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1.
Frontiers in Education ; 7, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2109746

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus pandemic has influenced the lives of many people. We analyzed the effects of physical activity and stress on students' motivation during the pandemic. Participants were 254 university students who reported their academic motivation, physical activity, general stress, the coronavirus pandemic strain, and their coronavirus stress. Women reported higher levels of coronavirus stress, general stress, and motivation. The coronavirus stress was predicted by the strain of the coronavirus pandemic but not by physical activity. General stress and gender predicted mastery goals, and performance goals were predicted by general stress. Physical activity was not related to students' motivation during the pandemic. Higher levels of general stress were associated with higher academic motivation. Negative emotions like stress could have enhanced students' motivation during uncertain times of the pandemic. Moreover, a moderate stress level could be favorable for academic dedication and achievement.

2.
Quality in Ageing and Older Adults ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107785

ABSTRACT

Purpose This paper aims to examine the impact of COVID-19 related employment disruption on individuals' retirement planning and whether these experiences differ by occupational social class. Design/methodology/approach To explore these issues, this study linked data from those who were employed in wave 9 of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA) main study with wave 1 of the ELSA COVID-19 study (N = 1,797). Multinominal regression analyses were conducted to explore whether the interaction between employment disruption and occupational social class was associated with planning to retire earlier or later than previously planned. Findings The results show that stopping work because of COVID-19 is associated with planning to retire earlier. However, there were no statistically significant interactions between occupational social class and employment disruptions on whether respondents planned to retire earlier or later. Originality/value This paper's original contribution is in showing that the pandemic has had an impact on retirement decisions. Given the known negative effects of both involuntary early labour market exit, the findings suggest that the COVID-19 related employment disruptions are likely to exacerbate social inequalities in health, well-being in later life and, consequently, can help anticipate where there will be need for additional support in later life.

3.
Chinese Management Studies ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2107730

ABSTRACT

Purpose Work from home has become as regular as the traditional commuting system after the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. Previous studies have discussed the influence of working at home on the work-family interface. However, there is limited understanding of how diverse workforces manage their work-family issues with various family-friendly policies. This study aims to bridge this research gap by examining the collective influence of work conditions and family-friendly policies on work-family balance. Design/methodology/approach A survey experiment featuring two working conditions (work from home or commuting) x four family-friendly policies (household subsidy, family-friendly supervisor, financial profit, paid leave vs no policy) was approached based on 703 valid responses in China. Findings The results indicate that family-friendly policies are more effective under the work-from-home condition than the commuting condition, household subsidies and financial profits are considered more helpful for work-family balance under the work-from-home condition and employees' policy preferences depend on personal identity and work conditions, which help them maintain work and family issues concurrently. Originality/value This study explores the joint impact of work conditions and family-friendly policies from a situational perspective. This study indicated that professional organizations need to perform delicacy management considering policy preferences. Moreover, changing working arrangements help employees facilitate their work-family balance.

4.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2037, 2022 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108762

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Gender nonconformity (GNC) (i.e., gender expression that differs from gender role expectations for feminine or masculine appearance and behavior) is an under-researched area of adolescent sleep health. The COVID-19 lockdown offers an opportunity to understand how the effect of GNC on adolescent health outcomes changes between school closure and reopening. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study in Shanghai, China, in 2020. The sample size for analysis was 3,265. The age-specific insufficient sleep was estimated according to National Sleep Foundation's sleep duration recommendations. The self-perceived and self-rated GNC were measured by the two items "On the same scale that goes from 100% as a girl to 100% as a boy, where do you think others see you?" and "On a scale that goes from feeling 100% like a girl to feeling 100% like a boy, where do you see yourself?", and birth sex. In addition, we calculated sex-stratified adjusted odds ratios (AORs) of insufficient sleep for students with high and moderate GNC compared to students with low GNC. Finally, we measured the AORs with self-perceived and self-rated GNC during COVID-19 school closure and reopening. RESULTS: Among 3,265 students in grade 6-12 in the analytic sample, 1,567(48.0%) were assigned female at birth (AFAB), 3,188 (97.6%) Han, and 1,921(58.8%) in grade 6-9. Among AFAB students, high self-perceived GNC was significantly associated with insufficient sleep (AOR,1.65; 95%CI,1.30-2.09) during school closure. Insufficient sleep was associated with high self-rated GNC (AOR,1.73; 95%CI,1.23-2.44) and moderate self-rated GNC (AOR,1.69; 95%CI,1.29-2.22) during school closure. After school reopening, neither self-perceived nor self-rated GNC was associated with insufficient sleep among AFAB students. Among assigned male at birth (AMAB) students, none of the two kinds of GNC was associated with insufficient sleep in the two periods during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests GNC is only associated with insufficient sleep among AFAB students during school closure. Furthermore, the association is nonsignificant among AMAB students. These findings indicate that GNC-related stigma within the family could be a risk factor for insufficient sleep among AFAB adolescents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Deprivation , Infant, Newborn , Adolescent , Male , Humans , Female , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Schools , Sleep
5.
Paediatr Anaesth ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108143

ABSTRACT

The Society for Pediatric Anesthesia launched the Women's Empowerment and Leadership Initiative (WELI) in 2018 to empower highly productive women pediatric anesthesiologists to achieve equity, promotion, and leadership. WELI is focused on six career development domains: promotion and leadership, networking, conceptualization and completion of projects, mentoring, career satisfaction, and sense of well-being. We sought feedback about whether WELI supported members' career development by surveys emailed in November 2020 (baseline), May 2021 (6 months), and January 2022 (14 months). Program feedback was quantitatively evaluated by the Likert scale questions and qualitatively evaluated by extracting themes from free-text question responses. The response rates were 60.5% (92 of 152) for the baseline, 51% (82 of 161) for the 6-month, and 52% (96 of 185) for the 14-month surveys. Five main themes were identified from the free-text responses in the 6- and 14-month surveys. Members reported that WELI helped them create meaningful connections through networking, obtain new career opportunities, find tools and projects that supported their career advancement and promotion, build the confidence to try new things beyond their comfort zone, and achieve better work-life integration. Frustration with the inability to connect in-person during the coronavirus-19 pandemic was highlighted. Advisors further stated that WELI helped them improve their mentorship skills and gave them insight into early career faculty issues. Relative to the baseline survey, protégés reported greater contributions from WELI at 6 months in helping them clarify their priorities, increase their sense of achievement, and get promoted. These benefits persisted through 14 months. Advisors reported a steady increase in forming new meaningful relationships and finding new collaborators through WELI over time. All the members reported that their self-rated mentoring abilities improved at 6 months with sustained improvement at 14 months. Thus, programs such as WELI can assist women anesthesiologists and foster gender equity in career development, promotion, and leadership.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110076

ABSTRACT

With the arrival of COVID-19, educational systems have had to adapt to the social and health situation immediately. This led to the appearance of the asynchronous teaching model. Throughout the pandemic, at the educational level, we can distinguish three phases, eminently online, hybrid, and finally, face-to-face. However, the perception of educational quality in these three educational moments, taking into account the psychometric profile and gender, has not been studied. Thus, 1093 university students from Ibero-American countries were analyzed. Through a questionnaire, demographic, academic, and psychological variables were analyzed at three moments during the evolution of the pandemic. Data suggest that, during the lockdown phase, while teaching was eminently online, students presented higher levels of stress and higher difficulty of learning; class attendance, convenience, preferred method of learning, grading score, and motivation were lower, compared to other phases of teaching (hybrid and face-to-face). During this period, females presented higher stress levels than males, as well as higher levels of anxiety and loneliness, without gender differences among the other studied variables. During the hybrid and face-to-face phases, male students presented higher values in the results of difficulty learning and demanding activities. No differences were seen regarding motivation, synchronous class attendance, learning level, grades, convenience, or preferred learning method. The results from the present study suggest that, despite the effect of the pandemic on mental health, asynchronous education is postulated as an effective teaching-learning alternative. Yet, a special focus should be given to female students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Female , United States , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sex Factors , Universities , Communicable Disease Control , Students
7.
Cogent Education ; 9(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2106849

ABSTRACT

During this COVID-19 pandemic, the community, especially students, experienced anxiety due to the uncertainty that occurred. To cover it up, self-handicapping is the most common option. People in the eastern culture, such as Indonesia, prefer to achieve social achievement (SAch) goals than academic achievement (AAch) goals in motivation. This study aims to examine the model of the relationship between SAch goals with adaptive and maladaptive outcomes. This study used 904 respondents who filled out a questionnaire that had been tested for validity and reliability using confirmatory factor analysis and internal consistency respectively. The respondents of this research were young business practitioners who were studying in college. The results of the correlation test confirm the results of previous research that SAch goals consist of three interrelated but independent dimensions, so that students can pursue these three goals. Academic engagement also has two correlated dimensions, while self-handicapping has two uncorrelated and even contradictory dimensions. The results of testing the relationship model using a two-stage structural equation modeling approach further strengthen that behavioral self-handicapping was maladaptive. Social development goals (SDevGs) produced adaptive outcomes, while social demonstration goals (SDemGs) produced maladaptive outcomes. Eastern culture prefers did not make mistakes than showed social competence by appearing popular and having many friends. Need a curriculum that includes activities that encourage the achievement of social goals and feel an attachment to academic activities but minimizes behavior that externalizes failure.

8.
Telemed J E Health ; 2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107314

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Telemedicine is a relatively new adjunct in orthopedic care but it has emerged from the periphery, driven in part by the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it has drastically increased in use, little is known of the factors that drive satisfaction with telemedicine. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the patient's satisfaction with postoperative telemedicine visits in those undergoing knee or shoulder arthroscopy, and to analyze the factors associated with satisfaction with telemedicine. Methods: A prospective study was performed to evaluate satisfaction comparing postoperative telemedicine and in-office visits, in those undergoing shoulder and knee arthroscopy. Multiple factors were analyzed for correlation with satisfaction via multi-linear regression, including demographics such as gender, education, age, and race. Patients were also evaluated for preference for future visits with reference to the group in which they were placed. Results: Overall, 215 patients were included with a subgroup analysis of 93 patients receiving telemedicine visits. Patients reported overall similar satisfaction with telemedicine visits after shoulder and knee arthroscopy, with a high level of satisfaction seen in both. Female sex was found to be associated with decreasing satisfaction with telemedicine visits (p = 0.036). In addition, as a whole, the cohort was found to prefer future visits to be the same as the group they were placed in, but females statistically did not have this preference for their familiar group and were skewed toward the preference of in-person visits (p = 0.377). Conclusions: Our study found that female patients were less likely to be satisfied with postoperative telemedicine visits after knee or shoulder arthroscopy. Further, females were also less likely to indicate preference for future telemedicine visits. In contrast, education, history of prior surgery, age, and race were not associated with postoperative satisfaction.

9.
Soc Sci Med ; 315: 115511, 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105993

ABSTRACT

Pandemic preparedness and COVID-19 response indicators focus on public health outcomes (such as infections, case fatalities, and vaccination rates), health system capacity, and/or the effects of the pandemic on the economy, yet this avoids more political questions regarding how responses were mobilized. Pandemic preparedness country rankings have been called into question due to their inability to predict COVID-19 response and outcomes, and COVID-19 response indicators have ignored one of the most well documented secondary effects of the pandemic - its disproportionate effects on women. This paper analyzes pandemic preparedness and response indicators from a feminist perspective to understand how indicators might consider the secondary effects of the pandemic on women and other equity deserving groups. Following a discussion of the tensions that exist between feminist methodologies and the reliance on indicators by policymakers in preparing and responding to health emergencies, we assess the strengths and weakness of current pandemic preparedness and COVID-19 response indicators. The risk with existing pandemic preparedness and response indicators is that they give only limited attention to secondary effects of pandemics and inequities in terms of who is disproportionately affected. There is an urgent need to reconceptualize what 'successful' pandemic preparedness and response entails, moving beyond epidemiological and economic measurements. We suggest how efforts to design COVID response indicators on gender inclusion could inform pandemic preparedness and associated indicators.

10.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 83: 103429, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105060

ABSTRACT

Women social workers' roles during COVID-19 have been under-researched. We contribute to filling this gap by examining patriarchal inequalities in the pay and status of women social workers in Wuhan, China to determine whether change occurred when they replaced men in first-tier responder or protector roles when the government replaced men in frontline social work with women social workers. We conducted a qualitative investigation into these practitioners' work during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown in Wuhan from 23 January to April 7, 2020 through 30 in-depth interviews of women social workers (11 working in Residents' Committees, 12 in NGOs from Wuhan and six other cities; and 7 in other local organizations). The findings highlight how women social workers' roles shifted during the pandemic from being second-tier responders to assuming the first-tier responder or 'protector' roles previously held by men while they continued their second-tier responders' and traditional caring roles. Despite this shift, the data show that women's demands for higher pay and status and involvement in decision-making structures remained unmet. Although women resisted unequal gender relations, doing men's roles as protectors loaded them with a 'triple' burden as protectors, second-tier responders and carers. The lack of gender equality for these women social workers highlights an urgency for policymakers and practitioners to promote gender equality by implementing women social workers' entitlements to pay parity, engagement in decision-making, and assumption of leadership roles, i.e., as men's equals.

11.
Popul Res Policy Rev ; 41(6): 2393-2418, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104028

ABSTRACT

It is important to assess the long-term consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic for gender equality, but we know little about US parents' domestic arrangements beyond the early days of the pandemic or how simultaneous changes in employment, earnings, telework, gender ideologies, and care supports may have altered domestic arrangements. This study assesses changes in parents' domestic labor during the first year of the pandemic using fixed-effects regression on data from a longitudinal panel of 700 different-sex partnered US parents collected at three time points: March, April, and November 2020. Parents' divisions of housework and childcare became more equal early in the pandemic, but divisions of housework reverted toward pre-pandemic levels by Fall 2020 whereas fathers' shares of childcare remained elevated. Changes in parents' divisions of domestic labor were largely driven by changes in parents' labor force conditions, but shifts in gender ideology also mattered. Decreases in fathers' labor force participation and increases in telecommuting in April portended increases in fathers' shares of domestic tasks. As fathers increased their time in paid work and returned to in-person work by fall, their shares of domestic labor fell. Shifts toward more traditional gender ideologies were also associated with decreases in fathers' shares of childcare in Fall 2020. Overall, results point to remote work as a possible means for achieving greater gender equality in domestic labor among couples, but shifts toward traditional gender ideologies may suppress any gains stemming from supportive work-family policies. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s11113-022-09735-1.

12.
Arch Sex Behav ; 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2103945

ABSTRACT

The global COVID-19 pandemic resulted in strict social distancing measures restricting close physical contact. Men (cis and trans) and other gender diverse people who have sex with men (MGDSM) are at higher risk of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and may have experienced changes in sexual behavior during government restrictions on social and sexual contact. We aimed to examine self-reported sexual behavior of MGDSM during the first UK-wide lockdown to identify the characteristics of the individuals who might most require sexual health promotion and clinical support. In April-May 2020, we conducted an online survey of MGDSM, promoted on social media and Grindr. Our exploratory approach used descriptive analysis to identify self-reported changes in sexual behavior and performed regression analyses to identify correlates of casual sex during the lockdown. A total of 1429 respondents completed the survey: mean age 36 years, 84% White, 97% male or trans male, 98% assigned male sex at birth, 2% female or non-binary, 65% degree educated or higher. During the lockdown, 76% reported not having any casual sex partners. While the majority reported reduced casual sex, 3% reported an increase in casual sex with one person and 2% with three or more people (group sex). About 12% of the sample engaged in casual sex with only one person and 5% with four or more sexual partners during the lockdown. Reporting casual sex during lockdown was associated with: lower level of education OR = 2.37 [95% CI 1.40-4.01]; identifying as a member of an ethnic minority OR = 2.27[1.40-3.53]; daily usage of sexual networking apps OR = 2.24[1.54-3.25]; being less anxious about contracting SARS-CoV-2 through sex OR = 1.66[1.12-2.44]; using PrEP before lockdown OR = 1.75[1.20-2.56]; continuing to use PrEP OR = 2.79[1.76-4.57]; and testing for STIs during lockdown OR = 2.65[1.76-3.99]. A quarter of respondents remained sexually active with casual partners, indicating a need to provide STI screening services and health promotion targeted to groups most likely to have need over this period. Future research is required to better understand how to support sexual and gender minorities to manage sexual risk in the context of pandemic public health initiatives.

13.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; 84(2-A):No Pagination Specified, 2023.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2102208

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the lived experiences of tenure-line academic mothers using a narrative methodology and interpretivist and feminist frameworks. Employing a semi-structured protocol, the researcher interviewed twelve tenure-line academic mothers at five midwestern institutions of higher education: one private four-year, one public four-year, one community college, one private Historically Black College or University (HBCU), and one private HBCU. After interviewing the academic mothers, the researcher composed narratives based on the transcripts. She also included her own narrative for analysis. After the narratives were member checked by the participants, the researcher conducted data analysis on the transcripts using low-inference coding. The coding allowed the researcher to focus on emerging themes as part of her plot analysis (Daiute, 2014). Through the use of plot analysis, the researcher uncovered the most prevalent characters, settings, initiating actions, complicating actions, and resolutions across the participants? narratives. The significant characters that emerged were: the mothers themselves, husbands, children, supervisors, and mentors. The salient settings were universities and departments. The initiating actions for academic mothers consisted of the job search/interviews and pregnancy/giving birth. Pregnancy loss and the Covid-19 constituted the most significant complicating actions. Finally, mothers turned to boundary setting and ?inscribing motherhood? (Pillay, 2009) as means of resolution. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

14.
Environment-Behaviour Proceedings Journal ; 7(21):423-431, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2100674

ABSTRACT

Malaysian millennials are reported to be struggling with stress and well-being issues at the workplace during the last decade. Drawing from the Self-Determination Theory, this study examines whether flexible working arrangements (FWAs) could impact millennials' mental health, well-being and productivity at the workplace. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed to 400 millennials in the services sector during the COVID-19 period. Findings revealed that FWAs influenced millennials' mental health, well-being, and productivity as millennials value job autonomy and a friendly work ecosystem as an ideal workplace. This sees a compelling case for Malaysian businesses to adopt FWAs in a more structured way in line with Sustainable Development Goal-3.

15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099505

ABSTRACT

Mandatory home isolation caused by COVID-19 in professional contexts led to a situation that required work activities to be converted into a remote modality. The literature on this topic is very recent, given the pandemic and the uncertainty of virtual and face-to-face work modalities. This study aimed to examine the effects of adults' prolonged exposure to screens on sleep quality, the type of devices used according to age and gender, periods of access to such devices and the impact on performance in the context of telework due to COVID-19. Specifically, the study analyzed the differences in the use of devices and in the time spent using them during and after teleworking between genders and age groups. A total of 127 Portuguese participants answered the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and a questionnaire that we specifically developed to characterize teleworking habits. The results showed differences between men and women regarding the use of devices and its impact on sleep quality, as well as differences in terms of age. These results are discussed in terms of how the current work context may affect performance, sleep, gender differences and the adverse effects of exposure to screens during and after work hours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Teleworking , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sleep , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
16.
ARS Medica Tomitana ; 27(2):78-82, 2021.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2099033

ABSTRACT

Objective: The COVID 19 pandemic has been the biggest health problem in the last 2 years, exerting huge pressure on the global healthcare system. Studies showed a predisposition in men to develop more severe forms, with a higher mortality rate, in comparison to women. Also, men infected with SARS CoV2 would be at higher risk of hospitalization in acute intensive care units (ICU) with complications that could lead to death Methods: We conducted a retrospective cross-sectional study that included 177 hospitalized patients in a time frame of 18 months with SARS CoV2 infection confirmed by RT PCR testing in the Pneumology Department of the Clinical Hospital of Pneumophtisiology of Constanta, Romania. The information needed to conduct the study was gathered from the patient's general clinical observation sheet and included: the smoker/non-smoker status of the patient, age, symptoms associated with COVID19 infection, biological data, form of disease, treatment administered during hospitalization. Result(s): The study group included 177 patients, 42% of whom were women (82) and 54% were men (95), suggesting a higher incidence of SARS CoV2 infection in males. The most dominant symptom was cough in 62% cases of women and 56% cases of men. Females had a higher incidence of anosmia (11%) and ageusia (2%) compared to males (anosmia, ageuzia-1%). A higher predominance of women developing moderate forms compared to males. Severe forms were found in 22% of cases in women and 23% in men. Conclusion(s): It is inconclusive if male patients show a more severe evolution of COVID19 infection compared to females. Women have shown a predisposition to symptoms such as ageusia, anosmia and a more severe inflammatory syndrome. Copyright © 2021 Authors. All rights reserved.

17.
International Journal of Emergency Services ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2097557

ABSTRACT

Purpose This study aims to identify levels of gender perception specific to disaster management process and gender-related factors among the health workers employed at can State Hospital, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach The study was carried out with a survey form consisting of 41 questions created by researchers with 207 health workers working at can State Hospital and by means of face-to-face interview technique. SPSS ver. 19.0 statistics software package was used in the research for analysis of data. Findings Of the participants, 70.24% had experienced a disaster before;88.03% reported that women and men were equally affected by disasters and 72.94% reported that women and men were equally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of the participants (70.29%) reported that the COVID-19 pandemic affected health workers of both genders equally. The health workers who consider that the disaster legislation is gender-sensitive, who have attended any disaster response training and who consider that women are included in the fragile/vulnerable group in disaster response activities have been found out to have significantly higher gender perception scores specific to disaster management process (p < 0.05). Most of the participants stated that both genders were affected equally by the disasters they experienced, which manifests that they adopted an egalitarian approach. Practical implications This study revealed the importance of providing disaster training for health workers to improve the gender perceptions. It is of high significance to integrate gender into the disaster trainings. Originality/value This study identifies and evaluates health workers' disaster-specific perceptions of gender, and necessary response activities can be performed accordingly.

18.
Glob Public Health ; : 1-7, 2021 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097150

ABSTRACT

This interview with Pau González, the co-founder of Hombres Trans Panamá (Trans Men Panama, HTP), the first trans men's organization in the country, explains how Panama's gender-based lockdown in response to the Covid-19 pandemic was a pivotal moment for the trans community. HTP was one of the national civil society organizations that spearheaded the response to the cases of anti-trans discrimination under the gendered measures, urging the government to issue guidelines that would allow trans people to circulate based on their gender identity and, later, to scrap the measure altogether. González explains how the lockdown not only exacerbated the structural inequalities that trans people in the country already experienced, but also forced them to reimagine their community and their activism.

19.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-5, 2022 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097040

ABSTRACT

Emerging adulthood is a critical period of development as individuals explore their identities and embark on developmental trajectories. Emerging adulthood may be an especially important period for sexual and gender minority (SGM) individuals as they explore, learn, and seek out communities related to their sexuality and gender identity. College is a unique setting in which SGM students may have access to physical and mental healthcare, secure food and housing, and affirming spaces and community related to their identity. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has interrupted or ended many of the services and resources provided by colleges and universities, potentially exacerbating challenges faced by sexual and gender minority students. This article provides recommendations for colleges and universities to improve access to and mitigate potentially negative outcomes among SGM students during and in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic.

20.
Phys Imaging Radiat Oncol ; 24: 129-135, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095886

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Twitter presence in academia has been linked to greater research impact which influences career progression. The purpose of this study was to analyse Twitter activity of the radiotherapy community around ESTRO congresses with a focus on gender-related and geographic trends. Materials and methods: Tweets, re-tweets and replies, here designated as interactions, around the ESTRO congresses held in 2012-2021 were collected. Twitter activity was analysed temporally and, for the period 2016-2021, the geographical span of the ESTRO Twitter network was studied. Tweets and Twitter users collated during the 10 years analysed were ranked based on number of 'likes', 're-tweets' and followers, considered as indicators of leadership/influence. Gender representation was assessed for the top-end percentiles. Results: Twitter activity around ESTRO congresses was multiplied by 60 in 6 years growing from 150 interactions in 2012 to a peak of 9097 in 2018. In 2020, during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, activity dropped by 60 % to reach 2945 interactions and recovered to half the pre-pandemic level in 2021. Europe, North America and Oceania were strongly connected and remained the main contributors. While overall, 58 % of accounts were owned by men, this proportion increased towards top liked/re-tweeted tweets and most-followed profiles to reach up to 84 % in the top-percentiles. Conclusion: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, Twitter activity around ESTRO congresses substantially decreased. Men were over-represented on the platform and in most popular tweets and influential accounts. Given the increasing importance of social media presence in academia the gender-based biases observed may help in understanding the gender gap in career progression.

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