, taking into account the seasonal effects of the monthly data to be used in the study.FindingsThe results show that the impact varies based on the labor market structure of the regions. While the earthquake positively affects the labor market of agriculture-oriented regions, it harms the labor market of nonagricultural-oriented regions.Research limitations/implicationsA major limitation of the study is that we cannot fully separate the impact of Covid-19 from our estimate. The authors believe that Covid-19 overestimates the negative impact of earthquakes on the labor market.Social implicationsEarthquakes have adverse effects on the labor market. The estimation of the earthquake-related costs may provide a useful guide on policy planning and government incentives.Originality/valueThe originality of the study lies in the fact that this is the first study to evaluate how the dynamics of the labor market has changed as a result of the earthquakes that have taken place in Turkey, within the framework of causality.Peer reviewThe peer review history for this article is available at:

8.
Ann Work Expo Health ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2188245

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We estimated influenza-like symptom (ILS) incidence among healthcare personnel (HCP) in four hospitals and the economic impact due to ILS in the Thai HCP population during July 2020-June 2021 (Thailand's expected 2020 influenza season), which also coincided with the novel coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. METHODS: We followed HCP, in a prospective observational cohort, weekly for >/=1 of: muscle pain, cough, runny nose/nasal congestion, sore throat, or difficulty breathing. We fitted population-averaged Poisson regression models to identify factors associated with acquiring ILS and to calculate ILS incidence. We applied epidemiologic parameters to Thailand's HCP population (227 349 persons) to estimate economic impact. RESULTS: Of 2184 participants, adjusted all-cause ILS incidence was 6.1 episodes per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval 3.4-10.9). Among Thailand's HCP population, 13 909 ILS episodes were estimated to occur annually and would result in US$235 135 economic loss. Controlling for study site and calendar month, factors associated with acquiring >/=1 ILS versus no ILS included being female, having asthma, and using personal protective equipment 'frequently, but not always'. CONCLUSIONS: All-cause ILS resulted in considerable economic loss among Thai HCP workforce. These findings underscore the importance of public health interventions to reduce the risk of acquiring ILS.

9.
IOP Conference Series Earth and Environmental Science ; 1122(1):012019, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2188017

ABSTRACT

Smart and resilient cities are on the same path to long-term sustainability and need the creation of an ecosystem that can withstand an increasing number of hazards in the future. One of the primary goals of the smart city movement was to address many issues that have arisen as a result of growing urbanization, including the scarcity of energy, traffic congestion, and pollution. The way urban dwellers live, work, and travel due to more often natural disasters and political issues is changing, and this has an impact on the economy and business models, forming a new trend in urban studies. Smart cities play a critical role in the worldwide fight against Covid-19 in terms of tracking and tracing instances of coronavirus using smart technologies. The integration of smart buildings into a smart city also plays an important role in this scenario, providing advanced infrastructure and greater comfort for their residents as well as improved safety control, increased energy efficiency, accessibility to services, and overall satisfaction with a higher quality of life. The findings of this study are based on the review of papers selected from high-impact research journals, as well as an analysis of the most important industry tendencies and widely referenced literature on smart cities and resilient cities. As a result, this study examines the concepts of smart and resilient cities, as well as the relationship between smart city technologies, and resilient city indicators;the impact of technologies applicable in different smart city domains on city resilience is discussed. Finally, the conclusions on how proposed integration toward smart and resilient cities could be implemented for future cities' development are presented.

10.
Current Issues in Tourism ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2187425

ABSTRACT

Hawaii was vulnerable to the COVID-19 pandemic due to its reliance on tourism. This article analyzes the pandemic's economic impact in Hawaii by comparing outcomes with the pre-pandemic forecast. We explain why Hawaii's experience differed from other states, suggest reasons for a slow recovery, and discuss the pandemic's lasting effects.

11.
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care ; 38(S1):S67, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2185346

ABSTRACT

IntroductionTo provide a complete picture of the economic impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emergency for the Italian National Health System (NHS), an estimate was made of the costs to the NHS of vaccination hesitation. The concept of economic impact was investigated with reference to the volume of hospitalizations and days of intensive care required for patients with COVID-19 related to missed vaccinations, considering a vaccine efficacy of less than 100 percent.MethodsData from the Istituto Superiore di Sanità were analyzed with respect to the number of people vaccinated in the general population, and the number of people with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection who were hospitalized or died in a one-month period stratified by vaccination status. The costs for unvaccinated patients admitted to a general hospital ward (Medical Area) or the intensive care unit were calculated.ResultsBased on the number of preventable hospitalizations among unvaccinated people, the economic impact of missed vaccinations on the NHS in the 30-day period from 13 August 2021 to 12 September 2021 was estimated. Among the unvaccinated hospitalized patients, 5,932 would have avoided hospitalization in the Medical Area and 715 would have avoided admission to the intensive care unit. Thus, each unvaccinated hospitalized patient had an average per capita cost of EUR 17,408. The total costs amounted to EUR 69,894,715, comprising EUR 51,166,079 for hospitalizations in the Medical Area and EUR 18,728,636 for hospitalizations in intensive care.ConclusionsBy evaluating the weekly incidence of hospitalizations per 100,000 people stratified by vaccination status (unvaccinated, partially vaccinated, and fully vaccinated), it is possible to see that we are facing two distinct pandemics running together.

12.
Annals of Tourism Research Empirical Insights ; 3(2), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2176156

ABSTRACT

Tourism is acknowledged as a contributor to destination economies in many countries. However, COVID-19 has devastated the tourism industry in numerous national economies. Although the economic impact of tourism on destinations has been examined in a large body of tourism literature, most studies have utilized the tourism-led economic growth hypothesis and traditional methods and data rather than cutting-edge economic methods. This study conducts a systematic literature review on tourism economic impact between 1975 and 2020, analyzing the general bibliometrics and examining the key themes and methods of assessing tourism economic impact. It contributes to an accurate assessment of tourism economic impact, works to identify gaps in the literature, highlights emerging trends in the field, and proposes directions for future research.

13.
Energy Science & Engineering ; 11(1):79-96, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2172896

ABSTRACT

Global carbon dioxide emissions have become a great threat to economic sustainability and human health. The carbon market is recognized as the most promising mean to curb carbon emissions, furthermore, carbon price forecasting will promote the role of the carbon market in emissions reduction and achieve reduction targets at lower economic costs for emission entities. However, there are still some technical problems in carbon price prediction, such as mode mixing and larger reconstruction error for the traditional empirical mode decomposition-type models. Therefore, the innovation of this paper is constructing a novel carbon price prediction model of complete ensemble empirical mode decomposition with adaptive noise (CEEMDAN)-long short-term memory (LSTM), that combines the advantages of CEEMDAN in decomposing the multiscale time-frequency carbon price signals and the LSTM model in fitting the financial signals. The results show the proposed CEEMDAN-LSTM model has significant accuracy in predicting the complex carbon price signals. The prediction error and expectation indicators of root mean square error, mean absolute error, mean absolute percentage error, and direction accuracy are 0.638342, 0.448695, 0.015666, and 0.687631, respectively, which is better than other benchmark models. Further evidence convince that the short-term forecasting performance is superior to the long-term and medium-term performance. That evidence concludes that the proposed model is a reliable method to reveal the carbon price-driving mechanism from the point of multiscale time-frequency characteristics. Particularly, short-term forecasting is more accurate and can provide a valuable technical reference for reduction entities and green financial companies to judge the market situation and formulate quantitative transactions.

14.
Rural ; 56(3):4-6, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2170116

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic induced a global recession and tipped millions into extreme poverty. In low-income countries, Russia's invasion of Ukraine is expected to further deepen poverty and worsen food insecurity. This article describes the wide range of socio-economic impacts which these overlapping crises are having on the various world regions and calls on the international community to take common, determined action.

15.
International Journal of Finance & Banking Studies ; 11(4):24-36, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169834

ABSTRACT

This study aims to analyze the development and soundness of banks from financial performance ratios in banking companies listed on the IDX in 2016-2021 using the RGEC approach;analyze the effect of the ratios used in RGEC on stock returns in banking companies listed on the IDX in 2016-2019 or before Covid19;analyzed the effect of the ratios used in RGEC on stock returns in banking companies listed on the IDX in 2020-2021 or during the Covid-19 pandemic. The sample consisted of the banking sub-sector listed on the IDX in the period 2016 to 2021. The data analyzed using the RGEC method. Based on the calculation of bank rating (bank soundness level), it can be seen that the key figures for the risk profile, GCG, earning and equity (RGEC) in the banking sub-sector listed on the IDX developed well in 2016-2021 in the banking sector on average from 39 banks studied. There are 11 Banks that are in Composite Rating 1 (Very Healthy), 25 Banks are on Composite Rating 2 (Healthy) and 3 Banks are on Composite Rating 3 (Sufficiently Healthy). Based on the results of panel regression tests in 2016-2019 (before Covid-19), bank rating (bank soundness level) which include risk profile (NPL and LDR), GCG, earnings (ROA andNĽM) and equity (CAR) together have an effect of28.89% of bank stock returns and 71.11% of stock returns are influenced by other factors outside the variables studied. However, based on the p-value results, the variables NPL, GCG, N'Ш and CAR have no significant effect on bank stock returns, while the LDR and ROA variables have a significant effect on stock returns. In general, the soundness of banks listed on the IDX is in a healthy condition. Whereas the results of panel regression tests in 2020-2021 (after Covid-19), bank rating (bank soundness level) which include risk profile (NPL and LDR), GCG, earnings (ROA and N'Ш) and equity (CAR) together have an effect of 4.93% of bank stock returns and 95.07% of stock returns are influenced by other factors outside the variables studied. However, based on the results of the p-value variables, NPL, LDR, GCG, ROA, NBA and CAR have no significant effect on bank stock returns. However, in general, the health level of banks listed on the IDX during the Covid-19 pandemic is in a healthy condition.

16.
Journal of Research ANGRAU ; 49(4):122-126, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2169641
17.
International Journal of Finance & Banking Studies ; 11(4):1-16, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169616

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the Coronavirus, which has caused a global crisis, has affected all aspects of human life. This pandemic has also seriously challenged the business environment, monetary and financial markets, and the performance of banks in countries. Accordingly, this paper aims to answer the question: "What is the impact of the COVID 19 pandemic crisis on the performance of the Canadian banking industry? Thus, the main purpose of the study is to investigate the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on the performance of the Canadian banking industry. For this purpose, the related literature was systematically reviewed to extract performance indicators. Then, a quantitative approach and a multiple case study strategy were used to examine the hypotheses and answer the questions. So, three Canadian banks including RBC bank, TD bank, and BMO were selected as cases. Document- and records-based method used to collect public data from official, and well-known economic and financial sources. For data analysis, structural equation analysis and correlation test were considered using Amos 28 and APSS 27. Based on the results, although the Covid-19 pandemic has shocked the Canadian banking industry, like many businesses, but because of its high capabilities, they have been able to manage the crisis well and come out of it successfully. The results show that the average profitability and efficiency of Canadian banks decreased slightly during the pandemic period, but it was not significant. In addition, during this period, business risk has increased slightly, but this situation has gradually returned to normal. Plus, some indicators such as the average of ROE, ROI, EPS, etc. after passing the initial shock, they have found a better position than the pre-crisis. Considering the newness of the pandemic and the lack of similar knowledge and experience that has surprised people, the results of this research contribute to the theoretical development ofthe literature, and its results can be used in the financial, banking, and commercial fields. Since the basis of the investigations was limited to the data of only three banks, therefore, it should be a little cautious in generalizing the results.

18.
Rural ; 56(3):22-24, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2168825

ABSTRACT

It is indicated that the COVID-19 pandemic is fuelling the vicious circle of poverty, hunger and exploitation which millions of children had already been exposed to before the first lockdown was imposed. The article looks at the pandemic's impacts on the life situation of millions of children, and shows why policy course corrections are urgently needed, also regarding development cooperation.

19.
Journal of Current Pharma Research ; 12(1):1-12, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2168800

ABSTRACT

All the countries of the world are facing humanity's biggest crisis since World War II. Almost every country has been affected by the devastating Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). An outbreak from China has gone everywhere. In the last almost year, Corona's epicenter has been shifted from China to Europe to the United States. By this time, over 1.5 million people had been affected by COVID-19 and about 80,000 people had died worldwide. Indirectly, billions of people have been suffering from the impact of the global pandemic of COVID-19. What is disturbing is that the numbers likely stem from under-reporting, and may probably rise alarmingly in the weeks ahead if we factor in asymptomatic patients and rapid tests. Given that the pandemic-driven crisis is constantly changing, countries are desperate to flattening the curve for COVID-19. Surely, this Coronavirus has put the world economy at a major risk Coronavirus ravages the economic foundations of world trade. Commentators have identified this outbreak as an outcome of hyper-globalization or starting of de-globalization. However, the world is going to face recession;and the global losses, according to some commentators, may exceed World Wars I and II combined. At the same time, the falling world price of crude oil has added further anxieties. Several estimates are now available on the economic loss and post-COVID-19 growth path, and most of the estimates show that the world is already in an economic crisis. South and Southeast Asian countries are no exception. They are heavily affected, health or otherwise. Countries are under full or partial lockdown for the last few weeks. It is a global challenge and a global response is called for. Flattening the COVID-19 curve together helps everyone in an inclusive manner. Unlike the 2007-08 Global Financial Crisis, it is primarily a health crisis, which has given birth to an economic shock. Meanwhile, the world order has been changing fast. Several theories are being postulated. Anti-globalization rhetoric venom is now unfurled. In such unfolding "New Normal" of the world order, the consensus is that countries need to save the earth from the epidemic if we need to live together.

20.
Agrarian perspectives XXXI ; Proceedings of the 31st International Scientific Conference:Prague, Czech Republic, 14-15 September 2022 2022, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2168783

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has become the cause of one of the greatest crises in the modern history of the global economy, including the agri-food sector. Business suspension and administrative restrictions on movement worsened business conditions and affected both the demand and supply of food products. On the other hand, state aid improved the financial liquidity of enterprises and limited the risk of their bankruptcy. In order to assess the impact of this situation, using the Altman Z-score index, changes in the level of bankruptcy risk in the 1000 largest enterprises in the agri-food sector in Poland in 2018-2020 were examined. The results indicated that during the period of the impact of the pandemic in 2020, the changes in bankruptcy risk were mild. Moreover, the directions of these changes varied depending on the section in which the enterprises operated. In 2020, out of the sixteen examined sections, the Z-score increased in nine and decreased in seven. The risk of bankruptcy decreased the most in the following sections: production of bread and bakery products and production of animal feed. It grew the most in the following sections: processing, preserving fruit and vegetables and refining fats and oils.

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