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1.
6th Kuala Lumpur International Conference on Biomedical Engineering, BioMed 2021 ; 86:415-423, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1844282

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus of 2019 is an ongoing pandemic that has infected millions of people and costed the life of more than three million people. It is a highly transmitting disease that has exhausted all the healthcare facilities trying to contain its spread. It has exposed the need for more health facilities and experts to cope with this pandemic without impacting on the safety of healthcare workers. The hardworking and struggling healthcare sector is in need of automated diagnostic devices that could lift the burden off the limited practitioners and also ensure their safety from coming in direct contact with the infection. This pandemic has made the world realize the need of automation for an infectious disease like COVID-19. Deep learning in radiology is an extensively researched topic over the last decade and has the potential to provide the much-needed automation required for COVID-19 diagnosis. In this paper we have fine-tuned three deep learning models—ResNet50, DenseNet121 and InceptionV3—for classification of COVID-19 CXR from regular pneumonia cases. Our models achieved an accuracy of 99.45, 99.50 and 98.55 respectively. © 2022, Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 03 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841367

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Knowledge of occupational health is crucial to the safety of healthcare workers in the pandemic period. The aim of our study was the rating of SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence in connection with selected demographic, social, and organizational factors, as well as the identification of key elements determining the safety of HCWs and patients of the University Hospital in Krakow. METHODS: This was a non-interventional, uncontrolled, open, single-center, cross-sectional online survey on the preparedness for the COVID-19 epidemic and the seroprevalence of medical and non-medical HCWs and students. Serum specimens from 1221 persons were tested using an immunoassay analyzer based on the ECLIA technique for the anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies IgM + IgG. RESULTS: The total seroprevalence was 42.7%. In medical students it was 25.2%, while in physicians it was 43.4% and in nurses/midwives it was 48.1%. Of those who tested positive, 21.5% did not know their serological status. The use of personal protective equipment did not have any significant impact on the result of testing for anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The risk of developing the disease was not influenced by sex, professional work experience, workplace, or intensity of contact with the patient. Among the studied elements, only care of COVID-19 patients significantly increased the risk. The protective factor was starting work between the waves of the epidemic (June-September 2020). CONCLUSIONS: PPE is only one element of infection prevention and control-without other components, such as hand hygiene, it can be dangerous and contribute to self-infection. It is also very important to test healthcare workers. Not being aware of the COVID-19 status of HCWs poses a threat to other staff members, as well as patients and the family and friends of the infected. Thus, extreme caution should be applied when employing respirators with exhalation valves during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Hospitals, University , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , Pandemics/prevention & control , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Vaccination
4.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(4)2022 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1841361

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The objective of the study was to investigate frontline healthcare professionals' experiences and attitudes in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic's ethical and psychosocial aspects in Estonia. There were two research foci: first, ethical decision-making related to treating patients in the context of potential medical resource scarcity, and second, other psychosocial factors for healthcare professionals pertaining to coping, role conflicts, and the availability of institutional support. METHODS: An online survey was conducted in the fall of 2020 amongst the frontline healthcare professionals working in the three most impacted hospitals; respondents were also drawn from two ambulance services. The focus of the survey was on the first wave of COVID-19 (spring 2020). A total of 215 respondents completed the quantitative survey and qualitative data were gathered from open comments. RESULTS: Over half of the surveyed healthcare professionals in Estonia expressed confidence in their roles during the pandemic. More than half cited the complex ethical aspects related to their decisions as their main source of doubt and uncertainty. In response to this uncertainty, Estonian healthcare professionals drew on their previous training and experience, the policies and guidelines of their institution, and support from their colleagues, to aid their decision-making during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Although frontline healthcare professionals faced difficult decisions during the first wave of the pandemic, overall, most agreed that experiencing the pandemic reconfirmed that their work mattered greatly.

5.
Journal of Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy and Research ; 10(2):137-145, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1837631

ABSTRACT

Since December 2019, a new coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 spread rapidly worldwide within months and caused stress and anxiety both in public and healthcare workers (HCWs). This study was conducted to determine psychologic effect of COVID-19 outbreak on and burnout level among HCWs of Pediatric Clinic while entering normalization process of pandemic. This cross-sectional study was carried out between June 10, 2020 and June 15, 2020 with participation of 261 HCWs. Questionnaire about demographic data, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21 (DASS-21), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) were self-reported by the participants. The mean age of participants was 29+/-9.88 years, 78.9% of them was female, 33% were physicians, 40.2% were nurses. In general, psychological outcomes of the participations were determined as depressive symptoms in 143 (54.8%), anxiety in 129 (49.4%), and stress in 87 (33.3%). Being female, having direct contact with COVID-19 patients increased the risk for anxiety, depression, stress, and psychological inflexibility. Younger age, less work experience, and longer working hours had a significant correlation with burnout as well as a its significant correlation with depression, anxiety, stress, psychological inflexibility. In multiple regression analysis psychological inflexibility, stress levels and working hours showed significant predictive effect on burnout. And also, predictive effects of psychological parameters on burnout were found more stronger than the environmental parameters. Psychological factors showed a stronger relationship with burnout scores compared to environmental factors. Even so, organizational strategies like limiting working hours, and doing a fair shift for HCWs who work on the front line and have direct contact with COVID-19 patients will help to reduce the psychological pressure on HCWs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) (Turkish) Aralik 2019'dan bu yana, yeni bir korona virus, SARS-CoV-2 dunya capinda aylar icinde hizla yayildi ve hem halk hem de saglik personelleri (SP) arasinda stres ve kaygiya neden oldu. Bu calisma, normallesme surecine girerken, COVID-19 salgininin Cocuk Sagligi ve Hastaliklari Kliniginde calisan SP uzerindeki psikolojik etkisini ve sebep oldugu tukenmislik duzeylerini belirlemek amaciyla yapildi. Bu kesitsel calisma, 261 saglik calisaninin katilimiyla 10 Haziran 2020 ve 15 Haziran 2020 tarihleri arasinda gerceklestirildi. Demografik verilerle ilgili anket, Depresyon Anksiyete Stres Olcegi-21 (DASS-21), Kabul ve Eylem Anketi-II (AAQ-II), Maslach Tukenmislik Envanteri (MIB) katilimcilar tarafindan doldurdu. Katilimcilarin yas ortalamasi 29+/-9,88 yil, %78,9'u kadin, %33'u hekim, %40,2'si hemsire idi. Genel psikolojik sonuclar 143'unde (%54,8) depresyon belirtileri, 129'unda (%49,4) anksiyete, 87'sinde (%33,3) stres seklinde belirlendi. Kadin olma ve COVID-19 tanili hasta ile dogrudan temasta bulunmanin anksiyete, depresyon, stres ve psikolojik esneklik icin riski artirdigi goruldu. Daha genc olma, is deneyiminin az olmasi ve uzun saatler calismanin depresyon, anksiyete, stres, psikolojik esneklik kaybi ile oldugu gibi, tukenmislik ile de iliskisi vardi. Regresyon analizinde psikolojik esneklik, stress duzeyive calisma saatinin tukenmislik uzerinde anlamli yordayici etkisi oldugu gosterildi. Psikolojik faktorler cevresel faktorlere gore tukenmislik puanlari ile daha guclu bir iliski gostermektedir. Bununla beraber calisma saatlerini sinirlandirmak, on saflarda calisan COVID-19 hastalariyla dogrudan temas halinde olan SP arasinda adil vardiya duzenlemek gibi kurumsal stratejiler, SP uzerindeki psikolojik baskiyi azaltmaya yardimci olacaktir. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

6.
Gates Open Res ; 4: 174, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835881

ABSTRACT

Background: Healthcare workers are at the forefront of the COVID-19 pandemic and it is essential to monitor the relative infection rate of this group, as compared to workers in other occupations. This study aimed to produce estimates of the relative incidence ratio between healthcare workers and workers in non-healthcare occupations. Methods: Analysis of cross-sectional data from a daily, web-based survey of 1,788,795 Facebook users from September 6, 2020 to October 18, 2020. Participants were Facebook users in the United States aged 18 and above who were tested for COVID-19 because of an employer or school requirement in the past 14 days. The exposure variable was a self-reported history of working in healthcare in the past four weeks and the main outcome was a self-reported positive test for COVID-19. Results: On October 18, 2020, in the United States, there was a relative COVID-19 incidence ratio of 0.7 (95% UI 0.6 to 0.8) between healthcare workers and workers in non-healthcare occupations. Conclusions: Currently in the United States, healthcare workers have a substantially and significantly lower COVID-19 incidence rate than workers in non-healthcare occupations.

7.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(4)2022 Mar 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834935

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at higher risk of developing COVID-19 due to their professional exposition to the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This study assesses the intention of vaccination against COVID-19 before the vaccines were approved, and the rate of vaccine uptake during the first nine months of immunization among HCWs. A cross-sectional seroprevalence study was carried out during July 2020 in University Clinical Hospital Center Bezanijska Kosa in Belgrade, Serbia that included 62.8% of all HCWs. Besides serological testing for IgG antibodies, data about HCWs' intention to accept COVID-19 vaccination if a vaccine became available were collected. This cohort of HCWs was followed up until the end of October 2021 to assess the number of vaccinated and PCR-positive staff. In the cross-sectional study, 18.3% HCWs had positive SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies without difference with IgG-negative HCWs regarding age, gender, profession type, and years of service. Before vaccines became available, a significantly higher percentage of IgG-positive HCWs compared to IgG-negative HCWs was unsure whether to be vaccinated (62.5% vs. 49.0%), and significantly fewer stated that they would not be vaccinated (16.7% vs. 25.1%). When the vaccines became available in Serbia, among IgG-negative HCWs, those who stated clear positive (yes) and clear negative (no) attitude toward vaccination before the immunization period had begun were vaccinated at 28% and 20%, respectively, while 51% of unsure HCWs received a vaccine (p = 0.006). Among IgG-positive HCWs, there was no statistical difference in vaccine uptake regarding those with previous negative, positive, and unsure opinions about vaccination (p = 0.498). In multivariate analysis, independent factors associated with uptake were being female (OR = 1.92; 95%CI: 1.04-3.55), age of 30-59 years, previously vaccine-unsure (OR = 1.84; 95%CI: 1.04-3.25), and those with previous positive vaccine attitudes (OR = 2.48; 95%CI:1.23-5.01), while nurses were less likely to become vaccinated (OR = 0.39 95% CI: 0.20-0.75) These findings indicate a positive change in attitudes of HCWs towards COVID-19 vaccination.

8.
Front Psychiatry ; 13: 874729, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834616

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers face numerous occupational stressors, including some that may challenge personal and shared morals and values. This is particularly true during disasters and crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic, which require critical decisions to be made with little time and information often under personal distress and situational constraints. Consequently, healthcare workers are at risk for moral injuries characterized by stress-related and functional impacts. Although research on the evaluation and treatment of moral injury among military veterans burgeoned in the recent decade, addressing moral injury in healthcare workers and other civilians remains an important gap. In this perspective piece, we identify research gaps and make recommendations to advance future work on assessment, prevention, and treatment of moral injury in healthcare workers. We draw on empirical studies of moral injury in veterans, limited studies of moral injury in health professionals, and our clinical experiences with healthcare workers affected by moral injury.

9.
Front Psychol ; 13: 858677, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834544

ABSTRACT

Aim: Healthcare workers have directly provided care for COVID-19 patients, and have faced many additional sources leading to poor mental health. The study aimed to investigate the mental health problems and related factors among healthcare staff in Vietnam. Methods: A descriptive cross-sectional mixed methods study, combining quantitative and qualitative research methods, was performed among 400 healthcare workers working at the National Hospital for Tropical Diseases and Ninh Binh General Hospital from the first day of treatment for COVID-19 patients to May 01, 2020. Results: The results showed that 8.0% of participants had stress, 17.5% of participants had anxiety, and 14.8% of participants had depression. Approximately 50% of participants reported that they had at least one of these symptoms. The findings illustrated that stress, anxiety, and depression were associated with the position in a hospital, health status during the COVID-19 pandemic, family members/relatives infected with COVID-19, physical and mental support from friends, family, and community, department, years of working, and the average work hours per day of healthcare workers exposed to COVID-19. Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers who worked in the hospital providing treatment and care for COVID-19 patients dealt with mental health problems such as stress, anxiety, and depression. It is necessary to promote mental health among healthcare workers, to contribute to the fight against the COVID-19 outbreak in Vietnam.

10.
Front Psychol ; 13: 808338, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834528

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers in Pakistan are still fighting at the frontline to control the spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) and have been identified as the earliest beneficiaries for COVID-19 vaccination by the health authorities of the country. Besides, the high vaccination rates of frontline healthcare workers (FHWs) are essential to overcome the ongoing pandemic and reduce the vaccines hesitancy among the general population. The current research employed the theory of planned behavior (TPB) to investigate the COVID-19 vaccination behavior among FHWs in Pakistan as well as the predictors of such behavior. Following the epidemic control and prevention policies, a sample of 680 FHWs were accessed to fill in the questionnaire evaluating the components of the TPB. Moreover, the potential role of anticipated regret (AR) and perceived susceptibility (PS) on COVID-19 vaccination behavior was also assessed. The partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) results revealed that the TPB components, as well as the AR, have positive associations with the COVID-19 vaccination behavior. The results further confirmed that PS positively affects the anticipated regret, attitude (ATT), and subjective norm (SN) to vaccinate against SARS-CoV-2. The perceived susceptibility also has a positive association with COVID-19 vaccination behavior through the mediation of anticipated regret, ATT, and SN. Our findings highlighted the importance of COVID-19 vaccination among healthcare workers, which can be applied to reduce vaccine hesitancy among the general public.

11.
International Journal of Workplace Health Management ; 15(3):410-426, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1831659

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The on-going COVID-19 pandemic has drastically impacted healthcare systems worldwide. Understanding the perspectives and insights of frontline healthcare workers caring for and interacting with patients with COVID-19 represents a timely, topical, and important area of research. The purpose of this qualitative action research study was to assist one US healthcare system that has an expansive footprint with the implementation of a needs assessment among its frontline healthcare workers. The leadership within this healthcare system wanted to obtain a deeper understanding of how the COVID-19 pandemic was impacting the personal and professional lives of its workers. Further, the organisation wanted to solicit employees’ feedback about what they needed, understand the issues they were facing, and solicit their ideas to help the organisation know where to take action.Design/methodology/approach>This qualitative research employed 45 focus groups, referred to as virtual listening calls (LCs) in this organisation, which were held over a four-week period. A total of 241 nursing staff, representing healthcare facilities across the country, attended 26 of the LCs. A total of 19 LCs were held with 116 healthcare workers who are employed in other clinical roles (e.g. therapists) or administrative functions.Findings>Extending beyond the available research at the time, this study was initiated from within a US healthcare system and informed by the frontline healthcare employees who participated in the LCs, the findings of this study include the perspectives of both nursing and other healthcare workers, the latter of which have not received considerable attention. The findings underscore that the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc on the personal and professional lives of all of these healthcare workers and has exacted an emotional toll as noted in other studies. However, this study also highlights the importance of listening to employees’ concerns, but more importantly, their recommendations for improving their experiences. Notably, the organisation is in the midst of making changes to address these frontline workers’ needs.Originality/value>The study, inclusive of nursing and other healthcare staff, demonstrates how an organisation can adapt to a crisis by listening and learning from its frontline employees.

12.
Euro Surveill ; 27(17)2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1834263

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe start of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign among French healthcare and welfare sector workers in January 2021 offered an opportunity to study psychological antecedents of vaccination in this group.AimWe explored whether knowledge and attitude items related to social conformism and confidence in systems contributed to explaining intention for COVID-19 vaccination.MethodsWe developed a knowledge and attitude questionnaire with 30 items related to five established and two hypothetical psychological antecedents of vaccination (KA-7C). The online questionnaire was distributed from 18 December 2020 to 1 February 2021 through chain-referral via professional networks, yielding a convenience sample. We used multivariable logistic regression to explore the associations of individual and grouped KA-7C items with COVID-19 vaccine intention.ResultsAmong 5,234 participants, the vaccine intention model fit (pseudo R-squared values) increased slightly but significantly from 0.62 to 0.65 when adding social conformism and confidence in systems items. Intention to vaccinate was associated with the majority opinion among family and friends (OR: 11.57; 95% confidence interval (CI): 4.51-29.67) and a positive perception of employer's encouragement to get vaccinated (vs negative; OR: 6.41; 95% CI: 3.36-12.22). The strongest association of a knowledge item was identifying the statement 'Some stages of vaccine development (testing) have been skipped because of the epidemic emergency.' as false (OR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.73-3.22).ConclusionThe results suggest that social conformism and confidence in systems are distinct antecedents of vaccination among healthcare and welfare workers, which should be taken into account in vaccine promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Influenza, Human , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Intention , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
13.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 9(5): ofac178, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831313

ABSTRACT

Background: One- and two-dose mRNA vaccine effectiveness (VE) estimates against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection by dosing interval and time since vaccination were assessed among healthcare workers (HCWs) in publicly funded acute and community (nonresidential) healthcare facilities in British Columbia, Canada. Methods: A test-negative design was used with controls matched to cases (6:1) on epidemiological week of SARS-CoV-2 test date. mRNA vaccination was defined by receipt of the first dose ≥21 days or second dose ≥14 days before the test date. HCWs ≥18 years old tested for SARS-CoV-2 between epi-weeks 3 and 39 (January 17-October 2, 2021) were included, when varying dosing intervals and a mix of circulating variants of concern contributed, including Delta dominance provincially from epi-week 31 (August 1). Results: Single- and two-dose analyses included 1265 and 1246 cases, respectively. The median follow-up period (interquartile range) was 49 (34-69) days for single-dose and 89 (61-123) days for two-dose recipients, with 12%, 31%, and 58% of second doses given 3-5, 6, or ≥7 weeks after the first. Adjusted mRNA VE against SARS-CoV-2 was 71% (95% CI, 66%-76%) for one dose and 90% (95% CI, 88%-92%) for two doses, similar to two heterologous mRNA doses (92%; 95% CI, 86%-95%). Two-dose VE remained >80% at ≥28 weeks post-second dose. Two-dose VE was consistently 5%-7% higher with a ≥7-week vs 3-5-week interval between doses, but with overlapping confidence intervals. Conclusions: Among HCWs, we report substantial single-dose and strong and sustained two-dose mRNA vaccine protection, with the latter maintained for at least 7 months. These findings support a longer interval between doses, with global health and equity implications.

14.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 1-5, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1830889

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: We explored the willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccine among health-care workers in Taizhou, China. METHODS: A population-based self-administered online questionnaire evaluating the willingness of health-care workers to pay for booster vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine was conducted in Taizhou, China. Of the 1102 health-care workers received the invitation, 1072 (97.3%) had received twice vaccination of COVID-19 vaccine. RESULTS: There were 1569 (53.1%) out of 1072 health-care workers not willing to pay for thebooster dose of COVID-19 vaccines, 348 (32.5%) were willing to pay less than 100CHY for the booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines, only 155 (14.5%) were willing to pay more than 100 CHY. The factors related to willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines were education level (c2 = 9.42, P = .01) or whether they had adverse effect to COVID-19 vaccines (c2 = 11.87, P < .01) . CONCLUSION: This study found that about half of health-care workers were willing to pay for booster dose of inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in Taizhou, China, most of them are willing to pay less than 100 CHY. Health-care workers' willingness to pay for booster dose of COVID-19 vaccines were related to sex, education level, whether they had adverse effect to COVID-19 vaccines.

15.
Lecture Notes on Data Engineering and Communications Technologies ; 113:178-191, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1826249

ABSTRACT

Significant with COVID-19 pandemic breakout, and the high risk of acquiring this infection that is facing the Healthcare Workers (HCWs), a safe alternative was needed. As a result, robotics, artificial intelligence (AI) and internet of things (IoT) usage rose significantly to assist HCWs in their missions. This paper aims to represent a humanoid robot capable of performing HCWs’ repetitive scheduled tasks such as monitoring vital signs, transferring medicine and food, or even connecting the doctor and patient remotely, is an ideal option for reducing direct contact between patients and HCWs, lowering the risk of infection for both parties. Humanoid robots can be employed in a variety of settings in hospitals, including cardiology, post-anesthesia care, and infection control. The creation of a humanoid robot that supports medical personnel by detecting the patient's body temperature and cardiac vital signs automatically and often and autonomously informs the HCWs of any irregularities is described in this study. It accomplishes this objective thanks to its integrated mobile vital signs unit, cloud database, image processing, and Artificial Intelligence (AI) capabilities, which enable it to recognize the patient and his situation, analyze the measured values, and alert the user to any potentially worrisome signals. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

16.
EClinicalMedicine ; 45: 101314, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1828404

ABSTRACT

Background: The extent to which healthcare worker (HCWs) experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic vary by race or ethnicity after adjustment for confounding factors is not currently known. Methods: We performed an observational prospective cohort study of 24,769 healthcare workers from 50 U.S. states and the District of Columbia, enrolled between April 10, 2020 and June 30, 2021, and evaluated participant experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic, including testing, diagnosis with COVID-19, emotional experiences, burnout, and interest in vaccines and vaccine clinical trials. Findings: After adjustment for professional role, medical history, and community characteristics, Black and Asian participants were less likely to receive SARS-CoV-2 viral testing (adjusted odds ratio (aOR) 0·82 [0·70, 0·96], p=0·012 and aOR 0·77 [0·67, 0·89], p<0·001 respectively) than White participants. Hispanic participants were more likely to have evidence of COVID-19 infection (aOR 1·23 (1·00, 1·50, p=0·048). Black and Asian participants were less likely to report interest in a COVID-19 vaccine (aOR 0·11 [0·05, 0·25], p<0·001 and aOR 0·48 [0·27, 0·85] p=0·012). Black participants were less likely to report interest in participating in a COVID-19 vaccine trial (aOR = 0·39 [0·28, 0·54], p<0·001). Black participants were also less likely to report 3 or more daily emotional impacts of COVID-19 (aOR = 0·66 [0·53, 0·82], p=<0·001). Black participants were additionally less likely to report burnout (aOR = 0·66 ([0·49, 0·95], p=0·025). Interpretation: In a large, national study of healthcare workers, after adjustment for individual and community characteristics, race/ethnicity disparities in COVID-19 outcomes persist. Future work is urgently needed to understand precise mechanisms behind these disparities and to develop and implement targeted interventions to improve health equity for healthcare workers. Funding: This work was funded by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), Contract # COVID-19-2020-001.

17.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 10(4)2022 Mar 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1822457

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19), was declared as pandemic in early 2020. While several studies reported the short-term adverse events (AE) of the mRNA COVID-19 vaccines, medium-term AE have not been extensively evaluated. This study aimed to evaluate the 6-month side effect profiles of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine. METHODS: This was a descriptive cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary hospital. Hospital workers who received two doses of the Cominarty (BNT162b2) mRNA vaccine, six months post-vaccination, were invited to participate in this study. All participants completed a self-reported survey assessing AEs occurrence and severity, duration of onset and recovery and if they previously reported these AEs. RESULTS: Of the 670 respondents who completed the survey, 229 (34.2%) experienced at least one AEs, with a total of 937 AEs reported during the 6-month period. After the first dose, the most common reported localized symptoms were pain (n = 106, 27.2%), swelling (n = 38, 9.8%) and erythematous (n = 12, 3.1%) at injection site. Systemic symptoms reported include fatigue (n = 72, 18.5%), fever (n = 55, 14.1%) and headache (n = 46, 11.8%). After the second dose, pain at site of injection (n = 112, 20.4%), swelling (n = 42, 7.7%) and erythematous (n = 14, 2.6%) were among the localized AE reported, while fever (n = 121, 22.1%), fatigue (n = 101, 18.4%) and headache (n = 61, 11.1%) were the most common systemic AE. The proportion of respondents who experienced moderate (first dose: 156 events; second dose: 272 events) and severe (1st dose: 21 events; 2nd dose: 30 events) AEs were higher after the second dose. Most AEs commonly resolved within 1-2 days, and none required hospitalization. No new onset of AE was observed 7 days post-vaccination. A total of 137 (59.8%) participants did not proceed to formal AE reporting. CONCLUSION: Most of the AEs reported were of mild to moderate intensity and short-term, consistent with those reported in previous studies. No medium-term finding was detected in the survey. AE reporting was not routinely performed, necessitating the attention of health authorities in order to enhance pharmacovigilance.

18.
J Clin Virol Plus ; 2(3): 100082, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821341

ABSTRACT

Given the ongoing COVID19 pandemic, the decline in serological response since dose 2, and the upcoming flu season, COVID19 vaccines will increasingly be administered in combination with vaccines against seasonal pathogens. It is of interest to confirm that concurrent vaccination against influenzavirus has no negative impact on serological response to SARS CoV-2. Anti-Spike IgG and Anti-Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) Neutralizing Antibodies (NAb) in serum  was assessed in 64 immunocompetent healthcare workers (HCW) before and 14 days post the third dose of BNT162b2 vaccine (Comirnaty®, Pfizer/BioNTech) or BNT162b2 plus quadrivalent flu vaccine (Vaxigript Tetra ®Sanofi Pasteur) on the same day. We report here safety and efficacy of combined BNT162b2 and flu vaccine in 64 healthcare workers at a single institution. No differences were found in adverse events or anti-Spike antibody levels.

19.
J Affect Disord ; 311: 78-83, 2022 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to explore the psychopathological burden related to COVID-19 together with coping strategies in healthcare workers, focusing on differences between frontline and second-line workers. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study part of the COvid Mental hEalth Trial (COMET). Participants' socio-demographic and COVID-19-related information was collected through an online survey. Psychiatric symptoms and coping strategies were also investigated. Multivariate analyses, corrected for demographic characteristics, were adopted to assess differences between frontline and second-line workers. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 20,720 individuals. Healthcare workers (n = 2907) presented with significantly higher risk for mental health disturbances as compared to the rest of the sample (p < 0.001). Healthcare professionals working versus not working on the front line differed in living in severely impacted areas (p < 0.001), precautionary isolation by COVID-19 (p < 0.001), infection by COVID-19 (p < 0.001). Frontline workers also reported significantly increased insomnia (p < 0.001), depression (p = 0.007), anxiety (p < 0.001), obsessive-compulsive symptoms (p < 0.001), non-specific chronic and acute traumatic stress (p < 0.001; p < 0.001), as well as more adaptive coping strategies (p = 0.001). LIMITATIONS: The survey was conducted between March and June 2020, at the peak of the COVID-19 outbreak in Italy. Accordingly, the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic might have changed over time. The survey design involved online invitation and it was not possible to assess the participation rate. CONCLUSIONS: To our knowledge, this is the largest study addressing the psychopathological burden of Italian healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak and associated coping strategies. Empowering supportive interventions is crucial for the whole healthcare workforce.

20.
J Relig Health ; 2022 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820959

ABSTRACT

Historically, there has be a close relationship between the nursing services and spiritual care provision to patients, arising due to the evolvement of many hospitals and nursing programmes from faith-based institutions and religious order nursing. With increasing secularism, these relationships are less entwined. Nonetheless, as nurses typically encounter patients at critical life events, such as receiving bad news or dying, nurses frequently understand the need and requirement for both spiritual support and religious for patients and families during these times. Yet there are uncertainties, and nurses can feel ill-equipped to deal with patients' spiritual needs. Little education or preparation is provided to these nurses, and they often report a lack of confidence within this area. The development of this confidence and the required competencies is important, especially so with increasingly multicultural societies with diverse spiritual and religious needs. In this manuscript, we discuss initial field work carried out in preparation for the development of an Erasmus Plus educational intervention, entitled from Cure to Care Digital Education and Spiritual Assistance in Healthcare. Referring specifically to post-COVID spirituality needs, this development will support nurses to respond to patients' spiritual needs in the hospital setting, using digital means. This preliminary study revealed that while nurses are actively supporting patients' spiritual needs, their education and training are limited, non-standardised and heterogeneous. Additionally, most spiritual support occurs within the context of a Judeo-Christian framework that may not be suitable for diverse faith and non-faith populations. Educational preparation for nurses to provide spiritual care is therefore urgently required.

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