Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 205
Filter
1.
Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics ; 35(6):1552-1568, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243586

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis study aims to investigate the relationships among monetary cost (stimulus), perceived greenwash fear, attitude and perceived behavioural control (organism-related factors) and green hotel patronage intention (response) using the stimulus-organism-response (S-O-R) model.Design/methodology/approachA total of 262 valid questionnaires were collected. Data were collected using the purposive sampling method and tested using the partial least squares (PLS) approach.FindingsMonetary cost is positively related to only one organism-related factor which is perceived greenwash fear. All organism-related factors are positively related to response, which is green hotel patronage intention. Attitude mediates the relationship between perceived greenwash fear and green hotel patronage intention, as well as perceived behavioural control and green hotel patronage intention.Research limitations/implicationsA longitudinal study can be performed in the future to observe the actual green hotel patronage behaviour of customers.Practical implicationsGreen hoteliers should focus on the development of communication strategies to enhance their corporate reputation. Green hoteliers also need to build trust by showing their green initiatives are genuine, identify consumers who are willing to pay more for green hotels and offer promotions with price incentives such as frequency discounts, coupons and rebates to increase interest and trialability.Originality/valueFew studies have focused on the use of monetary cost as a stimulus in the S-O-R model to predict green hotel patronage intention. This study also tested the mediating effect of attitude, one of the organism-related factors, in the model.

2.
The Science Teacher ; 90(2):20-22, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239806

ABSTRACT

From satellites to ground-based sensors, as well as mobile networks of monitors, the availability of massive data sets has increased the need for educating students in data literacy in order to ensure their competency in the global market (Bluhm et al. 2020;Gibson and Mourad 2018). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defines environmental justice as, "... the fair treatment and meaningful involvement of all people regardless of race, color, national origin, or income, with respect to the development, implementation, and enforcement of environmental laws, regulations, and policies." According to Lacombe, more individuals die yearly from car exhaust (53,000) in the United States than road casualties (37,400). Students worked in groups to discuss their assumptions about factors they perceived to have an impact on air pollution levels (e.g., affluence, traffic, and vegetation).

3.
British Food Journal ; 125(7):2407-2423, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20234895

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis study explores Greek and Swedish consumers' attitude towards organic food consumption in order to demonstrate possible differences that can be identified based on health and ecological consciousness beliefs rather than demographic factors. The examination of an emerging and a more mature market allow the authors to provide more targeted marketing strategies that possibly increase organic food consumption in both countries.Design/methodology/approachThe authors adopt an econometric approach to the analysis of consumer behavior in relation to organic food consumption in Sweden and Greece. More specifically, the authors examine the motivations and postexperiences of organic food consumers of different socioeconomic profiles in these two countries, one in northern and one in southern Europe. The authors apply an ordered logistic regression analysis model to map out the interaction between consumer attitudes and sociodemographic variables.FindingsThe authors results show that consumers in Sweden more frequently purchase organic foods than consumers in Greece. Environmental protection and ethical values increase the odds for Swedish organic food consumers to buy organic food products. Health consciousness and family well-being are perceived as factors that increase the odds for Greek organic food consumers to buy organic foods. Sociodemographic factors do not play a pivotal role for consumer behavior in relation to organic food in both countries.Originality/valueThis study distinguishes between organic food consumers in two countries with different levels of organic food production and export activity, size of organic market, national organic labeling system and legal definition and standards of organic food. Within these differences, the organic food industry could align its marketing efforts better rather focus on simplistic demographics. The current view unfolds the fact that there are limited studies comparing two European markets at different stages of development and the factors that influence organic food consumer behavior.

4.
Cadernos de Saude Publica ; 39(4) (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20234673
5.
Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics ; 23(11):6127-6144, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20232936

ABSTRACT

According to the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA), emissions from oil and gas infrastructure contribute 30 % of all anthropogenic methane (CH4) emissions in the US. Studies in the last decade have shown emissions from this sector to be substantially larger than bottom-up assessments, including the EPA inventory, highlighting both the increased importance of methane emissions from the oil and gas sector in terms of their overall climatological impact and the need for independent monitoring of these emissions. In this study we present continuous monitoring of regional methane emissions from two oil and gas basins using tower-based observing networks. Continuous methane measurements were taken at four tower sites in the northeastern Marcellus basin from May 2015 through December 2016 and five tower sites in the Delaware basin in the western Permian from March 2020 through April 2022. These measurements, an atmospheric transport model, and prior emission fields are combined using an atmospheric inversion to estimate monthly methane emissions in the two regions. This study finds the mean overall emission rate from the Delaware basin during the measurement period to be 146–210 Mg CH4 h-1 (energy-normalized loss rate of 1.1 %–1.5 %, gas-normalized rate of 2.5 %–3.5 %). Strong temporal variability in the emissions was present, with the lowest emission rates occurring during the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, a synthetic model–data experiment performed using the Delaware tower network shows that the presence of intermittent sources is not a significant source of uncertainty in monthly quantification of the mean emission rate. In the Marcellus, this study finds the overall mean emission rate to be 19–28 Mg CH4 h-1 (gas-normalized loss rate of 0.30 %–0.45 %), with relative consistency in the emission rate over time. These totals align with aircraft top-down estimates from the same time periods. In both basins, the tower network was able to constrain monthly flux estimates within ±20 % uncertainty in the Delaware and ±24 % uncertainty in the Marcellus. The results from this study demonstrate the ability to monitor emissions continuously and detect changes in the emissions field, even in a basin with relatively low emissions and complex background conditions.

6.
Fulbright Review of Economics and Policy ; 3(1):49-73, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20231774

ABSTRACT

PurposeThis study aims to examine the ability of clean energy stocks to provide cover for investors against market risks related to climate change and disturbances in the oil market.Design/methodology/approachThe study adopts the feasible quasi generalized least squares technique to estimate a predictive model based on Westerlund and Narayan's (2015) approach to evaluating the hedging effectiveness of clean energy stocks. The out-of-sample forecast evaluations of the oil risk-based and climate risk-based clean energy predictive models are explored using Clark and West's model (2007) and a modified Diebold & Mariano forecast evaluation test for nested and non-nested models, respectively.FindingsThe study finds ample evidence that clean energy stocks may hedge against oil market risks. This result is robust to alternative measures of oil risk and holds when applied to data from the COVID-19 pandemic. In contrast, the hedging effectiveness of clean energy against climate risks is limited to 4 of the 6 clean energy indices and restricted to climate risk measured with climate policy uncertainty.Originality/valueThe study contributes to the literature by providing extensive analysis of hedging effectiveness of several clean energy indices (global, the United States (US), Europe and Asia) and sectoral clean energy indices (solar and wind) against oil market and climate risks using various measures of oil risk (WTI (West Texas intermediate) and Brent volatility) and climate risk (climate policy uncertainty and energy and environmental regulation) as predictors. It also conducts forecast evaluations of the clean energy predictive models for nested and non-nested models.

7.
IOP Conference Series Earth and Environmental Science ; 1189(1):011001, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20231601

ABSTRACT

The title of the ConferenceXXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists "Interdisciplinary topics in mining and geology”The location and the date of the conferencevirtual event – online conference, June 29th to July 1st, 2022 in Wrocław, PolandXXIInd Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists "Interdisciplinary topics in mining and geology” continues a series of events that started in 2000 at Wrocław University of Science and Technology. Scientific programme of the Conference focuses on four thematic panels:1. Mining Engineering: sustainable development, digitalisation in mining, problems of securing, protecting and using remnants of old mining works, underground mining, opencast mining, mineral processing, waste management, mining machinery, mine transport, economics in mining, mining aeronautics, ventilation and air conditioning in mines,2. Earth and Space Sciences: geology, hydrogeology, environmental protection, extraterrestrial resources, groundwater and medicinal waters, engineering and environmental protection, geotourism,3. Geoengineering: environmental protection, applied geotechnics, rock and soil mechanics, geohazards,4. Geoinformation: mining geodesy, GIS, photogrammetry and remote sensing, geodata modeling and analysis.The XXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists was held as a virtual event, that is as a virtual, online conference in real-time. The reason why the Organizing Committee decided to change the traditional formula of the event to online formula was related to the concern for the health of the participants due to the COVID-19 epidemic.The XXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists took place from June 29th to July 1st, 2022 in Wroclaw, Poland. That is the organizers worked and managed the event from the Wrocław University of Science and Technology Geocentre building. Because the conference focused on four thematic panels, four different special opening lectures were delivered by wellknown scientists- Professor Jan Zalasiewicz (University of Leicester, England)- Associate Professor Artur Krawczyk (AGH University of Science and Technology, Poland)- Professor Biljana Kovacević-Zelić (University of Zagreb, Croatia)- Assistant Professor Eduard Kan (Tashkent Institute of Irrigation and Agricultural Mechanizations Engineers, Uzbekistan).The Conference was divided into 8 oral sessions (with 33 presentations) and 1 poster session (with 33 posters). The amount of time provided to one presentation was 15 minutes, after presentation there was 5 minutes available for discussion. The poster session was available throughout the event, and the posters were available for online viewing on the Conference's website with the possibility of make discussion and ask questions in real time via zoom meeting application as well. Every day of the Conference one "virtual coffee break” was devoted for discussion between participants and question and answer session for the Organizers.There were 96 registered participants from 13 countries. The online XXII Conference of PhD Students and Young Scientists was conducted using the Zoom meeting platform with commemorative screen shots taken. By tradition two competitions, for the best oral presentation and for the best poster were held. The award for the best oral presentation was given ex aequo to Julia Tiganj (TH Georg Agricola University of Applied Sciences, Germany) for the presentation entitled Post-mining goes international: hurdles to climate neutrality using the example of China and Oksana Khomiak, Jörg Benndorf (TU Bergakademie Freiberg, Germany) for the presentation entitled Spectral analysis of ore hyperspectral images at different stages of the mining value chain, whereas the best poster was awarded to Adam Wróblewski, Jacek Wodecki, Paweł Trybała, Radosław Zimroz (Wrocław University of Science and technology, Poland) for the poster entitled Large underground structures geometry evaluation based on point cloud data analysis.List of Scientific Committee, Organizing Committee, Editorial Team are available i this pdf.

8.
Applied Economics ; 2023.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2327893

ABSTRACT

Today, Ukraine find itself in a very difficult situation, on the one hand, the already unstable economy has just begun to recover after the coronavirus crisis;on the other hand, it is suffering colossal losses from Russian aggression. The article examines the current economic and ecological state of Ukraine, considering the influence of such drastic external factors as a military invasion with the aim of determining the prerequisites for the formation of an effective social and environmental policy and developing approaches to the improvement and stabilization of the national economy. To achieve the goals of the article, have been used intersectoral balance and in particular economic impact analysis (EIA), which was conducted on the example of the Ukrainian agricultural sector, because it is one of the three driving forces of its economy. The results of the study showed the scenarios of possible changes and their consequences for the economy of the state as a whole, and in the future can be used for study in order to develop new and improve existing methods of solving socio-economic problems at the national level and preserving natural capital, as one of the key elements on path to sustainable development.

9.
Anesthesia and Analgesia ; 136(4 Supplement 1):51, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2322066

ABSTRACT

Background: Within the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, literature has found worsened patient outcomes and increased virus transmissibility associated with reduced air quality. This factor, a structural social determinant of health (SDOH), has shown great promise as a link between air quality and patient outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Researching SDOH within our patient populations is often difficult and limited by poor documentation or extensive questionnaires or surveys. The use of demographic data derived from the electronic health record (EHR) to more accurately represent SDOH holds great promise. The use of area-level determinants of health outcomes has been shown to serve as a good surrogate for individual exposures. We posit that an area level measure of air quality, the county-level Air Quality Index (AQI), will be associated with disease worsening in intensive care unit (ICU) patients being treated for COVID-19. Method(s): We will calculate AQI using a combination of open-source records available via the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and manual calculations using geospatial informatics systems (GIS) methods. Subjects will be identified as adult (> 18 years) patients admitted to Vanderbilt University Medical Center's ICUs between January 1, 2020, and March 31, 2022 with a positive SARS-CoV-2 laboratory analysis result. We will exclude patients without a home address listed. Patient demographic and hospital data from ICU admission to 28 days following admission will include: age, sex, home address, race, insurance type, primary language, employment status, highest level of education, and hospital course data. Together these will be collated to produce our primary outcome variable of WHO Clinical Progression Scale score. These validated scores range from 0 (uninfected) to 10 (dead) to track clinically meaningful progression of COVID-19 infected patients. Our AQI variable will be obtained from the EPA available county-level monitoring station spatial data combined with open-source state/county center point spatial data. These data contain historic cataloguing to determine air quality at both specific time points and averages over time. Where a county's average yearly AQI is not available due to lack of a monitoring station, we will use spatial data tools to calculate an average based on data from nearby stations. We will utilize yearly averages of AQI in the year prior to COVID-19 diagnosis to describe overall impact of air quality on patients' respiratory outcomes as opposed to single day exposures. Linkage of patient data to AQI database will be performed using patient addresses. Discussion(s): By combining area level data with electronic health record (EHR) data, we will be positioned to understand the contribution of environmental and social determinants of health on patient outcomes. Our long-term goal is to elucidate which social and environmental determinants of health are associated with worse outcomes from COVID-19 and other respiratory viruses, using data extracted from the EHR.

10.
Rect@ ; 23(2):137-161, 2022.
Article in Spanish | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2321699

ABSTRACT

En las últimas décadas, los inversores se han preocupado no sólo de obtener rentabilidad de sus carteras, sino también de casar ese rendimiento con valores éticos relacionados con el mantenimiento del medio ambiente, la responsabilidad social y la gobernanza. Surge así la llamada Inversión Socialmente Responsable, siendo los fondos de inversión socialmente responsables uno de sus instrumentos más importantes. En este trabajo, hemos utilizado el análisis envolvente de datos (DEA) para analizar el impacto del COVID-19 sobre la eficiencia de fondos de inversión socialmente responsables del Reino Unido. Para ello hemos dividido nuestro periodo de estudio en dos: pre-COVID y COVID. De esta forma podremos concluir si hay diferencia respecto a la eficiencia en los fondos según su nivel de sostenibilidad y el periodo analizado. Los resultados obtenidos nos permiten concluir que en el periodo pre-COVID los fondos más eficientes pertenecen al grupo de los de mejor calificación ESG. Si bien este grupo también es el que más se ha visto afectado por la pandemia. Lo contrario se concluye para el grupo de los de menor calificación ESG.Alternate :In recent decades, investors have been concerned not only with obtaining returns on their portfolios, but also with matching these returns with ethical values related to environmental protection, social responsibility and governance. Thus arises the so-called Socially Responsible Investment, being socially responsible mutual funds one of its most important instruments. In this paper, the data envelopment analysis (DEA) has been considered to analyze the impact of COVID-19 on the efficiency of UK socially responsible mutual funds. For this, we have divided our study period into two: pre-COVID and COVID. In this way we will be able to conclude whether there is a difference in the efficiency of the funds according to their level of social responsibility and the analyzed period. The results obtained allow us to conclude that in the pre-COVID period the most efficient funds belong to the group of those with the best ESG rating. Although this group is also the one that has been most affected by the pandemic. The opposite is concluded for the group of those with the lowest ESG rating.

11.
Economic and Social Development: Book of Proceedings ; : 247-258, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2326752

ABSTRACT

The concepts of short agri-food supply chains and circular bioeconemy are complementary and mutually reinforcing, while they may play an important role in sustainability transitions. The elimination of middlemen and the possibilities of forward vertical integration of farmers are the key components ofshort agri-food supply chains, while bioeconomy refers to the sustainable production and use of biological resources stemming from forestry, agriculture, fisheries, and waste streams. The development of closed-loop systems where waste is converted into new resources, lies in the core of circular bioeconomy, which seeks to reduce waste and maximize resource usage. A sustainable and regenerative economy where waste is viewed as a resource and the use of finite resources is decreased is what this strategy seeks to achieve. When combined, short agri-food supply chains and circular bioeconomy can support sustainable economic growth, social advancement, and environmental protection by encouraging local manufacturing, minimizing waste, and developing innovative bio-based goods and procedures. In this article, we examine the benefits which occur in short agri-food supply when they adopt the principles of circular bioeconomy. Also, we examine how can the ideas of the circular bioeconomy be applied to short agri-food supply chains in order to minimize waste and maximize resource usage. In addition, we explore the corresponding difficulties and opportunities for creating bio-based goods and procedures in short agri-food supply chains. Last but not least, we discuss the effects of short agri-food supply chains and the circular bioeconomy on global agri-food systems and how these concepts are connected with issues at stake, such as food security and sustainability.

12.
Human Rights Quarterly ; 45(2):342-345, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2324851
13.
Electronic Green Journal ; - (48):1-25, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2317740

ABSTRACT

According to Riikka Paloniemi and Annukka Vainio (2011), as early as 1992, the United Nations in its international programme dubbed Agenda 21 asserted that young people, who constitute about 30 percent of the world's population, are important stakeholders in achieving sustainable development (398-399). Much momentum has accumulated in the direction of youth activism for the climate and environment. Besides garnering much recognition from the international community as important actors in climate change policy and action, youth-led climate commitment has continued to grow in leaps and bounds. Before the Covid-19 pandemic, this movement mobilized millions of school-going children/youths across many cities throughout the world to skip classes on Fridays and protest, asking their governments and corporate bodies to concretely address the global climate and environmental crises and save their future.2 Greta Thunberg has spoken to world leaders on the need to curb carbon emissions and has addressed the issue of climate change at many high-level gatherings, including COP24, which was held from in December 2018 in Katowice, Poland;the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January 2019 and 2020;the European Economic and Social Committee and the European Commission in February 2019;an audience with Pope Francis at the Vatican in April 2019;and the UK Parliament in Westminster, also in April 2019. [...]the School Strikes for Climate movement has not only caused the resignation of Belgian Environment Minister Joke Schauvliege (who had falsely claimed that children's climate protests were 'set-up') but has also been positively received by key global figures such as UN Secretary General António Guterres, who, following an unprecedented turnout of approximately 1.4 million young protesters in over 120 countries on 15th March 2019, remarked that "the climate strikers should inspire us all to act at the next UN summit".3 Moreover, on 12th April 2019, having witnessed the massive turnout of young protesters the month before, twenty-two renowned scientists across the globe published a letter in the journal Science acknowledging that "the concerns of young protesters are justified" and pledging their support for the youth strikes for climate (Hagedorn et al. 2019, 139-140).

14.
Electronics ; 12(9):2048, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2317166

ABSTRACT

The motivation for study derives from the requirements imposed by the European Union Corporate Sustainability Reporting Directive, which increases the sustainability reporting scope and the need for companies to use emerging digital technologies. The research aim is to evaluate the digital transformation impact of the European Union companies on sustainability reporting expressed through three sustainable performance indicators (economic, social, and ecological) based on a conceptual model. The data were collected from Eurostat for 2011–2021. The study proposes a framework for sustainable performance analysis through linear regression models and structural equations. Additionally, a hierarchy of digitization indicators is created by modeling structural equations, depending on their impact on sustainability performance indicators, which is validated using neural networks. The results indicate that the company's digital transformation indicators positively influence economic and social performance and lead to an improved environmental protection (a decrease in pollution), proving the established hypotheses' validity. The proposed model can be the basis for companies to create their dashboards for analyzing and monitoring sustainable performance. This research can be the basis of other studies, having a significant role in establishing economic and environmental strategies to stimulate an increase of companies that carry out sustainability reporting.

15.
Electronics ; 12(9):2025, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2316777

ABSTRACT

The ocean holds abundant resources, but the utilization of those resources for the marine economy presents a complex and dynamic industrial situation. Exploring sustainable development in this industry is of practical value, as it involves the rational use of marine resources while protecting the environment. This study provides an innovative review of the current application status of Digital Twins Technology (DTT) in various sectors of the marine industry, including the ship-building industry (SBI), Offshore Oil and Gas Industry, marine fishery, and marine energy industry. The findings reveal that DTT offers robust support for full life cycle management (LCM) in SBI, including digital design, intelligent processing, operation, and error management. Furthermore, this work delves into the challenges and prospects of DTT application in the marine industry, aiming to provide reference and direction for intelligent systems in the industry and guide the rational development and utilization of marine resources in the future.

16.
Climate Change Economics ; 14(1), 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2316674

ABSTRACT

Under the pressure of economic uncertainty and environmental protection in the post-COVID-19 era, achieving a new round of employment dividends has become one practical choice. Using the panel data of 30 Chinese provinces from 2007 to 2019, this study estimates the employment outcomes of carbon ETS pilots based on the difference-in-differences model. The findings of this study indicate the following: (1) Carbon ETS pilots can positively increase employment scales with an average effect of 7.12%. (2) This promoting effect will become more significant in provinces with high education levels, provinces with high average wages, and eastern region provinces. But there is no obvious difference between gender. (3) This positive effect can be transferred and enhanced by market competition and energy consumption. At the crossroads of green economic recovery, it will be greatly beneficial to formulate the national carbon market development roadmap under the carbon neutrality strategy.

17.
Frontiers in Environmental Science ; 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2316545

ABSTRACT

How to accelerate the clean use of fossil energy and promote the transformation and upgrading of energy structure is an important challenge commonly faced by countries around the world. In the post-Covid-19 era, the uncertainties faced by countries around the world are increasing and the frequency of policy adjustments in various countries is accelerating. The discharge of pollution by enterprises is significantly impacted by environmental regulatory policies. Under the carbon neutrality goal, the uncertainty of environmental policy caused by multiple political factors can directly influence the decisions made by businesses and residents, in turn, affect their confidence and expectations. However, researchers have given limited attention to measuring the environmental policy uncertainty index (EPUI). In this paper, we select 460 newspapers from the China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) newspaper database from 2001 to 2016 and use the text analysis method to directly construct China's national, provincial, and prefecture-level EPUI. The results show that China's EPUI has obvious stage characteristics and regional characteristics. By applying the Chinese city-level EPUI to the field of urban pollution reduction, we have obtained an important finding that when urban environmental policy uncertainty increases by 1%, urban industrial sulfur dioxide emission decreases by about 0.145%, and carbon dioxide emission decreases by about 0.053%. We believe that this is due to an increase in environmental policy uncertainty inhibiting the development and scaling of secondary industries.

18.
Insight Turkey ; 24(2):25-38, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2315293

ABSTRACT

The world politics of the 2020s seems to consist of two realities: People are concerned about an ecological catastrophe, as tion kills and climate change threatens societies. The focus of this article is to discuss climate change, and state politics in the Arctic in the context of the two realities. Behind this is the assumption that climate change mitigation is a challenge to state politics and national security. The commentary assumes that, although in world politics, there is a new (East-West) great power rivalry with its related conflicts, no armed conflicts appear in the Arctic, but environmental degradation and rapid climate change still threaten the people. The study firstly analyses how environmental issues came onto the political agenda of States, in particular, that of the Arctic states;secondly, it discusses huge investment packages and great power rivalry as substitutes for climate change mitigation, revealing the political inability of states;thirdly, it examines the Arctic from the point of view of functional cooperation on environmental protection, and that on science;and finally, it concludes what has possibly gone wrong in state politics related to the environment, and could be taken as the biggest challenge.

19.
International Food and Agribusiness Management Review ; 25(5):757-770, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2314603

ABSTRACT

Environmental, social and economic perspectives, derived from the sustainability approach and present within by the resilience concept, are integral parts of food systems. At the same time they are clearly articulated within the EU farm-to-fork (F2F) strategy referring to building up resilience to possible future crises as diseases and pandemics. The aim of this paper is to investigate resilience in the food sector referring to its selected environmental, social and economic dimensions, which in fact rely on each other and cannot be separated, simply because of the character of food system itself (work with living organisms, soil, within natural environment, etc. done by people for business purposes). The issue of resilience in the food sector must be considered multidimensionally. In this approach, the basic direction of activities should be the one focused on the resilience approach, both in environmental protection and society. For a harmonious combination of these activities, it is also necessary to look at economic perspective of food system and entire rural livelihoods (e.g. income and employment diversification). Considering the last shocks discussed (COVID-19, war in Ukraine, drought, embargo on grain exports from Russia, rising inflation), a difficult situation on the food market can be expected in the nearest future, which makes the concept of resilience in the food sector even more relevant than it has been so far.

20.
Sustainability ; 15(9):7596, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2313672

ABSTRACT

Environmental consciousness is linked to pro-environmental consumption behavior;however, the consequences of variations in the level of environmental consciousness have not been fully investigated. Therefore, we evaluated differences in individualism, collectivism, materialism, willingness to pay (WTP) for environmental protection, and pro-environmental consumption between groups with varying levels of environmental consciousness. After evaluating the factors that differentiate these groups, we identified the determinants of pro-environmental consumption for each group. For the study, an online survey was conducted, including 472 adults aged 20–69 years. Groups with low and high levels of environmental consciousness differed significantly with respect to all factors except individualism. The group with a high environmental consciousness exhibited higher collectivism, WTP for environmental protection, and pro-environmental consumption behavior, and lower materialism than the group with a low environmental consciousness. For the group with low environmental consciousness, collectivism was the main factor affecting pro-environmental consumption behavior (i.e., purchase, use, and disposal). In the group with high environmental consciousness, WTP for environmental protection and collectivism were the main determinants of pro-environmental consumption behavior. These results provide a basis for a systematic approach to improve pro-environmental consumption behavior based on environmental consciousness.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL