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1.
International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management ; 35(7):2496-2526, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20245285

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis study aims to propose a systematic knowledge management model to explore the causal links leading to the organizational crisis preparedness (OCP) level of integrated resorts (IRs) during the COVID-19 pandemic based on the intangible capital of organizational climate, dynamic capability, substantive capability and commitment.Design/methodology/approachThe authors use data obtained from IRs in Macau. The Wuli–Shili–Renli (WSR) approach underpins the study. Structural equation modeling following fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis (fsQCA) was used for data processing.FindingsThe results showed that organizational climate has an essential role in IRs preparedness for crises and affects their dynamic capacity, substantive capacity and commitment. The fsQCA results revealed that the relationships between conditions with a higher level of dynamic and substantive capability lead to higher OCP scores.Practical implicationsExecutives should develop systemic thinking regarding organization preparedness in IRs for crisis management. A comprehensive understanding of the IRs' business environment and crises is necessary, as they will require different factor constellations to allow the organization to perform well in a crisis. Financial support for employees could ensure their assistance when dealing with such situations. Rapid response teams should be set up for daily operations and marketing implementation of each level of the IRs management systems.Originality/valueThis study contributes to the extant literature on IRs crisis management in the OCP aspect. The authors constructed a systematic composite picture of organization executives' knowledge management through the three layers of intangible capitals in WSR. Moreover, the authors explored causal links of WSR from symmetric and asymmetric perspectives.

2.
Pharmaceutical Technology Europe ; 33(7):7, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243758

ABSTRACT

Whilst vaccination is progressing at increasing speed, the virus will not disappear, and patients will need safe and effective treatments to reduce the burden of COVID-19," said Stella Kyriakides, commissioner for Health and Food Safety in a press release (3). Promising candidates The five candidates identified by the EC will be prioritized for review, and it is hoped that three of the therapies will gain authorization by October 2021, permitting the final data demonstrate safety, efficacy, and quality. EC, "Register of Commission Expert Groups and Other Similar Entities: High-Level Group on the Health Emergency Preparedness and Response Authority (HERA) and HERA Incubator (E03770)," ec.europa.eu [Accessed 5 July 2021].

3.
Manitoba Law Journal ; 46(1):179, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241747

ABSTRACT

The aftermath of the February 2022 public order emergency in Canada offers a timely opportunity to modernize the Emergencies Act and revisit the coordination imperative with the complexity of global emergencies squarely in mind. The failure to coordinate globally in the early stages of the Covid-19 outbreak, despite a vast repository of knowledge of how to do so- set against the backdrop of increasingly polarized politics and geopolitics- transformed an avoidable public health emergency into multiple humanitarian, economic, social, and political crises. This short article highlights Commissioner Rouleau's focus on coordination failure throughout his report. It then situates the public order emergency in a global perspective, focusing on pandemic preparedness and the polarized political context that framed it. The essay is to stress the importance of viewing emergency powers holistically, and to advocate reading the Commissioner's recommendations not in isolation, but as a small and partial response to a wicked-or super wicked-problem of global proportions.

4.
Journal of International Crisis and Risk Communication Research ; 5(2):233-254, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241482

ABSTRACT

Despite the Americans with Disabilities Act being more than 30 years old, many government institutions fail to fully support their constituents, and provide understandable and actionable crisis communications before, during, and after emergencies and disasters. When residents do not effectively receive, understand, and act on crisis communications in a timely manner, life safety issues can occur. People may choose not to evacuate when necessary or lack the information for properly sheltering-in-place. These and other bad decisions can be deadly. Crisis communications, as a subset of risk communications, should be aligned with all the disaster phase cycles—the before, during, and after stages of disasters and crises—so that impacted residents obtain complete information they can use. U.S. government websites, including posted crisis communications public releases, must be compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) under Title II and they should use templated crisis communications available in other languages, English-only audio recordings, and videos of American Sign Language.

5.
Disaster Prevention and Management ; 32(1):234-251, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241245

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis paper applies the theory of cascading, interconnected and compound risk to the practice of preparing for, managing, and responding to threats and hazards. Our goal is to propose a consistent approach for managing major risk in urban systems by bringing together emergency management, organisational resilience, and climate change adaptation.Design/methodology/approachWe develop a theory-building process using an example from the work of the Greater London Authority in the United Kingdom. First, we explore how emergency management approaches systemic risk, including examples from of exercises, contingency plans and responses to complex incidents. Secondly, we analyse how systemic risk is integrated into strategies and practices of climate change adaptation. Thirdly, we consider organisational resilience as a cross cutting element between the approaches.FindingsLondon has long been a champion of resilience strategies for dealing with systemic risk. However, this paper highlights a potential for integrating better the understanding of common points of failure in society and organisations, especially where they relate to interconnected domains and where they are driven by climate change.Originality/valueThe paper suggests shifting toward the concept of operational continuity to address systemic risk and gaps between Emergency Management, Organizational Resilience and Climate Change Adaptation.

6.
Applied Clinical Trials ; 30(7/8):7-8, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20240688

ABSTRACT

At the end likely to be of most interest to readers of ACT, it will "support the development of cross-cutting technologies and solutions sustaining multiple potential future threat responses (e.g. vaccine platform technologies, or the application of digital tools and artificial intelligence) as well as the development of specific countermeasures, including through clinical trials and data infrastructure." [...]in practical terms it will monitor and pool production capacity and development facilities, raw material requirements and availability, and ensure that supply chain vulnerabilities are addressed. [...]it is working towards the 'EU FAB' project, a network for single or multi-user, single or multi-technology emergency response production capacity for vaccine and medicine manufacturing at the European level. To accelerate approval of adapted vaccines, the incubator is exploring the introduction of emergency authorization of vaccines at EU level, providing guidance on data requirements, and supporting research to include children in clinical trials.

7.
Pharmaceutical Technology Europe ; 33(1):8-9, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239778

ABSTRACT

"Though Europe's response has demonstrated strengths," the strategy document reports, "existing vulnerabilities have been thrown into sharp focus, including those related to data availability, the supply of medicines, or the availability of manufacturing capacities to adapt and support the production of medicines" (2). [...]a lot of the strategy's proposals stem from the European Green Deal, published in late 2019 (4), from which has emanated last year's EU industrial strategy (5). [...]setting up critical medicines production capacity in the EU would have to be compliant with the Union's competition rules and those of the World Trade Organization, the commission warned (2).

8.
Hadmernok ; 18(1):43-57, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239687

ABSTRACT

The aim of the law is to ensure personal, material and organisational conditions for safe work without endangering human health, to prevent work accidents and occupational diseases by defining the rights and obligations of the state, employers and employees. Since 2003, the concept of occupational safety and health commissioning has been included in the law, which plays a prominent role in the commissioning of dangerous technology or work equipment in health care. [...]of the epidemic, not only the so-called back office area, but also in patient care, the concept of remote work appeared in the field of telemedicine, and some other areas, such as in the case of finding analysis. According to the legislation, the employer must register and Investigate all accidents at work. [...]of this, a wave of insourcing started and in several health institutions they started to employ their own doormen again, wh ich raises further problems.

9.
International Journal of Event and Festival Management ; 14(2):137-140, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239277

ABSTRACT

Findings revealed that hygiene is not perceived as an integral part of event safety, but rather as a disconnected pillar beside traditional event safety measures and that event and health safety measures strongly influence each other, both positively, but often also negatively as event organisers are often concerned with how to get their events successfully through the approval process rather than focussing on the safety aspects. Acknowledging the prevalence of disability in its various forms in society and highlighting the fact that existing research exploring inclusive events and disabled people as event participants focuses mostly on the challenges faced by attendees, the author offers a refreshing perspective by exploring the potential that these events have and the opportunities they bring to people with disabilities and the wider community. [...]the author embraces the argument suggested in the call for papers of this special issue that events provide opportunities to determine new paths, make the future less fearsome, allow more positive outcomes and uses this description to define what they propose to be "revolutionary futures”. In an exploratory case study inspired by a hermeneutics approach and combining different methods of data collection, the author explores the perspectives of attendees, volunteers, event staff and organisers to investigate if the event can indeed create revolutionary futures.

10.
Disaster Prevention and Management ; 32(1):1-3, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20237707
11.
Family and Consumer Sciences Research Journal ; : No Pagination Specified, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-20237004

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to improve Canada's preparedness to rejuvenate the economy in public health crises by understanding how potential tourists acquire knowledge using the cognitive mediation model. We examined the effect of media motivations (i.e., surveillance gratification and anticipated interaction) in predicting two types of subjective knowledge (i.e., pandemic knowledge and travel health knowledge) through the mediation of media attention and elaboration. The study results supported all hypotheses except for the relationships between surveillance gratification and media attention, and media attention and travel health knowledge. This study provides implications for destination marketing organizations to understand Canadians' travel decisions during the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2023 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
Nephrology and Dialysis ; 25(1):26-35, 2023.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20236957

ABSTRACT

As the rate of natural disasters and other devastating events caused by human activities increases, the burden on the health and well-being of those affected by kidney disease has been immeasurable. Health system preparedness, which involves creating a resilient system that is able to deal with the health needs of the entire community during times of unexpected disruptions to usual care, has become globally important. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a heightened awareness of the amplification of negative effects on the renal community. Paradoxically, the complex medical needs of those who have kidney diseases are not met by systems handling crises, often compounded by an acute increase in burden via new patients as a result of the crisis itself. Disruptions in kidney care as a result of unexpected events are becoming more prevalent and likely to increase in the years to come. It is therefore only appropriate that the theme for this year's World Kidney Day will focus on Kidney Health for All: preparedness for the unexpected in supporting the vulnerable. © 2023 JSC Vidal Rus. All rights reserved.

13.
UCL Open Environ ; 4: e004, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237897

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic has influenced people's social relationships around the world in surprising ways. It has also underscored the importance of and accelerated innovation in solutions for social isolation and loneliness. This commentary offers takeaways from emerging research findings and a wide lens on the societal movement underway to create more socially connected communities.

14.
Indian J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 75(2): 600-606, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237312

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The COVID-19 pandemic has presented an unmatched challenge to the ENT residency programs to adapt to a form of web-based learning process and stimulation-based training. It also focuses on the mental stress underwent and the viewpoint of the residents to the paradigm shift in clinical care and academics. Methods: An anonymous questionnaire was created in an online survey generator with 22 questions with limited options (yes/no) and was circulated through email and what's app which has been responded to by 240 ENT residents throughout the country. The questionnaire was divided into five sections, demographics, knowledge about COVID-19 and its management, impact on clinical activity, academics and mental well-being section. Results: Out of 240 respondents, 190(79.2%) were junior residents and 50(20.8%) were senior residents. Although many of them knew the necessary precautions to be taken, 94(39.8%) turned out to be positive themselves with the high fear of transmitting to their family members. Three-fourth participants suggested extending the training period after graduation for the loss incurred. However, half of them sought an opportunity to train themselves for the management of communicable disease, 95% of the residents opined that they are having a negative impact on the job performance due to loss of surgical hands-on which has been drastically reduced. Conclusion: The issues mentioned have been addressed through STEPs - Safety of the residents, Time utilisation by research, Education continuation by online web learning and stimulatory programs, psychological support for mental well-being. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12070-022-03377-7.

15.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1110300, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236647

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic there were numerous stories of health equity work being put "on hold" as public health staff were deployed to the many urgent tasks of responding to the emergency. Losing track of health equity work is not new and relates in part to the need to transfer tacit knowledge to explicit articulation of an organization's commitment to health equity, by encoding the commitment and making it visible and sustainable in policy documents, protocols and processes. Methods: We adopted a Theory of Change framework to develop training for public health personnel to articulate where and how health equity is or can be embedded in their emergency preparedness processes and documents. Results: Over four sessions, participants reviewed how well their understanding of disadvantaged populations were represented in emergency preparedness, response and mitigation protocols. Using equity prompts, participants developed a heat map depicting where more work was needed to explicitly involve community partners in a sustained manner. Participants were challenged at times by questions of scope and authority, but it became clear that the explicit health equity prompts facilitated conversations that moved beyond the idea of health equity to something that could be codified and later measured. Over four sessions, participants reviewed how well their understanding of disadvantaged populations were represented in emergency preparedness, response and mitigation protocols. Using equity prompts, participants developed a heat map depicting where more work was needed to explicitly involve community partners in a sustained manner. Participants were challenged at times by questions of scope and authority, but it became clear that the explicit health equity prompts facilitated conversations that moved beyond the idea of health equity to something that could be codified and later measured. Discussion: Using the indicators and prompts enabled the leadership and staff to articulate what they do and do not know about their community partners, including how to sustain their involvement, and where there was need for action. Saying out loud where there is - and is not - sustained commitment to achieving health equity can help public health organizations move from theory to true preparedness and resilience.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Civil Defense , Humans , Pandemics , Public Health , Communication
16.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e405, 2023 06 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244553

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To promote equity for intersectionally disaster-vulnerable individuals and address three literature gaps: (1) incremental effects of collective and self-efficacy as preparedness predictors, (2) differentiation of fear and perceived severity of a disaster, and (3) clarification of the relationship between fear and preparedness. METHODS: Due to infection risks associated with communal housing, early in the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, many universities permitted students to remain in campus housing only if they were housing insecure, including many international students. We surveyed intersectionally-vulnerable students and their partners at a southeast US university, N = 54, who were international (77.8%), Asian (55.6%), and/or housing insecure at baseline (79.6%). In 14 waves from May-October 2020, we assessed pandemic preparedness/response behaviors (PPRBs) and potential PPRB predictors. RESULTS: We examined within- and between-person effects of fear, perceived severity, collective efficacy, and self-efficacy on PPRBs. Within-person perceived severity and collective efficacy both significantly, positively predicted greater PPRBs. All effects of fear and self-efficacy were not significant. CONCLUSIONS: Perceived severity and confidence that one's actions positively impact one's community fluctuated throughout the pandemic and are linked to greater PPRB engagement. Public health messages and interventions to improve PPRB may benefit from emphasizing collective efficacy and accuracy over fear.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Universities , Longitudinal Studies , Collective Efficacy , Students
17.
Kybernetes ; 52(6):1962-1975, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2327419

ABSTRACT

PurposeMost epidemic transmission forecasting methods can only provide deterministic outputs. This study aims to show that probabilistic forecasting, in contrast, is suitable for stochastic demand modeling and emergency medical resource planning under uncertainty.Design/methodology/approachTwo probabilistic forecasting methods, i.e. quantile regression convolutional neural network and kernel density estimation, are combined to provide the conditional quantiles and conditional densities of infected populations. The value of probabilistic forecasting in improving decision performances and controlling decision risks is investigated by an empirical study on the emergency medical resource planning for the COVID-19 pandemic.FindingsThe managerial implications obtained from the empirical results include (1) the optimization models using the conditional quantile or the point forecasting result obtain better results than those using the conditional density;(2) for sufficient resources, decision-makers' risk preferences can be incorporated to make tradeoffs between the possible surpluses and shortages of resources in the emergency medical resource planning at different quantile levels;and (3) for scarce resources, the differences in emergency medical resource planning at different quantile levels greatly decrease or disappear because of the existing of forecasting errors and supply quantity constraints.Originality/valueVery few studies concern probabilistic epidemic transmission forecasting methods, and this is the first attempt to incorporate deep learning methods into a two-phase framework for data-driven emergency medical resource planning under uncertainty. Moreover, the findings from the empirical results are valuable to select a suitable forecasting method and design an efficient emergency medical resource plan.

18.
Journal of Homeland Security Education ; 16:1-7, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2325299

ABSTRACT

Intelligence education and practice require significant adaptations to the global heating crisis, pandemic disease, and environmental threats. The latter are now and will increasingly influence traditional national security, yet most security analysis focuses almost exclusively on human agency, not complex environmental risks. This unique era in human history possesses unprecedented "wicked" security drivers altering more familiar international economic, geopolitical, and military variables. The security drivers present an acute cultural, intellectual, and institutional adaptation problem. The Intelligence Community (IC) community remains limited by bureaucratic tribalism, inertia, predictable human cognitive security biases, and fundamental knowledge gaps. U.S. politically driven controversies about climate and pandemics threaten its professional analytical effectiveness. The IC must go beyond business-as-usual incrementalism toward much greater interdisciplinary integration of science and natural systems into intelligence education and practice.

19.
Stud Health Technol Inform ; 302: 907-908, 2023 May 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326163

ABSTRACT

The impact of Covid-19 on hospitals was profound, with many lower-resourced hospitals' information technology resources inadequate to efficiently meet the new needs. We interviewed 52 personnel at all levels in two New York City hospitals to understand their issues in emergency response. The large differences in IT resources show the need for a schema to classify hospital IT readiness for emergency response. Here we propose a set of concepts and model, inspired by the Health Information Management Systems Society (HIMSS) maturity model. The schema is designed to permit evaluation of hospital IT emergency readiness, permitting remediation of IT resources where necessary.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Humans , Concept Formation , Hospitals , New York City
20.
J Palliat Care ; : 8258597231176410, 2023 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2321830

ABSTRACT

Objective. Palliative and end-of-life care, as provided by hospices, are important elements of a healthcare response to disasters. A scoping review of the literature was conducted to examine and synthesize what is currently known about emergency preparedness planning by hospices. Methods. A literature search of academic and trade publications was conducted through 6 publication databases, following Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines when applicable. Publications were selected and findings were organized into themes. Results. A total of 26 articles were included in the literature review. Six themes of Policies and Procedures; Testing/Training/Education; Integration and Coordination; Mitigation; Risk Assessment/Hazard and Vulnerability Analysis; and Regulations were identified. Conclusions. This review demonstrates that hospices have begun to individualize emergency preparedness features that support their unique role. The review supports all-hazards planning for hospices, and emerging from this review is a developing vision for expanded roles of hospices to help communities in times of disaster. Continued research in this specialized area is needed to improve hospices' emergency preparedness efforts.

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