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1.
Public Health Pract (Oxf) ; 4: 100338, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105786

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The Ethiopian government had planned to vaccinate the total population and started to deliver the COVID-19 vaccine but, there is limited evidence about vaccine acceptance among pregnant women. Thus, this study aimed to assess COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and associated factors among pregnant women attending an antenatal care unit clinic in Eastern Ethiopia. Study design: A facility-based cross-sectional study. Methods: A study was conducted from June 01 to 30/2021 among systematically selected pregnant women. Data were collected using a pre-tested structured questionnaire, which was adapted from previous studies, through a face-to-face interview. Predictors were assessed using a multivariable logistic regression model and reported using an adjusted odds ratio with 95% CI. Statistical significance was declared at p-value less than 0.05. Results: In this study, data from 645 pregnant women were used in the analysis. Overall, 62.2% of pregnant women were willing to be vaccinated if the vaccine is approved by the relevant authority. Fear of side effects (62.04%), a lack of information (54.29%), and uncertainty about the vaccine's safety and efficacy (25%) were the most common reasons for refusal to take the COVID-19 vaccine. The odds of unwillingness to accept the COVID-19 vaccine among pregnant women were increased significantly among mothers who were able to read and write [AOR = 2.9, 95% CI: (1.16, 7.23)], attain 9-12 grade level [AOR = 4.2, 95% CI: (2.1, 8.5)], lack information [AOR = 2.2, 95% CI: (1.41, 3.57)], and having a history of chronic diseases [AOR = 2.52, 95% CI: (1.34, 4.7)]. Conclusion: Less than two-thirds of pregnant women were willing to accept the COVID-19 vaccine. Extensive public health information dissemination aimed at women with lower educational backgrounds and a history of chronic disease could be critical.

2.
JMIR Res Protoc ; 11(11): e36174, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, COVID-19-related psychological distress is seriously eroding health care workers' mental health and well-being, especially in low-income countries like Nigeria. The use of mobile health (mHealth) interventions is now increasingly recognized as an innovative approach that may improve mental health and well-being. This project aims to develop an mHealth psychological intervention (mPsyI) to reduce COVID-19-related psychological distress among health care workers in Nigeria. OBJECTIVE: Our objective is to present a study protocol to determine the level of COVID-19-related psychological distress among health care workers in Nigeria; explore health care workers' experience of COVID-19-related psychological distress; develop and pilot test mPsyI to reduce this distress; and assess the feasibility of this intervention (such as usability, engagement, and satisfaction). METHODS: A mixed (quantitative and qualitative) methods approach is used in which health care workers will be recruited from 2 tertiary health care facilities in southwest Nigeria. The study is divided into 4 phases based on the study objectives. Phase 1 involves a quantitative survey to assess the type and levels of psychosocial distress. Phase 2 collects qualitative data on psychosocial distress among health care workers. Phase 3 involves development of the mHealth-based psychological intervention, and phase 4 is a mixed methods study to assess the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. RESULTS: This study was funded in November 2020 by the Global Effort on COVID-19 Health Research, and collection of preliminary baseline data started in July 2021. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study to report the development of an mHealth-based intervention to reduce COVID-19-related psychological distress among health care workers in Nigeria. Using a mixed methods design in this study can potentially facilitate the adaptation of an evidence-based treatment method that is culturally sensitive and cost-effective for the management of COVID-19-related psychological distress among health care workers in Nigeria. INTERNATIONAL REGISTERED REPORT IDENTIFIER (IRRID): DERR1-10.2196/36174.

3.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(10): ofac462, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087821

ABSTRACT

Surges of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections among health care workers (HCWs) have led to critical staffing shortages. From January 4 to February 4, 2022, we implemented a return-to-work antigen testing program for HCWs, and 870 HCWs participated. Antigen test positivity was 60.5% for those ≤5 days from symptom onset or positive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and 47.4% were positive at day 7. Antigen positivity was associated with receiving a booster vaccination and being ≤6 days from symptom onset or PCR test, but not age or a symptomatic infection. Rapid antigen testing can be a useful tool to guide return-to-work and isolation precautions for HCWs following infection.

4.
Médecine de Catastrophe - Urgences Collectives ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2082592

ABSTRACT

Summary The COVID-19 pandemic has had an exceptional impact on the health system. The lack of information and resources during the first stage of the outbreak COVID-19 has also meant a change in the way we work and in the way we relate to our relatives, colleagues and, of course, our patients. This traumatic situation, due to its characteristics of total uncertainty, novelty, frequency, and high intensity, made it necessary to develop a new approach to our work, a new psychological approach to the pandemic situation that leads to acute stress, insecurity, unknown consequences, uncertainty about its duration and a desolate future. During the first wave, it was necessary to respond to the new situation. In a first phase, an intervention protocol was created for front-line pre-hospital emergency professionals and a COVID-19 psychological unit was set up in a pandemic hospital in Madrid. In a second phase, emergency actions, their conditioning and possible change due to confinement are analysed;the emotional state of front-line intervention personnel is assessed, comparing the pre- and post-first wave period, and burnout syndrome is studied in the SAMUR-Civil Protection volunteer corps. Résumé La pandémie COVID-19 a eu un impact exceptionnel sur le système de santé. Le manque d’informations et de ressources qui ont été ressentis lors du premier état d’alerte COVID-19 a également signifié un changement dans notre façon de travailler et dans notre façon d’être en relation avec nos proches, nos collègues et, bien sûr, nos patients. Cette situation traumatisante, en raison de ses caractéristiques d’incertitude totale, de nouveauté, de fréquence et de haute intensité, a rendu nécessaire le développement d’une nouvelle approche de notre travail, une nouvelle approche psychologique de la situation pandémique qui a conduit à un stress aigu, une insécurité, des conséquences inconnues, une incertitude sur sa durée et un avenir désastreux. Lors de la première vague, il a fallu réagir à la nouvelle situation. Dans une première phase, un protocole d’intervention a été créé pour les professionnels de l’urgence pré-hospitalière de première ligne et une unité psychologique COVID-19 a été mise en place dans un hôpital pandémique de Madrid. Dans une deuxième phase, les actions d’urgence, leur conditionnement et leur éventuel changement dû au confinement sont analysés;l’état émotionnel du personnel d’intervention de première ligne est évalué, en comparant la période précédant et suivant la première vague, et le syndrome d’épuisement professionnel est étudié dans le corps des volontaires de SAMUR-Protection civile.

5.
Journal of Indian Association of Public Health Dentistry ; 20(3):257-262, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2071994

ABSTRACT

Background: Swab collection is a challenging task, and the health-care workers (HCWs) have to face many difficulties while collecting swab samples of suspected patients. They often need to counsel the suspects as some think they do not have an infection but carry fear. Appropriate precautions should be taken in collecting specimens since this may expose HCWs to respiratory secretions from the suspects. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to assess awareness, anxiety, and stress among HCWs deployed in swab collection during the COVID-19 pandemic in Andhra Pradesh, India. Materials and Methods: A total of 102 HCWs filled out the questionnaire in this cross-sectional study. Google Forms were sent through WhatsApp and email. The participants were asked to forward the link to other known people who were also deployed in swab collection. The study took place in Nellore, Andhra Pradesh, for 1 month. Results: About 73.5% of HCWs underwent training in swab collection. 90% of the undergraduates and 89% of the postgraduates were unhappy while staying away from family. Most of the study participants continued to wear personal protective equipment until completion of the working period. 39 of 44 undergraduates felt that swab collection was a high-risk job, and 42 of 55 postgraduates felt the same. Conclusion: Most of the HCWs are unhappy staying away from their family while deployed in swab collection. Majority of them reported swab collection as a high-risk job. As they are frontline workers, an enhanced variety of support should be offered. Psychosocial support and effective measures should be made readily available to them.

6.
International Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 122:420-426, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2069125

ABSTRACT

Objective: We compared the characteristics and outcomes of vaccinated and nonvaccinated patients hos-pitalized with COVID-19. Design: We analyzed patients hospitalized in a COVID hub during three one-month periods: (i) Octo-ber 15, 2020-November 15, 2020 (prevaccination peak);(ii) October 15, 2021-November 15, 2021 (Delta wave);(iii) December 15, 2021-January 15, 2022 (Omicron wave). To define the epidemiologic context, SARS-CoV-2 infection in healthcare workers was analyzed. Results: SARS-CoV-2 infection incidence in healthcare workers was 146 cases per 10 0 0 persons in 2020 (prevaccination) and 67 in 2021 (postvaccination, when the Omicron variant caused most infections). There were 420 hospitalized patients in the prevaccination period, 51 during the Delta wave (52.1% vac-cinated) and 165 during the Omicron wave (52.9% vaccinated). During the Delta wave, a significantly higher number of nonvaccinated (29.2%) than vaccinated patients (3.7%) were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) (p = 0.019). Nonvaccinated patients were younger and had a lower rate of concomitant medical conditions (53.2% vs 83.7%;p < 0.001) during the Omicron wave when 80% of patients admitted to ICU and all those who died were still infected by the Delta variant. Conclusions: Vaccine effectiveness in fragile individuals appears to be lower because of a faster immunity decline. However, the Omicron variant seems to cause less severe COVID-19. (c) 2022 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd on behalf of International Society for Infectious Diseases. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/ )

7.
Acta Anaesthesiologica Belgica ; 72(2):101-107, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068271

ABSTRACT

Background : During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers were facing shortage in personal protective equipment, especially adequate respirators. Alternative do-it-yourself respirators emerged, without any proof of protection. Objective : Verify seal potential of two alternative respirators compared to a common FFP2 respirator. Design : Quality assessment pilot study. Setting : Tertiary Care Hospital. Participants : Ten anaesthesiology residents. Interventions : Participants performed quantitative face-fit tests (QNFT) with three respirators to evaluate seal. A common FFP2 "duckbill" respirator was used as baseline (control group). Alternatives tested in this study were an anaesthesia face mask and a full-face modified snorkelling mask with a 3D-printed connector, both in conjunction with a breathing system filter. Main outcome : Non-inferior seal performance of the alternatives over FFP2, assessed by calculated QNFT based on measured individual fit factors, as defined by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Results :For each respirator a total of 90 individual fit factor measurements were taken. Within the control group, seal failed in 37 (41%) measurements but only in 10 (11%) within the anaesthesia mask group and in 6 (7%) within the snorkelling mask group (P < 0.001 respectively). However, when calculating the final, mean QNFT results, no difference was found between respirators. Successful QNFT were determined for 5 out of 10 participants in the FFP2 group, for 8 in the anaesthesia mask group (P = 0.25) and for 7 in the snorkelling mask group (P = 0.69). Conclusion : Both do-it-yourself respirators successfult) pass QNFT and have the potential to provide non inferior seal compared to a common FFP2 respirator. While anaesthesia masks are easily assembled, snorkelling masks must undergo significant but feasible modifications. Our results suggest that those do-it-yourself respirators seem to be viable alternatives for situations when certified respirators are not available but need further investigation for validation. Trial registration: Clinicaltrials. gov identifier: NCT04375774 Key Points : Question: Can alternative do-it-yourself respirators protect wearers from hazardous aerosols? Findings : Our findings demonstrate that do-it-yourself respirators have the potential to provide non-inferior seal as compared to regular FFP2 personal protective equipment. Meaning : Our real-life situational testing provides evidence that do-it-yourself respirators potentially provide sufficient seal to compete with or even outperform conventional FFP2 respirators and that face-fit testing should be a mandatory safety check in healthcare providers.

8.
Asian Journal of Medical Sciences ; 13(10):12-17, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2065387

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 is caused by coronavirus, first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019, spread rapidly across international borders, and was declared pandemic on March 11, 2020. Occupation hazards such as close patient contact, suboptimal hand washing, inadequate use of personal protective equipment (PPE), and breach in infection control measures pose higher risk to health care workers (HCWs). Aims and Objectives: The objectives of the study are as follows: (1) To assess knowledge, beliefs, and practices of HCWs of a tertiary care hospital in Arunachal Pradesh regarding COVID appropriate behavior. (2) To create awareness and thereby prevent the spread of infections. Materials and Methods: A stratified sampling technique was applied to identify the study participants. A pre-tested and semi-structured questionnaire was administered to assess their knowledge, beliefs, and practices toward COVID-19. All departments (study units) were enlisted, all the HCWs were stratified according to their profession, for example, doctors, nurses, pharmacists, laboratory technician, and other HCWs. From each stratum, HCWs were randomly selected using simple random sampling and interviewed. Results: We found, 96.18% wore mask properly, 74.81% maintained physical distancing, and 55.34% greeted without physical contact while only 24.05% maintained respiratory hygiene. Mask was observed to be the most commonly known preventive measure (85.5%), followed by hand hygiene (69.47%), physical distancing (56.49%), and PPE kits (17.56%). It was observed that 53.44% of HCWs relied on government source of information. Conclusion: Most of the HCWs were practicing COVID appropriate behavior and the vaccination coverage was high among the HCWs (up to 2nd dose). [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Asian Journal of Medical Sciences is the property of Manipal Colleges of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

9.
BMC Med ; 20(1): 379, 2022 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064796

ABSTRACT

This study evaluated the persistence of IgM, IgA, and IgG to SARS-CoV-2 spike and nucleocapsid antigens up to 616 days since the onset of symptoms in a longitudinal cohort of 247 primary health care workers from Barcelona, Spain, followed up since the start of the pandemic. The study also assesses factors affecting antibody levels, including comorbidities and the responses to variants of concern as well as the frequency of reinfections. Despite a gradual and significant decline in antibody levels with time, seropositivity to five SARS-CoV-2 antigens combined was always higher than 90% over the whole study period. In a subset of 23 participants who had not yet been vaccinated by November 2021, seropositivity remained at 95.65% (47.83% IgM, 95.65% IgA, 95.65% IgG). IgG seropositivity against Alpha and Delta predominant variants was comparable to that against the Wuhan variant, while it was lower for Gamma and Beta (minority) variants and for IgA and IgM. Antibody levels at the time point closest to infection were associated with age, smoking, obesity, hospitalization, fever, anosmia/hypogeusia, chest pain, and hypertension in multivariable regression models. Up to 1 year later, just before the massive roll out of vaccination, antibody levels were associated with age, occupation, hospitalization, duration of symptoms, anosmia/hypogeusia, fever, and headache. In addition, tachycardia and cutaneous symptoms associated with slower antibody decay, and oxygen supply with faster antibody decay. Eight reinfections (3.23%) were detected in low responders, which is consistent with a sustained protective role for anti-spike naturally acquired antibodies. Stable persistence of IgG and IgA responses and cross-recognition of the predominant variants circulating in the 2020-2021 period indicate long-lasting and largely variant-transcending humoral immunity in the initial 20.5 months of the pandemic, in the absence of vaccination.


Subject(s)
Ageusia , COVID-19 , Anosmia , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Immunoglobulin A , Immunoglobulin G , Immunoglobulin M , Oxygen , Reinfection , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Int J Disaster Risk Reduct ; 82: 103304, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061258

ABSTRACT

Background: With the emergence of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and rapid vaccine development, research interest in vaccine hesitancy (VH) has increased. Research usually focuses on quantitative estimates which largely neglected the qualitative underpinnings of this phenomenon. This study aimed to explore the beliefs and views towards COVID-19 vaccination among Arabs in different countries. Furthermore, we explored the effect of confidence in the healthcare system, misinformation, and scientific approaches adopted to mitigate COVID-19 on how individuals are following the recommended preventative actions including vaccination. Methods: This study was based on the Strategic Advisory Group of Experts (SAGE)-VH Model: A qualitative design that utilized in-depth, online interviews. The study was conducted in seven Arab countries (Egypt, Qatar, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, Libya, Sudan, United Arab Emirates and Jordan) from June 2020 to December 2021. Transcripts were analyzed using NVivo 12 Software. Results: A total of 100 participants, 44 males and 56 females, of different age groups (37.1 ± 11.56 years) were interviewed. Findings revealed six themes as enablers and barriers to COVID-19 vaccination. Many participants indicated trusting the vaccines, the healthcare systems, and the vaccination policies were the main driver to get the vaccine. Participants showed concerns towards potential long-term vaccine effects. A consistent inclination towards collective responsibility, which is the willingness to protect others by own vaccination, was also reported. Conclusion: Enablers and barriers of COVID-19 vaccination acceptance in the Arab region, from sociocultural and political perspectives, are critical to guide policymakers in designing target-oriented interventions that can improve vaccine acceptance.

11.
African Journal of Infectious Diseases ; 16(2):55-62, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2056736

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare providers have been at the frontline of the response to the COVID-19 disease. Many of them have contracted the disease, and some of them already dead. This study assessed the knowledge, compliance with preventive measures and determined the relationship between knowledge and practice of preventive strategies to COVID-19 among nurses working in a selected hospital in South-South Nigeria. Materials and methods: A cross-sectional descriptive design guided the study. Census method guided the recruitment of all the 378 nurses in the hospital who met the study's inclusion criteria.

12.
Journal of Medical Pest Control ; 38(3):277-281, 2022.
Article in Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056261

ABSTRACT

Objective To understand the awareness, psychological status and stress reduction of health care workers involved in the emergency response Corona Virus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak since the “traffic control” in Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture on 26 January 2020, in order to inform the development of relevant measures. To provide a reference basis for the development of related measures. Methods The study participants were invited through the Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture medical and nursing exchange group by snowball sampling method based on WeChat from February 4 to February 5, and the invited participants filled out the questionnaires online(Questionnaire Star). The invailed questionnaires were strictly eliminated according to the quality control conditions, and the questionnaires that fit the research study were selected for collation, statistical analysis was performed. Results Onerall high awareness of COVID-19 among health care workers after “traffic control” in Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture, with the highest knowledge of the source of infection was 95.95% and the lowest genotype knowledge rate of 64. 86%. The differences between the different psychological profiles of anxiety and stress, loneliness and depression among health care workers were statistically significant (x2 = 25. 439, P < 0. 01), and the highest percentage of anxiety among health care workers was 79. 73% and the lowest percentage of depression was 50. 85%;health care workers mainly reduced stress by watching TV and surfing the Internet, and the composition ratios of the two main forms of reducing stress were 68.92% and 60. 81%, respectively. Conclusion Different types of mental health problems existed among health care workers of different genders, occupations, titles and marital status after the “traffic control” in Dali Bai Autonomous Prefecture. Therefore, targeted mental health guidance and interventions for different health care workers. © 2022, Editorial Department of Medical Pest Control. All rights reserved.

13.
Disease Surveillance ; 37(6):720-724, 2022.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2055479

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the risk of public health emergencies, including both indigenous and imported ones, which might occur in the mainland of China in June 2022.

14.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(10): e39676, 2022 10 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and its corresponding preventive and control measures have increased the mental burden on the public. Understanding and tracking changes in public mental status can facilitate optimizing public mental health intervention and control strategies. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to build a social media-based pipeline that tracks public mental changes and use it to understand public mental health status regarding the pandemic. METHODS: This study used COVID-19-related tweets posted from February 2020 to April 2022. The tweets were downloaded using unique identifiers through the Twitter application programming interface. We created a lexicon of 4 mental health problems (depression, anxiety, insomnia, and addiction) to identify mental health-related tweets and developed a dictionary for identifying health care workers. We analyzed temporal and geographic distributions of public mental health status during the pandemic and further compared distributions among health care workers versus the general public, supplemented by topic modeling on their underlying foci. Finally, we used interrupted time series analysis to examine the statewide impact of a lockdown policy on public mental health in 12 states. RESULTS: We extracted 4,213,005 tweets related to mental health and COVID-19 from 2,316,817 users. Of these tweets, 2,161,357 (51.3%) were related to "depression," whereas 1,923,635 (45.66%), 225,205 (5.35%), and 150,006 (3.56%) were related to "anxiety," "insomnia," and "addiction," respectively. Compared to the general public, health care workers had higher risks of all 4 types of problems (all P<.001), and they were more concerned about clinical topics than everyday issues (eg, "students' pressure," "panic buying," and "fuel problems") than the general public. Finally, the lockdown policy had significant associations with public mental health in 4 out of the 12 states we studied, among which Pennsylvania showed a positive association, whereas Michigan, North Carolina, and Ohio showed the opposite (all P<.05). CONCLUSIONS: The impact of COVID-19 and the corresponding control measures on the public's mental status is dynamic and shows variability among different cohorts regarding disease types, occupations, and regional groups. Health agencies and policy makers should primarily focus on depression (reported by 51.3% of the tweets) and insomnia (which has had an ever-increasing trend since the beginning of the pandemic), especially among health care workers. Our pipeline timely tracks and analyzes public mental health changes, especially when primary studies and large-scale surveys are difficult to conduct.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Social Media , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Infodemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Policy
15.
American Journal of Lifestyle Medicine ; 16(3):399-407, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2053610

ABSTRACT

The study tested the effects of a vegan diet on cardiometabolic outcomes and quality of life among healthcare employees during the COVID-19 pandemic. Overweight hospital employees were enrolled and randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio) to an intervention group, which was asked to follow a low-fat vegan diet, or a control group, asked to make no diet changes. However, due to COVID-19 disruptions, all participants remained on their usual diets from March to June (12 weeks), creating a de facto control period, and all (n = 12) started the vegan diet with online classes in June, which continued for 12 weeks. Nine participants completed all final assessments. A crossover ANOVA was used for statistical analysis of differences in cardiovascular health during the control period and during the intervention. Despite the ongoing crisis, body weight decreased (treatment effect -5.7 kg [95% CI -9.7 to -1.7];P = .01);fasting plasma glucose decreased (-11.4 mg/dL [95% CI -18.8 to -4.1];P = .007);total and LDL-cholesterol decreased (-30.7 mg/dL [95% CI -53.8 to -7.5];P = .02;and -24.6 mg/dL [-44.8 to -4.3];P = .02, respectively);diastolic blood pressure decreased (-8.5 mm Hg [95% CI -16.3 to -.7];P = .03);and quality of life increased (P = .005) during the intervention period, compared with the control period. A vegan diet improved cardiometabolic outcomes and quality of life in healthcare workers at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic.

16.
J Nurs Manag ; 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2052806

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to evaluate health care professionals' perceived organizational support and its effect on their compassion, resilience and turnover intention in the United Arab Emirates. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic exerted unprecedented pressure on health care systems, professionals and management systems. Health care organizations begin to explore their roles and function in relation to risks and resilience, in addition to ascertain what level of organization support they are providing to their workers. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted with a questionnaire administered to 538 health care workers, to examine their personal resources and organizational support during the pandemic. RESULTS: A total of 37.7% of nurses were found to have a moderate level of resilience, logistic regression showed that being married is a protective factor against resigning from the profession (OR = 0.462, P = .012, 95% CI: 0.254-0.842), and health care workers who perceived higher organizational support were approximately 50% less likely to have a turnover intention (OR = 0.506, P = .009, 95% CI: 0.303-0.845). Multiple linear regression model indicated significantly higher resilience among physicians (ß = 0.12, P < .05) and allied health care practitioners (ß = 0.12, P = .022). Organizational support had a significant positive relationship with resilience scores (ß = 0.20, P < .001); adequate training was significantly related to higher compassion levels (ß = 0.11, P < .05) and high organizational support scores were associated with increased compassion scores (ß = 0.27, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Front-line health care workers reported moderate organizational support during the pandemic, commensurately reflected in moderate levels of personal resilience and self-compassion. Continued and better support is vital for employee sustainability and the increased health system performance, including quality of care and patient outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Nurse managers should help health care workers improve self-care strategies by strengthening personal resources, including shortened duty hours, offering adequate break time, providing a safe work climate and purveying adequate personal protective equipment and supplies to combat infections. They should build an empathetic work environment through understanding the needs of staff, helping tackle their work stress and sustaining cultures of compassion through promoting rewarding and flexibility strategies. Moreover, policymakers and nurse mangers should create a rewarding culture for nurses and other health care workers to increase their commitment to their jobs.

17.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol ; : 1-7, 2022 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050888

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this study, we investigated the impact of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination on seroprevalence in a cohort of healthcare workers (HCW) at an ophthalmic medical center. METHODS: IgG antibodies against the N, S1, and S2 antigens of SARS-CoV-2 as well as their serum neutralizing activity were determined. RESULTS: In the present study, we observed that 98.4% of HCW were seropositive for S1/S2 proteins of SARS-CoV-2 due to the national vaccination program. Interestingly, 78.4% of the participants had anti-N protein antibodies, suggesting previous COVID-19 infection. We also evaluated the neutralizing antibodies and found that the mean value was high (90.7%). CONCLUSION: These results indicate that our HCWs cohort presented a robust hybrid humoral response owing to the massive national vaccination program and natural infections.

18.
J Psychol ; 156(8): 535-551, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050746

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The present study aims to examine the association between mindfulness and COVID-19 vaccination intention, and the mediating role of presence of meaning in life and moral elevation in such association. METHOD: In a cross-sectional study design, a total of 1733 health care workers (81.1% females, Mage = 34.16 ± 9.03) from four cities in China were recruited and completed an online survey that measured mindfulness, moral elevation, presence of meaning in life and COVID-19 vaccination intention. RESULTS: It has been found that 73.1% of the participants reported an intention to receive COVID-19 vaccination. Mindfulness was positively associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention; Mediation analyses using structural equation modeling showed a significant indirect effect of mindfulness on COVID-19 vaccination intention, accounting for 42.4% of the total effect. Mindfulness was positively associated with COVID-19 vaccination intention directly via presence of meaning in life, and indirectly via moral elevation and presence of meaning in life. CONCLUSIONS: The findings add knowledge of how mindfulness may increase COVID-19 vaccination intention, and underscore the potential need for mindfulness training, positive emotion promotion, presence of meaning in life interventions to improve acceptance of COVID-19 vaccination among health care workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mindfulness , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Intention , Male , Psychology, Positive , Vaccination/psychology
19.
Studies in Big Data ; 114:13-31, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2048190

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the deadly Covid-19 virus has snatched smiles from everyone’s face and now the entire world has been affected directly or indirectly by the effects of the virus, this virus keeps on mutating due to which there is no proper medicine or a final vaccine that assures it will curb the spread of the virus, major countries all over the world has lost more people than in a war and is still losing its people even after getting fully vaccinated. The horror is so much imbibed in each human it seems unrealistic to even think that the world will be normal ever again. This outbreak of the unknown virus is certainly a black-swan event that has annihilated people economically, emotionally, and socially and has made each individual realize the importance of one’s health and how to be a responsible person by taking care of whatever finances one has, as in unprecedented times savings are the only resort left with a person. It is a testing time and everyone is at war, we all are soldiers in this pandemic and our health care workers, administration, and government are trying their best to stop the spread of the disease as it has killed more than four lakh people in India only and in the world tally is more than forty lakhs with numbers increasing. In this appalling situation when everything has been shifted to online mode solutions must be looked at in more technologically driven methods, in today’s world due to rapid advancement in the IT and computer science sector there are ways to track the next rising hotspot of the virus and how it can be contained by taking swift actions if predicted within a particular time frame. Data collection, data analysis, and studying trends can help in assessing the upcoming threats, and in this manner, new job opportunities can also be created as it will involve people being prepared with limited medical knowledge to cure the people affected with the virus. In these times government and administration must adopt technologically backed solutions which will help the system to make accurate decisions based on real-time data-driven modeling capable of identifying the relevant information. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd.

20.
Africa Health ; 43(3):12-14, 2021.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-2046809

ABSTRACT

This article concentrates on the most important COVID-19 data that are relevant to doctors, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who provide clinical care. The "Infodemic," or flood of false information being spread mostly through social media platforms and unofficial social networks, has hindered the use of vaccines, public health prevention measures, and patient care procedures. Healthcare professionals have a crucial role in both caring for their patients and teaching their communities. They are regarded as reliable sources of up-to-date knowledge. Unfortunately, it can be difficult for healthcare professionals to locate easily available, reliable sources of information. The collaboration between AFREHealth and Stanford University seeks to close this gap by offering training resources from reliable sources that will aid medical professionals in their fight against the widespread misinformation present in their communities. AfreHealth and Stanford University are collaborating to spread a free course that teaches medical professionals how to recognize and treat COVID-19 patients. Evidence to date shows that prompt diagnosis and top-notch treatment can significantly lower mortality rates and stop the spread of infections. In order to effectively care for their patients and be important information sources for their communities, healthcare staff must enhance what they already know with trustworthy information.

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