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1.
Front Reprod Health ; 4: 811429, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089946

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease pandemic has disrupted reproductive health services including decline in the use of pre-coital contraceptives. However, evidence of its impact on the use of emergency contraceptives, often, post-coital methods, is limited in the emerging literature, hence this study. Data on total number of emergency contraceptive users from January 2018 to February 2020 (pre-pandemic) and March to December 2020 (during the pandemic) were extracted from the Ghana Health Service District Health Information Management System. Interrupted Time Series analysis was used to estimate the impact of the pandemic on the trend of emergency contraceptive use, adjusting for serial autocorrelation and seasonality. The results showed a gradual upward trend in emergency contraceptive use before the pandemic, increasing at a rate of about 67 (95% CI 37.6-96.8; p = 0.001) users per month. However, the pandemic caused a sudden spike in the use of emergency contraceptives. The pandemic and its related restrictions had an immediate effect on the use of emergency contraceptives, increasing significantly by about 1939 users (95% CI 1096.6-2781.2; p = 0.001) in March 2020. Following March 2020, the number of emergency contraceptive users continued to increase by about 385 users per month (95% CI 272.9-496.4; p = 0.001). The evidence shows that use of emergency contraceptives, often used as post-coital methods for unprotected sex was not negatively impacted by the pandemic. In fact, it is the opposite. Hence, in planning for similar situations attention should be given to the distribution of post-coital contraceptive methods.

2.
Geoforum ; 136: 142-152, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086236

ABSTRACT

The article offers a qualitative examination of compounded precarity in creative work during the Covid-19 pandemic. Drawing on repeated in-depth interviews with twelve creative workers operating in the creative industries in Ghana, we examine one of the most prevalent practices for navigating, coping with, and managing compounded precarity: that of hustling. We empirically identify and discuss three interrelated practices of hustling in creative work: digitalization, diversification, and social engagement. We present a new way of conceptualizing creative work in precarious geographies by theorizing hustling, and the associated worker resourcefulness, improvisation, savviness, hopefulness, and caring not merely as an individualized survival strategy, but rather as an agentic and ethical effort to turn the vicissitudes of life into situated advantages and opportunities, and even social change.

3.
Soc Sci Med ; 311: 115360, 2022 Sep 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082856

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 epidemic has highlighted the risks of shortages resulting from dependence on medicine imports. Today's situation where a few companies in the Global North control COVID-19 vaccine production is having dire consequences on African countries' access. However, the challenges surrounding local production of medical products in Africa are long-standing issues dating back to independence. Using Ghana as a case study, this paper looks primarily at how the dependence on medicine imports can be understood as the result of policies implemented since independence, as well as the changes that the Ghanaian State has undergone in reaction to international events and the evolution of the structure of global pharmaceutical capital. It examines the policies associated with the Ghanaian State's project to promote local pharmaceutical production, from independence to the present, and the role that non-state actors such as pharmaceutical companies have played. Based on an historical political economy approach, it highlights how the roles of the State and its forms of intervention have evolved over time, from planning (right after independence), to implementing (during the global crisis of the 1970s-1980s), and finally to regulating (from the 1990-2000s onward). This paper draws on 14 months of PhD research fieldwork (2014-2018). It consists of interviews (n = 50) with Ghanaian actors in the pharmaceutical sector, observations in a pharmaceutical plant in Accra, and research into archives at the Public Records and Archives Administration Department (PRAAD) of the Ministry of Industry.

4.
Social Marketing Quarterly ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2083165

ABSTRACT

Background: SARS-CoV-2 (the virus that causes COVID-19) has spread to almost every area globally, infecting millions and killing millions. Several measures have been instituted across the globe to reduce the spread of the pandemic. However, the traditional strategies employed by governments and other stakeholders to tackle COVIT-19 pandemic have not been effective in changing behaviour. Focus: The study sought to investigate the influence of social marketing on eliciting voluntary adoption of Covid-19 safety behaviours during and beyond the coronavirus pandemic by integrating two behavioural change theories. Key Hypotheses: the study tested the following key hypotheses: perceived susceptibility of the Covid-19 pandemic will have significant influence on motivation to engage in safety behaviour, perceived severity to the Covid-19 pandemic will have significant impact on motivation to perform the Covid-19 safety behaviours, perceived benefits for engaging in the Covid-19 safety behaviours will significantly influence motivation to engage in the safety behaviours, perceived efficacy of the safety measures to prevent Covid-19 will have positive and significant impact on motivation to engage in the safety behaviours, there is a positive association between confidence in ability to perform the safety behaviours (self-efficacy) and motivation to perform the safety behaviours, there is a positive connection between cues to action and motivation to perform the Covid-19 safety behaviours and there is a negative relationship between perceived barriers and motivation to engage in the Covid-19 safety behaviours and Motivation to perform the Covid-19 safety behaviours will result in the actual performance of behaviour to wash hand frequently, avoid handshaking, social distance, and wear a facemask. Methods: The data was collected from 540 respondents in Ghana and the hypothesised relationships analysed using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Results: The study found a strong positive and significant relationship between motivation to engage in the safety behaviours and actual performance of the behaviour. The result further shows severity, perceived benefit, response efficacy, perceived barriers, cues to action, and self-efficacy as antecedents for motivation to engage in the safety behaviours during and after the pandemic. There was however, an insignificant relationship between perceived susceptibility and motivation to engage in the safety behaviours. Importance to Social Marketing Field: The contribution of this research among others to the field of social marketing constitutes an extension of previous theories that will expand generalisations or fine-tune the theoretical propositions. It is worth mentioning that although the health belief model has been empirically proven for its predictive ability to explain a significant amount of variance in health-related behaviours, integrating response efficacy and motivation from the protection-motivation theory in our model provides a high explanatory power of the model. The study, thus, contributes to the theory-building effort in social marketing. Limitations: Since this study only concentrated on residents in Accra, we do not assume that the findings reflect the views of the general Ghanaian population. This may limit the generalisability of the results. Future research may consider collecting data from the general Ghanaian population.

5.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1920, 2022 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079410

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused the loss of millions of lives and economic breakdowns in many countries across the globe. Despite the limited availability of vaccines and the challenges of poor health infrastructure, few interventions have been developed and implemented for those who live in rural areas, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa. In response, Cocoa360, a global health nonprofit in rural Ghana designed an intervention called Cocoa360's COVID-19 Preparedness and Outbreak Prevention Plan (CoCoPOPP). This paper aimed to examine the extent to which CoCoPOPP's design aligned with the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework. METHODS: We reviewed documents influencing CoCoPOPP's design between March and June 2021. A total of 11 documents were identified for analysis. Using the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS) framework as a guide, thematic analysis was done to analyze the extracted data. RESULTS: Overall, CoCoPOPP's design aligned with the evidence, context, and facilitation domains of the PARIHS framework. It positioned CoCoPOPP as an intervention that considered the unique context of a rural Ghanaian setting. It was guided by robust and high-quality published and non-published evidence and engaged external and internal stakeholders during its implementation. CoCoPOPP's context-dependent nature positions it for potential replication in sub-Saharan Africa's rural communities with similar farming contexts. Specific areas that were less well and/or not addressed were the unintended negative consequences of community engagement, the absence of primary data in the guiding evidence, and the lack of a facilitation continuum coupled with the role of power during the facilitation process. CONCLUSION: CoCoPOPP, Cocoa360's response to the COVID-19 pandemic in rural Ghana, is an evidence-driven, context-dependent public health intervention that has been designed to reduce COVID-19 infections and prevent potential deaths. This study underscores the importance of considering the unique community and cultural contexts, employing evidence, and engaging local and external actors as facilitators when designing interventions to respond to global health pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ghana/epidemiology , Health Services Research , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Rural Population
6.
Curr Psychol ; : 1-11, 2021 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075663

ABSTRACT

The advent of the coronavirus pandemic has impacted the psychological well-being of many people. This study examined the relationship between fear of COVID-19, psychological distress (depression, anxiety, and stress) and coping strategies adopted by undergraduate students in Ghana. A sample of 209 students were recruited to complete online surveys on fear of COVID-19, psychological distress and coping strategies between June and July 2020. Students scored between normal to mild levels of psychological distress but above average scores on fear of coronavirus (M = 19.45, SD = 6.04). Fear of COVID-19 was positively related to psychological distress. Only maladaptive coping was found to be significantly and positively associated with fear of COVID-19. However post-hoc analysis of the components of coping strategies revealed that denial (ß = .17, p = .028), venting (ß = .18, p = .036) and humour (ß = -.18, p = .023; an adaptive coping strategy) were associated with fear of COVID-19. Finally, both adaptive coping and maladaptive coping strategies had a mediating effect on fear of COVID-19 and psychological distress. These findings emphasize the need to design and optimize institutional interventions that will assess psychological distress and fear of COVID-19 levels during this pandemic and provide psychotherapeutic support for students as they return to school.

7.
Education as Change ; 26:1-14, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072427

ABSTRACT

Social movements are at the forefront of fighting for another world as imposed to contend with it have severely impacted not only the activism of movements, but also their capacity to learn. Translocal social movement learning offers one way in which such learning can continue. This article shares reflections from participants involved in a translocal learning engagement between movement members and activist-scholars from Ghana, South Africa and Canada. It provides an important example of the kind of non-hierarchal social movement learning that can happen at a distance, when movements share, learn and support one another.

8.
Innovative Marketing ; 18(3):84-98, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072382

ABSTRACT

Social media marketing has vastly benefitted businesses, including the development of brand identity via solid communication channels. Innovative marketing tools have proven effective among service and non-service-based businesses. This study examines the impact of social media on customer buying decisions via brand personality attributes among telecom products (e.g., mobile phones, sim cards, and data subscriptions) in Ghana. A positivist research paradigm with a non-probability sampling were deployed to achieve study goals. A structured questionnaire was designed to collect the data from subscribers of the telecom giants (MTN, Vodafone, and Airtel-Tigo) in the capital of Ghana through a non-probability sampling technique (snowball/referral method). Both self-administered and online survey (link) were deployed with strict adherence to Covid-19 protocols. A valid data set of 414 (representing 82% of response rate) from 507 responses was received for data processing. PLS-SEM was applied to analyze the study hypothesis. The study identified five main brand personality attributes (i.e., brand sincerity, brand excitement, brand competence, brand sophistication, and brand ruggedness) as mediators of the proposed framework. The study found that brand sincerity, brand excitement, and brand competence played a significant mediation effect on the relationship between social media usage and customer buying decisions, whereas brand sophistication and brand ruggedness did not. The findings suggest that brand management plays an interconnected role in customer decision-making in which brand practitioners should take a keynote regarding their strategic marketing decisions. Finally, the paper recommends that future research consider a mixed approach to offer an in-depth analysis.

9.
Journal of Asian & African Studies (Sage Publications, Ltd.) ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2064443

ABSTRACT

This paper examines the challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic on the existing health inequalities disproportionately affecting vulnerable populations. It explores the impact of COVID-19 pandemic response measures to “curb the spread” on informal sector workers in Ghana. In Ghana, like many other developing countries, the informal sector was impacted by a higher risk of exposure to the COVID-19 infection and the slew of pandemic response measures, for example, lockdowns and stay-at-home orders, as well as guidelines around social distancing implemented by their governments. Given the high level of precarity that undergirds work in the informal sector and the intersectional forces that contribute to and maintain their marginality—class, race, ethnicity, gender, religion, and geographic location—this paper creates a space for dialogue about the unintended consequences of pandemic response measures on the livelihood security of informal sector workers. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Asian & African Studies (Sage Publications, Ltd.) is the property of Sage Publications, Ltd. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2063192

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study aims to investigate the drivers that motivate employees and guests' hotel service participation to understand how that can influence the implementation of Value Co-Creation (VCC) in sub-Saharan African context. Design/methodology/approach: Using an interpretive paradigm, the study draws on 32 in-depth interviews, 6 focus group discussions involving 32 participants and participant observation field notes. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: The study unravels nine motives that drive employee–guest VCC participation: passion, relationship, belongingness, shared and enhanced experiences, satisfaction, reputation development, openness, communication and rewards. Research limitations/implications: This exploratory, cross-sectional study was undertaken in hotels within sub-Saharan Africa. Thus, findings cannot be generalised. However, it provides an opportunity for future quantitative approaches within different contexts involving other stakeholders. Practical implications: Considering the numerous challenges from COVID-19 pandemic on the service industry, hotel managers might want to use the findings to not only formulate policies that support employee–guest co-creation for service improvement and survival but also introduce enhanced innovative service practices that deliver on employee and guest service expectations for retention. The findings encourage hotel managers to identify employee and guest context-specific motivations to be able to match with value-driven service activities, aimed at attracting positive behaviours to better respond to the numerous COVID-19-related challenges. Originality/value: This work adds to the VCC literature by investigating the collective and individual drivers at the employee and guest dyadic level within sub-Saharan African hotel context. The authors propose a comprehensive model to guide the successful implementation of employee–guest VCC. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

11.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-344060

ABSTRACT

Background: In Ghana, as of 30 July 2022, around one-third of the eligible population are considered fully-vaccinated against COVID-19, and efforts are being made to increase coverage. Vaccine hesitancy is defined by the World Health Organization (WHO) as the delay in the acceptance, or blunt refusal of, vaccines. This study assesses vaccine hesitancy and confidence in Nkwanta South, a rural municipal in Oti region, Ghana. Methods: Data collection within Nkwanta South took place in sub-municipalities of Alokpatsa (11,028 population), Brewaniase (14,483), and Tutukpene (15,453). Data was collected by 47 local residents, known as Community-Based Surveillance Volunteers (CBSVs), using Kobo Toolbox forms on electronic devices (tablets). Information collected included numerous demographic variables, including age, gender, relationship status, and religion. Further questions covered reasons for vaccine hesitancy and COVID-19 vaccine status. Descriptive and inferential statistics assessed the association between variables to identify predictors of hesitancy. Findings: Across 1500 respondents, 700 (46.7%) reported having received at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose, and 800 (53.3%) reported being unvaccinated against COVID-19. Among unvaccinated respondents, 556 (69.4%) reported willingness to receive the vaccine once available, 190 (23.7%) said they would not be willing to be vaccinated, and 55 (6.9%) said they were unsure. Overall, this represented 30.6% hesitancy within the currently-unvaccinated group. Common reasons for hesitancy included believing that they did not need the vaccine (33.8%), believing the vaccine to be dangerous (30.6%), concerns about side effects (25.3%), and not having enough information (20.1%). Key predictors of hesitancy among our participants included high levels of mistrust, being female, greater years of education, and being Christian. Interpretation: The information gathered here can inform how best to target national and local health promotion strategies. Locally-tailored efforts, that understand local context and social dynamics, must remain a core component of public health activity to achieve a high vaccine uptake.

12.
Climate Change Management ; : 187-201, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2048088

ABSTRACT

The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic has affected multiple dimensions of daily activities, including the waste scavengers’ activities. This paper focuses on the effect of COVID-19 on waste scavengers’ business, income, quality of life and family quality of life in three Metropolitan, Municipal Assemblies in the eastern part of Greater Accra, Ghana. A questionnaire was distributed to 46 waste scavengers using a non-probability sampling approach for a voluntary response, from March to April 2021. The sample is mainly composed of 84.8% male scavengers, most aged 18 to 47 years old and married (58.2%). The results indicate that the majority of respondents believe that COVID-19 is real and poses a health threat, but more than 21% reported not wearing Personal Protective Equipment. The study showed that 60% of waste scavengers were prohibited from entering households, thus affecting the family life income. The less sale of waste material due to COVID-19 contributed to a lower income by the waste scavengers, causing different difficulties and financial insecurity. This study showed that waste scavengers in Ghana, an essential activity, are in the front line regarding the COVID-19 pandemic and public policies intended to cover their social, economic and health vulnerability to the virus, need to be addressed. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

13.
Africa Health ; 43(3):15-16, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2045412

ABSTRACT

This is a brief account of a community project that the medical staff of an urban primary care institution carried out. The goal was to spread knowledge and raise awareness about COVID-19 prevention among the Ghanaian communities that are a part of the Manna Mission Hospital's catchment area in the Ledzokuku Municipality. It has been discovered that community-based health education has a larger effect on the prevention of newly emerging infectious diseases, resulting in a decrease in the occurrence of such diseases. The pandemic caused by COVID-19 is not an exception. Results of a community outreach effort carried out by employees of a Ghanaian urban primary care hospital were emphasised in this paper. Increased health education is required to raise community residents' understanding of COVID-19's impact on public health. This community outreach initiative has raised awareness of COVID-19 prevention and control, handwashing, and facemask use. Many patients who attended the hospital wore face masks, frequently washed their hands with soap and water while it was running, and frequently used alcohol-based hand sanitisers, all signs of increased awareness. To stop the spread of COVID-19 in their communities, the primary healthcare workforce has a crucial role to play.

14.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2044994

ABSTRACT

African engineering students may find themselves facing stereotype threat fueled by negative global narratives. Culturally-responsive pedagogies have the potential to counter these narratives. Specific pedagogical approaches and mechanisms that build self-efficacy should be elucidated, so as to enable more African educators to leverage transformative tools in their teaching. This paper explores the hypothesis that in addition to mastery experiences, which can be experienced through project-based learning, the physical environment also plays a significant role in affecting African students' sense of possibility and therefore self-efficacy. By restricting students from entering the campus environment, as necessarily happened with the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, conditions for an experiment were naturally created. By comparing responses to the same surveys administered to the engineering students at Ashesi University (Ghana) between the cohorts who conducted their first year in person versus online, the author studies the extent to which the physical environment influences students' self-efficacy levels. The results suggest that the original hypothesis does not fully hold, and it may require a more nuanced view. While the author expected the initial self-efficacy measures towards design and fabrication reported by the 2020 cohort (online) to be lower, they were somewhat higher than the 2019 cohort (in person), with small effect size for both genders (gmen = 0.172, gwomen = 0.281). The change in self-efficacy levels over the semester were also equally to more significant for the 2020 cohort who attended online compared to the 2021 cohort completing the same mini-course with weekly sessions in-person. These results suggest that intangible sources of self-efficacy may have a greater influence than the tangible items in the physical environment. They may also suggest that the students' presence in the physical environment can equally be substituted with the assurance of the accessibility of the requisite facilities. Further studies should continue unpacking the role of different variables in driving self-efficacy levels of first year African engineering students. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022

15.
English in Africa ; 49(2):71-90,113, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2040231

ABSTRACT

As a feminist writer for social justice, Amma Darko exposes various instances of religious exploitation in Ghanaian society in the novel Not without Flowers. This study adds to the corpus of literature that critiques the androcentric organisation of patriarchal African societies, in which patriarchal and religious ideologies are used to institutionalise gender inequality. My argument in this paper is that the fear and anxiety surrounding mental illness, HIV and Aids, or other illnesses provide a fertile ground for religious exploitation and oppression of vulnerable women, as represented in Darko's novel. My study offers an analysis of how Darko uses her literary work to challenge deeply engrained and culturally sanctioned patriarchal and religious hierarchies of gender-based dominance and cultural valorisation. The main objectives of this article are to explore the religious exploitation and/or stigmatisation of vulnerable women, the human rights violations that occur in religious institutions, as well as how mental illness is considered to be caused by a spiritual force or demonic possession in the selected text.

16.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1163, 2022 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038741

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout syndrome is a psycho-social disorder which develops in an individual exposed to chronic stress on the job. Health workers in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are at increased risk of burnout due to job-related challenges. Burnout does not only affect the job performance of employees, but could result in dysregulation of multiple physiological systems (allostatic load) in victims and predispose them to non-communicable diseases (NCDs). This study examined the association between burnout and allostatic load among health workers engaged in human resourced-constrained hospitals in Accra, Ghana. METHOD: This study was a hospital-based cross-sectional study involving 1264 health workers (clinicians and non-clinicians) from three public hospitals in Accra, Ghana who were recruited using a proportionate stratified random sampling technique. The participants completed a questionnaire which collected general and burnout information. In addition, each participant's anthropometric; biochemical and hemodynamic indices were measured. The allostatic load in the participants was determined using eleven (11) biomarkers from the neuro-endocrine, cardiovascular, metabolic and anthropometric measures. The relationship between burnout and allostatic overload (high allostatic load) was determined at the bivariate and multivariable levels. The data analysis was done with the aid of Stata 15.0 at a 95% confidence level. RESULTS: The prevalence of burnout was 20.57%, higher in non-clinicians than clinicians (26.74% vs 15.64, p <  0.001). Also, non-clinical participants had higher levels of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization than the clinical participants. Over a quarter (26.27%) of the participants had allostatic overload manifesting as high allostatic load. Furthermore, for a one unit increase in overall burnout, the odds of experiencing allostatic overload was increased by 17.59 times (AOR = 17.59, 95% CI: 11.7-26.4) as compared to those without burnout and similar findings were found for the individual components of burnout syndrome with high allostatic load. CONCLUSION: Burnout among health workers is associated with multi-system physiological dysregulation manifesting as high allostatic load; a major risk factor for NCDs. It is recommended that measures aimed at reducing burnout and allostatic overload such as structured psychological counseling and healthy lifestyle patterns are recommended for health workers engaged in stressful work settings to reduce their risk of NCDs.


Subject(s)
Allostasis , Burnout, Professional , Allostasis/physiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ghana/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans
17.
J Environ Manage ; 320: 115810, 2022 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2036229

ABSTRACT

Most studies on the novel COVID-19 pandemic have focused mainly on human health, food systems, and employment with limited studies on how farmers implement sustainable agricultural practices (SAPs) in response to the pandemic. This study examines how perceptions of COVID-19 shocks influence the adoption of SAPs among smallholder farmers in Ghana. We find that perceptions of COVID-19 shocks influence the probability and intensity of SAPs adoption. Secondly, households who anticipated COVID-19 shocks recorded heterogeneity effects in the combinations (complementarity and substitutability) of SAPs. Farmers who anticipated an increase in input prices and loss of income due to COVID-19 recorded the highest complementarity association between pesticide and zero tillage while farmers who expected limited market access reported the highest complementarity between mixed cropping and mulching. Farmers who projected a decrease in output prices complements pesticides with mixed cropping. The findings suggest that understanding the heterogeneity effects in the combinations of SAPs due to COVID-19 shocks is critical to effectively design, target and disseminate sustainable intensification programs in a post-pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pesticides , Agriculture , COVID-19/epidemiology , Farmers , Ghana , Humans , Pandemics
18.
CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets ; 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2033653

ABSTRACT

This report highlights the achievements in 2021 of the CGIAR Research Program on Policies, Institutions, and Markets (PIM). PIM had a productive final year centered on synthesizing and packaging findings to consolidate the program's legacy while continuing to respond to demand related to the impacts of COVID-19 and preparing the transition to the new CGIAR portfolio. Among other achievements, PIM findings and engagement contributed to Myanmar's response to COVID-19, South Africa's policies on resilience to climate change, Tunisia's policies for pastoral development, a reform of Nigeria's national agricultural research system, Ghana's fish seed and farm certification system, gender strategies for three agricultural value chains in Honduras, and genome editing guidelines for the agricultural sector in four African countries. PIM research informed policy documents of FAO, IFAD, One CGIAR, the UK Government, the World Bank and the World Food Programme. PIM tools enabled more equitable co-management of 76 protected areas in Peru and informed World Bank social protection projects.

19.
Open House International ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2032229

ABSTRACT

Purpose The adaptation of emerging building designs for single room occupancy in off-campus university student housing during the COVID-19 pandemic is evolving. However, assessing its effects on student satisfaction to compensate for COVID-19-associated impacts is missing. As a result, the study examines the satisfaction of students with emerging building designs in single-room off-campus student housing in Ghana. Design/methodology/approach The study is quantitatively based on positivist philosophical thinking. A purposive sample of 202 purpose-built student housing facilities was selected across public and private universities in Ghana. Using systematic stratified sampling, the study sampled 1,212 student residents through a survey. A principal component method (PCM) was used to assess the availability of 10 emerging building design and basic building services variables across the study location. Multiple regression was employed to determine the satisfaction and predict potential variables for policy formulation. Findings The analysis revealed that private space for social distancing, the availability of hands-free fittings in the toilet and bathroom, and the availability of hands-free fixtures in the kitchen unit was common single-room self-occupancy support systems. However, there is a huge gap in the availability of key emerging building designs and basic building services and their associated effects on students' satisfaction across the study locations. Therefore, relevant proposals to serve as fundamental requirements for developing an off-campus student housing model during pandemics were indicated. Research limitations/implications It is seen that emerging building designs across the housing sector are equally evolving among off-campus student housing. The study helped to understand that student satisfaction with emerging building designs and basic services is a motivational need for students. However, the preparedness of student housing owners to adopt and satisfy the requirements of these design require further studies. Originality/value While COVID-19 and its associated effect keep evolving in building design requirements, it is equally relevant to assess the students' satisfaction with these designs and services among single room occupancy-made off-campus student housing. This research is limited to Africa.

20.
Ghana Medical Journal ; 56(2):71-77, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2024919

ABSTRACT

Objective: To quantify and describe the burden of COVID-19 infection amongst doctors in Ghana Design: A quantitative and qualitative analysis of cross-sectional data was performed. Setting: All 16 regions in Ghana. Participants: Participants were medical doctors diagnosed with COVID-19 between March 2020 and March 2021. Main outcome measures: Data sources were Ghana Medical Association and Ministry of Health records. Demographics and workplace data included age, gender, the rank of the doctor, and location and type of current facility. Characteristics of the COVID-19 infection included the likely source, clinical and recovery status, and place of management. Doctors reported their desire for a general checkup and psychological support and described the challenges encountered. Results: The prevalence of COVID-19 infection was 88.9 cases per 1000 doctor-population. Of 544 infected doctors, 59.2% were stable but symptomatic, and 1.7% were in critical condition, with a case fatality rate of 1.7%. Overall, 31.6% had recovered from their COVID-19 infection, and the majority (82.4%) were managed at home in self-isolation. Compared to medical officers, house officers (OR 1.36, p=0.03), senior house officers (OR 7.60, p<0.001), and consultants (OR 2.94, p=0.001) were more likely to have a COVID-19 infection. Desire for support was varied, with 13.0% desiring someone to check on them and 9.7% desiring psychological support. The majority (75.3%) reported facing a challenge, including difficulty obtaining needed vitamins and medications, and accessing daily necessities like groceries. Conclusions: In Ghana, COVID-19 infections greatly burden medical doctors. Copyright © The Author(s).

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