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1.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses ; 2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063762

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Seasonal influenza annually causes significant morbidity and mortality, and unpredictable respiratory virus zoonoses, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, can threaten the health and lives of millions more. Molecular iodine (I2 ) is a broad-spectrum, pathogen-nonspecific antiseptic agent that has demonstrated antimicrobial activity against a wide range of bacteria, virus, and fungi. METHODS: We investigated a commercially available antiseptic, a non-irritating formulation of iodine (5% povidone-iodine) with a film-forming agent that extends the duration of the iodine's antimicrobial activity, for its ability to prevent influenza virus transmission between infected and susceptible animals in the guinea pig model of influenza virus transmission. RESULTS: We observed that a once-daily topical application of this long-lasting antiseptic to the nares of either the infected virus-donor guinea pig or the susceptible virus-recipient guinea pig, or to the nares of both animals, prior to virus inoculation effectively reduced transmission of a highly transmissible influenza A virus, even when the donor and recipient guinea pigs shared the same cage. Daily treatment of the recipient guinea pig starting 1 day after initial exposure to an infected donor guinea pig in the same cage was similarly effective in preventing detectable influenza virus infection in the recipient animal. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that a daily application of this antiseptic formulation is efficacious in reducing the transmission of influenza A virus in the guinea pig model, and further study in this and other preclinical models is warranted.

2.
Vakcinologie ; 15(2):62-67, 2021.
Article in Czech | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2057597

ABSTRACT

The earliest cases of COVID-19 disease in Africa were, in most cases, the result of imports from abroad. The Democratic republic of the Congo (DRC) identified the first case at the beginning of 2020. Two days after his return from France, the first patient was tested positively in the capital, Kinshasa. The travel restrictions and status of the state of emergency were announced on 24 March 2020. A lockdown followed. In June of the same year, 11 provinces were already affected by COVID-19 disease. The negative socio-economic impact has occurred and is similar to that in any other country. The DRC does not differ from other African countries or on the issue of infectious diseases such as HIV, malaria, cholera, measles or Ebola virus disease. Recurring Ebola epidemics are addressed by vaccination with Ervebo vaccine. Unlike Ebola, part of the population does not believe in the existence of SARS-CoV-2 and does not respect basic anti-epidemic measures. Medical capacities were very limited at the beginning of the SARS-CoV-2 epidemic, both in terms of diagnosis and testing and availability of treatment (60 ventilators to 83 million inhabitants). The situation is complicated as a result of 20 years continuing wars. Another African country, Guinea, is currently facing not only COVID-19, but also the zoonotic disease of Lassa fever, which has been detected in several patients. Copyright © 2021, Medakta s.r.o.. All rights reserved.

3.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1): 752, 2022 Sep 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053869

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The advent of the effective COVID-19 vaccine was the most eagerly expected worldwide. However, this hope quickly became hesitation and denial in many countries, including Guinea. Understanding the reasons for low vaccine coverage is essential to achieving herd immunity leading to disease control. This study aimed to comprehend the facilitators and barriers to the acceptance COVID-19 vaccine in Guinea. METHODS: The survey focused on healthcare workers (HCWs) and the general population (GP) in 4 natural regions in Guinea from 23 March 2021 to 25 August 2021. We used the Fishbein integration model to study the behaviours of HWCs and GP regarding vaccination. A mixed cross-sectional study collected knowledge, attitudes, norms, and perceptions. Regression and thematic content analysis identified the main facilitators and barriers to vaccination. RESULTS: We surveyed 3547 HCWs and 3663 GP. The proportion of people vaccinated was 65% among HCWs and 31% among the GP. For HCWs: the main factors associated with vaccination against COVID-19 were as follows: absence of pregnancy AOR = 4.65 [3.23-6.78], being supportive of vaccination AOR = 1.94 [1.66-2.27] and being an adult AOR = 1.64 [1.26-2.16]. Regarding the GP, the following factors increased the odds of vaccination: absence of pregnancy AOR = 1.93 [CI 1.01-3.91], being favourable for vaccination AOR = 3.48 [CI 2.91-4.17], being an adult AOR = 1.72 [CI 1.38-2.14] and being able to get the vaccine AOR = 4.67 [CI 3.76-5.84]. Semi-interviews revealed fear, lack of trust, and hesitant perception of the government as potential barriers to vaccination. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that beliefs and negative perceptions are potential barriers to vaccination against COVID-19 among HCWs and the GP. Policies should emphasise practical strategies to mitigate these barriers among young people and pregnant women. Lastly, there is a need to improve access to vaccines in the GP.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guinea/epidemiology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Personnel , Humans , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Pregnancy , Vaccination
4.
Internationales Asien Forum. International Quarterly for Asian Studies ; 53(2):307-311, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046688

ABSTRACT

The presence of China poses a challenge to the dominance of Western powers and their allies, who have set the agenda in the Pacific since the end of the Second World War. [...]today, the region has been characterised by (post-)colonial power structures. In her opening remarks, Dame Meg Taylor clearly states that the Pacific Island states regard the presence of China in the region as a positive development because it gives PIF countries access to markets, technology, financing and infrastructure. The Boe Declaration of the PIF meeting in 2018, which states that "climate change remains the single greatest threat to the livelihoods, security and wellbeing of the peoples of the Pacific" (ix) - is the principal element of efforts by Pacific Island state leaders to implement the "Blue Pacific" concept and stands in stark contrast to the environmental and security policy of PIF member country Australia as well as that of the previous Trump administration. In Australia alone, economic damage caused each year by Beijing's punitive actions in response to bans on Huawei equipment (Australia excludes the Chinese company from the country's 5G roll-out) and COVID-19 demands (Canberra's call for an independent investigation into the origins of the virus) runs into the billions annually.

5.
Pacific Journalism Review ; 28(1-2):29-46, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2040607

ABSTRACT

This keynote commentary at the 2021 Asian Congress for Media and Communication (ACMC) conference with the theme Change, Adaptation and Culture: Media and Communication in Pandemic Times is addressed through a discussion of three main issues: 1. The COVID-19 Pandemic and how it is being coped with;2. A parallel Infodemic—a crisis of communication, and the surge of ‘disinformation’ and truth challenges in this ‘age of hatred and intolerance’;and 3. The global Climate Emergency and the disproportionate impact this is having on the Asia-Pacific region. Finally the author concludes with an overview of some helpful strategies for communicators and educa-tors from his perspective as a journalist and media academic with a mission.1. © 2022, Pacific Media Centre, Auckland University of Technology. All rights reserved.

6.
HPS Weekly Report ; 56:26, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2033656
7.
Zoonoses ; 1(6), 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2025742

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 that produces major symptoms of pneumonia, has been a disaster worldwide. The traceability of SARSCoV- 2 and the discovery of susceptible animal species is crucial to halt viral transmission and explore the mechanism of cross-species transmission. We selected 82 representative ACE2 sequences from the 1000 sequences with the closest homology to the hACE2 protein. All selected ACE2 proteins were subjected to homology modeling. Potential natural and intermediate hosts, as well as animal species susceptible to SARS-CoV-2, were analyzed systematically by calculation of the binding free energy of ACE2 protein to the RBD of SARSCoV- 2. Primates, some wild Felidae, civets, goats, spotted hyenas and golden hamsters are susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 and may be potential intermediate hosts, whereas pangolins, birds and reptiles are unlikely to be intermediate hosts. Mice, rats and guinea pig are not susceptible to SARS-CoV-2. Given their possible susceptibility, non-human primates, goats and golden hamsters could potentially be used as experimental models to examine SARS-CoV-2 infection without transgenesis. Herein, possible candidates for the natural and intermediate hosts of SARS-CoV-2 are suggested, to provide guidance for subsequent studies.

8.
Espace Politique ; (44)2021.
Article in French | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2024447

ABSTRACT

If COVID-19 epidemics confirmed social sciences' interest for the study of social media (Lee Hugues et Pale, 2009) and infodemic (Vosoughi et alii, 2018) in epidemic contexts, it also excluded a large part of the population still important in Africa from the production of knowledge: those who cannot access internet because of lack of connection and/or illiteracy. This paper fills this gap by analyzing local representations of COVID-19, drawing on the longitudinal study of radiophonic discourses in national languages and face-to-face ethnography led by anthropologists among the population. It examines how COVID-19 was appropriated and interpreted by Guinean population through the mobilization of epidemic, political and historic local experiences. It also considers how the evolution of local representations of the pandemics, over time and over political and economic perturbations, illustrates a progressive cognitive and practical lack of public interest in the virus. To do so, radio shows in national languages including participation from the public on COVID-19 topic were systematically recorded, transcribed and translated in French from March to August 2021. National languages included sosoxui for Basse-Cote, pulaar for Moyenne Guinee, kissiye and kp epsilon l epsilon epsilon woo for the Forest region, and maninkakan for Haute-Guinee. Long-term participant observation and face-to-face interviews were led in the cities of Conakry and Mamou, and in the rural areas of Forecariah from May 2020 to December 2021 among health professionals and general population. These data were analysed thematically and chronologically to examine how the epidemics was discussed and the restriction measures commented by the population through time. From March to May 2020, the massive diffusion of information about COVID-19, both at international and national level, led the Guinean to take ownership of the protection measures against the epidemic - the traumatic memory of Ebola playing a major role. However, as the epidemic event merged with the 2020 controversial electoral process, local populations began to question the relevance of the epidemic management policies and restriction measures. The reduced number of positive cases led to a trivialization of COVID-19 and to a rising popular resistance against restriction measures such as confinement and wearing a mask. The virus appeared exogenous and concerning only national elites and populations of Northern countries. The representation of the epidemic, first powered by the trauma of Ebola, rapidly turned to the register of coercion: now called the "Screwdriver epidemic", COVID-19 in Guinea appears for the local populations as the reproduction of the unequal relation binding them to their elites, as Guinea is bound to the rest of the world.

9.
Arab Gulf Journal of Scientific Research ; 40(2):139-152, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2018430

ABSTRACT

Purpose: There is a gap in knowledge about the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) because most studies are undertaken in countries outside the Gulf region – such as China, India, the US and Taiwan. The stock market contains rich, valuable and considerable data, and these data need careful analysis for good decisions to be made that can lead to increases in the efficiency of a business. Data mining techniques offer data processing tools and applications used to enhance decision-maker decisions. This study aims to predict the Kuwait stock market by applying big data mining. Design/methodology/approach: The methodology used is quantitative techniques, which are mathematical and statistical models that describe a various array of the relationships of variables. Quantitative methods used to predict the direction of the stock market returns by using four techniques were implemented: logistic regression, decision trees, support vector machine and random forest. Findings: The results are all variables statistically significant at the 5% level except gold price and oil price. Also, the variables that do not have an influence on the direction of the rate of return of Boursa Kuwait are money supply and gold price, unlike the Kuwait index, which has the highest coefficient. Furthermore, the height score of the variable that affects the direction of the rate of return is the firms, and the accuracy of the overall performance of the four models is nearly 50%. Research limitations/implications: Some of the limitations identified for this study are as follows: (1) location limitation: Kuwait Stock Exchange;(2) time limitation: the amount of time available to accomplish the study, where the period was completed within the academic year 2019-2020 and the academic year 2020-2021. During 2020, the coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19), which was a major obstacle, occurred during data collection and analysis;(3) data limitation: The Kuwait Stock Exchange data were collected from May 2019 to March 2020, while the factors affecting the stock exchange data were collected in July 2020 due to the corona pandemic. Originality/value: The study used new titles, variables and techniques such as using data mining to predict the Kuwait stock market. There are no adequate studies that predict the stock market by data mining in the GCC, especially in Kuwait. There is a gap in knowledge in the GCC as most studies are in foreign countries, such as China, India, the US and Taiwan. © 2022, Bedour M. Alshammari, Fairouz Aldhmour, Zainab M. AlQenaei and Haidar Almohri.

10.
Journal of Wildlife Management ; 86(7):1-21, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2013666

ABSTRACT

Negative interactions between waterbirds and people are increasing. Waterbirds feeding on agricultural crops cause significant losses to farmers worldwide, but so far most research to address these conflicts has been conducted on migratory species in the temperate northern hemisphere. We investigated the space use and habitat selection of the magpie goose (Anseranas semipalmata), a taxonomically distinct waterbird endemic to Australia and southern Papua New Guinea. In tropical northern Australia, magpie geese are protected but are increasingly persecuted by farmers to protect crops during the late dry–early wet season (~Sep–Jan), a bottleneck of natural resources for waterbirds in the monsoonal tropics. Using satellite telemetry of 38 geese spread across 3 seasons (2016–2017, 2017–2018, 2018–2019), we evaluated daily and seasonal space use, individual site fidelity, and habitat selection to determine the extent of use of agricultural fields by geese, and the spatiotemporal scales at which management should be undertaken. Geese used relatively small daily areas (x̄ = 8.2 km2) consistently throughout the late dry–early wet season, and repeatedly used agricultural fields, forested bushlands, and local wetlands. Geese used comparatively large seasonal areas (x̄ = 219.5 km2) encompassing several agricultural areas, and had a low mean overlap between successive weekly core activity areas, indicating that site fidelity rapidly weakened over time. These results suggest that farm‐scale (<30 ha) management of geese is unlikely to be effective because hazed individuals are likely to be replaced soon afterwards. Instead, our findings suggest that goose management should be coordinated strategically at the local (~1,000 ha), or regional (~100,000 ha) scale. Farm‐level management would likely be more effective if implemented in conjunction with the creation of regional sanctuaries where geese could rest and potentially feed undisturbed away from farms. Our findings can be used by wildlife managers for optimizing the location of such sanctuaries and highlight the necessity for management to be adaptive given the opportunistic nature of the species. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Wildlife Management is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

11.
ACORN ; 35(3):E16-E20, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2012865

ABSTRACT

ACORN provided an expert consultancy team known as the Perioperative Clinical Advisory Team (PCAT) to undertake the required work for the key deliverables that were aimed at ensuring a standard of care that will be safe for the patients undergoing surgical procedures provided by Morobe Provincial Health Authority. [...]the governance, operational flows and ORS efficiency are aLL muLtidiscipLinary and require coLLaboration from aLL teams with Leadership from both nursing and medicine to succeed. [...]the primary educational focus was nursing with other deliverables aimed at the muLtidiscipLinary teams. Key deliverables Four key deliverables were identified: 1.Development of a monitoring and evaLuation framework incLuding a governance structure and risk management plan. 2. The PNGPSP incorporates appendices that apply to: * Pre-operative patient checklist * Surgical hand scrubbing procedures (three- and fiveminute) * Surgical hand rubbing procedure * Accountable items count sheet * Papua New Guinea Surgical Safety Checklist * ORS and CSU environmental cleaning audit * Perioperative patient journey audit forms (measured against the standards) * Perioperative safety guidelines (relating to positioning the patient, diathermy safety, pneumatic tourniquet safety, sharps handling and disposal, and specimen coflection) * WHO recommendations for staffing CSU The count sheet and surgical safety checklist can be utilised across all perioperative environments in PNG, therefore, enabling a safe, consistent approach to perioperative documentation.

12.
Weekly Epidemiological Record ; 96(1/2):1-10, 2021.
Article in English, French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2010657

ABSTRACT

This article provides a brief overview of the 31st meeting of the International TaskForce for Disease Eradication (ITFDE) that was convened at The Carter Center in Atlanta, GA, USA on 20-21 October 2020 to discuss "The impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on eradication and elimination programmes and the way forward." It highlights the results of 7 eradication programmes, with specific conclusions and recommendations for each: Guinea Worm Eradication Programme(dracunculiasis;GWEP);Global Polio Eradication Initiative (GPEI);elimination programmes for measles and rubella (MR), malaria, river blindness (onchocerciasis;RB), and lymphatic filariasis (LF);and the program for the Global Elimination of Trachoma.

13.
Journal of Clinical Oncology ; 40(16), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2009572

ABSTRACT

Background: Currently, Black patients make up 20% of people living with multiple myeloma, yet they represent only 6% of participants in clinical trials.1 The underrepresentation of Black patients in clinical trials can contribute to outcome disparities thereby negatively impacting health equity in cancer treatment and outcomes.2 This project examined attitudes towards clinical trials among Black multiple myeloma patients and caregivers. Findings will inform the development of programs aimed at increasing clinical trial participation in this population. Methods: In 2021, the Cancer Support Community conducted an online survey to gain insights on barriers, facilitators, and perceptions of clinical trials among Black multiple myeloma patients and caregivers/care partners. Survey questions were informed by insights from prior focus groups. 94 patients and 101 caregivers were surveyed. Results: Most participants were male (62%) and African American (90%). 5% identified as African Caribbean and 5% as Black and Hispanic. The average age was 46 years. Just over half (51%) currently or previously participated in clinical trials. Of those who chose not to participate in a trial, the most common reasons were fear of side effects (46%) and fear of receiving a placebo (38%). Another barrier to participation reported was discomfort with being randomly assigned to a treatment (56%). Participants reported a significant level of distrust in medical research and doctors, saying that it was “very or somewhat likely” that doctors provide treatment as part of an experiment without patient consent (41%) and that they might be used as a “guinea pig” (25%). Of note, 57% of respondents said COVID had changed their attitude towards participating in clinical trials. 14 of 16 factors mentioned in our focus groups were affirmed by more than half of respondents as facilitating participation in a clinical trial. The top factors were: Understanding potential side effects (66%) My health care team speaks to me about trials (65%) Compensation offered for transportation, childcare, or time off work (62%) My family/community support my decision (61%). Conclusions: These findings are consistent with previous research which found that cancer patients reported the biggest attitudinal barriers to clinical trial participation were fear of side effects, distrust in medical research, and random assignment to clinical trial groups.3 Our study highlights that Blacks and African Americans living with multiple myeloma value multifactorial efforts to increase clinical trial participation: logistical and financial interventions, patient/provider communication, and culturally sensitive support and education programs. These programs can also work to improve health equity by reducing barriers to overall care and encouraging Blacks and African Americans living with multiple myeloma to be active members of their health care team.

14.
Trop Med Infect Dis ; 7(9)2022 Sep 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010301

ABSTRACT

Evidence suggests that the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacts tuberculosis (TB) activities. As TB and COVID-19 have similar symptoms, we assessed the effectiveness of integrated TB/COVID-19 screening in Guinea and Niger. From May to December 2020, TB screening was offered to symptomatic patients after a negative COVID-19 PCR test or after recovery from COVID-19 in Guinea. From December 2020 to March 2021, all presumptive COVID-19 patients with respiratory symptoms were tested simultaneously for COVID-19 and TB in Niger. We assessed the TB detection yield and used micro-costing to estimate the costs associated with both screening algorithms. A total of 863 individuals (758 in Guinea, and 105 in Niger), who were mostly male (60%) and with a median age of 34 (IQR: 26-45), were screened for TB. Reported symptoms were cough ≥2 weeks (49%), fever (45%), and weight loss (30%). Overall, 61 patients (7%) tested positive for COVID-19 (13 in Guinea, 48 in Niger) and 43 (4.9%) were diagnosed with TB disease (35 or 4.6% in Guinea, and 8 or 7.6% in Niger). The cost per person initiating TB treatment was USD $367 in Guinea and $566 in Niger. Overall, the yield of both approaches was high, and the cost was modest. Optimizing integrated COVID-19/TB screening may support maintaining TB detection during the ongoing pandemic.

15.
Trop Med Infect Dis ; 7(9)2022 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010299

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on all facets of life and has exacerbated many challenges faced by people living with tuberculosis (TB). This study aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of TB patients in Guinea during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. A mixed methods study was conducted using two validated tools to assess HRQoL and qualitative interviews among TB patients enrolled in treatment at 11 health centers in Conakry, Guinea. Logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with the deterioration of HRQoL. We included 439 participants in the study, among whom 44% and 31% experienced pain and anxiety, respectively. We found that an increase in the number of household size and the distance from participants' residence to the health centers were significantly associated with lower HRQoL. Qualitative interviews highlighted nutritional and financial issues, which were exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic and beliefs that the Guinean Government's assistance plan was insufficient. This study supports the implementation of specific relief plans for TB patients, which includes nutritional and psychological support, especially those whose movements are limited by travel restrictions, preventing access to TB care, reducing work opportunities and exacerbating financial needs and stress.

16.
Pacific Journalism Review ; 28(1-2):29-46, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1981042

ABSTRACT

This keynote commentary at the 2021 Asian Congress for Media and Communication (ACMC) conference with the theme Change, Adaptation and Culture: Media and Communication in Pandemic Times is addressed through a discussion of three main issues: 1. The COVID-19 Pandemic and how it is being coped with;2. A parallel Infodemic-a crisis of communication, and the surge of 'disinformation' and truth challenges in this 'age of hatred and intolerance';and 3. The global Climate Emergency and the disproportionate impact this is having on the Asia-Pacific region. Finally the author concludes with an overview of some helpful strategics for communicators and educators from his perspective as a journalist and media academic with a mission.

17.
BMJ Glob Health ; 6(10)2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1449866

Subject(s)
Syndemic , Guinea , Humans
18.
J Public Health Afr ; 13(2): 1475, 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1979487

ABSTRACT

Epidemic-prone diseases have high adverse impacts and pose important threats to global health security. This study aimed to assess levels of health facility preparedness and response to the COVID-19 pandemic in Guinea. This was a cross-sectional study in public and private health facilities/services across 13 Guinean health districts. Managers and healthcare workers (HCWs) from departments in each facility/service were interviewed. Descriptive statistics and comparisons were presented using Pearson's Chi-Squared Test or Fischer exact test. Totally, 197 managers and 1020 HCWs participated in the study. Guidance documents and dedicated spaces for management/isolation of suspected COVID-19 cases were available only in 29% and 26% of facilities, respectively. Capacities to collect (9%) and safely transport (14%) samples were low. Intensive care units (5%), dedicated patient beds (3%), oxygenators (2%), and respirators (0.6%) were almost lacking. While 36% of facilities/services had received infection prevention and control supplies, only 20% had supplies sufficient for 30 days. Moreover, only 9% of HCWs had received formal training on COVID-19. The main sources of information for HCWs were the media (90%) and the internet (58%). Only 30% of HCWs had received personal protective equipment, more in the public sector (p<0.001) and in Conakry (p=0.022). This study showed low levels of preparedness of health facilities/services in Guinea and highlighted a lack of confidence among HCWs who felt unsafe at their workplace. Better governance to improve and maintain the capacity of the Guinean health system to respond to current and future epidemics is needed.

19.
Fishing & Travel ; 19(Jan/Feb/Mar):13-13, 2022.
Article in English | Africa Wide Information | ID: covidwho-1970157
20.
FRONTIERS IN MARINE SCIENCE ; 9, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1969024

ABSTRACT

This study examines the response of women to disruptions caused by COVID-19 in small-scale fisheries (SSF) in the Gulf of Guinea (GOG). It interrogates the concept of resilience and its potential for mitigating women's vulnerability in times of adversity. We define resilience as the ability to thrive amidst shocks, stresses, and unforeseen disruptions. Drawing on a focus group discussion, in-depth interviews with key informants from Cote d'Ivoire, Ghana and Nigeria, and a literature review, we highlight how COVID-19 disruptions on seafood demand, distribution, labour and production acutely affected women and heightened their pre-existing vulnerabilities. Women responded by deploying both negative and positive coping strategies. We argue that the concept of resilience often romanticises women navigating adversity as having 'supernatural' abilities to endure disruptions and takes attention away from the sources of their adversity and from the governments' concomitant failures to address them. Our analysis shows reasons for "ocean optimism" while also cautioning against simplistic resilience assessments when discussing the hidden dangers of select coping strategies, including the adoption of digital solutions and livelihood diversification, which are often constructed along highly gendered lines with unevenly distributed benefits.

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