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1.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-344274

ABSTRACT

This paper addresses COVID-19 and its widespread and lasting inequality impacts around the globe. The paper also introduces the idea of the post-COVID-19 era heralding a new Renaissance that breeds a climate of ethics of inclusion. The economic, ethical and behavioral insights foundations of a vision for ethics of inclusivity advancements are provided in this article and concrete examples how to enact ethical inclusive leadership in the 21st century. Inequality alleviation will become necessary in inclusive leadership domains of the healthcare sector and providing access to affordable medicine. The currently rising gap between finance performance and real-world economic constraints exacerbated inequality and therefore ethics of inclusive leadership may bridge the gap between financial wealth accumulation and real-world liquidity constraints. Education is a driver of positive change that can transform globally in a digitalized learning space and social justice attentive education, which informs tomorrow’s inclusive leadership. Digitalization in the 21st century holds enormous implicit inclusive leadership potential to diminishes unnoticed inequality constraints that demand for attention to be overcome. The most pressing concerns over climate change are emphasized in order to then introduce a novel strategy to distribute the prospective economic gains from a warming globe equally within society, around the world and over time. The rest of the paper then discusses innovative methods to address inequality, for instance, through the combined strengths of law and economics.

2.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-344272

ABSTRACT

Resilience finance is understood as an advancement of Socially Responsible Investments. In the wake of the COVID-19 economic fallout, unprecedented amounts of governmental rescue and recovery aid were allocated towards social and environmental causes. This paper argues that advances in Socially Responsible Investments are resilience finance pegged to noble causes but also ethics and ideologies. The COVID-19 bailout and recovery packages can potentially provide, if well-designed and properly-used, a unique opportunity to develop fairer and sustainable societies. Finance can imbue responsibility in the post-COVID-19 era in the establishment and fortification of the current Sustainable Development Goals but potentially also in negative screenings and sanction mechanisms in international law infringements. The article argues for a comparative Behavioral Law & Economics approach to understand the most contemporary international finance politics and responsible investment trends around the world.

3.
Sci Total Environ ; 849: 157881, 2022 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2049903

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the impact of the Intercontinental Terminals Company (ITC) fire and COVID-19 on airborne particulate matter (PM) concentrations and the PM disproportionally affecting communities in Houston using low-cost sensors. METHODS: We compared measurements from a network of low-cost sensors with a separate network of monitors from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in the Houston metropolitan area from Mar 18, 2019, to Dec 31, 2020. Further, we examined the associations between neighborhood-level sociodemographic status and air pollution patterns by linking the low-cost sensor data to EPA environmental justice screening and mapping systems. FINDINGS: We found increased PM levels during ITC fire and pre-COVID-19, and lower PM levels after the COVID-19 lockdown, comparable to observations from the regulatory monitors, with higher variations and a greater number of locations with high PM levels detected. In addition, the environmental justice analysis showed positive associations between higher PM levels and the percentage of minority, low-income population, and demographic index. IMPLICATION: Our study indicates that low-cost sensors provide pollutant measures with higher spatial variations and a better ability to identify hot spots and high peak concentrations. These advantages provide critical information for disaster response and environmental justice studies. SYNOPSIS: We used measurements from a low-cost sensor network for air pollution monitoring and environmental justice analysis to examine the impact of anthropogenic and natural disasters.


Subject(s)
Air Pollutants , Air Pollution , COVID-19 , Air Pollutants/analysis , Air Pollution/analysis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Environmental Justice , Environmental Monitoring , Explosions , Humans , Particulate Matter/analysis
4.
Human Organization ; 81(3):280-290, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045673

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had disproportionate impacts on communities that already bear disparate burdens of environmental and climate injustice. Migrant communities and those that have been historically marginalized are especially vulnerable. Building and maintaining relationships that serve as community support is challenged by the distance mandated by the virus. In this article, research partners from neighborhood and academic communities explore ways that we have navigated related challenges. Using the organizing and research methodology of legislative theatre, our collaborative harnessed virtual space to maintain connection and further our research goals. Zoom became our virtual gathering space, which was enriched by incorporating embodied practices into our processes to deepen intimacy. We found that responsivity and consistency of connection served to support relationships in the absence of physical presence. While these practices and approaches allowed us to move our work forward while prioritizing equitable relationships, challenges remain. Accessibility is a key barrier, as both technology and internet connection are unreliable in many communities. Equity work, regardless of the form of engagement, requires time and engagement with place. Yet, we found that storytelling combined with embodied practices, responsivity, and consistency of connection, can transcend virtual space to promote healing and change.

5.
Canadian Geographer ; 66(3):434-449, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2029291

ABSTRACT

A research agenda for environmental justice in Canada The environmental justice literature grew out of the civil rights movement in the US;the literature associated with that movement largely focused on issues of socio-economic status and race. Keywords: environmental justice;meta-narrative review;Canada;justice environnementale;examen métanarratif EN environmental justice meta-narrative review Canada FR justice environnementale examen métanarratif 434 449 16 09/12/22 20220901 NES 220901 Introduction In 2020, the world was changed by the COVID-19 pandemic, while the Black Lives Matter movement seized the public's attention in Canada and the United States (US). The "Other" category includes natural hazards, indoor air pollution, agriculture, and other minor point sources. gl Discussion Environmental justice research in Canada: Developments from 2006 to 2017 In this meta-narrative review, we sought to take stock of the current state of environmental justice research in Canada (2006-2017), as well as characterize its evolution from the preceding three decades. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Canadian Geographer is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

6.
International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction ; 80, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2015392

ABSTRACT

This review evaluates the state of academic literature on disaster resilience and sustainability of incarceration infrastructures, focusing on engineering and architecture. The increasing frequency and intensity of climate crises, including global pandemics and ecological disasters, and the rise of mass incarceration around the world makes such a review timely. We conducted six targeted searches to identify relevant journal articles and two additional searches for literature on resilience and sustainability of schools for comparison. We present data on the results for all search categories, including search terms and qualitative interpretation of the literature. For three of our searches, we present metadata on the specific intersection with incarceration infrastructures investigated, type of facility, and location. We supplement our database search with governmental and nongovernmental agency publications. The results of our search demonstrate a dearth in academic research published at the intersection of incarceration, disaster resilience, and sustainability. This gap in the literature signals a lack of attention and knowledge about the ways researchers and practitioners as well as governmental agencies can predict and mitigate the impact of disasters on incarcerated people's lives. Overall, this paper offers an introduction on the topic of resilience and sustainability of engineering and architectural design for incarceration infrastructure, as well as future areas for additional research including how engineers and architects can engage with questions of prison abolition and justice.

7.
The Science Teacher ; 90(1):34-37, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2012095

ABSTRACT

While it should be common practice to talk about climate change throughout the curriculum (NGSS Lead States 2013), only addressing climate when it comes up in other classes results in students graduating high school still unable to articulate the causes or effects of climate change as well as what needs to be done to address the problem (Monroe, Oxarart, and Plate 2013;Reid 2019;Schreiner, Henriksen, and Kirkeby Hansen 2005). Even if building climate change into other science classes was an effective strategy for teaching climate science, students would still not have gained climate literacy because CCE should also incorporate societal effects and climate justice (Stapleton 2019). Students were encouraged to submit their projects to the potentially interested groups or organizations (e.g., Department of Transportation or city planning commission) once complete. Because climate change misconceptions abound (McNeil and Vaughn 2012), we identified common misconceptions ahead of time and provided tools to prevent or resolve these noncanonical understandings. Instead of telling students that the two can be confused, we start by discussing the ozone hole (because they are already familiar with it) and how ozone interacts with UV radiation before even mentioning the greenhouse effect and carbon dioxide interacting with infrared radiation.

8.
Climate Policy ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1991914

ABSTRACT

Transition to a post-carbon economy implies changes that are both far-reaching and unprecedented. The notion that a decarbonization transition must encompass multiple forms of justice is gaining ground. In response, the concept of Just Transition has become ever more popular–and confusion about its meaning ever greater. We argue in this paper that the term Just Transition needs a rigorous updating to develop its full conceptual power for the analysis and evaluation of the rapid and extensive energy transitions already underway. After reviewing the different uses of Just Transition in practice and scholarship, we propose that the term be used as an analytical concept for an ongoing process of transition. The Just Transition concept can provide an integrated, whole-system perspective on justice (procedural, distributive, recognition, and restorative) that can help in identifying systemic solutions to address environmental and socio-economic concerns. This would differ from reductionist approaches that derive from legacy silo-sectoral or technologically driven approaches;these too often overlook negative side-effects and wider justice implications of reorganizing economic practice. An examination of COVID-19 pandemic responses illustrates our operationalization of the Just Transition concept, highlighting the importance of designing whole-system policies that are equitable, as well as the pitfalls of pursuing a narrow sectoral approach. Taking seriously the implications of complex systems with hard-to-predict effects also has concrete implications for policy interventions at all levels of governance. In particular, we highlight the importance of attending to multiple social inequalities for ensuring the resilience of whole-system decarbonization in the face of instability, unpredictability, and unprecedented change. Key policy insights The transition to net-zero will be neither sustainable nor credible if it creates or worsens social inequalities;a backlash is likely if the transition is not perceived to be just. Pathways forward may only emerge through observation, experimentation, and experience. A range of policy tools exist to address Just Transition concerns. These include addressing social and environmental aspects of economic policy;making sure that interventions are adapted to local contexts;building democratic engagement platforms;and open and transparent communication. Job creation does not guarantee just outcomes, as justice goes beyond employment conditions. © 2022 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

9.
The Foundation Review ; 14(2):4-6, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1989356

ABSTRACT

Building on systems built by community members resulted in creative, locally owned solutions to achieve impact. The COVID-19 pandemic had a disparately harsh impact on Indigenous peoples, with U.S. death rates far higher for Native Americans than for the white population. The authors reflect on what it takes to shift norms, structures, and power in ways that lead to equitable outcomes and embed equity throughout an organization.

10.
Journal of Humanistic Mathematics ; 12(2):301-314, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1980495

ABSTRACT

This paper describes a class activity based on real data about COVID-19 death rates in California. The activity helps students learn about exponential func-tions while providing an opportunity to integrate social justice concerns into the mathematics classroom.

11.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112(8):1089-1091, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1958134

ABSTRACT

t is well established that socioeconomic and demographic factors, such as race and ethnicity, income, and education, are independently linked to health disparities.1 Tools that combine multiple socioeconomic and demographic variables into an overall rank, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) Social Vulnerability Index (SVI), provide a quantitative framework that can be used by policymakers to identify communities that have higher overall social vulnerability with regard to disparate health outcomes and living conditions across multiple factors, and to develop targeted interventions.2 Historically, the SVI and similar frameworks have been crafted for emergency preparedness and response and used for study and practice in more extreme natural and human-caused disaster scenarios. Over the years, the SVI has been used for public health research and practice, communications, and accessibility planning, and to target geographically specific interventions related to natural disasters such as flooding and hurricanes,3, human-caused events such as chemical spills,2 and disease outbreaks like the recent COVID-19 pandemic.4 However, addressing issues of health inequity attributable to environmental injustice is imperative, and should not be restricted to alleviating the impact of event-specific hazards. Environmental injustice in the built environment is often associated with the disproportionate placement of hazardous and industrial sites and polluting transportation infrastructure in socially vulnerable neighborhoods,5 where residents often lack the social or economic capital to influence policy decisions.6 Although existing research links housing and health equity,7 the impact of poor housing conditions and household exposures to lead, pests, and indoor air pollutants on the health and well-being of socially vulnerable populations is an important and often overlooked aspect of environmental injustice.7,8 The Environmental Protection Agency's definition of environmental justice is all-encompassing and espouses the idea that environmental justice is only achieved when "everyone enjoys: The SVI has already been used outside the realm of disaster management to better characterize obesity10 and physical fitness.11 Hollar et al. set a new precedent for the value it may bring to the environmental justice sector, and additional research should be done to understand its utility in identifying communities that may be more likely to experience other socially linked conditions associated with environmental injustice, such as routine exposure to indoor and outdoor environmental pollutants, chronic disease burden, poor working conditions, lack of greenspace, and other issues with the built environment, in addition to housing conditions.

12.
International Journal for Crime, Justice and Social Democracy ; 11(2):74-86, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1924529

ABSTRACT

Brazil covers a large territory, and although only 15% of its population is distributed in rural areas (IBGE Educa 2015), rural dwellers take on the chief responsibility for conserving local biodiversity. This article uses empirical research with a qualitative approach to present four cases of consolidated communities working with Amazonian rubber, regenerative cotton, weaving and lacework. It shows how rural communities pursue solutions for sustainable livelihoods in their own place of origin through the production of raw materials and products for the fashion chain, ensuring food security, income generation, maintenance of local biomes and gender justice. Particularly, this study examines the role of women beyond their families in ensuring work equity and better income distribution. Design appears as a positive agent, transforming ancestral and artisanal culture and knowledge into product innovation with added value to ensure production viability as well as enhancing community wellbeing.

13.
Journal of Applied Research on Children ; 12(1), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1918891

ABSTRACT

As a teenager with severe atopic dermatitis and asthma living in Puerto Rico, life has presented me with many obstacles and challenges that have shaped me into who I am. Living through powerful hurricanes, earthquakes and the COVID-19 pandemic has shone a bright light on the immediacy of the climate crisis. Our future is at stake, and the countdown to prevent and prepare is running out. I am discovering my role in promoting climate action as a vested stakeholder. How can an adolescent help and truly make a difference in the mitigation of climate change? Analyzing these issues from the intimate perspective of intergenerational environmental justice and an ever-growing passion for the environment, stirs the pot (PFOA free) to activate the environmental conscience in every reader. Key Take Away Points As a teenager with severe atopic dermatitis and asthma living in Puerto Rico, life has presented me with many obstacles and challenges that have shaped me into who I am. Living through powerful hurricanes, earthquakes and the COVID-19 pandemic has shone a bright light on the immediacy of the climate crisis. Our future is at stake, and the countdown to prevent and prepare is running out. I am discovering my role in promoting climate action as a vested stakeholder. How can an adolescent help and truly make a difference in the mitigation of climate change? Analyzing these issues from the intimate perspective of intergenerational environmental justice and an ever-growing passion for the environment, stirs the pot (PFOA free) to activate the environmental conscience in every reader.

14.
J Pediatr Surg ; 57(12): 865-869, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1914713

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The healthcare sector is responsible for 10% of US greenhouse gas emissions. Telehealth use may decrease healthcare's carbon footprint. Our institution introduced telehealth to support SARS-CoV-2 social distancing. We aimed to evaluate the environmental impact of telehealth rollout. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of pediatric patients seen by a surgical or pre anesthesia provider between March 1, 2020 and March 1, 2021. We measured patient-miles saved and CO2 emissions prevented to quantify the environmental impact of telehealth. Miles saved were calculated by geodesic distance between patient home address and our institution. Emissions prevented were calculated assuming 25 miles per gallon fuel efficiency and 19.4 pounds of CO2 produced per gallon of gasoline consumed. Unadjusted Poisson regression was used to assess relationships between patient demographics, geography, and telehealth use. RESULTS: 60,773 in-person and 10,626 telehealth encounters were included. This represented an 8,755% increase in telehealth use compared to the year prior. Telehealth resulted in 887,006 patient-miles saved and 688,317 fewer pounds of CO2 emitted. Demographics significantly associated with decreased telehealth use included Asian and Black/African American racial identity, Hispanic ethnic identity, and primary language other than English. Further distance from the hospital and higher area deprivation index were associated with increased telehealth use (IRR 1.0006 and 1.0077, respectively). CONCLUSION: Incorporating telehealth into pediatric surgical and pre anesthesia clinics resulted in significant CO2 emission reductions. Expanded telehealth use could mitigate surgical and anesthesia service contributions to climate change. Racial and linguistic minority status were associated with significantly lower rates of telehealth utilization, necessitating additional inquiry into equitable telemedicine use for minoritized populations. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV.

15.
Cities ; 128:103792, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1881785

ABSTRACT

Policy advocacy to address socioeconomic and racial/ethnic inequities in access to urban green space (e.g., parks) in the U.S. and elsewhere are often stymied by two dominant narratives on green space reinforced by politicians, business leaders, and mainstream media. The first argues that green space is “nice to have” but not necessary, and the second frames green space as “universally good” for economic development. In this paper, we study counter-narratives to push for equitable green space policy relying on qualitative research with 30 U.S. policy advocates about their experiences with green space equity work. We find that counter-narratives to the “nice to have” narrative could frame green space as essential, multifunctional, and resilient infrastructure. Also, counter-narratives to the “universally good” narrative could describe green space as a setting for equitable development, cultural representation and inclusiveness, and healing for people of color. Further, counter-narratives should be tailored to specific policy campaigns by targeting audiences, seizing historical opportunities (e.g., COVID-19 pandemic), and centering the stories of disadvantaged people. These findings can be interpreted through the lens of structural racism and can provide pathways forward for advocates seeking to achieve green space equity through policy change and power building.

16.
Canadian Journal of Nonprofit and Social Economy Research ; 13(S1):115-133, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1876465

ABSTRACT

This review article draws connections between ideas expressed in some key presentations of the 6th International Conference of the Centre for Research on Social Innovations (CRISES). First, in reference to the lectures of Nancy Fraser and Lo'ic Blondiaux, we discuss the interconnectedness of crises (democratic, economic, ecological, and now sanitary). Then, in relation to the lecture by Janice Fine and the one by Dominique Méda and Julie Battilana, we review transformations in the world of work and the challenges it faces in terms of social and environmental justice. Finally, in reference to the lectures of Flor Avelino and of Jean-Baptiste Comby, which we set up in dialogue with each other, we examine the capacity of social innovations to reproduce or transform power relations. We conclude our overview by drawing our own conclusions on what these analyses mean for our work as researchers.Alternate :Cet article-synthèse relie les réflexions issues de certaines conférences principales du 6e Colloque international du Centre de recherche sur les innovations sociales (CRISES). Nous discutons d’abord de l’articulation des crises (démocratique, économique, écologique et aujourd’hui sanitaire) par l’entremise des conférences de Nancy Fraser et de Loïc Blondiaux, puis des transformations du monde du travail et de ses défis en matière de justice sociale et de justice environnementale au travers des présentations de Janice Fine et de Dominique Méda et Julie Battilana, et enfin de la capacité des innovations sociales à transformer ou à reproduire des rapports de pouvoir à partir d’une mise en dialogue des conférences de Flor Avelino et de Jean-Baptiste Comby. Nous concluons ce tour d’horizon réflexif en tirant nos propres conclusions sur les implications de ces analyses pour notre propre travail de chercheurs et des chercheuses.

17.
Canadian Journal of Nonprofit and Social Economy Research ; 13:3-12, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1871256

ABSTRACT

[...]in this strong conception of social innovation, the need to co-construct knowledge and practice calls for contributions from researchers to the socio-ecological transition, in a context of epistemic injustice and a current questioning of the role of universities and of knowledge from outside academe. In addition to demonstrating an interest in the transformational potential of social innovations, they reflect a commitment to social debate on the part of their authors, either from a distance or side-byside with the people under observation. In "UK financialization of public service delivery goes global," Leslie Huckfield analyzes reforms to public service in the United Kingdom whose keywords include "impact measurement," "social investment," and "the financialization of social security." Sara Zirari's article is entitled "How can including multiply disabled residents in the process of recruiting professionals contribute to reducing social, symbolic, and epistemic injustices in a specialized care centre?" Her case study is based on participatory action research, in a process that foregrounds social justice (Fraser

18.
Urban Forestry & Urban Greening ; : 127622, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1867850

ABSTRACT

With the stay at home orders during the pandemic, the often semi-public green spaces of the residential environment, usually created during the building of the houses, became our literal spheres of experience. We explored use and perceptions of local greenery by residents after sixteen months of the COVID-19 crisis, using face to face questionnaires in eight socially disadvantaged neighborhoods of Berlin, all exposed to high loads of environmental stressors and belonging to four relevant building types of Central European cities. Residential greenery was highly appreciated by residents during COVID-19, and fostered a more active appropriation such as meeting neighbors to reduce the sense of loneliness, doing sports and co-creating refugia in challenging times (e.g. greened balconies). Having children or doing home office/schooling encouraged people to use the green in front of the door in more active ways, such as gardening or even during winter. A minor proportion of respondents reduced contacts mainly due to fear of infections, underlining the need to overcome those distances and to re-connect neighbors and living inside and outside the houses in a post-pandemic city. Our data prove the functionality of residential greenery as ‘social tissue’ or ‘social hubs’ of neighborhoods by fostering attachment to place and people and, at the same time, as healthy environment for practices such as enjoying nature and physical activity in fresh air.

19.
The Science Teacher ; 89(1):20-26, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1863869

ABSTRACT

Student groups research air pollution (both a cause of climate change with the buildup of greenhouse gases, and an effect of climate change as the warming atmosphere holds the polluted air close to the earth), and other effects of climate change. Explore Divide the students into groups to research one vulnerable population and create an audio-visual presentation to help the rest of the class understand how a particular population is affected disproportionately by the impacts of climate change. Encourage students within each group to peruse different resources and then pool their knowledge to create a focused presentation. Since time is always at a premium, consider giving students access to the Vulnerable Populations Research Websites page (see Online Connections), rather than having them do an open search. Have different student groups focus on different parts of the world, or different issues (drought, fire, sea level rise, extreme weather, air quality), or different populations (poor, children, elderly, sick).

20.
Earth and Space Science ; 9(5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1863833

ABSTRACT

GeoHealth research both characterizes and predicts problems at the nexus of earth and human systems like climate change, pollution, and natural hazards. While GeoHealth excels in the area of integrated science, there is a need to improve coordinated and networked efforts to produce open science to enable environmental justice. There is a need to resource and empower frontline populations that are disproportionately marginalized by environmental injustice (i.e., the unequal protection from environmental harms and lack of access and meaningful engagement in decision making for a healthy environment;EPA, 2022, https://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice). GeoHealth practice has the opportunity to advance environmental justice or the “fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income” with respect to how research and collaboration of GeoHealth professionals supports the “development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies” that produce equal protection from environmental and health hazards and access to the decision making for a health environment (EPA, 2022, https://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice). Here we highlight barriers and opportunities to apply an equity‐centered ICON framework to the field of GeoHealth to advance environmental justice and health equity.

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