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3.
Zagadnienia Ekonomiki Rolnej ; JOUR(2):5-27, 371.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2100916

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by the outbreak of the SARS-CoV-2 virus has widespread socio-economic consequences worldwide. The implications of the COVID-19 crisis also include changes in production, consumption, trade, and agri-food commodity prices. This paper focuses on the repercussions of the COVID-19 crisis on producer and retail prices of agri-food commodities in European Union (EU) countries. The study is based on monthly producer and consumer food price indices in EU countries. In estimating the impact of COVID-19 on prices, actual price changes were compared with counterfactual figures derived from ex-post forecasts calculated according to regARIMA models. The study of the causes of price changes was based on both quantitative and qualitative approaches. In the quantitative approach, the impact of the strength of applied restrictions and the trade position of countries on the deviation of actual prices from the forecasts was examined. For this purpose, regression models based on cross-sectional data were applied. The results show that there is a quite significant variation in the dynamics of changes in agri-food commodity prices both among countries and across the marketing chain. A negative and statistically significant relationship has been found between country food self-sufficiency in the pre-COVID-19 period and changes in producer prices during the first phase of the COVID-19 crisis. In turn, the strength of stay-at-home restrictions was significant for retail price formation during the COVID-19 crisis. The general conclusion is that the responses of agri-food prices during the pandemic vary both spatially and over time.

4.
Journal of Agricultural Science and Technology ; JOUR(5):1-7, 23.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2100438

ABSTRACT

The whole world is facing unprecedented food security challenges under COVID-l9 pandemic. In order to understand the global food situation, this paper analyzed the world's and China's food supply situation and food security response strategies, and put forward strategy to guarantee China food security. It was found that global grain production was generally stable as expected, and high impact resistant. China's main grain supply was guaranteed, but imported commodities were affected at certain extent such as soybeans. Due to the various situations in different countries, each country adopted measures to protect their domestic food supply, such as increasing financial and policy support, raising food stocks, building green channels, restricting food exports, reducing import tariffs, and implementing price controls. On this basis, this paper suggested to stabilize grain production by cracking supply bottlenecks, control grain prices by strengthening regulation, and stabilize social expectations by effectively guiding the market to ensure China food security and the stable operation of the food supply chain.

5.
PeerJ ; 10: e13924, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100353

ABSTRACT

Background: In Taiwan, the aerial part of Adenostemma lavenia (Al) is used in the form of herbal tea or in a folk remedy primarily to mitigate inflammatory conditions in the lungs and liver. Due to the excellent health benefits of Al against inflammation, it has become increasingly crucial and in great demand during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, Al has been found to be adulterated with Wedelia biflora, Sigesbeckia orientalis, and/or Wedelia chinensis because of similarities in appearance and vernacular names. Methods: This study aimed to develop a PCR-RFLP DNA molecular method for the authentication of Al. The restriction enzyme BsrI was used according to the sequencing and alignment results of PCR products in the ITS2 regions of Al and its adulterants. Gel electrophoresis resulted in the clear separation of Al and its adulterants into two distinct categories. Results: In conclusion, the PCR-RFLP authentication method developed herein provides an easy, rapid, and accurate method to distinguish Al from its adulterants to assure user health and safety.

6.
Biomedica ; 42(Sp. 2): 14-18, 2022 10 31.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100344

ABSTRACT

Durante dos años y medio, tanto en Colombia como en el resto del mundo, hemos enfrentado la pandemia generada por el SARS-CoV-2, agudizando los múltiples problemas de salud pública que venían cursando a manera de sindemias. Tal es el caso de las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles asociadas, entre otros factores, a los malos hábitos alimenticios, especialmente por el gran consumo de alimentos ultraprocesados y bebidas azucaradas. En julio del 2021, se aprobó la Ley 2120, por medio de la cual se adoptaron medidas para fomentar entornos alimentarios saludables. Entre estas medidas, también se promueve que los alimentos empacados, procesados y que afectan negativamente la salud humana, tengan un sello que identifique sus componentes y valor nutricional para informar a los consumidores sobre el producto que están comprando o consumiendo. Entre las enfermedades más prevalentes en Colombia que afectan la salud bucal, se encuentran las caries y las periodontitis, ambas con factores de riesgo comunes con las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles. Dados sus costos y prevalencia, dichas enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles resultan primordiales desde un enfoque de gestión del riesgo en salud pública, siendo, quizá, su gravedad mayor durante la pandemia generada por el SARS CoV-2. Asimismo, se especula que la población confinada pudo llegar a consumir más comida chatarra durante la pandemia del COVID-19 en comparación con otros períodos, además, porque en aquellos con enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles, el confinamiento obligado se asocia con mayor sedentarismo y con un menor número de controles médicos regulares, asuntos que se han reportado previamente. La promulgación de la ley de comida chatarra no va a cambiar los hábitos de alimentación de los colombianos "de la noche a la mañana" y, por esto, se necesita con urgencia implementar procesos de educación y sensibilización frente a los efectos adversos de los alimentos procesados y ultraprocesados en la salud.


Durante dos años y medio, tanto en Colombia como en el resto del mundo, hemos enfrentado la pandemia generada por el SARS-CoV-2, agudizando los múltiples problemas de salud pública que venían cursando a manera de sindemias. Tal es el caso de las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles asociadas, entre otros factores, a los malos hábitos alimenticios, especialmente por el gran consumo de alimentos ultraprocesados y bebidas azucaradas. En julio del 2021, se aprobó la Ley 2120, por medio de la cual se adoptaron medidas para fomentar entornos alimentarios saludables. Entre estas medidas, también se promueve que los alimentos empacados, procesados y que afectan negativamente la salud humana, tengan un sello que identifique sus componentes y valor nutricional para informar a los consumidores sobre el producto que están comprando o consumiendo. Entre las enfermedades más prevalentes en Colombia que afectan la salud bucal, se encuentran las caries y las periodontitis, ambas con factores de riesgo comunes con las enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles. Dados sus costos y prevalencia, dichas enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles resultan primordiales desde un enfoque de gestión del riesgo en salud pública, siendo, quizá, su gravedad mayor durante la pandemia generada por el SARS CoV-2. Asimismo, se especula que la población confinada pudo llegar a consumir más comida chatarra durante la pandemia del COVID-19 en comparación con otros períodos, además, porque en aquellos con enfermedades crónicas no transmisibles, el confinamiento obligado se asocia con mayor sedentarismo y con un menor número de controles médicos regulares, asuntos que se han reportado previamente. La promulgación de la ley de comida chatarra no va a cambiar los hábitos de alimentación de los colombianos "de la noche a la mañana" y, por esto, se necesita con urgencia implementar procesos de educación y sensibilización frente a los efectos adversos de los alimentos procesados y ultraprocesados en la salud.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Colombia/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies
7.
Sensors (Basel) ; 22(21)2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099737

ABSTRACT

The rapid growth of the world population has increased the food demand as well as the need for assurance of food quality, safety, and sustainability. However, food security can easily be compromised by not only natural hazards but also changes in food preferences, political conflicts, and food frauds. In order to contribute to building a more sustainable food system-digitally visible and processes measurable-within this review, we summarized currently available evidence for various information and communication technologies (ICTs) that can be utilized to support collaborative actions, prevent fraudulent activities, and remotely perform real-time monitoring, which has become essential, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic. The Internet of Everything, 6G, blockchain, artificial intelligence, and digital twin are gaining significant attention in recent years in anticipation of leveraging the creativity of human experts in collaboration with efficient, intelligent, and accurate machines, but with limited consideration in the food supply chain. Therefore, this paper provided a thorough review of the food system by showing how various ICT tools can help sense and quantify the food system and highlighting the key enhancements that Industry 5.0 technologies can bring. The vulnerability of the food system can be effectively mitigated with the utilization of various ICTs depending on not only the nature and severity of crisis but also the specificity of the food supply chain. There are numerous ways of implementing these technologies, and they are continuously evolving.


Subject(s)
Blockchain , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Artificial Intelligence , Food Security
8.
J Egypt Public Health Assoc ; 97(1): 21, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098478

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The world is facing an extraordinarily unprecedented threat from the COVID-19 pandemic triggered by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Global life has turned upside down, and that several countries closed their borders, simultaneously with the blockage of life cycle as a result of the shutdown of the majority of workplaces except the food stores and some few industries. MAIN BODY: In this review, we are casting light on the nature of COVID-19 infection and spread, the persistence of SARS-CoV-2 virus in food products, and revealing the threats arising from the transmission of COVID-19 in food environment between stakeholders and even customers. Furthermore, we are exploring and identifying some practical aspects that must be followed to minimize infection and maintain a safe food environment. We also present and discuss some World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines-based regulations in food safety codes, destined to sustain the health safety of all professionals working in the food industry under this current pandemic. CONCLUSION: The information compiled in this manuscript is supporting and consolidating the safety attributes in food environment, for a prospective positive impact on consumer confidence in food safety and the citizens' public health in society. Some research is suggested on evaluating the use and potentiality of native and chemical modified basic proteins as possible practices aiming at protecting food from bacterial and viral contamination including COVID-19.

9.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1982, 2022 10 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098329

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Food insecurity is the lack of access to nutritious healthy food due to economic and financial insufficiencies. Food insecurity is expected to be higher during these difficult times in Lebanon, which is facing many financial, political, economic and health debates. The present study aims to find the prevalence of food insecurity among Lebanese children during the COVID-19 pandemic and its correlates. METHODS: This cross-sectional study enrolled 4001 participants from all Lebanese governorates (March-April 2022). The Ministry of Education and Higher Education randomly disseminated the link to parents of children aged between 5 and 11 years from public and private schools. RESULTS: The results showed that 1505 (37.6%) and 1497 (37.4%) had moderate and severe food insecurity. A significantly higher percentage of families with severe food insecurity was reported by fathers compared to mothers. In addition, participants who reported a bad overall health status of their children had a severe food insecurity. Moreover, those with a severe food insecurity had their children's daily snacking habit between meals decreased, with a decreased quantity of meals, intake of vegetables/fruits, the intake of balanced diet, junk food, sugar-sweetened beverages, consumption of sweets/candies/chocolate, consumption of unhealthy food, intake of immunity-boosting food, intake of nutrition supplements, participation in the house chores, number of sleeping hours and sleep quality, as well as stress/anxiety decreased. Finally, a higher mean financial burden was seen in families with severe food insecurity compared to the other groups. CONCLUSION: The current study found a high prevalence of moderate to severe food insecurity among Lebanese children during the COVID-19 pandemic. Food insecurity should be seriously discussed in Lebanon due to its rapid development in the middle of all the crises facing the country in order to avoid short and long term consequences on human's health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Female , Humans , Child, Preschool , COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Supply , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Feeding Behavior , Food Insecurity , Educational Status
10.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 806, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098325

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) was revised in 2009 to be more congruent with national dietary guidelines. There is limited research examining effects of the revision on women's and children's health. The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the revised WIC food package was associated with various indicators of physical and mental health for women and children. METHODS: We used 1998-2017 waves of the National Health Interview Survey (N = 81,771 women and 27,780 children) to estimate effects of the revised WIC food package on indicators of health for both women (self-reported health and body mass index) and children (anemia, mental health, and parent-reported health). We used difference-in-differences analysis, a quasi-experimental technique that assessed pre-post differences in outcomes among WIC-recipients while "differencing out" the secular underlying trends among a control group of non-recipients. RESULTS: For all outcomes evaluated for women and children, we were unable to rule out the null hypothesis that there was no effect of receiving the revised WIC food package. These findings were confirmed across several secondary analyses conducted to assess heterogeneity of effects and robustness of results. CONCLUSION: While we did not find effects of the revised WIC food package on downstream health indicators, studies using similarly robust methods in other datasets have found shorter-term effects on more proximal outcomes related to diet and nutrition. Effects of the modest WIC revisions may be less impactful on longer-term indicators of health, and future studies should examine the larger COVID-19-era expansion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Food Assistance , Infant , Child , Female , Humans , Child Health , Women's Health , Food
11.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-24, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096217

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To compare food insecurity (FI) risk, and food-related COVID-19 infection risk perceptions, practices, and problems (3P) in Washington (WA), New York (NY) and Louisiana (LA). METHODS: Data from the RAPID Multi-Wave Risk Perception Study was collected via online surveys between 19 May to 14 July 2020 (N=1260). Multivariable-adjusted logistic and ordinal regressions were performed for odds of FI risk and 3P during these early months of the pandemic. RESULTS: The determinants of FI risk in all states included income, age, and employment. Some determinants were state-specific: households with members at high risk for COVID-19 (WA and NY), ethnicity (NY), education and relationship status (LA). The odds of FI risk were higher among those who perceived higher likelihood of COVID-19 infection via in-store shopping (OR=1.34, 95%CI: 1.06, 1.70), and improperly cooked food (OR=1.87, 95%CI: 1.46, 2.41). FI risk was associated with higher odds of problems related to food affordability (OR=10.66, 95%CI: 7.87, 14.44), preference (OR=2.51, 95%CI: 1.86, 3.39), sufficiency (OR=2.63, 95%CI: 1.96, 3.54), food sources (OR=7.68, 95%CI: 5.73, 10.31), food storage capacity (OR=0.48, 95%CI: 0.36, 0.66), and knowing where to find help in obtaining food (OR=7.68, 95%CI: 5.73, 10.31), most of which did not differ by state. No association was found between food insecurity risk and food-related practices. CONCLUSION: Better food preparedness is needed to reduce FI risk during pandemics in specific groups in WA, NY, and LA. Specifically, food affordability, sufficiency, storage, sources and increasing knowledge on food programs are limitations that need to be addressed for emergency situations.

12.
J Rural Stud ; 96: 180-189, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095697

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 caused severe disruptions to global supply chains in March 2020, local and regional food producers were widely heralded for their flexibility in adapting and 'pivoting' to meet changing market demand amidst public health protocols in ways their behemothic agri-food counterparts could not. While "resilient food systems" have become both an academic buzzword and a practical goal for urban and municipal planners, there is an emergent critical literature that calls for greater attention to questions of power within discourses on resilience. This article contributes to a more critical geography of food system resilience through analyzing the experiences of local food producers and meat processors in the state of Iowa, U.S. during the early pandemic period using a moral economy framework. We argue that while the small-scale, producers who market direct-to-consumer may show resilience in their ability to cope with and adapt to system shocks due to short supply chains and social relations, their uneven experience with socio-emotional and economic 'costs' of resilience merits increased attention from both academics and policymakers. The ethic of 'hustle' within farming, along with the greater social 'embeddedness' of market transactions in local food, invites a certain self-exploitation that is differentially enacted and experienced based on factors such as age, gender, health status, and their level of dependence on farm income. Our conclusions suggest that any policies focused on strengthening local and regional food system resilience need to also focus on the wellbeing of local food producers and promote policies towards dignified and remunerative work.

13.
20th LACCEI International Multi-Conference for Engineering, Education Caribbean Conference for Engineering and Technology, LACCEI 2022 ; JOUR, 2022-July.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2091202

ABSTRACT

The objective of the research was to design a logistics management model for the competitiveness of an SME in the balanced food industry to the year2021. The methodology used has a mixed, applied and prospective approach. Validated instruments were applied according to experts, identifying nine root causes demonstrating inadequate logistical management and low competitiveness. A logistics management model was developed by means of eight strategies to improve the processes: supply, storage, inventory and distribution. Diagrams were restructured increasing 6% the total activitiesand 16% the automated activitiesby means of information technologies, annual savings of S/16 920 have been estimated in salaries and 80% in merchandise acquisition costs, likewise, the numberof operatorswasreduced by 50% anda recovery of 5% of merchandise is achieved. Implementation costs were estimated at S/61 103 and finally;the environmental impact was determined using the 3 R's, being a precedent for companiesin the same industry that want to increase their competitiveness. © 2022 Latin American and Caribbean Consortium of Engineering Institutions. All rights reserved.

14.
International Journal of Multidisciplinary: Applied Business & Education Research ; JOUR(10):1878-1884, 3.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2090879

ABSTRACT

This study mainly aims to determine the knowledge, attitudes, and practices among Filipino college students on food hygiene and sanitation in the context of flexible blended learning during the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. Twenty college students major in Bachelor of Science in Industrial Technology (BSIT) in Food Technology are purposively selected as the main respondents of the study. This mixed-method study reveals that the students have excellent knowledge, attitudes, and practices towards cleaning and sanitization procedures, the use of appropriate clothing, and the proper storage of foods during their laboratory activities. The very positive findings of the study indicate that the students have a high level of knowledge, attitude, and practices regarding general sanitary measures. [ FROM AUTHOR]

15.
Frontiers in Sustainable Food Systems ; JOUR, 6.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2089957

ABSTRACT

Young people are on the front lines of transforming agriculture and food systems, coping with the social and economic impacts of COVID-19 as well as environmental and climate change effects which are likely to accelerate and intensify during their lifetimes. At the same time, young people across global contexts are increasingly emerging as visible agents of change in food systems, especially through networks that create, transform, and distribute food systems knowledge. This policy and practice review examines the role of youth as actors through food systems knowledge networks. Increasing youth participation in creating sustainable food systems for the future requires policies and practices that support food systems-related knowledge in two ways: (1) democratizing formal education systems;and (2) strengthening horizontal networks of grassroots research and innovation, including through traditional, ecological, local and community knowledge (TELCK). Food systems policies should be developed through dialogue with diverse knowledge systems, experiences, place-based needs, and aspirations of young people to maximize their participation in food systems policy development and evaluation.

16.
Journal of Indian Business Research ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2088004

ABSTRACT

Purpose This paper aims to evaluate the responses taken during the pandemic of COVID-19 in sustaining agricultural activities and safeguarding local food supply via digital platforms by applying the case study method. Design/methodology/approach This paper uses a case study approach due to its systematic way of collecting data, analysing information and reporting results to understand the particular problem. For this study, secondary data consisting of government reports and documents are used to give a broader understanding of the impact of COVID-19 on the local food system and digital platform for agricultural produce. Findings The impact of COVID-19 on the agri-food sector is the move towards a more resilient and sustainable local food system, whereby nations emphasise food security by encouraging local food production. This is done by boosting micro, small and medium enterprises' (MSME) output, "supporting local" initiatives and leveraging digital platforms and FinTech in business transactions. Research limitations/implications This study highlights that MSMEs' adoption of digital platforms, particularly in the agri-food sector, demonstrates their willingness to embrace new business models that leverage technological advancements while maintaining the personal touch that attracts customers. Practical implications This study implies that although the pandemic outbreak created prolonged uncertainties with an immediate impact on the economy and ways of doing business transactions, digital platforms and FinTech ensured continuous food supply during the period. Originality/value This paper provides initial valuable insight to academics, practitioners and policymakers in agriculture and innovation management. It can be observed that digital platform and FinTech plays an essential role in ensuring safety and undisrupted food supply, especially in the case of fresh produce grown by local small-scale farmers and MSMEs. This creates a more resilient agri-food system and reduces the pressure from the conventional model of food purchase and social distancing requirements.

17.
International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education ; JOUR
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2087993

ABSTRACT

Purpose Because food waste is a serious problem today, society is currently aiming for more responsible consumption to minimize it, as defined in the 12th goal of the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. This study aims to examine whether an informative initiative can help to raise university students' awareness of food waste consequences. Design/methodology/approach The initiative consisted of explaining the problem of food waste to students of two marketing subject modules within economics and business administration degrees and asking them to participate in an activity in which they analyzed their own behavior. To assess its impact, two questionnaires about the students' food waste behaviors were administered, before and after the initiative, adopting an experimental design. Findings The results show that the information and awareness activities were successful, because, after the initiative, the students were more aware about the food waste problem and its consequences and were more critical of their behavior regarding the management of leftovers at home. Research limitations/implications Despite some circumstances under which the study was conducted (the COVID-19 pandemic and the lockdown), the practical and social implications are relevant. Practical implications This study offers some interesting practical implications for educational institutions that want to inform and train students in more responsible consumption behavior. It shows that an initiative in which students are involved, like collecting data about food waste, in their homes with a diary, and informative sessions can be useful to increase students' awareness of food waste to behave in a more sustainable way. Social implications These findings may be of interest to academics for designing initiatives that try to train and educate young people in making more responsible personal and professional decisions. Originality/value This study analyzes the impact of an awareness-raising initiative about food waste in higher education, which is a relatively neglected topic in the literature.

18.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 28(11): 1-8, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089722

ABSTRACT

During 2020-2021, countries in Latin America and the Caribbean reported clinical emergence of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales that had not been previously characterized locally, increased prevalence of carbapenemases that had previously been detected, and co-production of multiple carbapenemases in some isolates. These increases were likely fueled by changes related to the COVID-19 pandemic, including empirical antibiotic use for potential COVID-19-related bacterial infections and healthcare limitations resulting from the rapid rise in COVID-19 cases. Strengthening antimicrobial resistance surveillance, epidemiologic research, and infection prevention and control programs and antimicrobial stewardship in clinical settings can help prevent emergence and transmission of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacterales.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Latin America/epidemiology , beta-Lactamases/genetics , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteria
19.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1962, 2022 10 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089184

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Food insecurity has increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, affecting an estimated 260 million people. However, little evidence is available on how pandemic-related characteristics influence food security in a high-altitude population. The objective of this study was to assess factors associated with food insecurity in high-altitude Peruvian cities during the second epidemic wave of COVID-19. METHODS: A retrospective, cross-sectional study was conducted in eight Peruvian cities over 1,500 m above sea level. An online survey measuring food security, presence of anxiety & depressive symptoms, sleep quality, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), resilience, and sociodemographic characteristics was disseminated through social networks between December 2020 and February 2021. Generalized linear models were used to identify an association between the study variables. RESULTS: Of 700 participants, the median age was 23 years, and more than half were female (56.7%). The prevalence of food insecurity was 37.1%. Anxiety symptoms, depressive symptoms, and PTSD were present in 72.7%, 64.1%, and 15% of respondents, respectively. The prevalence of food insecurity was higher in people with fair (PR: 1.60, 95% CI: 1.23-2.07) and very bad perception of their health (PR: 4.06, 95% CI: 2.63-6.26), individuals seeking mental health support (PR: 1.42, 95% CI: 1.25-1.62), and in those who lost their job due to the pandemic (PR: 1.82, 95% CI: 1.62-2.04). Having moderate (PR: 1.52, 95% CI: 1.26-1.83) and moderate to severe depressive symptoms (PR: 1.58, 95% CI: 1.11-2.27) also increased the prevalence of food insecurity. CONCLUSION: During the pandemic, the prevalence of food insecurity has increased in the Peruvian high-altitude population, revealing the need for preventive strategies. Identification of pandemic-related characteristics that influence food insecurity can guide interventions in at-risk individuals and reduce the long-term impact of this problem on overall health and quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Young Adult , Adult , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Prevalence , Peru/epidemiology , Cities , Retrospective Studies , Quality of Life , Altitude , Food Supply , Food Insecurity
20.
Adv Physiol Educ ; 46(4): 742-751, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088956

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to the suspension of in-person learning at many higher education institutions (HEIs) in March 2020. In response, HEIs transitioned most courses to online formats immediately and continued this mode of instruction through the 2020-2021 academic year. In fall 2021, numerous HEIs resumed in-person courses and some hybrid courses, and faculty began noting academic-related behavior deficiencies not previously observed in students. Focus groups of teaching faculty (n = 8) from one university department were conducted to gather information on changes in student academic-related behaviors attributed to the disruption of teaching and learning due to COVID-19 and to compare observed deficiencies with the university's undergraduate learning goals. Mind mapping software was utilized to capture themes and subthemes. Identified themes were related to problem-solving skills, grades, time management, attendance, and interpersonal communication, both in terms of student-to-student and student-to-faculty communication. For these identified areas, outcomes during the return to in-person learning were mostly undesirable. Based on these identified issues, suggested modifications that HEIs could use to modify course content and delivery to offset skill gaps and improve interpersonal communication were identified. Furthermore, observations may indicate that fully remote learning inhibited student learning and skill development during the 2020-2021 academic year. Future work should examine the effectiveness of the proposed modifications on student success.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This article contains information gathered from mind map-driven faculty focus group observations of student academic-related deficiencies resulting from transitioning from remote to in-person learning and how said deficiencies compare to university undergraduate learning goals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Learning , Students , Faculty
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