Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 52
Filter
1.
Companion ; : 17-19, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2046845
2.
Zycie Weterynaryjne ; 96(1):15-23, 2021.
Article in Polish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034286

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the betacoronavirus that causes COVID-19, has spread rapidly around the world since December 2019. It was suspected from the beginning that the primary outbreak in China, was of a zoonotic origin, but the SARS- CoV-2 animal reservoir(s) has not been definitively identified yet. So far, it has been confirmed that numerous animal species are susceptible to infection and that experimentally infected cats, shrews, hamsters and ferrets can also shed the virus. The SARS-CoV-2 was also detected in farmed mink (Neovison vison), in which it caused both, the clinical and subclinical disease, with respiratory symptoms and increased mortality. In April 2020, the first SARS-CoV-2 cases were detected in minks in the Netherlands, and to date (November 2020), further outbreaks have been confirmed in Denmark, Italy, Spain, Sweden, the United States, Greece, France and Poland. It has also been shown that the transmission of infection from humans to minks and from minks to humans may occur. The OIE is working on the inclusion of mink in the WAHIS database and encouraging the Members to provide appropriate data for this species to improve the monitoring of the epidemiological situation worldwide and prevent the establishment of a possible new reservoir for SARS-CoV-2.

3.
Slovensky Veterinarsky Casopis ; 45(2):75-76, 2020.
Article in Slovak | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034130

ABSTRACT

This article highlights information on the beneficial and pathogenic microorganisms of the oral cavity of dogs, effects of grass consumption, and the breeding and care of dogs.

4.
Zhongguo Yufang Shouyi Xuebao / Chinese Journal of Preventive Veterinary Medicine ; 44(3):344-344, 2022.
Article in English, Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2034013

ABSTRACT

Wild animals may be closely related to the outbreak of infectious diseases in recent years. For example, it has been reported that there are closely related SARS-CoV and new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) in civet cats, raccoon dogs and pangolins. Therefore, it is of great significance to identify existing or potential pathogens in wild animals that may be in close contact with humans, in order to trace the origin of a specific epidemic and to carry out risk assessment of the most likely source of future epidemics.

5.
Journal of Anatolian Environmental and Animal Sciences ; 7(2):145-155, 2022.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2026648

ABSTRACT

Many pandemic diseases have emerged in the history and millions of people affected from these diseases. Among the marked pandemics in history, the plague, known as the black death, was recorded to cause the death of 17-54% of the world population. Similar to previous pandemics, as the SARS CoV-2, which emerged in 2019 and belonged to the coronavirus family, caused an epidemic and turned into a pandemic infection, positive cases were detected in more than 483 million people, and more than 6.1 million people died. While this emerging epidemic is still continuing its effects, it has been determined that there are positive cases in pets such as dogs and cats, especially in mink (Neovison vison). Especially in Denmark, Netherlands and Finland, positive animals for COVID-19 were accepted. Unlike the pandemic until today, the COVID-19 has spread to broader geographies and affected many animal species. With the reports that the SARS-CoV-2 - was first transmitted from bats to humans, this viral agent has been accepted as zoonotic, but a complete transmission route has not been shown for its transmission from other animals to humans except bats. It is reported that there is no significant risk of transmission of the virus, which is transmitted primarily by the respiratory route, from both pets and edible foods to humans. Although there are many reports in terrestrial animals, studies on the presence of SARS-CoV-2 - in aquatic animals or aquatic environments and COVID-19 transmission in aquatic animals have doubts. Here we reviewed the viability of the SARS-CoV-2 - in the aquatic environment, transmission to the aquatic ecosystem and aquatic animals, and therefore the risks to humans through water or aquatic products.

6.
Zoonoses ; 1(6), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2025742

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 that produces major symptoms of pneumonia, has been a disaster worldwide. The traceability of SARSCoV- 2 and the discovery of susceptible animal species is crucial to halt viral transmission and explore the mechanism of cross-species transmission. We selected 82 representative ACE2 sequences from the 1000 sequences with the closest homology to the hACE2 protein. All selected ACE2 proteins were subjected to homology modeling. Potential natural and intermediate hosts, as well as animal species susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, were analyzed systematically by calculation of the binding free energy of ACE2 protein to the RBD of SARSCoV- 2. Primates, some wild Felidae, civets, goats, spotted hyenas and golden hamsters are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and may be potential intermediate hosts, whereas pangolins, birds and reptiles are unlikely to be intermediate hosts. Mice, rats and guinea pig are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2. Given their possible susceptibility, non-human primates, goats and golden hamsters could potentially be used as experimental models to examine SARS-CoV-2 infection without transgenesis. Herein, possible candidates for the natural and intermediate hosts of SARS-CoV-2 are suggested, to provide guidance for subsequent studies.

7.
Journal of Mahanakorn Veterinary Medicine ; 17(1):123-133, 2022.
Article in Thaï | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2012234

ABSTRACT

A male Munchkin cat was brought to a small animal teaching hospital at Mahanakorn University of Technology. The patient presentation with vomiting, chronic diarrhea, and intermittent fever. From history-taking, the owner previously had a cat that was diagnosed with feline infectious peritonitis (FIP) living in the same house but had isolated in a separate area. Fecal examination revealed bacterial enteritis. Hematology and blood chemistry results shown lymphopenia, hypoalbuminemia, and low serum albumin/globulin ratio (0.3 A: G ratio). Abdominal ultrasound revealed mesenteric lymph node (MLN) enlargement and cholecystitis. Cell cytology from the liver and MLN revealed suppurative inflammation. Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was negative for the Feline coronavirus (FCoV) in the blood sample. On the 4th day of treatment, the cat developed pleural and peritoneal effusion. Thoracentesis and abdominocentesis were performed and submitted for analysis. The fluid's results were classified as modified transudate, low A: G ratio (0.3), Rivalta's test (positive), and positive for FCoV by using RT-PCR. On the 8th day of treatment, the cat died from systemic hypotension. Viscous straw yellow-colored fluid and pyogranulomatous lesions at the liver, lung, kidney, and MLN were observed from the necropsy. Histopathology's results shown severe suppurative inflammation in all the above organs. FIP was confirmed by detected FCoV antigen in the cytoplasm of macrophages in the kidney and lung tissue by immunohistochemistry staining.

8.
Chinese Journal of Nosocomiology ; 32(9):1430-1434, 2022.
Article in English, Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2012147

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of COVID-19, the opinion that the aerosol plays a key role in the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 has been controversial. The COVID-19 pandemic has continued interpersonal transmission for more than two years, especially after the emergence of Delta and Omicron variants, making the situation of COVID-19 pandemic more severe. The transmission of SARS-COV-2 variants was significantly accelerated and the time of transmission between generations was significantly shortened. Therefore, it has been questioned to attribute the close-range infection to droplet transmission. The point that the aerosol can also has a close-range transmission and may play a dominant role is neglected under the influence of traditional transmission mode of respiratory infectious diseases. A large number of studies have shown that normal breath, talk and cough could release a large number of respiratory aerosol particles, and the virus particles were mainly tiny particles(=5.0 micro m). The biological activity and infectivity of the droplet nuclei have been questioned in the studies on their physicochemical properties. Animal models of ferrets and hamsters showed that SARS-COV-2 could transmit via aerosol. Therefore, the new evidence for the aerosol transmission of SARS-COV-2 was reviewed in the article so as to provide latest evidence-based evidence for prevention and control of COVID-19.

9.
Journal of Tropical Medicine ; 20(10):1390-1393, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2011867

ABSTRACT

With the outbreak of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in China and even the world, people are paying Close attention 10 the source of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), Clinical symptoms of being infected, and treatment Options. Whether the new coronavirus Will be transmitted to pets has also lead to discussion and concern. Due to the short period of time, there is a lack of direct research on domestic pets of SARS-CoV-2, so there is no strong evidence that pets can act as intermediate hosts or communicators to spread SARS-CoV-2 in the natural environment. Meanwhile, SARS-CoV-2 share high similarity With SARS-CoV that broke out in 2003 in terms of binding to functional receptors. Therefore, based on the theoretical research of SARS-CoV on this issue, this report analyzes the possibility transmission in animals of SARS-CoV-2, and relevant suggestions and treatment measures are put forward for existing problems. At the same time, further research is needed to prove this possibility.

10.
IOP Conference Series : Earth and Environmental Science ; 976(34), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2001167

ABSTRACT

Feline Panleukopenia Virus (FPV), Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP), Feline Calici Virus (FCV), and other cat's viral diseases were reported in Indonesia. Viral diseases that appear usually appear in each season with different intensities depending on the type of virus. The research data was taken from Animal Hospital Prof. Soeparwi's medical record in 2017-2019 along with rainfall, humidity, and temperature data in the Yogyakarta area in 2017-2019 obtained from the Climatology and Geophysics Meteorology Agency (BMKG). Disease data are grouped by diagnosis;temperature, humidity, and rainfall data. Data analysis was performed with Microsoft Excel 2016 in the form of a frequency chart and descriptive. The results of the analysis between the incidence patterns of FPV, FIP, FCV, Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis (FVR), and Papilloma with climatic conditions in the dry and rainy season periods show patterns that vary depending on the character of the virus that causes the disease. High incidence in the rainy season is seen in FPV and FCV, for FIP the incidence of each season is almost the same in each year, whereas the incidence of FVR and Papilloma can be higher in the rainy season and sometimes also can be higher in the dry season. These findings indicate that the incidence of viral diseases in cats has a seasonally based pattern of events.

11.
Point Veterinaire ; 51(410):16-20, 2020.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1999460

ABSTRACT

In this article the author discusses how electrophoresis can aid in the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory and infectious diseases in animals such as feline infectious peritonitis, Leishmania infantum and neoplasms.

12.
Zycie Weterynaryjne ; 95(7):398-405, 2020.
Article in Polish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1999285

ABSTRACT

Family Coronaviridae (coronaviruses, CoVs), comprises enveloped, positive sense RNA viruses. They are largest RNA viruses identified so far. CoVs are known for over half a century as agents causing respiratory, alimentary or systemic infections in domestic and wild birds and mammals. Feline (FcoV) and canine coronaviruses (CCoV) are common in the populations of these animals and fetine infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV), infection may often be fatal. The new human coronavirus, SARS-CoV-Z, causing COVID-19 (coronavirus disease-IQ), identified in 2019 and responsible for the ongoing pandemics, has raised concerns about its zoonotic potential. Since cats and dogs live in close contact with owners it is important to establish their possible role in COVlD-19 epidemiology. There have been reports of SAHS-Covo2 positive dogs and cats in the literature and on various websites, including OIE website. However, considering that despite that millions of people are infected and the virus is still spreading worldwide, while only few cases of SARS-CoV-19 in dogs and cats have been confirmed, these companion animals do not play a role as virus reservoirs, thus are not important in COVlD-19 pandemics.

13.
Indonesia Medicus Veterinus ; 11(3):412-423, 2022.
Article in Indonesian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1994709

ABSTRACT

Minmin, a 1-year-old male local cat weighing 4.3 kg has decreased appetite and an enlarged abdominal cavity. Based on physical examination, there was abdominal distension. Routine hematology and blood biochemical examinations were performed which showed chronic inflammation and abnormal liver and kidney function. Radiographic examination and abdominocentesis showed fluid accumulation in the abdominal cavity (ascites) with pale yellow fluid and thickened liquid consistency. The results of the rivalta test showed a positive accumulation of exudate which was characterized by a jellyfish-like formation. The cat was diagnosed with effusive feline infectious peritonitis. The therapies given are diuretic furosemide 5 mg/kg BW (twice a day) intravenously, antibiotic cefotaxime sodium 30 mg/kg BW (twice a day) intravenously, anti-inflammatory dexamethasone 0,5 mg/kg BW (twice a day) subcutaneously, hepato-protector betaine 2.5 mg/kg BW (every two days) subcutaneously, and keto acid 11 mg/kg BW orally (every two days). The results of treatment for one week only provide temporary results in reducing the degree of abdominal distension. The cat died in the sixth month after therapy.

14.
Summa, Animali da Compagnia ; 39(6):19-25, 2022.
Article in Italian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1989439

ABSTRACT

Since the appearance of COVID-19 in humans, there have been numerous reports of dogs and cats being infected with SARSCoV- 2, with cats appearing to be particularly susceptible. The portal of entry of the virus into the body's cells is a membrane receptor called ACE2 (angiotensin converting enzyme 2) belonging to the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. The ACE2 receptor is expressed in airway epithelial cells, myocardium, venous and arterial endothelial cells, kidney, liver, oral cavity, intestine and also adipose tissue, explaining the diversity of clinical expression of the disease, with respiratory manifestations predominating. SARS-CoV-2 causes an imbalance in the renin-angiotensin- aldosterone system. In addition, the virus has a direct action combined with an immune reaction, that is sometimes intense, causing a cascade of lesions, mainly in the lungs but also in the heart. The clinical expression of SARS-CoV-2 infection remains rare in dogs and cats and mainly includes fever, depression, anorexia, digestive, respiratory or ocular disorders. As in humans, various cardiovascular clinical signs are less frequently seen. Several cases of myocarditis, correlated with a positive SARS-CoV-2 test (PCR or serology), have been identified in England and at least one in France. In the latter case, further investigation led to a strong suspicion of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy complicated by myocarditis. It is highly likely that obesity (with significant fat deposition in the pleural and pericardial spaces, tissues with high expression of the ACE2 receptor) may have favoured these complications. SARS-CoV-2 infection should therefore now be included in the differential diagnosis of agents causing myocarditis and pneumonia in both cats and dogs.

15.
Veterinary Ireland Journal ; 10(9):487-490, 2020.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1989213
16.
Chinese Journal of Virology ; 36(2):170-175, 2020.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1975403

ABSTRACT

2019 novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is a new strain of coronavirus that has never been found in humans. SARS-CoV-2 is a beta coronavirus. whereas the coronaviruses infecting pet dogs and cats arise mainly from a-coronaviruses. Whether SARS-CoV-2 infects cats, dogs and other pets is an important public-health issue during this time. In the present study, respiratory-tract symptoms in 20 pet cats and 4 pet dogs (especially with obvious fever and cough symptoms) in Beijing, China, were detected by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of SARS-CoV-2 and established diagnostic methods. Throat swabs were collected to detect the nucleic acids of SARS-CoV-2 using fluorescence quantitative PCR and to detect other pathogens. The nucleic acids of SARS-CoV-2 were not present in the 24 pets that we evaluated.

17.
Journal of Southwest Minzu University Natural Science Edition ; 48(2):135-141, 2022.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1958497

ABSTRACT

Feline Astrovirus (FAstV), Feline Parvovirus(FPV) and Feline Enteric Coronavirus (FECoV) are important pathogens causing diarrhea in cats.In order to establish a molecular detection method which can differentiate the three pathogens in the same PCR system, an FAstV/FPV/FECoV triple PCR method was established with optimized primer concentrations and annealing temperature, and specificity, sensitivity and repeatability were tested. The results showed that the PCR method could only identify FAstV (320 bp), FPV (468 bp) and FECoV (664 bp) genes, while not other canine and feline related pathogens. The detection limits of FAstV, FPV and FECoV were 2x10~7 copy/L (7.1 pg/L),4.7x10~6 copy/L (2.4 pg/L) and 7x10~6 copy/L (5.1 pg/L) respectively. The established triple PCR method was used to detect 207 cat fecal samples collected in Chengdu from 2019 to 2020, including 141 diarrhea samples and 66 clinical health samples. The detection rates of FAstV, FPV and FECoV were 24.15% (50/207), 37.20% (77/207) and 15.46% (32/207) respectively, and the co-infection rates of FAstV/FPV, FPV/FECoV and FAstv/FECoV were 9.18%,6.28% and 6.28% respectively. In conclusion, the triple PCR method of FAstV/FPV/FECoV was successfully established, and could be applied for virus detection and epidemiological investigation.

18.
Biomedica ; 42(Suppl. 2), 2022.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1957852

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The severe acute respiratory syndrome of the new coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is the causal agent of the health emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although humans are the main susceptible host, experimental studies and reported cases of natural infection have evidenced scenarios of SARS-CoV-2 reverse zoonosis in animals.

19.
Veteriner Hekimler Dernegi Dergisi / Journal of the Turkish Veterinary Medical Society ; 93(2):124-132, 2022.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1924975

ABSTRACT

Coronaviruses in the family Coronaviridae cause digestive and respiratory system infections in humans and animals. There are two subtypes of canine coronaviruses (CCoV), which are included in the alfacoronavirus, as CCoV I and CCoV II. CCoV-II is divided into two genotypes, CCoV-IIa and IIb. Although CCoV affects dogs of all ages and all diets, newborn puppies can be particularly susceptible and severely affected. According to the literature research, no molecular studies have been found in our country for the detection of canine coronavirus, especially in lower respiratory tract infections. In this study, it was aimed to detect and molecular characterization of CCoV un shelter dogs with lower respiratory tract infection. For this purpose, Bronchoalveolar Lavage (BAL) fluids taken from 40 shelter dogs with lower respiratory tract infections were examined. CCoV was detected in 3 of the BAL fluids of 40 dogs tested. A phylogenetic tree was constructed with the sequences obtained after the sequence analysis. It was determined that 2 of the 3 positive samples in the phylogenetic tree were CCoV-I and one sample was CCoV-II. In conclusion, this study revealed that CCoV-I and CCoV-II may play a role in lower respiratory system disorders of shelter dogs. In addition, the detection of two different CCoVs in different animals in the same shelter has been considered as an important data, and the detection of both types in dogs housed in crowded environments such as shelter conditions shows that the possibility of new variants or subtypes that may occur in the future should not be ignored.

20.
Infectious disease management in animal shelters ; 2(656), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1918436

ABSTRACT

This second edition contains 24 new and updated chapters on aetiology, epidemiology, prevalence, pathogenesis, clinical signs, treatment, prevention and control of infectious diseases in cats, dogs and exotic small companion mammals in animal shelters. These include an introduction to infectious disease management in animal shelters, wellness, data surveillance, diagnostic testing, necropsy techniques, outbreak management, pharmacology, sanitation, canine and feline vaccinations and immunology, canine infectious respiratory disease, canine distemper virus, canine influenza, feline infectious respiratory disease, canine parvovirus and other canine enteropathogens, feline panleukopenia, feline coronavirus and feline infectious peritonitis, internal parasites, heartworm disease, external parasites, dermatophytoses, zoonoses, rabies, feline leukaemia and feline immunodeficiency viruses and conditions in exotic companion mammals (ferrets, rabbits, guineapigs and rodents). It is intended for shelter veterinarians, managers and workers.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL