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1.
Iranian Journal of Language Teaching Research ; 11(1):141-156, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20245031

ABSTRACT

Rapid and continuous changes in digital technologies have changed both classroom practices and teacher profiles in education. It can be argued that a new context of teaching may lead some teachers to develop a different teacher identity in order to meet the needs of the era. Within this perspective, this case study attempts to explore the impacts of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) revolution in education on teachers' professional identity through the lens of three English instructors from three different contexts in Turkey. The study particularly focuses on reflections of teachers during the pandemic. As a theoretical framework, the study adopts Wenger's (1997) social theory of learning and, within this framework, it discusses these teachers' professional identities in relation to their ICT usage. In particular, three modes of belonging, Engagement, Imagination and Alignment, are underlined. A qualitative approach is employed based on the written history documents of the participants and semi-structured interviews as data collection tools. The findings are gathered with a deductive thematic analysis, and they illustrate that teachers have some external and internal difficulties regarding their ICT usage, and they form a new shape of professional identity mainly through collaboration, community expertise and contributing new ideas in their school contexts. Although the use of new digital technologies mostly enables them to adopt a positive and modern teacher identity in their teaching contexts, it also leads some of them to sometimes question their teacher identity due to their limited ICT knowledge and competence. Thus, the study suggests some implications both for language teachers to invest in their digital identities, and for school administrations to create a friendly atmosphere where the community of expertise can be shared freely among teachers.

2.
Journal of Professional Capital and Community ; 8(1):1-16, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244164

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study is twofold. First, this study reflects on the development of professional capital through understanding collective cultural factors, namely, academic optimism and shared vision. Second, it aims at exploring teacher learning. Teacher learning resulting in changes to teacher knowledge, attitudes and practices is crucial for the necessary changes education is continually confronted with. This learning is too often studied as a result of individual traits or structural factors, such as motivation or time. The authors investigated how teacher learning is influenced by academic optimism and shared vision. Design/methodology/approach: The authors administered an online web-based survey to 278 teachers in higher education, using the educational change to online learning due to the COVID pandemic as a unique chance to study the role of collective cultural factors in teacher learning. Findings: Results showed how teachers characterized their learning, academic optimism and shared vision during the educational change to online learning resulting from the COVID pandemic. The authors found that teacher learning was greatly influenced by teachers' collective sense of efficacy, an aspect of their academic optimism. Teachers' strong belief in each other, that they as fellow professionals could handle the challenging changes that the COVID pandemic required, strongly enhanced teacher learning during the COVID pandemic. Teachers' feeling of a professional community helped teacher to make sense of, and push through, the undeniable chaos that was the COVID pandemic. Originality/value: Collective cultural factors are rarely studied in conjunction with educational change. Insights into how a collective culture of professionalism enhances or hinders teacher learning are important for theory, policy and practice as it helps understand how teacher teams can be supported to build their professional capital by learning from educational change.

3.
Journal of Latinos & Education ; 22(3):1294-1298, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20242968

ABSTRACT

Most countries in the world closed their educational centers and maintained classes online to prevent the spread of the virus SARSV-Cov-2. Latin America is not an exception. Estimates of the transmission dynamics of the pandemic indicate the application of actions that will affect educational contexts for years. This piece reflects on necessary changes in educational policies to take account of the current setting of COVID-19. We focus this reflection from a Latino American perspective, but it is not exclusive. The discussion can be useful to other countries with similar characteristics. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Latinos & Education is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

4.
Schools: Studies in Education ; 20(1):122-139, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20242629

ABSTRACT

This piece describes how the faculty of City-As-School used Descriptive Inquiry to generate shared educational principles during the 2020-21 school year during the coronavirus pandemic. City-As-School is a public experiential learning school in New York City serving older adolescents seeking an alternative to traditional high school. Descriptive Inquiry is an inquiry process developed by Patricia Carini and faculty at the Prospect School in Bennington, Vermont, that supports educators in understanding children and their own educational practice to teach for human dignity, ethical well-being, and holistic growth. The piece provides an introduction to City-As-School and briefly describes how faculty members have used Descriptive Inquiry to foster whole school professional learning and growth. The piece then details how the faculty used Descriptive Inquiry to surface and concretize shared educational principles during the 2020-21 school year, a poignant example of Patricia Carini's notion of "making and doing philosophy in a school."

5.
Journal of Workplace Learning ; 35(3):288-305, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241349

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The study refers to a health-care organization engaged in adopting "home health care" as a new object of activity. This study aims to explore how the reconfiguration of the object influences the transformative perspective, affecting not just a service but a broader approach and meaning behind patient care. It also investigates the main contradictions at play and the levers to support inter-organizational learning while facing the new challenges and change processes. Design/methodology/approach: The work is based on a qualitative and ethnographic methodology directed to examine cultural, practical and socio-material aspects. The activity theory is assumed as a powerful approach to understand collective learning and distributed agency processes. Findings: The renewal of the new object of work is analyzed as a trigger for shifts in representations, cultural processes and collective support implemented by the organization. Three agentic trajectories -- technical, dialogical and collaborative agency -- were cultivated by the management to deliver home health care through joint exercises of coordination and control, dialogical spaces and collaborative process. Research limitations/implications: The data collection was disrupted by the pandemic. A follow-up study would be beneficial to inquire how the learning processes shifted or were influenced by the contextual changes. Practical implications: This contribution provides a practical framework for health-care organizations aiming to navigate and explore the physiological tensions and contradictions emerging when the object of work is changed. Originality/value: The paper develops the field of intra- and inter-organizational learning by presenting an intertwined and structural connection between these processes and the renewing of the object of work. It advises that processes of transformation must be handled with attention to the critical and collective dynamics that accompany sustainable and situated changes.

6.
Online Submission ; 13(1):669-681, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239739

ABSTRACT

Education has gone through rapid changes during the emergency remote teaching period resulting by the COVID-19 pandemic. These changes, in part, have been associated with educational institutions attempting to implement a viable solution to the problem of distance education. Although organizational management theory literature suggests that great change in very little time results in a detrimental psychological phenomenon called change fatigue in employees and that this phenomenon has even been investigated in the context of teaching staff in the past;there have been no attempt at understanding change fatigue from a student perspective. This quantitative study attempts at proposing a structural equation model towards the understanding of how to change fatigue and other variables, namely, digital literacy, online learning attitude and school alienation that might have been influenced by it have affected teacher candidates after resuming face-to-face education followed by a 1.5 year of emergency remote teaching period. Results indicated that change fatigue predicts school alienation and yet;does not predict online learning attitude;hinting that there might be another category of alienating organizational change that universities have gone through that does not solely involve online education. Nevertheless, digital literacy is a beneficial skill for all students that helps bolster online learning attitudes and reduce overall school alienation.

7.
Teaching Public Administration ; 41(1):23-27, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239322

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced surprised governments worldwide to act fast and decisively, often revealing lack of preparation for this kind of situation. However, such crises are expected to occur far more frequently than ever before. To keep societies prospering, governments, administrations, and civil servants will have to adapt quickly and effectively--and hence need to develop the required capabilities (e.g., appropriate policies, strategies, knowledge, skills). To deepen our understanding of appropriate action in face of crises, resulting consequences for stability and required, demanded or enforced behavior of people, we propose the concept of resilience. Resilience, we argue by way of five propositions, helps articulating the underlying dynamics in society and its administrative systems in order to allow for a sustainable incorporation of the long-term perspective in the short-term strategy, particularly in times of disturbances and temporary perturbations.

8.
Teaching Public Administration ; 41(1):99-107, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239075

ABSTRACT

The article focuses on challenges and disruption in the higher education sector in Italy due to COVID-19 pandemic. The study explores the experience of the Single-Cycle Master's Degree in Law of the University of Genoa, especially taking into account students' perspective.

9.
Journal of Cases in Educational Leadership ; 26(1):71-81, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20233809

ABSTRACT

Predominantly white institutions (PWIs) struggle to attract and retain underrepresented faculty. Despite aspirations for diversity, the reality remains that underrepresented faculty are not hired and retained in numbers sufficient to change the institution's demographics. The leadership of PWIs strives for solutions to ameliorate the trend in recruitment, retention, and climate. The issue has gained even more significance recently due to the global coronavirus pandemic when layoffs, non-renewals, and hiring freezes have been widely imposed. This case examines how systemic leadership problems, mindsets, and climates keep PWIs at the status quo, and invites application of leadership and adult learning theories to develop a strategy for improving faculty diversity at PWIs.

10.
Journal of Interactive Media in Education ; 2023(1), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20233552

ABSTRACT

This article responds to the rise of the micro-credential movement. It evidences the heightened attention politicians, policy-makers and educational leaders are giving to micro-credentials by framing the discussion in several recent high-level policy developments, an exponential growth in the number of academic publications and the increasing level of interest shown by popular media. It follows that micro-credentials appear to be high on the change agenda for many higher education institutions (HEIs), especially in the post-COVID-19 environment. However, the emergence of the micro-credential raises several crucial questions for educational leaders, set against fear of missing out. Importantly, the paper identifies a significant gap in the literature regarding leadership and strategic institutional responses to micro-credentials. Indeed, there is a dearth of literature. Leadership is crucial to the success of any educational change or innovation, so five key questions are presented for institutional leaders. They challenge institutions to make strategic decisions around how they engage with and position micro-credentials. If micro-credentials are part of an HEI's change agenda, then serious consideration needs to be given to the type of leadership and internal structures required to develop and execute a successful micro-credential strategy. Consideration must also be given to fit-for-purpose business models and how to mitigate potential risks. We hope to bring these strategic questions to the table as institutions plan, envision and develop their micro-credential strategies. © 2023 The Author(s).

11.
The Palgrave Handbook of Educational Leadership and Management Discourse ; : 985-998, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2326483

ABSTRACT

Three vectors describe the research about the global challenge of educational reform (Shirley, J Educ Change 21(3):385-392, 2020). These vectors address fundamental questions within the field: Who is doing the work and how are they supported? How can reform that is successful in one realm be both sustained within that context and travel to other contexts? Who benefits? These sticky questions are not rhetorical, and yet they also do not have an answer. In spite of decades of practice and research, much of the field of educational reform remains in flux. This chapter builds upon such scholarship, describing the global challenge of educational reform, briefly tracing the history of reform over the last 20 decades in order to frame the understanding of educational reform, and then outlining the obstacles that have been met along the way. These waves of reform and across the waves the vectors of change play a strong role in making sense of the past and highlighting the global challenge of educational reform work. The chapter then describes the challenges of the present moment, including but not limited to the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on reform efforts. © The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2022.

12.
Revista de Filosofía ; 40(105):174-191, 2023.
Article in Spanish | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2313418

ABSTRACT

Pedagogical practices incapable of ethically mediating learning are inoperative in the face of the many contemporary social crises. Thus, the health emergencies due to the COVID-19 pandemic make it possible to identify the humanizing capacity of the instruction plans that meet the ethical request to train, using the multiple resources that information technologies present. Therefore, the research has the purpose of analyzing the digital transformations of higher education supported by pedagogies capable of enabling ethical values for the benefit of equitable societies. It concludes that virtual innovation in training considerably improves skills training;situation that is placed at human service when actions are subordinated to solidarity, dialogic listening, tolerance and respect as an articulator of just societies. (English) [ FROM AUTHOR] Prácticas pedagógicas incapaces de mediar éticamente los aprendizajes son inoperantes ante las muchas crisis sociales contemporáneas. A su vez, las urgencias sanitarias debido a la pandemia por COVID-19 permiten identificar la capacidad humanizante de los planes de instrucción que atienden la solicitud ética de formar, empleando los múltiples recursos que las tecnologías de la información presentan. Por consiguiente, la investigación tiene el propósito de analizar las transformaciones digitales de la educación superior sustentadas en pedagogías capaces de habilitar valores éticos en beneficio de sociedades equitativas. Concluye que con la innovación virtual en la formación mejora considerablemente la capacitación de competencias;situación que se coloca al servicio humano cuando las acciones se supeditan a la solidaridad, la escucha dialógica, la tolerancia y respecto como articuladora de sociedades justas. (Spanish) [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Revista de Filosofía is the property of Revista de Filosofia-Universidad del Zulia and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
Educational Review ; 75(4):597-616, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2296055

ABSTRACT

This paper brings together two rich bodies of knowledge that have barely intersected in research: parental involvement in the school and processes of pedagogical change. Until now, parental involvement has been studied in many contexts, but references to parental involvement in a school's pedagogy are rare. Management of pedagogical change has also been studied extensively, but mainly by relating to the school as an organisation that functions separately from the community context. This study, conducted in 2019–2021 (including the COVID-19 pandemic period), is based on 22 in-depth, semi-structured interviews with parents, principals, and senior education officials of two elementary schools in Israel that are undergoing pedagogical changes. The schools share some similar demographic characteristics but differ in pedagogy: One is an older school characterised by a traditional pedagogy (including, for example, frontal teaching and standardised evaluation);the other is new and was founded with innovative pedagogy in the spirit of the 21st century (for example, personalised teaching and alternative evaluation). The findings reveal that the parents in both schools are interested in influencing the school's pedagogy, but that they do so in opposite directions: The parents at the more traditional school are interested in promoting innovative learning, while the parents in the innovative school are interested in reintroducing traditional practices. The findings also contribute to the discussion of parental involvement from a gender perspective and the roles of key players. Finally, the article offers initial insights regarding parent–school relations, including the pedagogical aspects, following the COVID-19 pandemic. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Educational Review is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

14.
Center on Reinventing Public Education ; 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2264824

ABSTRACT

Public schooling has always been politically fraught, but current disagreements over issues related to race, sexuality, gender, and COVID-19 have reached a tipping point. According to this report from the Center on Reinventing Public Education and RAND, half of school system leaders say that these disagreements are disrupting schooling. Almost one in three district leaders also said their educators had received verbal or written threats about politically controversial topics since fall 2021. The findings come from surveys issued to 300 district and charter network leaders and interviews with superintendents. Their responses shed light on how political polarization has affected classrooms and how districts are responding. This report presents results from the fall 2022 survey of the American School District Panel (ASDP). The ASDP is a research partnership between RAND and CRPE. The panel also collaborates with several other education organizations, including the Council of the Great City Schools and Kitamba, to help improve outcomes for students throughout the United States.

15.
Arts and Humanities in Higher Education: An International Journal of Theory, Research and Practice ; 22(1):81-99, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2263538

ABSTRACT

This article sets out a methodology for integrating a focus on the student voice in deliberations about the future of teaching and learning in the Arts and Humanities. Qualitative data gleaned from JISC's 20/21 Student Digital Experience Insights Survey and feedback collected from students studying on undergraduate programmes in the Faculty of Arts at the University of Nottingham in the United Kingdom (UK) is used to sketch out pedagogical imaginaries of the future that can be used heuristically by universities as they work their way through the pandemic and out the other side. The imaginaries, it argues, act as tools to kickstart debates, underpin experimentation and inform pedagogical planning and design. To address questions of credibility and plausibility, the imaginaries are rooted in the present, embody empirical trends and are consistent with practices, structures and technologies that have come to prominence during the pandemic.

16.
Research on Education and Media ; 15(1):88-94, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2259432

ABSTRACT

All around the world, schools and universities should re-think and update teaching to adjust to technological changes and exploit their potentialities by means of hybrid teaching (Limone, 2013). Considering teaching in presence as absolutely good and online teaching as bad and necessary only during the pandemic is ideological, reductive and wrong (Ferri, Moriggi, 2018). If properly used in an ad-hoc pedagogical approach, technology represents an opportunity for students (Bonaiuti, Dipace, 2021), who can participate in training and updating processes and better adapt to changes. The long and complex post-pandemic period should allow the experimentation of a better integration between teaching in the classroom and technologically 'augmented' teaching. The process of digitalisation and methodological innovation should become permanent, as suggested in Mission number 4 -- Education and Research of the NPRR. This was the starting point for an explorative survey (Lucisano, Salerni, 2002) conducted with 400 students of the University of Bari in order to research their challenges and levels of satisfaction with the online courses attended in the a.a. 2020/2021. The survey shows the difficulties with distance teaching and presents an overview on possible future blended approaches.

17.
Journal of Early Childhood Research ; 21(1):63-75, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2258747

ABSTRACT

The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on demands, resources, and job satisfaction among a convenience sample of early childhood education (ECE) staff employed in Head Start preschools in a large metro area of Colorado. A survey was administered to a sample of Head Start staff at two timepoints: Time 1 (pre-COVID-19 pandemic) in October of 2019 (n = 137) and Time 2 (during the COVID-19 pandemic) in November of 2020 (n = 86). The survey consisted of a combination of validated measures to assess personal and external demands and resources and work satisfaction. Workload is a perceived external "demand" that significantly improved from pre- to mid-pandemic in this sample (z = -3.3, p < 0.01). Many personal and external "resources" changed pre- to mid-pandemic, though none were statistically significant. Overall job satisfaction in this sample increased, though it was not statistically significant (z = -1.04, p = 0.3). Mitigating demands, such as minimizing workload, and increasing job-related resources, such as bolstering management supports, may lead to improved job satisfaction of the ECE workforce employed in Head Start settings. Although the COVID-19 pandemic has amplified poor mental health and numerous job demands, some of the pandemic-related regulations may have also decreased the workload for some subgroups of the ECE workforce, potentially translating to improved job satisfaction. However, significant disparities remain with respect to personal and external demands among this sample of the ECE workforce compared to the national workforce suggesting multi-level resources and supports are critical to further buffer these stressors.

18.
Journal of Workplace Learning ; 35(9):50-65, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2258414

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aims to examine how a social entrepreneurial organisation in Sweden collectively learned to adapt itself to the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach: Using an abductive approach, this study conducted single case fieldwork on a social entrepreneurial organisation called SFE. The following research questions were asked: What are the changes in collective learning conditions that SFE has to face during the pandemic? What are the outcomes of collective learning during the pandemic in SFE? Findings: This study results indicate that collective learning conditions were changed by restructuring the organisation's design and teamwork during the pandemic, which facilitated sharing of knowledge and experiences. This collective learning helped the organisation develop new virtual projects during the pandemic. Another result of this collective learning was the members' new shared understanding of the organisation's vision. Research limitations/implications: This study hopes to broaden the understanding of the relationship between collective learning in organisations and organisational adaptation in times of crisis. Practical implications: This study can help leaders of social entrepreneurial organisations understand what changes are necessary to create a team that collectively learns. Originality/value: The data had the advantage of being gathered as a real-time process, and the researcher witnessed how the organisation achieved adaptation as it happened and not just through its members' reflection of it as a past phenomenon.

19.
Participatory Educational Research ; 10(1):213-236, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2256914

ABSTRACT

With the recent COVID-19 pandemic, the way of teaching has rapidly turned into online learning environments. This situation has brought along various difficulties in the implementation of online teaching. From this point of view, this research focuses on the experiences of graduate students in the online teaching process and the multifaceted effects of this process on them. The research is a case study examining the opinions of 16 graduate students from various state and foundation universities in Türkiye. The maximum diversity sampling method, one of the purposeful sampling methods, was taken as a criterion in the determination of the participants. The data of the study were obtained with a semi-structured interview form developed by the researchers. Thematic analysis technique was used in the analysis of the obtained data. Research results show that online education facilitates access to education, develops students' self-discipline and awareness of taking responsibility;however, it has disadvantages in terms of social and psychological aspects. In addition, it has been concluded that online teaching is not yet ready to be considered as a stand-alone teaching delivery model, and it is more appropriate to use it as an alternative model to traditional face-to-face education. It is thought that the results obtained within the scope of the research will contribute to the improvement and development of online learning experiences of graduate students, as well as being a guide to higher education stakeholders and policymakers. [This study was presented as an oral presentation at "The 15th International Congress On Educational Administration" held in Gaziantep between 5-6 November 2021.]

20.
Change ; 55(2):41-46, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2251944

ABSTRACT

Changing student demographics, COVID-19 ramifications, and political pressures all underscore the need for organizational change sooner rather than later. While higher education has successfully resolved a number of challenges, we continue to be stymied by areas where needed change has not materialized. Even after repeated efforts, these changes still have not occurred, and there are ongoing consequences. To facilitate change, this article both identifies areas of needed change as well as incremental next steps to be taken. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Change is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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