Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Trop Med Infect Dis ; 7(10)2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043967

ABSTRACT

Achieving HIV prevention goals will require successful engagement in each stage of the HIV continuum. The present study sought to understand the ways in which socio-structural factors influence HIV care engagement among people living with HIV (PLH) within the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Twenty-five PLH were recruited from January to October 2021. Semi-structured interviews discussed various socio-contextual factors that influenced engagement in HIV-related care as a result of the pandemic. A thematic content analysis reported semantic level themes describing factors influencing HIV care following an integrated inductive-deductive approach. Qualitative analysis revealed three themes that either supported or hindered engagement in care within the context of the COVID-19 pandemic: (1) social determinants of health, (2) social support, and (3) modes of healthcare delivery. The results underscore the need to assess socio-structural factors of health as means to promote successful engagement in the HIV care continuum and shed new insights to guide future practice in the era of COVID-19.

2.
AIDS Behav ; 2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2007174

ABSTRACT

This study conducted 28 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with Young Black Men who have Sex with Men in Chicago to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on their HIV care and ancillary service access. The qualitative analysis identified both negative and positive effects. The negative effects included: (l) mixed disruptions in linkage to and receipt of HIV care and ancillary services, and (2) heightened concerns about police and racial tensions in Chicago following the murder of George Floyd, contributing to possible disruption of retention in care. The positive effects included: (1) the ability to reflect and socially connect, contributing to heightened self-care and retention in care, and (2) some improvements in receipt of medical care. These findings suggest that while COVID-19 disruptions in care reduced in-person use of HIV care, the expansion of telemedicine allowed more administrative tasks to be handled online and focused in-person interactions on more substantive interactions.

3.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 25(7): e25967, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1958775

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Globally, over half of the estimated new HIV infections now occur among key populations, including men who have sex with men, sex workers, people who inject drugs, transgender individuals, and people in prisons and other closed settings, and their sexual partners. Reaching epidemic control will, for many countries, increasingly require intensified programming and targeted resource allocation to meet the needs of key populations and their sexual partners. However, insufficient funding, both in terms of overall amounts and the way the funding is spent, contributes to the systematic marginalization of key populations from needed HIV services. DISCUSSION: The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has recently highlighted the urgent need to take action to end inequalities, including those faced by key populations, which have only been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. To address these inequalities and improve health outcomes, key population programs must expand the use of a trusted access platform, scale up differentiated service delivery models tailored to the needs of key populations, rollout structural interventions and ensure service integration. These critical program elements are often considered "extras," not necessities, and consequently costing studies of key population programs systematically underestimate the total and unitary costs of services for key populations. Findings from a recent costing study from the LINKAGES project suggest that adequate funding for these four program elements can yield benefits in program performance. Despite this and other evidence, the lack of data on the true costs of these elements and the costs of failing to provide them prevents sufficient investment in these critical elements. CONCLUSIONS: As nations strive to reach the 2030 UNAIDS goals, donors, governments and implementers should reconsider the true, but often hidden costs in future healthcare dollars and in lives if they fail to invest in the community-based and community-driven key population programs that address structural inequities. Supporting these efforts contributes to closing the remaining gaps in the 95-95-95 goals. The financial and opportunity cost of perpetuating inequities and missing those who must be reached in the last mile of HIV epidemic control must be considered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Sexual and Gender Minorities , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control
4.
National Technical Information Service; 2020.
Non-conventional in English | National Technical Information Service | ID: grc-753625

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic reached the African continent in less than three months from when the first caseswere reported from mainland China. As COVID-19 preparedness and response plans were rapidly instituted across sub-Saharan Africa, many governments and donor organizations braced themselves for the unknown impact the COVID-19 pandemicwould have in under-resourced settings with high burdens of PLHIV. The potential negative impact of COVID-19 inthese countries is uncertain, but is estimated to contribute both directly and indirectly to the morbidity and mortality ofPLHIV, requiring countries to leverage existing HIV care systems to propel COVID-19 responses, while safeguarding PLHIVand HIV programme gains. In anticipation of COVID-19-related disruptions, PEPFAR promptly established guidance to rapidlyadapt HIV programmes to maintain essential HIV services while protecting recipients of care and staff from COVID-19. Thiscommentary reviews PEPFARs COVID-19 technical guidance and provides country-specific examples of programme adaptionsin sub-Saharan Africa.

5.
IJID Reg ; 3: 114-116, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1739807

ABSTRACT

The 2025 UNAIDS targets prioritize reaching all subpopulations living with HIV and those at risk for HIV as the only pathway to achieving control of the HIV epidemic. This has brought to the fore the importance of addressing the needs of key marginalized groups and placing such communities at the center of HIV response strategies. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a setback in terms of confronting HIV. With this in mind, it is important not only to protect services within HIV responses among key populations, but also to expand such services to meet the UNAIDS 2025 targets. Without this, gains in controlling COVID-19 may be achieved at the expense of losses in controlling the spread of HIV, which had been achieved after sustained and resource-intensive actions.

6.
Front Public Health ; 9: 623468, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158355

ABSTRACT

The present commentary explored the intersecting nature of the COVID-19 and HIV pandemics to identify a shared research agenda using a syndemic approach. The research agenda posits the following questions. Questions around HIV infection, transmission, and diagnosis include: (i) molecular, genetic, clinical, and environmental assessments of COVID-19 in people living with HIV, (ii) alternative options for facility-based HIV testing services such as self- and home-based HIV testing, and (iii) COVID-19 related sexual violence and mental health on HIV transmission and early diagnosis. These and related questions could be assessed using Biopsychosocial and socio-ecological models. Questions around HIV treatment include: (i) the effect of COVID-19 on HIV treatment services, (ii) alternative options for facility-based treatment provision such as community-based antiretroviral therapy groups, and (iii) equitable distribution of treatment and vaccines for COVID-19, if successful. Bickman's logic model and the social determinants of health framework could guide these issues. The impact of stigma, the role of leveraging lessons on sustained intra-behavioral change, the role of medical mistrust and conspiracy beliefs, and the role of digital health on integrated management of HIV care and spectrum of care of COVID-19 need assessment using several frameworks including Goffman's stigma framework, Luhmann's Trust theory, and Gidden's theory of structuration. In conclusion, the potential research agenda of this commentary encompasses a variety of research fields and disciplinary areas-clinicians, laboratory scientists, public health practitioners, health economists, and psychologists-, and suggests several theoretical frameworks to guide examination of complex issues comprehensively.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coinfection , HIV Infections , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19 Vaccines , Coinfection/virology , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Syndemic , Trust
8.
J Int AIDS Soc ; 23(8): e25587, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-641138

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic reached the African continent in less than three months from when the first cases were reported from mainland China. As COVID-19 preparedness and response plans were rapidly instituted across sub-Saharan Africa, many governments and donor organizations braced themselves for the unknown impact the COVID-19 pandemic would have in under-resourced settings with high burdens of PLHIV. The potential negative impact of COVID-19 in these countries is uncertain, but is estimated to contribute both directly and indirectly to the morbidity and mortality of PLHIV, requiring countries to leverage existing HIV care systems to propel COVID-19 responses, while safeguarding PLHIV and HIV programme gains. In anticipation of COVID-19-related disruptions, PEPFAR promptly established guidance to rapidly adapt HIV programmes to maintain essential HIV services while protecting recipients of care and staff from COVID-19. This commentary reviews PEPFAR's COVID-19 technical guidance and provides country-specific examples of programme adaptions in sub-Saharan Africa. DISCUSSION: The COVID-19 pandemic may pose significant risks to the continuity of HIV services, especially in countries with high HIV prevalence and weak and over-burdened health systems. Although there is currently limited understanding of how COVID-19 affects PLHIV, it is imperative that public health systems and academic centres monitor the impact of COVID-19 on PLHIV. The general principles of the HIV programme adaptation guidance from PEPFAR prioritize protecting the gains in the HIV response while minimizing in-person home and facility visits and other direct contact when COVID-19 control measures are in effect. PEPFAR-supported clinical, laboratory, supply chain, community and data reporting systems can play an important role in mitigating the impact of COVID-19 in sub-Saharan Africa. CONCLUSIONS: As community transmission of COVID-19 continues and the number of country cases rise, fragile health systems may be strained. Utilizing the adaptive, data-driven programme approaches in facilities and communities established and supported by PEPFAR provides the opportunity to strengthen the COVID-19 response while protecting the immense gains spanning HIV prevention, testing and treatment reached thus far.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Delivery of Health Care , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/complications , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/mortality , Africa South of the Sahara/epidemiology , COVID-19 , China , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cost of Illness , Delivery of Health Care/economics , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/mortality , Humans , International Cooperation , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL