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1.
SSM - Population Health ; 21:101349, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2211500

ABSTRACT

The increase in availability of online on-demand food and alcohol delivery services has changed the way unhealthy commodities are accessed and understood. We conducted a systematic scoping review of academic and grey literature to map the current knowledge of public health and regulatory/policy outcomes arising from on-demand food and alcohol delivery (defined as delivery within 2 h). We systematically searched three electronic databases and completed supplementary forward citation searches and Google Scholar searches. In total, we screened 761 records (de-duplicated) and synthesised findings from 40 studies by commodity types (on-demand food or alcohol) and outcome focus (outlet, consumer, environmental, labour). Outlet-focused outcomes were most common (n = 16 studies), followed by consumer (n = 11), environmental (n = 7), and labour-focused (n = 6) outcomes. Despite geographical and methodological diversity of studies, results indicate that on-demand delivery services market unhealthy and discretionary foods, with disadvantaged communities having reduced access to healthy commodities. Services that deliver alcohol on-demand can also subvert current alcohol access restrictions, particularly through poor age verification processes. Underpinning these public health impacts is the multi-layered nature of on-demand services and context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which creates ongoing complications as to how populations access food and alcohol. Changing access to unhealthy commodities is an emerging issue in public health. Our scoping review considers priority areas for future research to better inform policy decisions. Current regulation of food and alcohol may not appropriately cover emerging on-demand technologies, necessitating a review of policy.

3.
J Egypt Public Health Assoc ; 97(1): 21, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098478

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The world is facing an extraordinarily unprecedented threat from the COVID-19 pandemic triggered by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Global life has turned upside down, and that several countries closed their borders, simultaneously with the blockage of life cycle as a result of the shutdown of the majority of workplaces except the food stores and some few industries. MAIN BODY: In this review, we are casting light on the nature of COVID-19 infection and spread, the persistence of SARS-CoV-2 virus in food products, and revealing the threats arising from the transmission of COVID-19 in food environment between stakeholders and even customers. Furthermore, we are exploring and identifying some practical aspects that must be followed to minimize infection and maintain a safe food environment. We also present and discuss some World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines-based regulations in food safety codes, destined to sustain the health safety of all professionals working in the food industry under this current pandemic. CONCLUSION: The information compiled in this manuscript is supporting and consolidating the safety attributes in food environment, for a prospective positive impact on consumer confidence in food safety and the citizens' public health in society. Some research is suggested on evaluating the use and potentiality of native and chemical modified basic proteins as possible practices aiming at protecting food from bacterial and viral contamination including COVID-19.

4.
Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070695

ABSTRACT

Socioeconomic and place-based factors contribute to grocery shopping patterns which may be important for diet and health. Big data provide the opportunity to explore behaviours at the population level. We used data collected from Flipp, a free all-in-one savings and deals content app, to identify visitation to grocery stores and estimate home-to-store distances, monthly frequencies and number of unique stores visited in eight Canadian cities during 2020. Grocery shopping outcomes and associations with income, population density and percentage of car commuters were explored using data aggregated at the Aggregate Dissemination Area level in which app users lived. Changes in patterns of grocery shopping following restrictions implemented in response to the COVID-19 pandemic were also investigated. The median of average home-to-store distances ranged from 4 to 5 km across all cities throughout 2020. Shorter distances for grocery shopping were shown consistently for shoppers living in lower income, densely populated and low car-commuting ADAs. A maximum of three unique supermarkets were visited on average each month. Decreases in the frequency and variability of grocery store visits were shown across all cities in April 2020 following the implementation of restrictions in response to COVID-19, and pre-pandemic levels of shopping were rarely achieved by the end of the year. Ultimately, these results provide much needed information regarding the characteristics of grocery shopping trips in a high-income country, as well as how food shopping was impacted by the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. This information will be useful for a range of future studies seeking to characterise access to food retail.

5.
Public Health Nutr ; : 1-11, 2022 Oct 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062134

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the promotion of food and beverage and marketing strategies used by online food delivery services (OFDS) in a social media platform before and during the pandemic in Brazil. DESIGN: Publicly available data were extracted from OFDS Instagram accounts. Posts published 6 months immediately before and after the first case of COVID-19 in Brazil were randomly sampled. Two independent authors coded the posts' content. Food and beverage items featured in posts were classified according to the NOVA food system classification. Marketing strategies were coded according to protocols from previous studies. SETTING: Top three OFDS Instagram accounts in Brazil. PARTICIPANTS: Posts published in the period studied (n 304). RESULTS: During the pandemic, the proportion of posts featuring at least one food item decreased from 71·6 % to 40·2 %, and the proportion of ultra-processed foods decreased from 57·6 % to 27·9 %. Before the pandemic, the most widely used marketing strategies were branding elements (80·7 %), product imagery (unbranded) (48·9 %) and partnerships/sponsorship (35·2 %). While during the pandemic, branding elements (62·2 %) continued to be the most applied, but were followed by the use of videos/graphics interchange format/boomerangs (34·1 %) and corporate social responsibility (31·7 %). The most frequent COVID-19 marketing strategies were 'social responsibility in the pandemic' (30·5 %), 'combatting the pandemic' (28·0 %) and 'accelerating digitalisation' (20·7 %). CONCLUSIONS: OFDS advertisements on a social media platform placed less emphasis on food items, but improved the nutritional quality of foods and beverages featured in posts. A COVID-washing approach was highlighted, especially through the use of social responsibility marketing during the pandemic.

6.
Front Public Health ; 10: 994236, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055098

ABSTRACT

Background: Animal source foods, especially fish is the most commonly consumed and an important source of macro and micronutrients in the diet of the urban low-income residents. The COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted the food environment in Bangladesh but little is known about how food access and food prices (affordability) have affected the purchase and consumption of fish. The objective of the study was to understand the impact of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on urban food environment with a specific focus on fish consumption. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 586 homogeneous adults (288 females and 298 males) from separate households from five informal settlements in Dhaka city, Bangladesh during October-November 2020. Data were collected on: (1) food access and affordably; and (2) food purchase and fish consumption. The associations between food access, price, food purchase, and fish consumption were evaluated using path analysis. Results: The majority of respondents reported that food access was more difficult, food prices increased, and food purchase decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to pre-COVID (84-89% of respondents). Fish and meat were more difficult to access, more expensive and purchased less compared to other foods (74-91% of respondents). Compared to pre-COVID period, households consumed less fish during the COVID-19 pandemic, and reported compromised the variety and quality of fish. In the path analysis, food access was associated with food purchase (b = 0.33, p < 0.001). Food purchase was associated with quantity, variety, and quality of fish consumed. Food price was inversely associated with the quality of fish consumed (b = -0.27, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic negatively affected the food environment, particularly food access, price (affordability), purchase, and consumption, especially of fish. Limited food access negatively affected the quantity, variety and quality of fish consumed. An increase in food prices directly affected the quality of fish consumed. Policy actions are essential to ensure equal access to nutritious foods, such as fish. These policies need to focus on diversity and quality along with preventing increases in food prices during emergencies to mitigate future threats to the nutrition and health of the urban low-income residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Animals , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Micronutrients , Pandemics
7.
Proceedings of the Nutrition Society ; 81(OCE1):E1-E58, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2044707

ABSTRACT

This journal issue includes 48 articles that discuss development and validation of a novel quality assessment tool to measure the quality of nutrition information online;longitudinal association between takeaway food environment and secondary school adolescents BMI and body fat percentage;dietary practices, beliefs, and behaviours among adults with inflammatory bowel disease;postpartum depression in Irish mothers and associations with infant feeding practices;the impact of dietary saturated fat replacement with unsaturated fat on the plasma lipidome and cardiometabolic disease risk;ole of brain serotonin in age-related decline in physical activity in mice;ey stakeholder perceptions of food allergies within the airline industry;sleep quality of higher education students during COVID-19 and its association with diet quality and lifestyle behaviours.

8.
Foods ; 11(18)2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043644

ABSTRACT

Home confinement during the COVID-19 pandemic has been accompanied by dramatic changes in household food dynamics that can significantly influence health. This systematic literature review presents parental perspectives of the impact of COVID-19 lockdown (up to 30 June 2022) on food preparation and meal routines, as well as other food-related behaviors, capturing both favorable and unfavorable changes in the household food environment. Themes and trends are identified and associations with other lifestyle factors are assessed. Overall, families enjoyed more time together around food, including planning meals, cooking, and eating together. Eating more diverse foods and balanced home-cooked meals (e.g., fresh fruit and vegetables) was combined with overeating and increased snacking (e.g., high-calorie snacks, desserts, and sweets), as parents became more permissive towards food; however, food insecurity increased among families with the lowest income. Adoption of meal planning skills and online shopping behavior emerged alongside behaviors aimed at self-sufficiency, such as bulk purchasing and stockpiling of non-perishable processed foods. These results are an important first step in recognizing how this pandemic may be affecting the family food environment, including low-income families. Future obesity prevention and treatment initiatives, but also ongoing efforts to address food management, parental feeding practices, and food insecurity, can account for these changes moving forward.

9.
Nutrients ; 14(18)2022 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2033076

ABSTRACT

Online grocery shopping has expanded rapidly in the U.S., yet little is known about the retailer's perceptions of online grocery services, which can aid in the expansion of services. Furthermore, many barriers to online grocery utilization persist across geographic areas, especially among Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-authorized retailers. This study captured perceived barriers and facilitators of online grocery shopping for managers of SNAP-authorized retailers. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with managers (n = 23) of grocery stores/supermarkets in urban and rural areas across four different states: TN, KY, NC, and NY. Grocery store managers offering online ordering (n = 15) and managers from brick-and-mortar stores without online services (n = 8) participated in the interviews. Three primary themes emerged among managers offering online ordering: (1) order fulfillment challenges, (2) perceived customer barriers, and (3) perceived customer benefits. Among managers at brick-and-mortar locations without online services, four major themes emerged: (1) thoughts on implementing online shopping, (2) COVID-19 pandemic impacts, (3) competition with other stores, and (4) benefits of maintaining brick-and-mortar shopping. This study provides a deeper understanding of retailers' experience and perceptions of online grocery services among stores authorized to accept SNAP benefits. This perspective is necessary to inform policies and enhance the evolving virtual food marketplace for SNAP customers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Assistance , Commerce , Food Supply , Humans , Pandemics , Supermarkets
10.
Health Place ; 78: 102906, 2022 Sep 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007715

ABSTRACT

Measures to control the spread of COVID-19 have changed the way we shop for food and interact with food environments. This qualitative study explored food shopping practices in the East of England, a large diverse region including coastal, urban and rural settings. In 2020/2021 we interviewed 38 people living in the region and 27 professionals and volunteers providing local support around dietary health. Participants reported disruption to supermarket shopping routines; moving to online shopping; and increased reliance on local stores. COVID-19 has impacted disproportionately upon lower-income households and neighbourhoods. The longer-term implications for dietary health inequalities must be investigated.

11.
J Nutr Sci ; 11: e64, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1972473

ABSTRACT

Marketing influences consumers' dietary purchases. However, little is known about marketing environments in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP)-authorised stores. The present study explored SNAP-authorised store marketing environments in Louisiana by rurality, store ownership and store type (n 42). Sampling methods were designed to include randomly selected stores in each geographic area of the state. The GroPromo was used to measure placement, promotion, and child-focused aspects of marketing strategies used for healthier (fruits and vegetables) and less healthy products (chips, candy, sugar-sweetened beverages, child-focused cereal) in medium- and high-prominence marketing areas. In using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) (P < 0⋅05) for data analysis, variations in GroPromo scores were found among SNAP-authorised stores by rurality (P < 0⋅05) and store ownership (P < 0⋅001); no differences were found by store type (P > 0⋅05). Future research, practice and policy strategies are required to understand the influence of marketing environments on SNAP participants' dietary quality and to design responsive public health interventions.


Subject(s)
Food Assistance , Beverages , Commerce , Food Supply , Humans , Marketing , Poverty
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 06 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1924285

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic and measures such as lockdowns affect food access, dietary choices, and food security. We conducted an online survey among 517 respondents during early 2020 in Nanjing, China to explore respondents' food acquisition behaviors before and during the pandemic and associations with the community food environment. Using geographic analysis and binary logistic models, we revealed that despite inconvenience regarding food acquisition, no food security issues occurred during lockdown in Nanjing. The pandemic changed the access and frequency of obtaining food; meanwhile, pre-pandemic habits had a strong impact on food acquisition behavior. Online and in-store food acquisition showed a substitution relationship, with online food access playing a crucial role in food acquisition. Physical and digit food outlets are highly integrated in Chinese urban communities, and both objectively measured and perceived accessibility of these food outlets had a significant association with the food acquisition methods and transportation mode chosen by people during this public health crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Food , Humans , Pandemics
13.
Nihon Koshu Eisei Zasshi ; 69(10): 833-840, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1912162

ABSTRACT

Objectives In Japanese nutrition policy, emphasis is placed on healthy food environment improvement through restaurants and other settings by prefectures and cities of cabinet order (cities). This study aimed to clarify the actual status of management implementation by prefectures and cities.Methods A mail survey of 47 prefectures and 106 cities throughout Japan was conducted in October 2020. Management implementation, including the existence of a healthy food environment improvement system (system) for restaurants and other settings, was confirmed. Local governments that had implemented the system were asked about the scope, dissemination efforts, process evaluation, and improvement of the system.Results Of the local governments that responded, 39/42 prefectures (92.9%) and 57/82 cities (69.5%) implementing the system were included in the study. A total of 84.6% of prefectures and 14.0% of cities assessed the nutrient intake of local residents within the past five years. The median number of dietitians in the main office of the department in charge of healthy food environment improvement was two in both prefectures and cities. A target for healthy food environment improvement was set by 69.2% of prefectures and 54.4% of cities. The scope of the system was restaurant meals for 94.9% of prefectures and 100.0% of cities as well as ready-made meals for 87.2% of prefectures and 93.0% of cities. A total of 69.2% of prefectures and 66.7% of cities collaborated internally or with other local governments, while 15.4% of prefectures and 15.8% of cities entrusted system dissemination to external organizations. A total of 87.2% of prefectures and 89.5% of cities assessed the number of registered stores/companies, while 17.6% of prefectures and 21.6% of cities assessed the number of restaurants and other settings in the entire jurisdiction. A total of 33.3% of prefectures and 40.4% of cities established a renewal system, while 71.8% of prefectures and 33.3% of cities improved the system.Conclusion Although underreporting due to the COVID-19 pandemic is possible, in local governments that had implemented the system, few cities assessed nutrient intake, and approximately 50-70% of prefectures and cities set targets for healthy food environment improvement. While approximately 90% of each local government assessed the number of registered stores/companies, those that assessed the number of stores/companies in the entire jurisdiction as a population size were approximately 20%. Approximately 30-40% of each local government has established a renewal system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Restaurants , Cities , Humans , Nutrition Policy , Pandemics
14.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(9):5523, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1837731

ABSTRACT

Online spaces are increasingly important in the sale of food, alcohol and tobacco. This analysis focuses on two developments in online food delivery: delivery-only ‘dark kitchens’ and rapid grocery delivery services (RGDS), with the aim to understand and assess the availability of health harming and health promoting products through these services. Data was collected for one metropolitan local authority in London, UK, using publicly available online sources. Being explorative in nature, the analysis includes descriptive statistics and qualitative assessment. Three dark kitchens (renting kitchens to 116 food businesses), three grocery delivery apps, and 76 grocery businesses available through online delivery platforms were identified. Most businesses renting dark kitchen space were ‘virtual restaurants’ (52%) selling fast food (47%) or dessert (21%) through online delivery platforms. RGDS sold a variety of items, with a focus on pre-packaged foods high in fat, salt and sugar, alcoholic beverages and tobacco. These items were also most likely to be promoted through offers and promotional language. Fruits and vegetables were less commonly available and mainly on grocery delivery apps. Online delivery services increase the temporal and geographic availability and promotion of many unhealthy products. Research expanding on the geographic area of interest is needed.

15.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 843, 2022 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817213

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Restaurants, particularly independently-owned ones that serve immigrant communities, are important community institutions in the promotion of dietary health. Yet, these restaurants remain under-researched, preventing meaningful collaborations with the public health sector for healthier community food environments. This research aimed to examine levels of acceptability of healthy eating promotion strategies (HEPS) in independently-owned Latin American restaurants (LARs) and identify resource needs for implementing HEPS in LARs. METHODS: We completed semi-structured, online discussions with LAR owners and staff (n = 20), predominantly from New York City (NYC), to examine current engagement, acceptability, potential barriers, and resource needs for the implementation of HEPS. Verbatim transcripts were analyzed independently by two coders using Dedoose, applying sentiment weighting to denote levels of acceptability for identified HEPS (1 = low, 2 = medium/neutral, 3 = high). Content analysis was used to examine factors associated with HEPS levels of acceptability and resource needs, including the influence of the Coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19). RESULTS: The most acceptable HEPS was menu highlights of healthier items (mean rating = 2.8), followed by promotion of healthier items (mean rating = 2.7), increasing healthy offerings (mean rating = 2.6), nutrition information on the menu (mean rating = 2.3), and reduced portions (mean rating = 1.7). Acceptability was associated with factors related to perceived demand, revenue, and logistical constraints. COVID-19 had a mixed influence on HEPS engagement and acceptability. Identified resource needs to engage in HEPS included nutrition knowledge, additional expertise (e.g., design, social media, culinary skills), and assistance with food suppliers and other restaurant operational logistics. Respondents also identified potential policy incentives. CONCLUSIONS: LARs can positively influence eating behaviors but doing so requires balancing public health goals and business profitability. LARs also faced various constraints that require different levels of assistance and resources, underscoring the need for innovative engagement approaches, including incentives, to promote these changes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Restaurants , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diet, Healthy , Humans , Latin America , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Appetite ; 169: 105806, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814111

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic brought about many changes that potentially altered the home food environment, which has been associated with child eating patterns and dietary intake. There is also some evidence that changes due to the COVID-19 pandemic are associated with health behaviors in children, such as an increased intake of high-calorie snack food. The current study aimed to more deeply understand how the COVID-19 pandemic affected the home food environment of meal and snack time routines and parent feeding practices within families of young children. Data for this study are taken from the Kids EAT! Study, a racially/ethnically diverse cohort of families with 2-5 year old children. Qualitative interviews were conducted by phone and video conference with mothers (n = 25) during August/September 2020 and were coded using a hybrid deductive/inductive analysis approach. This allowed coders to identify themes using the interview questions as an organizational template (deductive) while also allowing unique themes to emerge from the qualitative data (inductive). Three overarching themes emerged with multiple sub-themes: 1) Mothers were more directive in the types of food and amounts of food eaten by children; 2) Mothers had less rules around mealtimes; 3) Mothers had increased meal responsibilities. When faced with a change in a structured schedule and increased stress-such as occurred with the COVID-19 pandemic, parents may benefit from advice on how to manage parent feeding practices, including tips on appropriate limit setting, establishing a schedule and routines, and improving accessibility of healthful snacks. Lessons learned during the COVID-19 pandemic may have relevance to other time periods when families face disruptions to routine and during other times of transition.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child, Preschool , Feeding Behavior , Female , Humans , Parents , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Front Sustain Food Syst ; 6: 724321, 2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798915

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has globally jeopardized food security, with heightened threats for the most vulnerable including smallholder farmers as well as rural, indigenous populations. A serial cross-sectional study was conducted to document effect of COVID-19 pandemic on food environment, agricultural practices, diets and food security, along with potential determinants of food systems resilience, among vulnerable smallholder farmer households in indigenous communities of Santhal, Munda, and Sauria Paharia of Jharkhand state, India. Telephonic household surveys were conducted in two phases i.e., lockdown and unlock phase to assess the impact of the pandemic on their food systems and agricultural practices. Market surveys were conducted during the unlock phase, to understand the impact on local informal markets. Secondary data on state and district level food production and Government food security programs were also reviewed. For data analysis purpose, a conceptual framework was developed which delineated possible pathways of impact of COVID-19 pandemic on food environment, food security and food consumption patterns along with factors that may offer resilience. Our findings revealed adverse effects on food production and access among all three communities, due to restrictions in movement of farm labor and supplies, along with disruptions in food supply chains and other food-related logistics and services associated with the pandemic and mitigation measures. The pandemic significantly impacted the livelihoods and incomes among all three indigenous communities during both lockdown and unlock phases, which were attributed to a reduction in sale of agricultural produce, distress selling at lower prices and reduced opportunity for daily wage laboring. A significant proportion of respondents also experienced changes in dietary intake patterns. Key determinants of resilience were identified; these included accessibility to agricultural inputs like indigenous seeds, labor available at household level due to back migration and access to diverse food environments, specifically the wild food environment. There is a need for programs and interventions to conserve and revitalize the bio-cultural resources available within these vulnerable indigenous communities and build resilient food systems that depend on shorter food supply chains and utilize indigenous knowledge systems and associated resources, thereby supporting healthy, equitable and sustainable food systems for all.

18.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 463, 2021 Dec 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1759772

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the COVID-19 pandemic, most countries implemented lockdowns that motivated changes in the dietary patterns, physical activity, and body mass index (BMI) of consumers worldwide, as well as the emergence of new food marketing strategies in social media. We sought to design and validate a methodology for monitoring and evaluating the Facebook marketing strategies of multinational fast-food chains in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. DATA DESCRIPTION: We developed three datasets. First, a dataset with the Uniform Resource Locators (URLs) of 1015 Facebook posts of five fast-food chains present in Argentina, Bolivia, Guatemala, and Peru. Second, a dataset of 106 content-analyzed posts we used in a pilot to determine intercoder reliability using statistical tests. Third, a dataset of a final sample of the 1015 content-analyzed posts that we used to determine the variables most frequently used. Following a mixed-methods approach, we developed 29 variables that recorded general information, as well as the marketing strategies we identified in the posts, including 14 COVID-19 specific variables. These data should help to monitor the social media marketing strategies that fast-food chains have introduced during the COVID-19 lockdowns, thus providing initial evidence about how they could be contributing to an unhealthy food environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Social Media , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Latin America , Marketing , Pandemics , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Front Nutr ; 9: 828550, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753395

ABSTRACT

Background: To limit the spread of COVID-19, a strict lockdown was imposed in France between March and May 2020. Mobility limitations and closure of non-essential public places (restaurants, open-air markets, etc.) affected peoples' food environment (FE) and thus their food purchasing practices (FPPs). This study aimed to explore changes in FPPs of French households during lockdown and associations with individual and environmental factors. Methods: In April of 2020 households from the Mont'Panier cross-sectional study (n = 306), a quota sampling survey conducted in the south of France, were asked to complete an online questionnaire about their FPPs during lockdown and related factors, including perceived FE (distance to closest general food store, perception of increased food prices, etc.). Objective FE (presence, number, proximity, and density of food outlets) was assessed around participant's home using a geographical information system. Multiple correspondence analysis based on changes in frequency of use and quantity of food purchased by food outlet, followed by a hierarchical cluster analysis, resulted in the identification of clusters. Logistic regression models were performed to assess associations between identified clusters and household's sociodemographic characteristics, perceived, and objective FE. Results: Five clusters were identified. Cluster "Supermarket" (38% of the total sample), in which households reduced frequency of trips, but increased quantity bought in supermarkets during lockdown, was associated with lower incomes and the perception of increased food prices. Cluster "E-supermarket" (12%), in which households increased online food shopping with pickup at supermarket, was associated with higher incomes. Cluster "Diversified" (22%), made up of households who reduced frequency of trips to diverse food outlet types, was associated with the perception of increased food prices. Cluster "Organic Food Store" (20%), in which households did not change frequency of trips, nor quantity purchased in organic food stores, was associated with being older (35-50 y vs. <35 y). Finally, cluster "Producer" (8%), which includes households who regularly purchased food from producers, but mostly reduced these purchases during lockdown, was associated with the presence of an organic food store within a 1-km walking distance around home. Conclusion: This study highlighted diverse changes in FPPs during lockdown and overall more significant associations with perceived than with objective FE indicators.

20.
Nutrients ; 13(11)2021 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502474

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused alterations to be made in the way many people access, prepare, and consume food. Rural communities are particularly impacted due to pre-existing structural vulnerabilities, i.e., poverty, lack of infrastructure, and limited fresh food options. This study aimed to characterize experiences of one rural Appalachian community's changes to the food environment during the pandemic. In April 2021, six focus groups were conducted with residents of Laurel County, Kentucky. Using grounded theory, we identified losses, gains, and overall changes to the community food environment since the onset of COVID-19. Seventeen Laurel Countians (17 female; ages 30-74) participated in the six focus groups. Three main themes emerged regarding food environment changes-(1) modifications of community food and nutrition resources, (2) expansion and utilization of online food ordering, and (3) implications of the home food environment. Rural communities faced considerable challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, in part, due to gaps in existing infrastructure and loss of pre-existing resources. This study illustrates the complexity of changes occurring during COVID-19. Using the preliminary data obtained, we can better understand pre-existing issues in Laurel County and suggestions for future programming to address the inequitable access and response during public health emergencies and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Healthy , Food Supply , Poverty , Rural Population , Adult , Aged , Female , Focus Groups , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Kentucky , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritive Value , Qualitative Research
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