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1.
Academic resilience: Personal stories and lessons learnt from the COVID-19 experience ; CHAP: 71-88,
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2087961

ABSTRACT

The unpredictability of the COVID-19 pandemic gripped the world and now, over a year later, people are still coming to terms with the mayhem caused by this deadly virus. To curb the spread of the coronavirus, the South African government instituted stringent lockdown mea- sures such as intermittent closure of universities. To resume the academic programme, universities advocated the transition from face-to-face teaching to online teaching. This posed serious challenges for academic staff who were compelled to make sacrifices so that students could receive quality education. This chapter explored the resilience of three academics who made paradigm shifts to their teaching practice. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12925, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066482

ABSTRACT

Due to the increasing appearance of global contagious diseases such as COVID-19, the goal of this research is to directly and explicitly advance the learning motivation, interests, and performance of online course participants into developing sustainable development and strategic approaches to discover the effective solution of the research question: how to provide the most effective online courses of sustainable development strategy for contemporary higher education in order to advance the student’s learning motivation, confidence, and desires? This is accomplished by integrating the three briefest analytical aspects of the Social Learning Theory, the main theoretical philosophies of Learning Community, and 10 core technological features to determine the most critical core determinants. Beyond the complex measured results, the most valuable conclusions were: (1) the highest Standardized Comparative Weight Scales (SCWS) was located in the Publicity Philosophy for contemporary online higher education sustainable development strategy, which meant the first hypothesis was accepted and the second and third hypotheses were denied. Hence, the Publicity Philosophy (PP) of the learning community directly and effectively advanced the contemporary online higher education sustainable development strategy for educational institutions as the best solution to the research question in order to achieve the main research objective. (2) Continuously, in detail, the PP of the learning community was directly and effectively enforced by the Professionalization Technology Feature of Course Function. This directly indicated that most online course participants focus on the professionalized technological features in the system operation, such as friendly operational platforms for easy uploads, convenient downloads of online course information, and real-time news during online courses at higher education institutions. Significantly, the aggregated technology in group discussions or teamwork assignments and the complete and fair evaluation of online course technological system can facilitate collaborative lesson preparation and lesson observation of the PP of the learning community in order to advance online course interests and learning performance to be the sustainable development strategic approach in contemporary higher education era.

3.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12623, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066439

ABSTRACT

Most research states that implementing environmental, social, and governance (ESG) has positive impacts. However, fewer studies have discussed ESG implementation in higher education. This study aimed to develop instruments to assess the ESG atmosphere in higher education institutions. A modified Delphi approach was employed. Experts were invited from a private higher education institution in Indonesia. A deductive study, discussion, and two stages of getting consensus from panelists were conducted. The instrument was distinguished into four types for four groups of higher education stakeholders: Students, Staff, Faculty Members, and Community Members. The I-CVIs ranged from 0.80–1.00, while the minimum values of S-CVI/Ave and S-CVI/UA were 0.98 and 0.91, respectively, meaning the content validity was excellent. The final version instrument has been tested and declared valid, reliable, and ready to be used for empirical research for universities to assess their contribution to the Sustainability Development Goals (SDGs). There are also opportunities to conduct further research on the existence of recursive and non-recursive models between factors.

4.
Sustainability ; 14(19):11949, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066379

ABSTRACT

The refurbishment of building facilities needs to incorporate end-user engagement to ensure refurbished building facilities outcomes that include user-responsive learning spaces and satisfy users’ learning needs. However, existing refurbishment design process frameworks neglect to show the engagement process. A new framework for engaging end users in the refurbishment design of building facilities in higher education is presented. A qualitative research methodology was employed to obtain and analyse interview data from twenty-one design team stakeholders involved in two cases of refurbished building facilities in higher education institutions in Australia and New Zealand. The findings revealed four core themes which indicate the context and phases in the refurbishment design process where end-user engagement should be taken seriously. They are the higher education context, early design, user engagement in the design process and post-design phases. In addition, the findings revealed six specific strategies for end-user engagement in the refurbishment design of building facilities in higher education institutions. They are identifying stakeholder value systems, capturing end-user needs, communicating and integrating. Others are the setting of engagement boundaries and surveying of end users. This study modified the project heartbeat originally developed by Stanford University in 2010 for the refurbishment design process in a higher education context. The new framework bridges the gaps in the current literature between stakeholder theory and refurbishment design, and, by incorporating the refurbishment design processes, the framework can be employed in wider education and other project contexts to facilitate the balanced involvement of end users.

5.
Behav Sci (Basel) ; 12(10)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065708

ABSTRACT

Trauma-informed approaches serve as an essential framework for human service organizations and are now being applied in education settings, including higher education institutions (HEIs). The increasing incidence of traumatic events, including the global pandemic of COVID-19 and the systemic violence against persons of color, has prompted HEIs to examine how culture and inclusivity are conceptualized in the curriculum and reflected in institutional policy and programming. Within this context, there is a need to identify how trauma-informed approaches at HEIs can be culturally responsive. This article briefly summarizes evidence supporting the rationale for trauma-informed approaches at HEIs and how culture has historically been addressed through cultural competency and cultural humility. Cultural sensitivity and responsiveness are then conceptualized from a trauma-informed lens as informed by the literature. Finally, key concepts and theory relevant to applying culturally responsive trauma-informed approaches at HEIs are defined, with recommendations for policy, research, and practice.

6.
Professional Medical Journal ; 29(9):1426-1431, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2056968

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the perception of medical teaching faculty of a public sector medical college in Pakistan and the barriers in e-learning methodologies according to faculty's opinion. Study Design: Analytical Cross-Sectional Study. Setting: Department of Medical Education, Sahiwal Medical College Sahiwal. Study Period: 1st April 2020 to 30th April 2020. Material & Methods: The questionnaire was sent to all the faculty members through Whatsapp due to COVID-19 pandemic in Pakistan. Mean scores were calculated by using SPSS-26. Results: A total of sixty six faculty members responded to the questionnaire while it was sent to all 72. So the response rate of our study is 91.66%. According to our results, external sources barrier questions were found to be of highest mean value of 10.64 with standard deviation of 4.64. Internal source barriers were found to have least of the means value of 5.39 with standard deviation of 2.41. Motivation related to e-learning was with highest mean score of 2.67 and with standard deviation of 0.591. Lack of central policy was found to be of major concern by the respondents with mean value of 1.15 and standard deviation of 0.361. Conclusion: This study found that motivation towards e-learning as the most dominant factor. Also external sources barriers were predominately revealed in the college such arrangements are required to speedily guarantee that fast web get to and dependable systems are accessible at the higher education institutions. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Professional Medical Journal is the property of Professional Medical Journal and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

7.
Contemporary Educational Research Quarterly ; 30(2):125-165, 2022.
Article in English, Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2056210

ABSTRACT

Purpose Higher education institutions (HEIs) can better know how to act when COVID-19 pandemic further evolves, by learning how other higher education institutions handle this pandemic. Facing global pandemic outbreak, what prevention planning modes for crisis management were taken by HEIs? Did they take the reactive and short-term emergency planning or a proactive planning mode? This study aims to systematically review the anti-COVID-19 plans of colleges and universities in Taiwan to identify a planning gap and provide a comprehensive campus anti-pandemic framework for future reference. Design/methodology/approach The documentary analysis was adopted to study the anti-COVID-19 plans of colleges and universities in Taiwan. The samples include 160 colleges and universities. Variety forms of documents were collected for systematic evaluation in this study, including institutional information on the COVID-19 websites (Chinese/ English), and their anti-COVID-19 plans. Findings/results (1)98% of the samples set up anti-COVID-19 websites for communicating with internal and external stakeholders. 34% of HEIs publicized their presidential letters, releasing peak time being in February and March, 2020. Only 25% of the samples issued their anti-COVID-19 meeting minutes, and only 17.5% of them issued both Chinese and English versions. The websites showed that internal and external communication decreased as the pandemic got eased. (2)Regardless of their institutional characteristics and size, all the anti-COVID-19 plans followed the same roadmaps issued by the Central Epidemic Control Center (CECC) and by the Ministry of Education. The common version of planning mode, only 2 main categories and 5 types of planning, was identified. Despite of the differences in the length of the plans, not many differences existed among institutions. (3)The anti-COVID-19 plans remained incomplete since they all had ‘emergency plan’ (EP) and most of them also had ‘academic continuity planning’ (ACP), but a planning gap showed up in ‘business continuity management’ (BCM). (4)Insufficient data collection for the anti-COVID-19 plans constituted a problem. The risk assessment was made on school gathering, student societies, and admission affairs but not comprehensively on the core affairs at the institutional level, teaching, research, and services, and followed by planning institutional risk management for anti-COVID-19 plan. Based on the findings, this study argues that anti-COVID-19 prevention planning mode tends to be reactive rather than proactive because the frequency of communication and discussion within institutions declined as COVID-19 eased, and regardless of institutional characteristics and size, the presence of the ‘common version’ of anti-COVID-19 plans and lack of risk assessment and crisis management planning remain unchanged, especially the lack in the sector of ‘business continuity management’ (BCM). When HEIs do not conduct risk assessment of the core activities (institutional, teaching and learning, research, and services) caused by the COVID-19, the planning mindset of the risk management taken by HEIs and its justification will be weakened. Since this study collected the published information from institutional websites for documentary analysis, the findings must be limited by the extent of how HEIs revealed their anti-COVID-19 measures. It implies that the planning mode revealed in the anti-COVID-19 websites and plans might represent part of, instead of the whole, institutional responses. Therefore, the interpretation of the findings drawn from institutional open data should pay attention to data limitation and to avoid overgeneralization. Originality/value This is the first empirical study to systematically review the anti-COVID-19 plans of 160 colleges and universities in Taiwan. Based on the empirical data, the ‘common version’ of planning mode reveals a reactive rather than a proactive mode, to global pandemic outbreak. Thus, this study proposes a comprehensive campus anti-pandemic framework as re erence for HEIs to go beyond the current emergency reactive model in order to better cope with the future. Suggestions/implications ‘Never let a crisis go to waste’ said Sir Winston Churchill. For higher education institutions, planning for anti-COVID-19 pandemic not only requires a well-thought crisis management, but also using this knowledge to inform and prepare for the likely future pandemic. Pandemic outbreak offers HEIs an opportunity to assess institutional risk assessment and based on it to refine their crisis management. It can strengthen institutional proactive planning mindset to enhance their resilience and agility when dealing with other or similar crisis and unforeseen challenges in the future. © 2022,Contemporary Educational Research Quarterly.All Rights Reserved

8.
8th International Conference on Frontiers of Educational Technologies, ICFET 2022 ; : 92-96, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2053362

ABSTRACT

As higher education institutions engage in technology-enhanced learning spaces, the question of how to structure these settings to be as effective as feasible arises. The synchronous hybrid learning environment, in which both on-site and remote students can participate in learning activities at the same time, is a unique new learning space. Given the relative newness of synchronous hybrid learning, there have been few research that have studied its application and efficacy. The context of this study is a technical college in Vietnam. The purpose of this study is to investigate teachers' perceptions of synchronous hybrid teaching which has never been implemented in this school before. The results show that the teachers were well-prepared before switching to hybrid teaching. Several advantages of hybrid teaching were suggested, including (1) instructional flexibility, (2) optimal learning conditions for on-campus students, and (3) the ability for people who are Corona virus positive to study from home. Furthermore, several issues experienced by instructors were (1) class administration, (2) suitable activities for both online and onsite students, (3) greater energy from teachers, (4) interaction, and (5) technology. Recommendations were made as a result. Finally, challenges faced by both remote and online students as perceived by the teachers were recorded. The results of this study will be references for not only the studied institution but other educational institutions that want to employ this mode of teaching in their training program. © 2022 ACM.

9.
2021 Universitas Riau International Conference on Education Technology, URICET 2021 ; : 28-31, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2052114

ABSTRACT

The appearance of COVID 19 caused the closure of many higher education institution facilities across the world and Mexico was no exception. This situation interrupted normal teaching and learning activities, fostering the search and development of tools which can guarantee the continuation of learning and teaching activities. Accordingly, this article describes the need for a tool to support learning activities within the context of a challenge-based learning approach. Consequently, after a search for an existing tool it was decided to design a tool suitable for competence development through challenge-based learning. Thus, a mobile app named Klever 21 was designed and released as a test version for this purpose. Additionally, this mobile app is associated with a web platform to aid project management and student competence evaluations. This article describes the main features of Klever 21 which is currently being tested at Tecnologico de Monterrey. This technology represents an evolution of mobile app technologies to face disruptive situations in higher education institutions. © 2021 IEEE.

10.
Open House International ; 47(2):338-360, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2051900

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The paper aims to understand and assess architecture students' experiences of online teaching during the initial lockdown caused by the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic between March–June 2020. The exploratory study was conducted across two architectural engineering departments of two separate campuses of the same not-for-profit, non-governmental higher education institution in Cairo, Egypt, focusing on two course streams within their architectural curriculum;design-studio-based courses (DC) and technology courses (TC).Design/methodology/approach>A mixed-methods approach was used, where a questionnaire-based survey was developed to gather qualitative and quantitative data based on perceptions of a sample of 245 students. The survey quantitatively queried five dimensions related to students' learning experiences and qualitatively sought to evaluate both the positive experiences and challenges the students experienced.Findings>Findings outline that students' experiences were neutral but veered toward the positive end of the scale. Three factors appear to have affected students' learning experiences;students' reliance on educational technologies, the stage of architectural education students were enrolled in when they went into lockdown, and finally, quality and timing of feedback received. While challenges were faced during transition to the digital realm, these may have compelled students to take ownership of the students' own knowledge construction.Originality/value>Results provide a nuanced understanding of how students dealt with this critical transformation in architectural pedagogy at a unique moment in history, highlighting merits that could have an everlasting impact on design education during and after times of pandemic.

11.
13th International Conference on Computer Supported Education, CSEDU 2021 ; 1:491-496, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2046878

ABSTRACT

Peer-teaching has been rapidly adopted throughout higher education institutions, including medical schools, to provide students with a diverse learning environment and to enhance academic development. Peer assisted study session (PASS) is a peer-teaching program implemented in Monash University Malaysia and was conducted virtually during the COVID-19 pandemic. Perspectives from the viewpoint of peer tutors during the pandemic period are presented in this paper. Throughout the year, peer tutors were confronted with the unique challenges of teaching virtually. Various factors which contribute to changes in the dynamics of group-based discussions in online classes are discussed. On online platforms, students are graced with more privacy and freedom, a double-edged sword that can translate into reduced student engagement. Nonetheless, the practical skills acquired by adapting to the abrupt switch from on-campus to online peer-teaching can be employed in our future practice as health professionals. Copyright © 2021 by SCITEPRESS – Science and Technology Publications, Lda. All rights reserved

12.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045963

ABSTRACT

Present-day higher education institutions offering undergraduate engineering programs need to prepare their students for a world filled with complex global challenges. Such preparation requires the acquisition of multidisciplinary knowledge and the application of multidisciplinary methodologies. A pilot initiative was launched in Fall 2017 for an elective three-year (sophomore to senior year) cross-departmental multi-disciplinary undergraduate engineering program at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) named New Engineering Education Transformation (NEET). The program has three cross-departmental pathways across STEM disciplines and technical domains. The program has completed its fourth year of operation and has grown to become the fourth-largest undergraduate academic cohort at MIT. This paper is divided into two parts: the first part describes the revision of program requirements and their implementation during Fall 2019-Fall 2020. The second part describes the launching of a new single-themed program titled Climate & Sustainability Systems, which took place and was implemented during Summer-Fall 2021. Both initiatives responded to issues and changing circumstances raised by students, faculty, and instructional staff, with the aim of affording students more flexibility, reducing the additional workload beyond their chosen majors, enhancing their educational experience, and increasing their engagement with the program-wide community. In January 2020, following feedback collected from MIT students, faculty, instructional staff, and senior administration, we began a systematic process of reviewing the program's academic requirements. Data collected includes student questionnaires and specifications of program requirements throughout the study period. The revised requirements were published toward the end of the Spring 2020 semester, serendipitously around the same time as the COVID-19 mandated university-wide pivot from in-person on-campus teaching to emergency remote teaching and were implemented in Fall 2020. Since the publication of these new requirements, enrollment in the program has increased substantially year-on-year across all program threads. Subsequent data collection during Spring 2020 and Spring 2021 showed that word-of-mouth about the program has grown stronger, with 'current students' and 'other first-years' being two of the most-cited sources as to how first-years get to know about NEET. This paper explains the impetus for changing the program requirements, describes how the new requirements were formulated and implemented, and outlines what we have learned from implementing the revised requirements. We also describe how we collaborated with various stakeholders in the planning, design, and implementation of the revised requirements. For the second part of the paper, we describe how we launched a new climate and sustainability pathway based on our three-year experience of introducing pathways connected to energy, manufacturing ands materials, and sustainable development of cities, and on the growing interest amongst students in combating climate change in a sustainable manner. We describe how the process of consolidation was planned out and designed, how we collaborated with various stakeholders and how initial implementation has undergone. It should be emphasized that the approach we have taken here is largely qualitative and based primarily on how students and other key stakeholders responded to, engaged with the NEET program, and helped to evolve it. NEET leadership commissioned a systematic programmatic evaluation starting from Spring 2021, and we will be guided by their assessment of the changes as we look to the future. This paper is intended for institutional leadership, departmental leadership, faculty, and academic staff seized by the need to create and implement relevant and engaging cross-departmental multi-disciplinary undergraduate engineering programs. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

13.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045738

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has greatly impacted educators all over the world and a major area of disruption has been the ability for higher education institutions to provide meaningful STEM education activities to the broader community. In this work, methods to adapt materials science outreach activities to meet the needs of students, teachers, and the community at large during the pandemic are explored and outcomes and recommendations are provided. This is accomplished through a focus on three efforts: fully-virtual classroom visits, remote visitation for in-person classrooms, and an innovative hybrid museum tour that showcases materials science in art for general community outreach. Results show that methods developed with restrictions on in-person interaction in place can have benefits in terms of the ability to reach broader audiences while also fostering more consistent interaction between those broader audiences and those conducting outreach. These methods also have the potential to remain effective even following a return to "normal" conditions and thus supplement and positively augment pre-pandemic methods. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022.

14.
129th ASEE Annual Conference and Exposition: Excellence Through Diversity, ASEE 2022 ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2045459

ABSTRACT

Delivering hands-on design and manufacturing courses is challenging in several lecture and laboratory settings. This type of instruction is even harder lately due to higher education institutions' strict COVID-19 policies and procedures, since offering the courses in on-ground settings is not a possibility. One method practiced by a high number of educators to meet course learning outcomes and ABET student outcomes is to implement the Flipped Classroom technique. In a Flipped Classroom, course lectures and laboratories are provided to students earlier than the class time. Then, class times are used to provide more practice and content so that students can learn more in their regular lectures and lab hours. This paper reports the structure of a few Flipped Classroom courses from a diverse group of institutions and the evaluation results received from these courses. © American Society for Engineering Education, 2022

15.
Journal of Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences University ; 17(5):S47-S50, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2040166

ABSTRACT

Background: Currently, India is witnessing another wave of COVID pandemic, where it has drastically disrupted most of the important aspects of human life including education. It has created an unparalleled education test, where campuses are closing and institutions have been transferred to online study protocols at numerous educational institutions worldwide. Internationalization has significantly slowed down. Some 32 crore students in India stopped moving to schools, and all educational practices are temporarily ended. The Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) have responded constructively, despite all of those difficulties, ensuring the consistency of teaching, study and contribution to society using those methods, and techniques during the pandemic. This survey study focuses on COVID-19's important impacts on India's HEIs. Some steps are taken to provide smooth education services during the crisis by HEIs, and education authorities in India have been addressed herein. Aim/Objectives: This study aimed to assess the need of online education during COVID-19 pandemic for Bachelor of Medical Radiology and Imaging Technology (MRIT) students at Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Science (DMIMS). Methodology: A total number of 60 students (includes only MRIT students under Allied Health Science at DMIMS) will be participating in this survey by means of answering the questionnaires, which include open-ended and closed-ended type of question patterns with signed consent from each student, and based on answers, we will be analyzing and interpreting the data for understanding the views of MRIT students. Expected Results: The offline mode of study for the Indian education system is more convenient than the online mode of study;however, during the COVID pandemic, Indian education system has adopted the online mode of study. Conclusions: Generally speaking, the offline mode of education is preferable than the online mode;however, in this pandemic, students prefer the online mode. There have been several new ways of learning introduced, as well as new prospects and new trends, which have allowed for the development of new ways of teaching learners, which has resulted in the generation of fruitful ideas for educational work in the pandemic. © 2022 Wolters Kluwer Medknow Publications. All rights reserved.

16.
Academic Voices: A Conversation on New Approaches to Teaching and Learning in the post-COVID World ; : 311-324, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2035568

ABSTRACT

The past decades have witnessed tremendous growth in technology integration in the classroom. Learning management systems (LMS) support flexible learning with high interaction levels between faculty and learners, promoting active and collaborative learning regardless of space, time, and distance constraints. Over the years, higher education institutions (HEI) in developed countries have adopted LMSs to enhance teaching and learning. Despite increased access to technology, HEIs in the global South have struggled to adopt e-learning. The COVID-19 outbreak has shown a great intertwinement of education and technology. LMS implementation and adoption in Zimbabwe are still low despite the enormous potential to transform the education sector. An adapted Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model provided the study’s conceptual framework to evaluate the faculty’s perceptions and voices towards Moodle adoption during the COVID-19 induced lockdown. The study was ex-ante, utilising a quantitative survey, where 200 faculty members were selected randomly, and 114 responded. The survey results revealed that the lack of digital skills, policies, devices, cost of data and slow Internet speed impacted negatively on the adoption of Moodle. Overall, the results show that Moodle implementation responds positively to the COVID-19 disruptions to face-to-face teaching during and beyond the pandemic. The study recommends continuous training and support of faculty in techno-pedagogies. It extends the application of the UTAUT through an adapted model, which other researchers can apply comprehensively. Policymakers and institutions can use these results to improve technology-based teaching interventions during disruptive events and beyond. Future studies should also involve several HEIs and include students for better generalisability of the results. © 2022 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

17.
The International Journal of Technologies in Learning ; 29(2):45-55, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030481

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic forced educational institutions to expand virtual learning options, with many providing more synchronous online courses using video conferencing technology. This case study explores the student experience in a newly synchronous online course using live remote sessions and compares their perceptions of learning in that environment with traditional in-person and asynchronous online courses. Learning more about the student experience in classrooms of various modalities is important as institutions continue to expand virtual learning options in higher education and workforce training. Students responded to an online survey, and responses were summarized and described categorically and descriptively. Albeit limited to a single course, the overall student response rated their experience in a synchronous online course at or below a traditional classroom learning experience. The live sessions did not adequately address the common shortfalls that often come with asynchronous online learning, including building a sense of community and connectedness with the instructor and fellow classmates. Due to the unprecedented times, the synchronous online modality was the only option provided to students for this class. Virtual learning opportunities are essential to meet the diverse needs of students in higher education, but synchronous online learning is not an automatic substitution for an in-person experience;students should be provided multiple modalities to choose the classroom environment that best fits their learning style.

18.
The International Journal of Technologies in Learning ; 29(1):79-93, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030480

ABSTRACT

In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic presented many higher education institutions with a sudden challenge to shift from either face-to-face and/or blended instruction to remote teaching in order to save the academic year. This article examines preservice teachers’ experiences of a redesigned blended-learning year course on work-integrated learning (WIL). The article uses the Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge (TPACK) framework within a blended-learning environment to examine the responses of 414 preservice teachers in their first year of study to a survey completed at the end of the course. Descriptive statistics were used together with course content analysis to generate the findings, which suggested that the majority (above 80%) of the preservice teachers remained active during the shift to remote teaching, and about 93.3% responded positively to the course redesign by actively accessing the course on the online platform at least once a week. The survey results also showed that only 10.4% of the preservice teachers did not experience one or another form of challenge in learning through remote teaching during this time. The results build a case for how other practitioners and instructional designers could redesign courses with the consideration of context and learning challenges. The article concludes with the argument for the design of blended courses for future needs to focus more closely on each aspect of the mode of delivery so as to ensure effective design that can withstand emergency situations, such as those we have seen during COVID-19.

19.
Ubiquitous Learning ; 16(1):1-12, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030446

ABSTRACT

Since the pandemic outbreak, governments have introduced measures to decrease the spread of COVID-19. One of the measures widely implemented has been linked to social distancing. As a result of these measures, many activities had to be canceled or moved to a remote environment. This has also affected the education sector, where educators and students had to quickly adapt to online teaching and learning. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, in many schools, distance learning was very limited, or it did not exist at all. Even though it was mainly elementary and secondary schools that were adversely affected, many higher education institutions were also taken by surprise by the need to switch abruptly from onsite to online mode. The long-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic remains to be studied and assessed in depth, but after two years since the first wave of the pandemic, lessons from the transition to online learning can be drawn. In this article, we analyze the impact of student specific characteristics and the perceived efficiency of online education on students’ knowledge acquired compared to their pre-pandemic performance. We find that perceived effectiveness of online education, size of the city of residence, and whether a student is a foreign or domestic student have a positive and statistically significant impact on students’ performance, compared to their pre-pandemic results.

20.
TEM Journal ; 11(3):1047-1054, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2030428

ABSTRACT

The arrival of COVID-19 meant a drastic change in the way of teaching and research. This paper explores the effect that the measures taken to contain the COVID-19 spreads have had on the research activities of teachers about variables such as area of knowledge, educational level, and role in projects or gender. To this end, an online survey was designed to collect data, requesting information about time lost in research, the number of papers proposed for publication in scientific journals, difficulties in managing research projects, guarantees in project funding or the capacity to reformulate research activities. Two hundred seventy-one teachers and researchers were asked to participate. Among the main results, most respondents agree on the difficulties in managing their projects;they have been forced to reformulate their research, although they claim that the time lost in research has been limited. The results will help to make decisions on the measures to be taken to alleviate the low performance of research by teacher-researchers during this period and to prepare contingency plans to reduce the impact. © 2022, Iris Betzaida Pérez-Almeida et al;published by UIKTEN. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License.

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