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1.
Erciyes Medical Journal ; 44(3):347-349, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1841711

ABSTRACT

Background: Severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus (SARS-CoV) and SARS-CoV-2 might affect the hypothalam-ic-pituitary-adrenal axis. This paper presents a rare case of pituitary insufficiency diagnosed after CoV disease (COVID)-19. Case Report: On December 7, 2020, a 67-year-old male patient presented to the Endocrinology Department of Lokman Hekim University with weakness, weight loss, and abdominal pain lasting for 3 weeks. In his medical history, he had a positive real-time polymerase chain reaction test result for SARS-CoV-2 based on the nasopharyngeal swab analyzed on September 30. Central hypothyroidism, secondary adrenal insufficiency, hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, and a low dehy-droepiandrosterone-sulfate level were detected in the laboratory examinations. Steroid therapy was initiated.

2.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 75(4): 463-470, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841824

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: The aim of this study was to investigate the status of anxiety, quality of work life, and fatigue of healthe care providers in six educational and medical centers of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences in the southwest of Iran in the Covid-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The present study was a cross-sectional study and included the statistical population of healthcare providers in six educational and medical centers of Shahrekord University of Medical Sciences in the southwest of Iran. Using random sampling method, 181 people who had direct involvement with patients with Covid-19 were selected and compared with 261 staff in other wards who had no direct contact with patients with Covid-19. For data collection, demographic information (demographic characteristics questionnaire), Covid-19 Anxiety Questionnaire, quality of work life and Rhoten fatigue questionnaires were used by self-administered online questionnaires. RESULTS: The results showed that the quality of life in both groups decreased and fatigue and anxiety caused by Covid-19 increased, but there was no statistically significant difference between anxiety derived fatigues of personnel involved with Covid-19 with personnel of other wards which were no directly faced Covid-19 patients. Regarding the quality of work life, no significant difference was observed in other components except in the component of human resource development. The results also showed that there was a statistically significant relationship between the level of anxiety caused by Covid-19 with quality of work life and fatigue. CONCLUSION: According to the results of the present study, Covid-19 had a negative effect on physical, mental and various aspects of quality of life of health care staff and led to increased fatigue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Depression/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics , Poland , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(7-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837925

ABSTRACT

Background: Online education is a concept that has been rapidly evolving. The perceptions of online education have been negative by the majority of face-to-face instructors. However, technological advancements have created opportunities to expand in the online education sector. The COVID-19 pandemic has shed light on how unprepared institutions are to transition to online education. As a result, occupational stressors have had a negative impact on online faculty. Educators' burnout rates have almost doubled since the start of the pandemic. While burnout is a known problem in the teaching profession, the effects of burnout in online education are not clear. The purpose of this literature review was to research potential preventative measures and interventions against burnout for faculty teaching in online education. Methods: The review of the literature addressed the following topics: a) the negative effects of faculty burnout, (b) online stressors that increase the risk of faculty burnout in the online environment, and (c) preventative measures and interventions to combat faculty burnout outcomes. Results: A literature review demonstrates that implementing preventative strategies and interventions against faculty burnout in online education is necessary to maintain faculty health and job performance. Most importantly, yoga, physical activity, positive coping strategies, and social support systems effectively mitigate burnout symptomology for faculty. Conclusion: Preventative measures and interventions play a valuable role in reducing burnout symptomologies such as high emotion exhaustion, high depersonalization, and low personal achievement for faculty. Future research is warranted to assess how effective these preventative measures and interventions are for faculty in online education. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
Journal of International Studies ; 15(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835977

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic mainly affected those target groups who, due to the nature of their duties, were unable to isolate themselves. The consequences of such work are psychological tension with various symptoms. In this situation, the formation of a system for localizing its consequences becomes a very important task. Three parts are distinguished: a quantitative assessment of the scale and nature of the pandemic, a quantitative assessment of the need to localize the consequences and the analysis of current system;third, the formation of a monitoring system. The chosen system allows verbal assessments to be transformed into quantitative ones. Based on it, the aggregated values of seven essential signs of psychological stress in the target groups (medical and social workers, police, customs officers, educators, pharmacists, and entrepreneurs) were identified: anxiety (0.80), stress (0.78), aggression (0.63), insomnia (0.62), persistent fatigue (0.61), depression (0.56), sadness (0.49). The application of the methodology allows forming a monitoring system considering the scale of the pandemic impact and the psychological consequences. The mental distress caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has been shown to be characterized by such negative effects as anxiety, stress, insomnia, persistent fatigue, depression and persistent sadness. The study revealed that the major shortcomings in the system developed for localizing the negative effects are as follows: insufficient efforts of state institutions even in the case the negative effects are getting worse;inadequate provision of psychological assistance conditioned by unreasonably high prices and deficient legal framework.

5.
Management Revue ; 32(4):297-301, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835553

ABSTRACT

[...]articles from the special issue are assigned to three categories: (1) New Organization, (2) New Leadership, and (3) New Learning. [...]studies have shown that such arrangements do not necessarily benefit all groups of workers equally (Kossek & Lautsch, 2017) and may come with new challenges like blurring work-life boundaries or protecting leisure time and psychological detachment. [...]New Work arrangements may require new forms of leadership (Banks et al., 2019;Sheninger, 2019). Ute Rademacher, Ulrike Weber, and Cassandra Zinn focus on informal rules and social practices that are established in the work-related use of smartphones. Since professional use of the smartphone can significantly blur the line between work and leisure, communication rules are important to ensure psychological detachment after working hours. Future work may be dedicated to studying these technological developments, which have the potential to spur profound transformations in a wide range of HR and organization processes. [...]the COVID-19 pandemic has provided an unintended global 'field experiment', and new unforeseen issues have emerged, such as the phenomenon of 'Zoom-fatigue', or the prevalence of psychological problems related to social isolation in virtual settings (Brunsbach, Kattenbach & Weber, 2021).

6.
Turk Hijyen ve Deneysel Biyoloji Dergisi ; 79(1):13-24, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1835512

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: During the coronavirus infectious disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, healthcare workers are the occupational group most affected by SARS-CoV-2. Infection of healthcare workers with SARS-CoV-2 poses a potential risk of infection for other healthcare workers, patients and their families. The viral load measure in the sample is determined as the cycle threshold (Ct) with the RT-qPCR method. It has been reported that the RT-qPCR Ct value may be related to the severity and potential contagiousness of the infection. In this study, it was aimed to evaluate the relationships between socio-demographic factors, COVID-19 symptoms and Ct value in SARS-CoV-2 RT-qPCR positive healthcare workers. METHODS: In this study, 300 healthcare workers with positive SARS-CoV-2 RT-qPCR test were included. SARS-CoV-2 RT-qPCR test was performed from nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal swab samples with Bio-speedy SARS-CoV-2 RT-qPCR (Bioeksen, Turkey) kit. The RT-qPCR Ct value results of healthcare staff patients were classified as low, medium and high, socio-demographic characteristics and the risk of viral spread was evaluated. RESULTS: The rate of those who showed at least one symptom among the 300 health personnel included in the study was 88.3% (n=265) and the most common symptoms were muscle-joint pain 39.7%, fatigue 33% and sore throat 30.7%. The median RT-qPCR Ct value was determined as 23.17(19.3-29.4) and Ct value was found to be low (<24.0) in 59% of healthcare personnel. In addition, the Ct value of the personnel working in the administrative units was found to be lower than those working in the COVID-19 polyclinic, service and intensive care unit (p=0.020). Those who had fever and at least one of the COVID-19 symptom (fever, cough, respiratory distress) group had a lower Ct value than those who did not (p=0.008, p=0.019, respectively). When the possible source of transmission was evaluated, it was determined that 22% of the health personnel were infected during patient care, 21% from other health personnel and 23.3% from non-hospital sources. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Our results have shown that most of the SARS-CoV-2 transmission seen in healthcare workers occurs within the hospital, but more viral load is exposed in out-of-hospital contacts. In addition, it has been observed that administrative personnel who do not have contact with patients can be a potential source of transmission. This situation has reaffirmed that PPE usage rules should be followed in order to reduce the risk of transmission in healthcare personnel and that personnel working outside the clinic should follow the mask and distance rules during their contact with their colleagues. It was determined that the Ct value was lower (higher viral load) in the presence of any of the symptoms of fever, cough, respiratory distress and fatigue in healthcare workers. In the presence of these symptoms, PCR testing of healthcare workers and taking necessary isolation measures until the test result is obtained will reduce the possibility of transmission.

7.
Anthropology and Aging ; 42(2):21-35, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835451

ABSTRACT

In Italy, the COVID-19 pandemic and its associated lockdowns have provoked potentially serious short and long-term consequences for older people with serious health conditions as well as their family caregivers. With the closure of adult day-care centres and the suspension of private homecare services, families have needed to rearrange care activities and many are concerned about the situation of their relatives in residential homes. This article examines interpretations of aging and caregiving fatigue during the first period of national lockdown in Emilia-Romagna, Italy. The relation between old age, lockdown, and social isolation, with respect to global ideas and rhetoric, focuses on vulnerability, individual autonomy, and caregiving fatigue. I examine how the representation of the ‘burden’ of caregiving in late age shaped the media depictions, and I analyze it in relation to the meanings of fatigue attached to narrations from family caregivers and the members of a local Alzheimer’s Café. I also focus on the life story of one family caregiver to critique the idealized vision of family care that was reproduced during the pandemic. I argue that the recognition of aging and caregiving fatigue during the lockdown reflected pre-existing normative models and structural inequalities of family care rather than radically altering them.

8.
Women ; 1(4):267, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1834938

ABSTRACT

The modern woman has taken her rightful place in society as a worker, a caregiver, a mother, and a world citizen. However, along with the privileges of these roles comes the great cost of stress and resultant exhaustion and fatigue. Psychosocial, physical, cultural, and disease-related realms of stress act as strands of a web that serve to bind and hinder women with chronic stress. New areas of research, such as exercise intervention, improved social programs (e.g., childcare), and supplementation are constantly evaluated for effectiveness alongside traditional remedies such as exercise. This review will highlight some of the key issues regarding stress in women and explore reports of new treatment modalities in light of the specific requirements of the modern woman.

9.
Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience ; 16, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1834470

ABSTRACT

Although myalgic encephalomyelitis/chronic fatigue syndrome (ME/CFS) has a specific and distinctive profile of clinical features, the disease remains an enigma because causal explanation of its pathobiological matrix is lacking. Several potential disease mechanisms have been identified, including immune abnormalities, inflammatory activation, mitochondrial alterations, endothelial and muscular disturbances, cardiovascular anomalies, and dysfunction of the peripheral and central nervous systems. Yet, it remains unclear whether and how these pathways may be related and orchestrated. Here we explore the hypothesis that a common denominator of the pathobiological processes in ME/CFS may be central nervous system dysfunction due to impaired or pathologically reactive neuroglia (astrocytes, microglia and oligodendrocytes). We will test this hypothesis by reviewing, in reference to the current literature, the two most salient and undisputed features of ME/CFS, and by investigating how these might be linked to dysfunctional neuroglia. From this Review we suggest that the multifaceted pathobiology of ME/CFS could be attributed in a unifying manner to neuroglial dysfunction. Because the two features – post exertional malaise and decreased cerebral blood flow – are now also recognized as central hallmarks in a subset of post-acute sequelae COVID-19 patients, we suggest that our findings may extend to this entity, too.

10.
Front Psychol ; 13: 814109, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834529

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the last 2 weeks of January 2021, Portugal was the worst country in the world in incidence of infections and deaths due to COVID-19. As a result, the pressure on the healthcare system increased exponentially, exceeding its capacities and leaving hospitals in near collapse. This scenario caused multiple constraints, particularly for hospital medical staff. Previous studies conducted at different moments during the pandemic reported that COVID-19 has had significant negative impacts on healthcare workers' psychological health, including stress, anxiety, depression, burnout, post-traumatic stress symptoms, and sleep disturbances. However, there are many uncertainties regarding the professional quality of life of hospital nurses and physicians. To address gaps in previous research on secondary traumatic stress, we focused on healthcare workers working in hospitals affected by a major traumatic event: the third wave of COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to identify the contribution of personal and work-related contextual variables (gender, age, parental status, occupation, years of experience, working with patients affected by COVID-19) on professional quality of life of healthcare workers. METHODS: Cross-sectional study with a web-based questionnaire given to physicians and nurses working in a hospital setting. A total of 853 healthcare professionals (276 physicians and 586 nurses; median age 37 years old) participated in the survey assessing professional quality of life compassion satisfaction, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. Factors of professional quality of life were assessed using regression analysis. RESULTS: Most of the participants showed moderate (80%; n = 684) or high (18%; n = 155) levels of compassion satisfaction, whereas the majority of them experienced moderate levels of burnout (72%; n = 613) and secondary traumatic stress (69%; n = 592). The analyzed variables demonstrated no differences between professionals who were directly or not involved in the care of COVID-19 patients. Parental status was found to be a significant factor in compassion satisfaction. Female gender was significantly associated with more susceptibility to secondary traumatization. Factors that may potentially contribute to burnout include years of professional experience and the number of work hours per week. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has created a new challenge for the healthcare system. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress can lead to medical errors and impact standards of patient care, particularly compromising compassionate care. It is therefore recommended that hospitals develop psychoeducational initiatives to support professionals in dealing with barriers to compassion.

11.
International Journal of Workplace Health Management ; 15(3):359-374, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1831663

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The prevalence and multi-system nature of post-COVID-19 symptoms warrants clearer understanding of their work ability implications within the working age population. An exploratory survey was undertaken to provide empirical evidence of the work-relevant experiences of workers recovering from COVID-19.Design/methodology/approach>A bespoke online survey based on a biopsychosocial framework ran between December 2020 and February 2021. It collected quantitative ratings of work ability and return-to-work status, qualitative responses about return-to-work experiences, obstacles and recommendations, along with views on employer benefits for making accommodations. A sample of 145 UK workers recovering from COVID-19 was recruited via social media, professional networks and industry contacts. Qualitative data was subject to thematic analysis. Participants were mainly from health/social care (50%) and educational settings (14%).Findings>Just over 90% indicated that they had experienced at least some post-COVID-19 symptoms, notably fatigue and cognitive effects. For 55%, symptoms lasted longer than six months. Only 15% had managed a full return-to-work. Of the 88 who provided workability ratings, just 13 and 18% respectively rated their physical and mental workability as good or very good. Difficulties in resuming work were attributed to symptom unpredictability, their interaction with job demands, managing symptoms and demands in parallel, unhelpful attitudes and expectations. Manager and peer support was reported as variable.Originality/value>Workplace health management characterised by flexible long-term collaborative return-to-work planning, supported by more COVID-centric absence policies and organisational cultures, appear pivotal for sustaining the return-to-work of the large segments of the global workforce affected by post-COVID-19 symptoms.

12.
Work ; 2022 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834305

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The easy accessibility of smartphones has led to a fivefold increase in their use. People use smartphones almost anywhere, including during travelling and studying. During the global COVID-19 pandemic, the average smartphone screen time has increased from 2.25 to 4.8 hours per day. In India, smartphone usage increased by 68% , and the average screen time increased from 2.42 to 6.9 hours. This dependency on smartphones has led to smartphone addiction. Inappropriate postures during the prolonged use of smartphones can exert adverse effects such as musculoskeletal disorders, digital eye strain, loss of focus and attention. OBJECTIVES: This study was undertaken to understand the effects of prolonged smartphone utilisation and explored fatigue measurement techniques. METHODS: A total of 130 studies examining the effects of smartphone utilisation published in the previous 10 years were identified from the following databases: IEEE, Science Direct, PubMed, PubMed Central, and Google Scholar are reviewed. This study was conducted from September 2019 to January 2021. RESULTS: One in every four adolescents were prone to smartphone addiction, which causes poor mental health. Moreover, India's research on the effects of excessive smartphone usage is limited. CONCLUSIONS: Studies are required to establish the correlation between fatigue levels and smartphone usage patterns.

13.
Am J Health Syst Pharm ; 2022 Feb 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830988

ABSTRACT

DISCLAIMER: In an effort to expedite the publication of articles related to the COVID-19 pandemic, AJHP is posting these manuscripts online as soon as possible after acceptance. Accepted manuscripts have been peer-reviewed and copyedited, but are posted online before technical formatting and author proofing. These manuscripts are not the final version of record and will be replaced with the final article (formatted per AJHP style and proofed by the authors) at a later time. PURPOSE: Current literature surrounding management of patients with reported ß-lactam allergies focuses on allergy delabeling. Standard clinical decision support tools have not been optimized to be compatible with the currently accepted cross-reaction rate of 1% to 2%. This potentially promotes use of non-ß-lactam antibiotics, which are often not first-line therapy and may carry increased risks. The impact of electronic medical record (EMR) clinical decision support tool optimization on utilization of ß-lactam antibiotics in ß-lactam-allergic patients was evaluated. METHODS: A retrospective pre-post ß-lactam cross-allergy EMR alert suppression quality improvement intervention cohort study of ß-lactam-allergic adult inpatients prescribed antibiotics was conducted. Preintervention baseline data were collected for an initial cohort admitted during September 2018. The intervention, in which clinical decision support rules were updated to display ß-lactam cross-sensitivity allergy alerts only for ß-lactam-allergic patients with documentation of organization-defined high-severity reactions of anaphylaxis, hives, and shortness of breath, was implemented August 20, 2019. The postintervention cohort included patients admitted during September 2019. RESULTS: A 91% increase in the percentage of ß-lactam-allergic patients who received a ß-lactam agent at any time during their admission was noted after the intervention (26.6% vs 51%, P < 0.001). Statistically significant decreases in prescribing of alternative antibiotic classes were seen for fluoroquinolones (decrease from 45.3% to 26%, P < 0.001), aminoglycosides (decrease from 9.4% to 2.9%, P = 0.002), and aztreonam (decrease from 30% to 16.7%, P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: EMR ß-lactam cross-allergy alert optimization consistent with current literature significantly improved the utilization of alternative ß-lactam subclasses, mostly through ß-lactam prescribing as initial therapy in ß-lactam-allergic patients.

14.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-334460

ABSTRACT

Background: The long-term consequences of the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) are likely to be frequent but results hitherto are inconclusive. Therefore, we aimed to summarize the state-of-the-art literature in relation to long COVID symptomatology, using a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational studies. Methods: A systematic search in several databases was carried out up to 12 January 2022 for observational studies reporting the incidence rate of long COVID signs and symptoms divided according to body systems affected and defined using the World Health Organization criteria. Data are reported as incidence and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Several sensitivity and meta-regression analyses were moreover performed. Findings: Among 11,162 papers initially screened, 196 studies were included, consisting of 120,970 participants (mean age: 52.3 years;48.8% females) who were followed-up for a median of six months. The incidence of any long COVID symptomatology was 56.9% (95%CI: 52.2-61.6). General long COVID signs and symptoms were the most frequent (incidence of 31%), digestive issues the less frequent (7.7%). Higher percentage of females moderated the onset of any, neurological, general and cardiovascular long COVID symptomatology, whilst higher mean age was associated with higher incidence of psychiatric, respiratory, general, digestive and skin conditions. The incidence of long COVID symptomatology was different according to continent, age and follow-up length. Interpretation: Long COVID is a common condition in patients who have been infected with SARS-CoV-2, whether symptomatically or asymptomatically, and often regardless of the severity of the acute illness indicating the need for more cohort studies on this topic.

15.
Psychol Med ; : 1-12, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1829890

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Despite the multitude of clinical manifestations of post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 infection (PASC), studies applying statistical methods to directly investigate patterns of symptom co-occurrence and their biological correlates are scarce. METHODS: We assessed 30 symptoms pertaining to different organ systems in 749 adults (age = 55 ± 14 years; 47% female) during in-person visits conducted at 6-11 months after hospitalization due to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), including six psychiatric and cognitive manifestations. Symptom co-occurrence was initially investigated using exploratory factor analysis (EFA), and latent variable modeling was then conducted using Item Response Theory (IRT). We investigated associations of latent variable severity with objective indices of persistent physical disability, pulmonary and kidney dysfunction, and C-reactive protein and D-dimer blood levels, measured at the same follow-up assessment. RESULTS: The EFA extracted one factor, explaining 64.8% of variance; loadings were positive for all symptoms, and above 0.35 for 16 of them. The latent trait generated using IRT placed fatigue, psychiatric, and cognitive manifestations as the most discriminative symptoms (coefficients > 1.5, p < 0.001). Latent trait severity was associated with decreased body weight and poorer physical performance (coefficients > 0.240; p ⩽ 0.003), and elevated blood levels of C-reactive protein (coefficient = 0.378; 95% CI 0.215-0.541; p < 0.001) and D-dimer (coefficient = 0.412; 95% CI 0.123-0.702; p = 0.005). Results were similar after excluding subjects with pro-inflammatory comorbidities. CONCLUSIONS: Different symptoms that persist for several months after moderate or severe COVID-19 may unite within one latent trait of PASC. This trait is dominated by fatigue and psychiatric symptoms, and is associated with objective signs of physical disability and persistent systemic inflammation.

17.
Respir Res ; 23(1): 115, 2022 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822194

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Published studies suggest physical recovery from the COVID-19 is complex, with many individuals experiencing persistent symptoms. There is a paucity of data investigating the longer-term trajectory of physical recovery from COVID-19. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal design was utilised to investigate the impact COVID-19 has on physical functioning at 10-weeks (T1), 6-months (T2) and 1-year (T3) post-hospital discharge. Objective measures of recovery included 6-Minute Walk Test Distance (6MWTD), frailty (Clinical Frailty Scale), quantification of falls following hospital-discharge, return to work status and exercise levels. Subjective markers included symptoms (COVID-19-Specific Patient Concerns Assessment), fatigue (Chalder Fatigue Score) and health-related quality of life (HrQOL) [Short-Form-36 Health Survey Questionnaire (SF-36-II)]. Univariate analysis was performed using t-test, Wilcoxon rank-sum, and Chi-squared test, paired analysis using one-way analysis of variance and Krustal Wallis testing and correlation analysis with Spearman correlation tests. RESULTS: Sixty-one subjects participated. Assessments were conducted at a median of 55 days(T1), 242 days(T2), and 430 days(T3) following hospital-discharge. 6MWTD improved significantly overtime (F = 10.3, p < 0.001) from 365(209)m at T1 to 447(85)m at T3, however remained below population norms and with no associated improvement in perceived exertion. Approximately half (n = 27(51%)) had returned to pre-diagnosis exercise levels at T3. At least one concern/symptom was reported by 74%, 59% and 64% participants at T1, T2 and T3 respectively. Fatigue was the most frequently reported symptom at T1(40%) and T2(49%), while issues with memory/concentration was the most frequently reported at T3(49%). SF-36 scores did not change in any domain over the study period, and scores remained lower than population norms in the domains of physical functioning, energy/vitality, role limitations due to physical problems and general health. Return-to-work rates are low, with 55% of participants returning to work in some capacity, and 31% of participants don't feel back to full-health at 1-year following infection. CONCLUSION: Hospitalised COVID-19 survivors report persistent symptoms, particularly fatigue and breathlessness, low HrQOL scores, sub-optimal exercise levels and continued work absenteeism 1-year following infection, despite some objective recovery of physical functioning. Further research is warranted to explore rehabilitation goals and strategies to optimise patient outcomes during recovery from COVID-19. CLINICAL MESSAGE: Hospitalised COVID-19 survivors report significant ongoing rehabilitation concerns 1-year following infection, despite objective recovery of physical functioning. Our findings suggest those who returned to exercise within 1-year may have less fatigue and breathlessness. The impact of exercise, and other rehabilitative strategies on physical functioning outcomes following COVID-19 should be investigated in future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Frailty , Cohort Studies , Dyspnea , Fatigue/diagnosis , Fatigue/epidemiology , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life
18.
BMC Emerg Med ; 22(1): 82, 2022 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822164

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The resuscitation guidelines provided for the COVID-19 pandemic strongly recommended wearing personal protective equipment. The current study aimed to evaluate and compare the effectiveness of chest compressions and the level of fatigue while wearing two different types of mask (surgical vs. cloth). METHODS: A randomized, non-inferiority, simulation study was conducted. Participants were randomised into two groups: surgical mask group (n = 108) and cloth mask group (n = 108). The effectiveness (depth and rate) of chest compressions was measured within a 2-min continuous chest-compression-only CPR session. Data were collected through an AMBU CPR Software, a questionnaire, recording vital parameters, and using Borg-scale related to fatigue (before and after the simulation). For further analysis the 2-min session was segmented into 30-s intervals. RESULTS: Two hundred sixteen first-year health care students participated in our study. No significant difference was measured between the surgical mask and cloth mask groups in chest compression depth (44.49 ± 10.03 mm vs. 45.77 ± 10.77 mm), rate (113.34 ± 17.76/min vs. 111.23 ± 17.51/min), and the level of fatigue (5.72 ± 1.69 vs. 5.56 ± 1.67) (p > 0.05 in every cases). Significant decrease was found in chest compression depth between the first 30-s interval and the second, third, and fourth intervals (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The effectiveness of chest compressions (depth and rate) was non-inferior when wearing cloth mask compared to wearing surgical mask. However, the effectiveness of chest compressions decreased significantly in both groups during the 2-min chest-compression-only CPR session and did not reach the appropriate chest compression depth range recommended by the ERC.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Delivery of Health Care , Fatigue , Humans , Manikins , Pandemics , Students
19.
Electronic Journal of Research in Educational Psychology ; 20(1):43-68, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1820643

ABSTRACT

Introduction. The sudden changes in school educational modality due to the COVID-19 pandemic and social isolation have affected the lifestyle, mental and emotional health, and perception of their academic training in students with high intellectual abilities. The aim of this study was to analyze the predictor variables of sleepiness, satisfaction with studies, and emotional exhaustion in students with high intellectual abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method. This study involved 409 third to fifth grade high school students with high intellectual abilities and who receive a free special education associated with talent and high achievement (COAR). Ages ranged from 14 to 17 years (M = 15.26, SD = .89). The Brief Study Satisfaction Scale (EBSE), Emotional Fatigue Scale (ECE), Eating Habits and Physical Activity Scale (EHAAF), Pittsburgh Index, Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale-2 (GAD-2) and Epworth Short Sleepiness Scale (ESE) were used. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and the normality of the variables was assessed. In addition, a predictive model was analyzed based on goodness-of-fit indices using structural equation modeling. The analyses were performed using SPSS 24.0 and Amos 24.0 statistical software. Results. The descriptive analysis yielded adequate skewness and kurtosis coefficients. The analyses showed that all variables were significantly correlated (p < .01). Likewise, the predictive model of sleepiness, satisfaction with studies and emotional exhaustion presents adequate goodness-of-fit indices (X-2 = 7.427, gl = 6, p = .283, X-2/gl = 1.238, TLI = 0.994, CFI = 0.998, RMSEA = 0.024 and SRMR = 0.186). Conclusion. This study presents a predictive model of sleepiness, study satisfaction, and emotional exhaustion in students with high intellectual abilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. It is concluded that physical activity, eating habits and sleep quality are predictors of sleepiness and, in turn, generalized anxiety, physical activity and sleep quality predict emotional fatigue, which is also a predictor of satisfaction with studies.

20.
International Journal of Biomedical Science ; 17(4):40-45, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1820603

ABSTRACT

The ongoing outbreak of COVID-19 has quickly become a daunting challenge to global health. In the absence of satisfied therapy, effective treatment interventions are urgently needed. Previous studies have demonstrated that acupuncture is effective at relieving common symptoms of COVID-19 including breath-lessness, nausea, insomnia, leukopenia, fatigue, vomiting, and abdominal pain. Experiments have shown that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits the replication cycle of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavi-rus with similar structures of COVID-19. Increase in level of NO by using NO gas inhalation has been shown to restore lung function by reducing airway resistance and improving virus-induced lung infections in SARS patients. Recent case report showed that a medical acupuncturist with symptoms consistent with severe COVID pneumonia achieved full recovery by self-administered medical acupuncture and cupping therapy at home. Clinical features and pathophysiology demonstrated that NO deficiency and endothelial dysfunction contribute to the development of COVID-19. Several studies from different groups consistently demonstrated that acupuncture increases NO synthase expression and induces an elevation of NO production and release in plasma and the local skin regions in both animals and humans. It is suggested that exogenous NO supplies or interventions that induce increasing levels of NO can play an important role in protective effects against inflammation and acute lung injury. This article reviews the rationale for mechanisms of NO induction induced by acupuncture in the possible treatment of COVID-19 and highlights its potential for contributing to better clinical outcomes and improving future clinical studies of acupuncture on treatment of COVID-19.

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