Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.767
Filter
1.
Pacific Accounting Review ; 34(4):526-535, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1973422

ABSTRACT

Purpose>In this commentary, the author uses the development of data analytics curriculum at DePaul University as an example to highlight possible challenges and share the experience. In addition, seven different possible future research directions are identified so the readers are able to understand more about the impact of emerging technologies on the accounting profession and accounting curriculum.Findings>Challenges and experience when developing data analytics curriculum at DePaul University are discussed. In addition, seven different possible future research directions are identified so the readers are able to understand more about the impact of emerging technologies on the accounting profession and accounting curriculum.Originality/value>This paper expresses the author’s viewpoints regarding the impact of emerging technologies on accounting curriculum and the accounting profession.

2.
Measuring Business Excellence ; 26(3):229-244, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1973418

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The sustainable and responsible investing (SRI) is the part of sustainable investment which focusses on mutual funds. The purpose of this paper is to map and evaluate all the active European SRI funds, their performances and correlation with the national identity.Design/methodology/approach>The sample of the research was analysed with descriptive statistics, mainly the frequency, the mean and the correlation analysis. A well-known volatility is represented by the synthetic risk and reward indicator (SRRI). Other two ratings are the environmental, social and governance (ESG) funds score distribution and the ESG funds letter rating distribution.Findings>SRI investment may seem to be performing better than in the funds with a different focus. The segment of SRI funds will grow for the next decade.Research limitations/implications>There is a lack of definitions and clear metrics for sustainable investing. For better performance, it would be also appropriate to examine each country separately.Practical implications>This paper is part of the project targeting to design a model and methodology of SI evaluation taking into account ESG factors and risks, including profitability in a selected sector. This model can be used by investors for better decision-making.Social implications>The paper focusses on the funds selecting investments that fulfil ESG criteria, which are part of the social responsibility and sustainability.Originality/value>An analysis of the current approaches to evaluating investments shows that the key barrier in the transitions to sustainable investment is not taking into account the ESG factors. The research in this paper includes the ESG factors in the evaluation.

3.
Journal of Communication Management ; 26(3):236-253, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1973398

ABSTRACT

Purpose>Many organisations wrestle with how to develop value-oriented businesses and societies. A humanistic communication approach that promotes understanding and dialogue amongst stakeholders can contribute to a solution. Communication professionals play a pivotal role in achieving a humanistic communication process. This paper aims to determine the significance of humanistic communication professionals and their characteristics.Design/methodology/approach>A literature review was conducted to identify the characteristics of humanistic communication professionals. Thereafter, the extent to which such characteristics have been implemented in competency models in the Netherlands was investigated. This country’s strong tradition of developing competencies for communication professionals has resulted in competency models that serve as standards for professional development.Findings>The literature review shows that a humanistic approach to communication is characterised by dialogic engagement and social listening to build and maintain trust, foster transparency and create engagement with stakeholders. Communication professionals can act as “cultural interpreters”, “organisational listeners” and “stewards of meaning”. The human element plays a key factor in the competency standards for communication professionals in the Netherlands, although the extent to which they are embedded varies. The analysis shows a shift from passing on a message towards dialogue and engagement.Originality/value>Most studies of communication professionals’ competencies have been based on roles or tasks they perform. Little scholarly attention has been paid to competencies that add to developing value-oriented businesses and societies. This paper focuses specifically on how communication professionals can contribute to creating humanistic organisations.

4.
J Med Ethics ; 2022 Aug 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973860

ABSTRACT

We would like to thank each of the commentators on our feature article for their thoughtful engagement with our arguments. All the commentaries raise important questions about our proposed justification for natural immunity exemptions to COVID-19 vaccine mandates. Thankfully, for some of the points raised, we can simply signal our agreement. For instance, Reiss is correct to highlight that our article did not address the important US-centric considerations she helpfully raises and fruitfully discusses. We also agree with Williams about the need to provide a clear rationale for mandates, and to obtain different kinds of data in support of possible policies.Unfortunately, we lack the space to engage with every one of the more critical comments raised in this rich set of commentaries; as such, in this response, we shall focus on a discussion of hybrid immunity, which underlies a number of different arguments evident in the commentaries, before concluding with some reflections responding to Lipsitch's concern about the appropriate standard of proof in this context.

5.
J Med Ethics ; 2022 Aug 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973859

ABSTRACT

Equity was-and is-central in the US policy response to COVID-19, given its disproportionate impact on disadvantaged communities of colour. In an unprecedented turn, the majority of US states used place-based disadvantage indices to promote equity in vaccine allocation (eg, through larger vaccine shares for more disadvantaged areas and people of colour).We conducted a nationally representative survey experiment (n=2003) in April 2021 (before all US residents had become vaccine eligible), that examined respondents' perceptions of the acceptability of disadvantage indices relative to two ways of prioritising racial and ethnic groups more directly, and assessed the role of framing and expert anchors in shaping perceptions.A majority of respondents supported the use of disadvantage indices, and one-fifth opposed any of the three equity-promoting plans. Differences in support and opposition were identified by respondents' political party affiliation. Providing a numerical anchor (that indicated expert recommendations and states' actual practices in reserving a proportion of allocations for prioritised groups) led respondents to prefer a lower distribution of reserved vaccine allocations compared with the randomised condition without this anchor, and the effect of the anchor differed across the frames.Our findings support ongoing uses of disadvantage indices in vaccine allocation, and, by extension, in allocating tests, masks or treatments, especially when supply cannot meet demand. The findings can also inform US allocation frameworks in future pandemic planning, and could provide lessons on how to promote equity in clinical and public health outside of the pandemic setting.

6.
Soins Gerontol ; 27(156): 10-12, 2022.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972311

ABSTRACT

Many ethical issues were raised by the pandemic crisis. Caregivers were under great pressure and stress in their work in residential care facilities for the dependent elderly (Ehpad), both with residents and their families. The implementation of ethical support tools was only gradual, particularly for the management of residents' deaths. Anxiety has set in among all the people working or living in the Ehpad, blurring interpersonal relations and increasing tensions and professional exhaustion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caregivers , Aged , Homes for the Aged , Humans , Pandemics
7.
Ethique Sante ; 2022 Jun 09.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972082

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has severely affected social cohesion and the traditional landmarks of our fellow citizens. In addition to suffering related to the loss of a loved one, disorganization of the funeral and the experience of confiscation of the funeral deeply affected the psychic life of the bereaved. Despite the adaptation of funeral laws during the pandemic, an anthropological discontinuity has emerged. This anthropological break prevented the dynamic of mourning and burial of Covid-19 deaths, all the while affecting the ritualization of people leaving at the end of life, the orderliness of feelings through funeral rites as well as the resilience of caregivers and families facing an unprecedented wave of deaths. This has resulted in both a pandemic-related mortality and funeral crisis and a human crisis revealed by the Covid-19 viral storm.

8.
Journal of Hydrology ; 61(1):77-91, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970955

ABSTRACT

This paper reflects on the work that was done to establish a national wastewater pathogen surveillance system in New Zealand in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. After a short review of the wastewater literature, a timeline of SARS-CoV-2 is described to situate the work in a country that effectively eliminated COVID-19 from the community, but at the time of writing had a population that was more exposed than in other countries. The paper then turns to describe three broad categories of research needed to establish the COVID-19 wastewater surveillance system: monitoring, data analysis and ethics. Some of the work covers familiar ground for those trained in science, technology, engineering and mathematics, such as the spatial location and temporal frequency of field sampling. Other work sits more comfortably with those trained in the humanities and social science, such as population mobility and the ethics of surveillance. The message that comes from our experience is the need to work together, which takes courage, empathy and patience as we learn to accept each other's epistemological foundations and modus operandi.

9.
Journal of Hydrology ; 61(1):1-3, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970954

ABSTRACT

There are a range of spatial scales addressed in the papers, from the individual building scale to the cargo ship (Coxon et al., 'Exploring opportunities for sewage testing on cargo ships as a tool to screen seafarers for COVID-19'), subcatchment to sewershed (Nicoll et al., 'Neighbourhood-scale wastewater-based epidemiology for COVID-19'), and city to national (Gilpin et al., A pilot study of wastewater monitoring for SARS-CoV-2 in New Zealand' and Trowsdale et al., 'Establishing New Zealand's national pathogen surveillance system using wastewater-based epidemiology');and all the papers make use of the international literature to provide context for what is a global pandemic. Marrying such information with environmental water samples collected on a daily or weekly basis is problematic. Repurposing data also raises important ethical questions of ownership, confidentiality and responsibility that need to be asked to ensure what we scientists do is both good and right (Price and Trowsdale, 'The ethics of wastewater surveillance for public health').

10.
Journal of Hydrology ; 61(1):59-75, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970799

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has fuelled interest in the use of wastewater analysis for public health surveillance. Hydrologists, engineers, environmental scientists, microbiologists, public health experts and those in other disciplines have been tasked with the implementation of national-scale surveillance and the resultant data have been used for decision making at the highest levels of government. The widespread surveillance of communities is not without its concerns, however. This paper explores the ethics of surveillance drawing on the literature and our experiences with wastewater analysis. Consent is not typically required for wastewater surveillance, which can exacerbate perceptions of risk and undermine public trust. Seemingly innocuous communication of surveillance data can stigmatise communities and perpetuate inequities. There are tensions between the desire for the rapid delivery of information and the time needed to build confidence in surveillance data. There are also limitations and uncertainties in the science of wastewater surveillance, and these add to the pressures of communication for and with decision makers. Media representations can be problematic and perpetuate social stigma. On a positive note, the transdisciplinary nature of wastewater surveillance presents an opportunity to work across and beyond traditional disciplinary boundaries to address the ethics of surveillance, which, we expect, will be especially important as wastewater surveillance becomes further mainstreamed, particularly under the auspices of surveillance capitalism.

11.
Journal on Developmental Disabilities ; 27(1):1-10, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970497

ABSTRACT

This brief report describes the demographic and clinical profiles of 190 adult home care users with intellectual and developmental disabilities tested for COVID-19 from March 2020 to May 2021. A crosssectional study design (n=190) was conducted. ChiSquare tests, Fisher’s Exact tests, and odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals are reported. Older age and congregate living increased the odds of having a positive COVID-19 test, while dependence in personal dressing was associated with decreased odds. These findings provide useful data from the first 15 months of the pandemic;trends over time should be investigated.  Alternate :Ce rapport bref décrit les profils démographiques et cliniques de 190 résidents adultes recevant des soins à domicile et ayant un trouble développemental ou une déficience intellectuelle qui ont été testés pour la COVID-19 entre mars 2020 et mai 2021. Un devis d’étude transversale (n = 190) a été mené. Des tests du Chi carré, des tests selon la méthode exacte de Fischer, et des rapports des cotes ayant un intervalle de confiance à 95% sont présentés. Un âge avancé et la vie en habitation collective a augmenté la probabilité d’obtenir un résultat positif au test de la COVID19, tandis que la dépendance pour l’habillage était associée à une probabilité moins élevée. Ces  résultats offrent des données utiles issues des 15 premiers mois de la pandémie;les tendances au fil du temps devraient être étudiées. Mots-clés : COVID-19, trouble du développement, déficience intellectuelle, soins à domiciles, interRAI, adultes.

12.
Australian Journal of General Practice ; 51(8):595-603, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970444

ABSTRACT

Continued investment in the rural primary care workforce will be key to improving access issues. disparities in cancer outcomes between rural and urban populations remain a global problem.1 Australia is not excepted to such rural-urban inequities.2 For breast cancer, women living in rural New South Wales (NSW) have worse survival rates compared with their urban counterparts.3'4 They are also more likely to have late-stage breast cancer upon diagnosis, longer diagnostic interval and higher risk of death.5-7 Improved cancer control to reduce rural-urban disparities rightly remains an important health priority. Numerous qualitative studies have investigated what influences help-seeking behaviour for such women across various international settings.10-18 A meta-ethnographic synthesis of these studies revealed eight common concepts that affected help-seeking behaviour: symptom detection, initial symptom interpretation, symptom monitoring, social interactions, emotional interactions, priority of seeking medical help, appraisal of health services and personal-environmental factors.19 However, these qualitative findings must be interpreted within the contexts that they were conducted in, considering related social and cultural issues for that sample group. The relationship between prolonged breast cancer pathways and poorer survival is well established,22 and identifying factors that prolong the patient interval and determining whether these factors are more common in rural areas could help facilitate the identification of targeted interventions to address the gaps in service delivery and reduce the disparity in breast cancer outcomes for people living in rural Australia. Overview of themes Six key themes emerged from the data analysis, each encompassing a range of facilitators and barriers to help-seeking: 1) Initial symptom appraisal;2) symptom monitoring processes;3) emotions and attitudes towards symptoms;4) social interactions;5) personal or environmental factors;and 6) accessing GP services.

13.
Journal of Allied Health ; 50(4):269-276, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970421

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the importance of interprofessional education (IPE) programming and provides discussion and student evaluation data on implementation of a virtual IPE COVID-19 patient case study. Represented disciplines included athletic training, clinical psychology, communication sciences and disorders, nursing, nutrition and dietetics, physician assistant, and social work. Faculty committee members from each discipline developed a case study that followed COVID-19 patients in a family and allowed for students to explore cultural considerations within the case. Sixty-four of the 80 students who participated in the event responded to a survey of close-ended and open-ended questions in a predominantly positive manner. Utilizing the experience of this IPE case study and feedback from student participants, we conclude with suggestions for future IPE programming. J Allied Health 2021;50(4):269-276.

14.
American Nurse Today ; 17(7):39-39, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-1970377
15.
Journal of Research in Health Sciences ; 22(2), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1970045

ABSTRACT

Background: The highest-income countries procured 50 times as many COVID-19 vaccines as low-income countries, a global health inequity that resulted in only 4.6% of the poorest 5th of the world receiving a COVID-19 vaccine. High-income countries are considering vaccine mandates and passports to contain the spread of COVID-19. This study is a curated discourse aimed at examining how vaccine mandates and passports may impact global vaccine equity from an ethics perspective. Study Design: Narrative review adapted for a debate. Methods: In November 2021, we conducted a review of studies examining global vaccine mandates for an upper-level global health course at Northeastern University, Boston, United States (U.S.). In total, 19 upper-level students, one research assistant, and one instructor participated in the data collection, analysis, and discussion. Results: The review showed vaccine mandates are ethical and effective if autonomy-centered alternatives like soft mandates are first exhausted. Unwarranted stringent public health measures degrade public trust. In the U.S. alone, COVID-19-related deaths hovered above 300 000 before COVID-19 vaccination began in mid-December 2020. Since then, the number of COVID-19 deaths more than doubled, despite the wide availability of the vaccine. For many low-and middle-income countries (LMICs) vaccines are not available or easily accessible. Global collaboration to facilitate vaccine availability in LMICs should be a priority. Conclusions: It is essential to get as many people as possible vaccinated to return to some normality. However, vaccine mandates and passports need to be used only sparingly, especially when other options have been exhausted.

16.
MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS IN PRODUCTION ENGINEERING ; 30(3):282-290, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1968963

ABSTRACT

The article analyses the problems (dilemmas) in approach to the environmental protection and management. EU has declared the plan for the Great Reset of global economy and environmental politics. The idea is not new, but the approach is expected to be completely different. While the EU leaders set the strategy of centralisation, there are strong claims for opposite way - decentralisation. The second dilemma we analyse in our article is the problem of European Commission massive support of green investments (including using of renewable sources of energy and focus of environmental protection), especially after lockdowns connected with covid pandemic which meets with the strong negative position of those economical circles which see such types of initiatives as green shooting to the economy. Terra Carta as an integral part of Sustainable Markets Initiative was launched in 2020. The third dilemma we pay our attention is connected with the efficiency of new environmental taxes. The article focuses also on the good practice as can be seen in environmental protection management efforts and green solutions for using and saving energy resources. As an examples we assess the projects supporting use of renewable energy in Africa (e.g. Lights for Africa), Cradle to Cradle Program (C2C) and we go back to the Come2CoM. The whole is analysed in the context of corporate social responsibility.

17.
BMJ Global Health ; 7:A29, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1968272

ABSTRACT

Just as it is the case in other issues in clinical ethics, the discourse on COVID-19 has been dominantly preoccupied with the difficulty in taking urgent decision on who gets access to scarce medical resources when demand outstrips supply. The emergence of COVID-19 in the late 2019 and its attendant consequences has created global tension and anxiety. The debate on addressing the ravaging COVID-19 pandemic has gone on at professional and policy levels. It has taken international, intercontinental and inter-racial tones. Critical in this debate are issues of vaccine production, distribution and consumption. Conspiratorial theorists are up in arms against not only the production but also distribution and consumption of the vaccine. The nationalists are taking a hardline posture against free flows of the vaccines across national boundaries while the globalists are pushing for universal access. As this debate continues to inform and enlarge scholarly and policy perspectives, issues of priority in the distribution and consumption still loom large in successes and failures across both the nationalist and globalist paradigms. The nationalists are at the crossroad with respect to prioritizing the distribution and consumption needs of rural dwellers over those of their urban counterparts. The globalists are also confronting priority challenges not only across geographies but also genders. This paper interrogates these dilemmas, with a view to articulating ways in which market and moral dynamics as well as placespecific factors might be mobilized as a game changer in the context of priority in the distribution and consumption of COVID-19 vaccine in Africa. The paper uses conceptual clarification, philosophical argumentation and analysis, to explore the commercial and charity features of the vaccine and demonstrates how some elements within African cosmology may become precursors in the emergence of effective triage system for addressing the nationalist and globalist priority dilemmas in Africa.

18.
BMJ Global Health ; 7:A11, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1968258

ABSTRACT

Objective The political costs associated with healthcare priority- setting give decision-makers an incentive to shield from the consequences of unpopular decisions. This fact, together with the factual and normative complexity of priority-setting decisions, give politicians reason to delegate decision-making through arrangements such as consultative procedures and to seek the advice of moral and political philosophers. Not surprisingly, many countries made use of ethics expert panels to advice on priority setting of COVID-19 vaccines in the first phase of the pandemic. However, the authority of a distinctive expertise in ethical guidance was being questioned in the public debate on vaccine prioritisation. This sceptical stance regarding the role and expertise of the ethics expert is not new. If we are all equal as autonomous beings and autonomy is the source of normativity, then we all have equal capacity for moral decision-making. The aim of this paper is to examine if and how ethics expertise can contribute to policy making regarding the development and implementation of COVID-19 immunisation programmes: What kind of expertise can ethicists offer? Methods Theoretical discussion based on an illustrative case: Domestically prioritisation of COVID-19 vaccines. Results and Discussion We argue that ethicists have an epistemic authority in the sense of being in a privileged position to give ethical advice if a set of meta-principles for regulation of the ethical debate is followed. By using a methodology of 'engaged philosophy', the ethics experts should seek to identify relevant values in the context of a specific problem and work through a series of steps so that broad agreement can be made in a given case. While we may not necessarily converge on the deepest foundations for our normative beliefs, we may reach agreement particular outcomes and mid-level principles.

19.
BMJ Global Health ; 7:A6, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1968249

ABSTRACT

Introduction Given the devastating effects COVID-19 has had, many may think it is obvious that more should have been spent on pandemic preparedness and mitigation measures. But this would have required investment to be taken away from existing health problems to be put towards a problem that may arise in the future at an uncertain time. When the resources available for health are finite, priorities need to be determined. How does pandemic preparedness fit into current approaches to determining health priorities? Methods Conceptual analysis of how pandemic preparedness work compares against other global health priorities, using a framework of three common factors in discussion of the ethics of health-priority setting: scale, cost-effectiveness and justice. Outcome The present-orientation of standard conceptions of burden of disease estimates omits the potential burden from new pandemics, and the uncertainty of pandemics makes it difficult to include them in projections of global disease burden. The use of high discount rates and relatively short time horizons may lead cost-effectiveness estimates to under-value pandemic preparedness work. Whether pandemic preparedness is considered a priority from the perspective of equity depends on how well-off we expect future generations to be relative to the present, and the scale of future pandemic events. Finally, many of the actions to reduce pandemic risks happen outside of the healthcare system. This suggests a need for increased focus on approaches to priority-setting outside of healthcare, including in health research and government and institutional attention. Conclusion The uncertainty and future-orientation of pandemic preparedness activities mean that this area of work doesn't easily fit into traditional approaches to determining global health priorities. Approaches to determining global health priorities need to adapt to enable comparison of stochastic, future-oriented issues to problems of existing health burden.

20.
BMJ Global Health ; 7:A3, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1968245

ABSTRACT

Introduction Policies to increase global vaccine access involve HICs making ethically fraught tradeoffs between saving lives at home or abroad. Such policies should be justifiable to the affected populations. Yet there is little robust data on whether HIC residents endorse their countries' policy choices. Most existing data asks highly simplified questions, without providing background on the ethical tradeoffs involved. These data do not capture the public's informed views, giving policymakers limited guidance on how to craft international vaccine policy. This paper provides the first nuanced data on the informed views of a representative sample of the U.S. public about providing COVID vaccine to poorer countries. Methods This study involved two interventions: a description of ethical arguments for/against providing vaccine to poorer countries and visuals depiction of ethically relevant tradeoffs about providing vaccine to poorer countries at different time points in the US vaccination campaign. A representative sample of 4000 U.S. adults were surveyed, divided evenly into four arms: 1) arguments only;2) tradeoffs only;3) both interventions;4) no interventions. Results Across all four arms, people are more willing to donate vaccines than previously reported, with generosity increasing over time. 43% of respondents were willing to share at an early timepoint when supply was extremely limited, increasing to 54% and 71% at intermediate and current timepoints, respectively. Some specific variables (e.g., political affiliation, age, acceptability of masks) were predictive of willingness to donate and endorsement of specific arguments. Discussion These data can guide policy about providing or keeping U.S. vaccine doses as the world navigates the effects of new variants and the potential need for booster shots in the coming months. Given high levels of willingness to donate, U.S. policy could have initiated global vaccine donations earlier and could be more generous currently.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL