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1.
Nutrients ; 14(21)2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2200560

ABSTRACT

ß-Hydroxy-ß-methylbutyrate (HMB), a leucine metabolite, can increase skeletal muscle size and function. However, HMB may be less effective at improving muscle function in people with insufficient Vitamin D3 (25-OH-D < 30 ng/mL) which is common in middle-aged and older adults. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that combining HMB plus Vitamin D3 (HMB + D) supplementation would improve skeletal muscle size, composition, and function in middle-aged women. In a double-blinded fashion, women (53 ± 1 yrs, 26 ± 1 kg/m2, n = 43) were randomized to take placebo or HMB + D (3 g Calcium HMB + 2000 IU D per day) during 12 weeks of sedentary behavior (SED) or resistance exercise training (RET). On average, participants entered the study Vitamin D3 insufficient while HMB + D increased 25-OH-D to sufficient levels after 8 and 12 weeks. In SED, HMB + D prevented the loss of arm lean mass observed with placebo. HMB + D increased muscle volume and decreased intermuscular adipose tissue (IMAT) volume in the thigh compared to placebo but did not change muscle function. In RET, 12-weeks of HMB + D decreased IMAT compared to placebo but did not influence the increase in skeletal muscle volume or function. In summary, HMB + D decreased IMAT independent of exercise status and may prevent the loss or increase muscle size in a small cohort of sedentary middle-aged women. These results lend support to conduct a longer duration study with greater sample size to determine the validity of the observed positive effects of HMB + D on IMAT and skeletal muscle in a small cohort of middle-aged women.


Subject(s)
Cholecalciferol , Muscle Strength , Humans , Middle Aged , Female , Aged , Cholecalciferol/pharmacology , Dietary Supplements , Muscle, Skeletal , Double-Blind Method
2.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 9: 837420, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198965

ABSTRACT

Background: Evidence increasingly suggested that impaired respiratory function remained in about 40% of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) after discharge, jeopardizing their activities of daily living and quality of life (QoL) in a long term. Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) can improve exercise capacity and QoL in individuals with chronic lung disease; however, evidence on the effect of PR for patients with post-COIVD-19 was scarce. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis to evaluate the effect of PR on lung impairment for patients with post-COVID-19. Methods: Five databases were searched for all the published trials of PR for patients with post-COVID-19 from 2019 to October 2021. Data were extracted using a standardized form. The risks of bias of included studies were assessed using the Cochrane risk of the bias assessment tool. Data were synthesized where possible; otherwise, qualitative analysis was done. Results: Among 6,000 retrieved studies, 3 studies with 233 patients after COVID-19 were included. The pooled estimate of PR effect on 6-min walk test (6-MWT) (50.41, 95% CI 34.34 to 66.48; p < 0.0001) was in favor of the experiment group with clinical importance. It is found that PR could improve the symptom of dyspnea and QoL; however, its effect on pulmonary function test was inconsistent across studies. The risk of bias of included studies varied, with major concerns on the risk of blinding of participants and interventions performers. Conclusion: The review showed that PR could improve exercise capacity measured by 6-MWT among patients with mild-to-moderate lung impairment after COVID-19. The interpretation of effects on lung function, dyspnea, and QoL should be cautious due to inadequate and conflicting data reported across studies. Systematic Review Registration: https://www.crd.york.ac.uk/prospero/display_record.php?ID=CRD42021289562, identifier: CRD42021289562.

3.
Healthcare ; 11(1):84, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2199991

ABSTRACT

Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that leads to a great deterioration in the quality of life. Objective: We aimed to assess the effectiveness of two individual programs, one based on transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) and another based on the effect of physical exercise on fatigue and quality of life in patients with MS. Methods: A total of 12 patients with relapsing–remitting and progressive secondary MS participated. Fatigue and quality of life were assessed before and after intervention. The exercise program and tDCS were carried out over a 4-week period, with a washout period of 5 months. Results: The results show significant improvements in the different quality of life subscales after the application of tDCS, activities of daily living (r = 0.625;p = 0.037) (g = 0.465), psychological well-being (r = 0.856;p = 0.004) (g = 0.727) and coping (r = 0.904;p = 0.18) (g = 0.376), and in those after the application of exercise, activities of daily living (r = 0.853;p = 0.003) (g = 0.570) and psychological well-being (r = 0.693;p = 0.041) (g = 0.417). After the application of both therapies, more than 50% of the subjects did not have a positive fatigue score on the MFIS scale. Conclusion: The major findings suggest that the application of both therapies produces a beneficial effect with significant improvements in the quality of life of this sample.

4.
Healthcare ; 11(1):42, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2199990
5.
Cancers ; 15(1):34, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2199797

ABSTRACT

Simple SummaryOperation Phalco is an experimental training protocol for breast cancer survivors implemented through a network of oncologists, sports medicine physicians and kinesiologists. The aim of this research is to evaluate the effects of an online adapted physical activity protocol with respect to a usual care on functional capacity, fatigue and quality of life of breast cancer patients. The protocol was structured by taking into account both cancer-related issues and the presence of comorbidities detected in the enrolled patients. For this reason, the patients recruited in the oncology centers of Rome and Verona were divided into three risk levels based on the risk stratification carried out by a sports medicine physician during a medical examination. The results evidenced the positive impact of a well-adapted physical activity on breast cancer patients' quality of life, suggesting that this program should be included as early as possible in the cancer patient's care process.The international literature emphasizes the importance of physical activity (PA) in the first steps after cancer surgery. The regular practice of physical exercise causes positive adaptations on several functional capacities, with positive consequences on patients' quality of life. This project aims to evaluate the effect of a post-operative training protocol, structured by taking into account both cancer-related issues and the presence of comorbidities, on functional capacities and quality of life of breast cancer survivors. Therefore, it was necessary to create a synergy between oncologists (referring physicians), sport medicine physicians (risk stratification and exercise prescription) and kinesiologists (trainers). Thirty-five post-surgery BC patients decided on a voluntary basis to attend an online Adapted PA (APA) protocol for 4 months, twice a week (APA Group) or Usual Care Group (UC Group). Functional capacity of the APA Group significantly increased, by 13.1% (p = 0.000), whereas perceived exertion decreased by 19.7% (p = 0.020). In the same group, the general health evaluated through the questionnaire EORTC-QLQ-C30 increased (p = 0.050). No differences were found in the UC Group. Operation Phalco, creating a network between oncologists, sports medicine physicians and kinesiologists, confirms the importance of structuring a post-operative path where APA should be included as early as possible in the cancer patient care.

6.
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems ; 6, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199607

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, which began in 2019, has far-reaching ramifications, including economic losses and health challenges that still affect various parts of the world. During our review, we learned that the entire world is working to stop the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak. We explore ways that may lower the danger of SARS-CoV-2 contamination and useful strategies to avoid the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 spreading through food. While hygienic protocols are required in the food supply sector, cleaning, disinfection, and the avoidance of cross-contamination across food categories and other related goods at different stages of the manufacturing process remain especially important because the virus can survive for long periods of time on inert materials such as food packaging. Furthermore, personal hygiene (regular washing and disinfection), wearing gloves and using masks, garments, and footwear dedicated to maintaining hygiene provide on-site safety for food sector personnel, supply chain intermediaries, and consumers. Restrictions imposed in response to the pandemic (e.g., closure of physical workplaces, canteens, cafes, restaurants, schools, and childcare institutions), changes in household grocery shopping frequency, individuals' perceived risk of COVID-19, income losses due to the pandemic, and sociodemographic factors are among the factors. The conclusions drawn from this study consider the implications of healthy diets, food system resilience, behavior change, and nutritional imbalance for policymakers and food supply chain participants, as well as the antimicrobial effects of vitamins and nutrients. During a public health crisis, people should eat less, necessitating preventive policies and nutritional advice to deal with this.

7.
Frontiers in public health ; 10:1017479, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2199490

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the association between poor visual acuity, the use of digital devices and physical activity (PA) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method(s): A total of 327,646 Chinese children and adolescents were included in the analysis using a cluster random sampling method;this is a case-control study, of those 144,708 children and adolescents with poor visual acuity were included in the case group, while 182,938 who did not have poor visual acuity were included in the control group. A logistic regression model was used to assess the contribution of PA and the use of digital devices to poor visual acuity. Result(s): A total of 144,708 children and adolescents experienced poor visual acuity during the COVID-19 pandemic;54.8% were male, and 55.2% live in rural areas. Compared to controls, children and adolescents with poor visual acuity exhibited more time for the use of digital devices (4.51 +/- 2.44 vs. 3.79 +/- 2.34 for cases and controls, respectively;P < 0.001) and PA (3.07 +/- 0.92 vs. 2.85 +/- 1.00 for cases and controls, respectively;P < 0.001). During the COVID-19 pandemic, risk factors related to poor visual acuity among children and adolescents included the use of digital devices (OR 1.135;95% CI 1.132-1.139), and PA (OR 1.269;95%CI 1.259-1.278). The results of interaction analysis show that for children and adolescents aged 12 to 17, the positive association between the use of digital devices and poor visual acuity decreased. The interaction effect between PA and digital devices is 0.987. Conclusion(s): Children and adolescents were at risk of poor visual acuity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Extended use of the digital devices increased the risk of poor visual acuity, especially for children aged 6-11 years. But the risk of poor visual acuity among children and adolescents decreases as the time spent on PA increases. Copyright © 2022 Zheng, Shi, Ou, Xue, Xu, Xue, Zhang, Liang, Huang, Qin and Zhang.

8.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10:1009703, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2199482

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Safety measures implemented to address the COVID-19 pandemic have had a profound impact on the mobility of people worldwide We synthesized the global evidence on physical activity (PA) participation before and during the pandemic.

9.
Frontiers in Psychology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199208

ABSTRACT

IntroductionParental burnout is a mental state that combines long-term stress and depression with an overwhelming feeling of parental pressure. MethodsIn Study 1, we conducted a web-based survey of 390 Chinese parents (75.1% mothers) with children aged 1-18 years old (Mean age = 9.05 years, SD = 5.098) to examine the parental burnout during the COVID-19 global pandemic and to identify associated factors during the national lockdown. In Study 2, eight weeks of resilience intervention was administered to 20 parents to compare parental resilience and parental burnout before and after the intervention. ResultsThe correlational study showed that greater parental burnout occurred in parents with the lower educational levels and in parents of school-age children. The risk factors of parental burnout included household burden and children's interference with work;while protective factors included living materials, family atmosphere, and parent-child meeting frequency. The intervention study showed the effectiveness of meditation intervention in resilience and parental burnout, suggesting that meditation training can effectively increase parental resilience and reduce parental burnout. DiscussionThese findings demonstrate the risk and protective factors associated with parental burnout during the COVID-19 lockdown and highlight the positive role of meditation in mitigating parental burnout.

10.
Frontiers in Physiology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199129

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic and imposed restrictions influenced athletic societies, although current knowledge about mild COVID-19 consequences on cardiopulmonary and physiologic parameters remains inconclusive. This study aimed to assess the impact of mild COVID-19 inflection on cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) performance among endurance athletes (EA) with varied fitness level. Materials and Methods: 49 EA (n(male) = 43, n(female) = 6, mean age = 39.94 +/- 7.80 yr, height = 178.45 cm, weight = 76.62 kg;BMI = 24.03 kgm(-2)) underwent double treadmill or cycle ergometer CPET and body analysis (BA) pre- and post-mild COVID-19 infection. Mild infection was defined as: (1) without hospitalization and (2) without prolonged health complications lasting for > 14 days. Speed, power, heart rate (HR), oxygen uptake (VO2), pulmonary ventilation, blood lactate concentration (at the anaerobic threshold (AT)), respiratory compensation point (RCP), and maximum exertion were measured before and after COVID-19 infection. Pearson's and Spearman's r correlation coefficients and Student t-test were applied to assess relationship between physiologic or exercise variables and time. Results: The anthropometric measurements did not differ significantly before and after COVID-19. There was a significant reduction in VO2 at the AT and RCP (both p < 0.001). Pre-COVID-19 VO2 was 34.97 +/- 6.43 ml kg.min(-1), 43.88 +/- 7.31 ml kg.min(-1) and 47.81 +/- 7.81 ml kg.min(-1) respectively for AT, RCP and maximal and post-COVID-19 VO2 was 32.35 +/- 5.93 ml kg.min(-1), 40.49 +/- 6.63 ml kg.min(-1) and 44.97 +/- 7.00 ml kg.min(-1) respectively for AT, RCP and maximal. Differences of HR at AT (p < 0.001) and RCP (p < 0.001) was observed. The HR before infection was 145.08 +/- 10.82 bpm for AT and 168.78 +/- 9.01 bpm for RCP and HR after infection was 141.12 +/- 9.99 bpm for AT and 165.14 +/- 9.74 bpm for RCP. Time-adjusted measures showed significance for body fat (r = 0.46, p < 0.001), fat mass (r = 0.33, p = 0.020), cycling power at the AT (r = -0.29, p = 0.045), and HR at RCP (r = -0.30, p = 0.036). Conclusion: A mild COVID-19 infection resulted in a decrease in EA's CPET performance. The most significant changes were observed for VO2 and HR. Medical Professionals and Training Specialists should be aware of the consequences of a mild COVID-19 infection in order to recommend optimal therapeutic methods and properly adjust the intensity of training.

11.
Orthopedic Research and Reviews ; 14:477-485, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2197693

ABSTRACT

Purpose: During the COVID-19 quarantine period, most outdoor activities and events were banned, resulting in a decrease in physical activity (PA) and prolonged sitting (PS) time, which are significant factors in the development of lower back pain (LBP). The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between physical inactivity and daily sitting time during quarantine with LBP among the Saudi Arabian population.Patients and Methods: In this cross-sectional study conducted at King Abdulaziz University Hospital, 288 participants were recruited using an online, self-administered questionnaire in Arabic. It consisted of 21 questions assessing back pain, PA, and daily sitting time before and during quarantine. The main outcome measures included demographics, low back pain levels, daily sitting time, and PA level.Results: The participants consisted of 236 women and 52 men aged 18-65 years. During quarantine, 74% of participants sat most of the time and did not exercise or performed less exercise. Furthermore, almost half of the participants did not engage in PA both before and during the quarantine. There was an increase in the prevalence of LBP, with only 44.8% of participants presenting with LBP before quarantine and 59.4% having it during quarantine. A statistically significant association was found between daily sitting time and LBP (P=0.007) and PA and LBP (P=0.045) during quarantine. However, there was no significant association between age and painkiller use for LBP (P=0.251).Conclusion: Our study highlights the relationship of physical inactivity and PS during quarantine with an increase in the prevalence and intensity of LBP. The limitations of the study include the use of self-reports, a small sample size, and unequal survey distribution. A well-distributed survey with a larger sample size is necessary to obtain an adequate representation of the entire Saudi population.

12.
Hormone Molecular Biology and Clinical Investigation ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2197323

ABSTRACT

Sedentary life style separated during COVID-19 pandemic. Patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are vulnerable with sedentary life style. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 8 weeks of combined and high intensity interval training (HIIT) on C Reactive protein, galectin-3, leptin, fibrinogen and insulin resistance index in coronary heart disease after COVID-19. Thirty-six cardiovascular patients (55.14 +/- 1.4 years, 78.6 +/- 5.1 kg) were divided into three groups of combined exercise (n=13), HIIT (n=12) and control group (n=11). Combined exercise consisted of aerobic (4 weeks) and aerobic + HIIT exercise (4 weeks), three sessions per weeks. The protocol of the HIIT group included performing high intensity interval training, three sessions per weeks for 8 weeks. Blood samples were taken 24 h before the first training session and 48 h after the last training. C Reactive protein (CRP), galectin-3, leptin, fibrinogen measured with ELISA kit. CRP, galectin-3 and fibrinogen decreased significantly after 8 weeks of combined training and HIIT (compare to pre-Test). Also, insulin resistance index after 8 weeks of combined exercise showed a significant decrease compare to pre-Test (p<0.05). After 8 weeks, CRP, galectin-3 and insulin resistance significantly decreased compare to control group (p<0.05). In the patient with CVD, combined exercise training may be more effective than HIIT in reducing metabolic and heart risk factors after an epidemic such as COVID-19. However, change of leptin need to more studies. Copyright © 2022

13.
PLoS ONE [Electronic Resource] ; 17(12):e0279468, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197103

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has been linked with increased reports of depression, anxiety, and stress. Stay-at-home directives during the pandemic-imposed lifestyle changes, including eating and sedentary behaviors that can further undermine mental health outcomes. Physical activity is a vital component for metabolic health, as well as for mental health by serving as an active coping strategy to manage stress and promote resilience. Global reports of increased sedentary leisure behaviors have been associated with feelings of depression and anxiety, but it unclear whether the relationship between physical activity and depression or anxiety persists over time. In this longitudinal study, we investigated (i) whether physical activity at the onset of the pandemic was related to feelings of depression or anxiety over time and (ii) whether this relationship was mediated by stress appraisals during the pandemic. We surveyed 319 adults living in Canada or the United States to assess physical activity, stress appraisals, and mental health outcomes at two time points over a 6-month period. We found a reduction in leisure-time physical activity that was linked to subsequent feelings of depression. Furthermore, individuals with lower levels of physical activity were more likely to appraise their COVID-19 situation to be uncontrollable at pandemic onset and as the pandemic continued. Stress appraisals of threat and uncontrollability were also positively related to feelings of depression. Modelling these three factors together showed that appraising a situation as uncontrollable mediated the relationship between initial physical activity and subsequent depressive feelings. Although correlational, these data highlight the protective role of leisure-time physical activity against worsened mental health outcomes during periods of prolonged stress.

14.
PLoS ONE [Electronic Resource] ; 17(12):e0279355, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2197089

ABSTRACT

In 2020, schools in England closed for six months due to COVID-19, resulting in children being home-schooled. There is limited understanding about the impacts of this on children's mental and physical health and their education. Therefore, we explored how families coped with managing these issues during the school closures. We conducted 30 qualitative interviews with parents of children aged 18 years and under (who would usually be in school) between 16 and 21 April 2020. We identified three themes and eight sub-themes that impacted how families coped whilst schools were closed. We found that family dynamics, circumstances, and resources (Theme 1), changes in entertainment activities and physical movement (Theme 2) and worries about the COVID-19 pandemic (Theme 3) impacted how well families were able to cope. A key barrier to coping was struggles with home-schooling (e.g., lack of resources and support from the school). However, parents being more involved in their children's personal development and education were considered a benefit to home-schooling. Managing the lack of entertainment activities and in-person interactions, and additional health worries about loved ones catching COVID-19 were challenges for families. Parents reported adverse behaviour changes in their children, although overall, they reported they were coping well. However, pre-existing social and educational inequalities are at risk of exacerbation. Families with more resources (e.g., parental supervision, access to green space, technology to facilitate home-schooling and no special educational needs) were better able to cope when schools were closed. On balance, however, families appeared to be able to adapt to the schools being closed. We suggest that policy should focus on supporting families to mitigate the widening health and educational gap between families with more and less resources.

15.
PLoS Global Public Health ; 2(11), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2196835

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the impact of the 2020 COVID-19 lockdown on community-dwelling older adults attending a community-based exercise program to seek strategies to keep them active during self-isolated situations. A two-phase mixed methods approach included a survey followed by in-person focus groups. Forty-eight participants, with 32 starting a community-based exercise program before the lockdown and 16 joining the program after the lockdown, completed a questionnaire survey about physical activities before and during the lockdown. This was followed by three focus groups (26 participants in total) to identify factors influencing physical activity behaviours found in the survey. The survey found that the COVID-19 lockdown had varied impact on exercise adherence of the older adults: 43% of the participants exercised less during the lockdown than pre-lockdown, but 26% exercised more. Interestingly, among the participants approximately 80% still achieved the recommended physical activity level by the WHO during the lockdown. The focus groups revealed that exercise behaviours before the lockdown directly affected the behaviours during the lockdown. Participants' recognition of the support from trustworthy people also influenced their motivation to perform exercises in an isolated environment. Remote exercise programs, such as digital and printed exercise materials, were found beneficial for the participants only when they came from the people the older adults trusted through their previous experience (i.e., the program). A sense of belonging to the exercise group was also essential for the participants to achieve self-managed exercise. It was concluded that older adults need connections to an exercise group and a trustworthy exercise instructor who could continuously support them to be physically active in isolated situations such as lockdowns, in addition to exercise knowledge and a better understanding of the benefits of exercise.

16.
Trials ; 24(1):39, 2023.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2196415

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic remains ongoing, with a significant number of survivors who have experienced moderate to severe clinical conditions and who have suffered losses of great magnitude, especially in functional capacity, triggering limitations to daily autonomy and quality of life. Among the possibilities of intervention for disease rehabilitation, physical exercise training stands out, which can benefit several health outcomes and favours the adoption of healthier behaviours. Therefore, the aim of the study will be to analyse the effects of physical training on the functional, clinical, morphological, behavioural and psychosocial status in adults and the elderly following COVID-19 infection. METHODS: A randomised controlled clinical trial is to be conducted in parallel, with the experimental group undergoing an intervention involving a multicomponent physical rehabilitation programme, carried out at the Sports Center in partnership with the Academic Hospital of the Federal University of Santa Catarina, in Florianópolis, Brazil. Participants will be adults and the elderly, of both sexes, in a post-COVID-19-infection state, who were hospitalised during the infection. The intervention will have a total duration of 24 weeks and will include a multicomponent physical training programme, which will have gradual progression in frequency, duration and intensity over time. Regarding the outcomes, before, at the 12th and after 24 weeks of intervention, functional (primary outcome = functional index of aerobic capacity), clinical, morphological, behavioural and psychosocial outcomes will be assessed. DISCUSSION: This study will contribute to a greater understanding of the safety, adherence and benefits of physical training in the rehabilitation of post-COVID-19 patients. The results of this study will be disseminated through presentations at congresses, workshops, peer-reviewed publications and local and international conferences, especially with a view to proposing a post-COVID-19 rehabilitation care protocol. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ReBEC, RBR-10y6jhrs . Registered on 22 February 2022. 2015.

17.
Trials [Electronic Resource] ; 23(1):1052, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196411

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and associated social distancing regulations have led to an increased risk of social isolation and physical inactivity, particularly among older adults. The benefits of physical activity for reducing fall risk and improving mood and mental functioning have been well documented. The aim of this trial is to investigate the effect of the MovingTogether programme on psychological distress (primary outcome) and physical activity, social capital, cognition, concern about falling, loneliness, physical functioning, quality of life and physical activity enjoyment (secondary outcomes).

18.
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition & Physical Activity ; 19(1):157, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2196332

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Partnering with a public transport (PT) provider, state government, and local government, the single-blinded randomised controlled trial, trips4health, investigated the impact of PT use incentives on transport-related physical activity (PA) in Tasmania, Australia. The intervention involved 16-weeks of incentives (bus trip credits) for achieving weekly PT use targets, supported by weekly text messages. This study objective was to conduct a process evaluation of the COVID-19 disrupted trips4health study.

19.
Bmc Nursing ; 21(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2196248

ABSTRACT

BackgroundNurse managers play a pivotal role in quality patient care and staff satisfaction and retention. An overwhelming amount of work tasks and responsibilities might result in their sleep problems which are expected to aggravate in the context of the COVID-19, thereby affecting their overall health and work quality. However, little attention has been paid to sleep quality among nurse managers. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of sleep disorders among nurse managers and identify related factors of sleep quality during regular prevention and control of the COVID-19 pandemic in China. MethodsThis cross-sectional online survey was conducted in 14 hospitals on a sample of 327 nurse managers in China. Participants were invited to complete the general demographic questionnaire, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Simplified Coping Style Questionnaire (SCSQ). Multiple linear regression analysis was used to explore the influencing factors of sleep quality among nurse managers. ResultsIn this study, 43.7% of nurse managers suffered from sleep disorders. Active coping style and frequent exercise were positive factors that could influence nurse managers' sleep quality, while passive coping style and age over 41 years old were negative predictors, collectively accounting for 52.0% of the variance of sleep quality. ConclusionsThe issue of sleep disorders among nurse managers during regular epidemic prevention and control period is underscored. Coping style and demographic factors including age and frequency of exercise can significantly affect nurse managers' sleep quality. Healthcare administrators should pay more attention to nurse managers' sleep disorders and implement targeted strategies based on influencing factors to ensure their sleep quality.

20.
Therapeutic Advances in Urology ; 14:3-4, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2195426

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Simulated training in Pediatric Surgery/Urology is gaining significance due to the following reasons: (a) being a specialty of rare diseases affects individual surgeon's exposure to index cases;(b) subspecialty areas are not universally accessible;and (c) Covid-19 affected elective surgery. Consequently, targeted training, via workshops and simulated models, is necessary. Hypospadias is the index case/operation in Pediatric Urology, requiring a spectrum of dissection and reconstruction skills. It is further challenging to revisit and redo, thus sound initial repair is crucial. To date, there has been no successfully utilizable 3D-printed hypospadias model. We hereby present our experience with silicone 3D-printed high-fidelity hypospadias models. Method(s): Overall, 27 trainees from different countries, under the supervision of 15 instructors, completed the training exercise. They were all given a seminar to show the relevant anatomy and eight key steps of the exercise. Each trainee filled a structured assessment form for the quality of the exercise and resemblance to live surgery. Each exercise was evaluated by a trainer on-site, who supervised the activity and two independent assessors through photographs of the cardinal steps. Result(s): In total, 11 (40.7%) trainees had 1-3 years of specialist training experience, 10 (37%) had 4-6 years, and 6 (22.2%) had beyond. Meanwhile, 2 (7.4%) trainees had no hypospadias experience, 16 (59.2%) assisted in procedures or performed steps, 5 (18.5%) performed whole procedures with guidance, and 4 (14.8%) without guidance. The trainees rated each step from unsatisfactory (1/5) to excellent (5/5) for each of the (1) degloving;(2) urethral marking;(3) incision;(4) tubularization;(5) glanuloplasty;(6) dartos layer preparation;(7) preputioplasty, and (8) skin closure. However, 20 (74%) trainees and 15 (100%) instructors judged the model to resemble the anomaly. Meanwhile, 17 (63%) trainees and 13 (86.6%) instructors rated needle penetrability of the material compared to human tissue >= 3/5. In total, 16 (59%) trainees and 13 (86.6%) instructors rated suture holding >= 3/5. Moreover, 11 (73.3%) and 13 (86.6%) instructors rated sutures' evenness and edge cooptation >= 3/5. Conclusion(s): Majority of instructors found this 3D-model able to mediate transferring skills. Trainees reported adequate skill acquisition.

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