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1.
Planning Theory & Practice ; JOUR(4):637-646, 23.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2097125

ABSTRACT

The events of the last two years have vividly illustrated the uncertainty of our cities’ long-term futures. The effects of climate change are becoming increasingly severe, with more frequent and unpredictable storms, flooding, heatwaves, and wildfires. Optimistic predictions about the arrival of automated vehicles have proven premature, but new technologies like artificial intelligence, online shopping, e-bikes, and smart infrastructure continue to confront urban planners with new opportunities and challenges. Most dramatically, the COVID-19 pandemic has not only resulted in major short-term disruptions, but also introduced long-term uncertainties about telecommuting, public health, and more. Such uncertainties have fostered a growing interest among planners in conducting long-range planning using exploratory scenarios.1

2.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; : 1-16, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2096998

ABSTRACT

Health restrictions enacted during the COVID-19 pandemic made it difficult for older adults living in low-income housing (hereinafter referred to as residents) to maintain a routine. The study aimed to explore the ways in which residents carried on, experienced and adapted their activities during the pandemic. An action research study, conducted in cooperation with a community partner, involved nineteen residents who participated in semi-structured interviews inspired by an occupation focused health promotion model. Qualitative data obtained was analyzed using thematic and cross-case analyses. Two thirds of the sample reported a high level of change in their daily routine. The need to connect with others and to live moments of pleasure and joy were the least satisfying dimensions of experience while performing their activities, which was not surprising. Three occupational adaptation profiles were identified based on the residents' perception of changes in routine and their degree of satisfaction with time spent in the different dimensions of experience. Among strategies and resources reported for overcoming the impact of the pandemic on their daily lives, having a supportive social network, access to communication technologies and a positive attitude seemed to be key to residents' successful occupational adaptation.

3.
J Gerontol Soc Work ; : 1-25, 2022 Oct 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087460

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, service coordinators increased the capacity of a large and diffuse inter-organizational network to support lower-income older adults. Researchers conducted two surveys of service coordinators who worked with older residents of US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) multifamily properties in mid-2020 and late-2021. These residents experienced many pandemic-related disruptions to their support systems, and findings revealed ways that service coordinators assessed resident need, linked them to public benefits programs, improved their access to technology, translated public health responses, and facilitated access to partner organizations and professional supports. Through assessment and communication, and decision-management and problem solving, service coordinator work increased the efficiency and effectiveness of external supports available to help meet residents' needs for food, medicine, supplies, personal care, and mental and physical healthcare. With an aging population and an increasing rate of unpredictable weather events, service coordination, which is inconsistently funded and is not mandated for HUD properties, may offer an opportunity to improve the adaptability and resilience of older supported housing residents.

4.
Public Health Pract (Oxf) ; 4: 100332, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086654

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the Seattle Public Utility mobile hygiene station program, a program deployed using public funds in response to the large-scale closures of public hygiene facilities due to COVID-19. Study design: We conduct a qualitative analysis using semi-structured interviews. Methods: We interviewed four Seattle Public Utility (SPU) and Public Health Seattle & King County (PHSKC) employees involved in the design, deployment, and management of the hygiene station intervention. Data were also collected from communications and reports released through SPU/PHSKC web sources. Results: Our analysis revealed factors affecting the implementation of the hygiene program included the rental of hygiene trailers, community partnership to mediate between housed and housing insecure populations, funding source and cost-effectiveness, geographic location of the units, and maintenance of the units to continue population hygiene support. Conclusion: The SPU/PHSKC hygiene station was designed to support the housing insecure and homeless by compensating for the large-scale closures of public restrooms and showers. Several logistical and financing challenges need to be addressed to ensure the continuity of the program.

5.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-346155

ABSTRACT

This research investigates the Australian rental sector during the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic and considers priorities for governments;tenant experiences and reflections on the effectiveness of assistance and interventions;changing tenant aspirations;and the priorities for emerging responses. The research highlights how ‘nimble’ the Australian policy community had been in response to COVID-19, and the success of many of their rapid interventions. The challenge is how to sustain assistance as Australia moves from the health emergency to maintaining (perhaps very long-term) assistance. There is an enduring need for policy action and innovation focussed on the rental market through all stages of a major event such as a pandemic. This includes the period during which the impacts are less acute or visible, and this intervention is needed to provide support in the face of second order effects, including increased demand for housing. In addition, there is a need for policies and strategies that build resilience in the rental market at all times. Key initiatives could include reform of tenancy legislation, the provision of a larger stock of affordable housing available through the social housing sector, and measures to sustain affordable entry into home ownership. There is scope also to consider ways in which affordable housing provision could be better integrated with national urban planning aspirations through the economic and housing market development of smaller regional cities.

6.
Urban Planning ; 7(3):418-429, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2081166

ABSTRACT

This article describes the usage of an online podcast workshop as an arts-based research method to reflect on intercultural participation. The podcast workshop was co-developed by researchers, local civil society actors, and administrative employees and deployed in a research infrastructure based on real-world labs. We show how the online podcast workshop as a research tool elicits co-creation with agonistic as well as communicative practices. The podcast combined practices of making with socially engaged research, using digital storytelling. It aimed at enhancing intercultural dialogue and participation and was used as an opportunity for voices that are not sufficiently represented in local public discourse on neighbourhood development to become recognised and challenge marginalisation. Based on one online podcast workshop, the article addresses new possibilities for collective and collaborative action during the Covid-19 pandemic and frames the podcast as a moderated place for exchange and reflection in the digital space. The podcast workshop intended to foster further discussion on the topic of intercultural participation and was conceived as a tool for empowerment that participants can use for further conversations and exchange in their communities.

7.
Health Soc Care Community ; 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078484

ABSTRACT

Veterans in rural areas of the United States face barriers to accessing healthcare and other services, which are intensified for those experiencing housing instability. Recent legislative acts have the potential to address obstacles faced by rural patients in the U.S. This study explores how infrastructure-including features related to the physical and digital environment-impacts the ability of rural Veterans experiencing housing instability to access healthcare and related services from the perspective of homeless service providers within the Veterans Health Administration (VHA). We conducted semi-structured telephone interviews (n = 22) with providers in high/low performing and/or resourced communities across the U.S. in May and June 2021 and analysed transcripts using template analysis. Themes described by providers highlight how infrastructure limitations in rural areas can exacerbate health disparities for Veterans experiencing housing instability, the impact of COVID-19 on service access, and recommendations to enhance service delivery. Providers suggested that VHA reconfigure where and how staff work, identify additional resources for transportation and/or alternative transportation models, and increase Veterans' access to technology and broadband Internet. Federal infrastructure investments should address challenges faced by Veterans experiencing housing instability in rural areas and the concerns of providers connecting them with care.

8.
Building and Environment ; 224, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2068745

ABSTRACT

While many studies have explored green buildings, there remain many unsolved questions about how to expand this section of the housing market, such as how the capitalization effect of green buildings varies across time and location. This study investigates the price premiums of green buildings in Taipei City, the largest metropolis in Taiwan, to examine how they have changed over time, and assesses the magnitude of the capitalization effects under varying housing price levels. The empirical results indicate that Taipei residents are willing to pay higher prices for houses with green-label certification. The higher the certification level, the higher the price that residents are willing to pay. This study additionally identifies two characteristics of the capitalization effects in this market. The first is that the price premiums vary with the market condition. For example, during housing market downturns (e.g., 2014-2015), building green premiums may be unremarkable or non-existent. The second effect identified is that green buildings tend to exhibit an 'aristocratic trend.' This means that high-priced houses (i.e., houses priced above the 80% quantile) in the high-end label category attract the highest premiums, implying that the willingness to pay for green features tends to only exist among wealthy buyers. The result of this paper provides evidence to explain the heterogeneity of green build premiums. Regarding the specificity of these premiums, this paper provides recommendations for builders and managers.

9.
International Journal of Sustainable Development and Planning ; 17(5):1677-1683, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2067430

ABSTRACT

The global epidemic, evidenced the design gap formed in architecture where COVID-19 changed the way people live, induced designers to see how the epidemic affects people's daily habits in the built environment in the long-term life within a new framework e and vision of redesigning houses with the below perspective. This paper aims to discuss the design gap in pre-epidemic house design and how COVID-19 affects the relative parameters, focusing lost and unused spaces. Hence the suggestion stems from the need for providing solutions to the various crises that occur in the world, in order to contribute to a new urban life. The impact on houses that reflects the way of live in the community focusing on the mid-size apartments redesigning and creating new single spaces that combine several services for people needs during the pandemic COVID-19 lockdowns or self-isolation. This research is based on data collected during coronavirus curfew to analyze the satisfaction and adaptation of the housing environments design at psychological and physical levels in Jordan. Mixed-methodological approach is used for gathering information as well as getting a deeper understanding regarding the quality of housing environment from two perspectives: dwellers’ and housing designers’ perspective. The used methods are questionnaire that executed by using an online survey application and focus group executed via online meeting because of the COVID-19 lockdown. The data analysis showed that the architects’ role in both academic and professional fields should collaborate to raise awareness regarding the importance of creating high quality environments beside giving value to aesthetics. As well, focusing on humanistic aspects through adopting design approach derived from adaptability and flexibility to meet the dwellers’ needs in different situations such as a COVID-19 lockdown. © 2022 WITPress. All rights reserved.

10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066008

ABSTRACT

Children's health can be affected by the interrelated characteristics of the physical and social environment where they live, including housing quality, neighbourhood characteristics and the local community. Following a systems-based approach, this exploratory project sought to understand how the needs and aspirations associated with the home environment can work in synergy with, or be exacerbated by, other aspects of the local area. The study recruited parents of children aged 2-12 years old from two local authorities in England with high levels of child poverty: Tower Hamlets in East London, and Bradford District in West Yorkshire. Thematic analysis of participant interviews highlighted ten themes and opportunities for improvements. The evidence presented in this research emphasises how environmental quality issues within and outside the home, compounded further by delays in repairs and reduction in service standards, as well as affordability issues, are likely to deeply affect the wellbeing of an entire generation of disadvantaged children whose parents can feel disempowered, neglected and often isolated when attempting to tackle various dimensions of inequalities. Interventions which can improve the quality of housing, and access to space and services, are urgently needed, including initiatives to support and empower families and local communities, especially those prioritising opportunities for action.


Subject(s)
Child Health , Housing , Child , Child Poverty , Child, Preschool , England , Humans , Residence Characteristics
11.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1029394, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065654

ABSTRACT

The abysmal health of the urban poor or slum dwellers was attributed to structural inequities such as inadequate housing, water, and sanitation. This review aimed to assess housing-related opportunities and challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic among urban poor in low-and middle-income countries. For study identification, a comprehensive search was performed in 11 databases that yielded 22 potential studies. The inadequate housing infrastructure makes the lives of the urban poor more precarious during COVID-19. Typically, the houses lacked lighting, ventilation, and overcrowding. This review reflected that it is crucial to reimagine housing policy for the urban poor with an emphasis on pandemic/epidemic guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Housing , COVID-19/epidemiology , Developing Countries , Humans , Pandemics , Urban Population , Water
12.
Archives of Disease in Childhood ; 107(Supplement 2):A67-A68, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2064018

ABSTRACT

Aims Poverty is an ever increasing problem with 4.2 million children living in poverty in the UK in 2019, an increase of 600,000 from 2011(1). This has been particularly exacerbated by the COVID pandemic with an estimated 200,000 more children living in poverty in the UK since the pandemic(1). Poverty can affect multiple aspects of children's health and wellbeing, putting additional strain on already stretched NHS recourses. We wanted to assess paediatricians' knowledge about poverty, particularly around prevalence, risk factors, the effect on children's health and wellbeing and how to help families if there are concerns of poverty. From this we hoped to highlight areas where more education and support is required. Methods We designed an online survey with 11 questions including a mixture of multiple choice and free text answers. The questionnaire was distributed to all doctors working in paediatrics at a tertiary paediatric hospital, over a 4 week period. Results There were 29 respondents in total, with grades ranging from FY1 to consultant. Nearly two-thirds of respondents underestimated the prevalence of poverty in the UK and 38% underestimated the prevalence by half or more. Over 80% of respondents underestimated the percentage of children living in poverty locally. All respondents recognised parental disability and unemployment as risk factors for poverty and 90% recognised child disability or serious illness as a risk factor. Only one person suggested parental drug and alcohol use as a risk factor. The respondents were able to list a wide range of health implications of poverty, the most common answers being failure to thrive/poor nutrition, obesity, tooth decay and poor mental health. Two-thirds of respondents admitted not feeling at all comfortable about asking parents about poverty and 40% felt that they never screen for poverty when assessing patients. To assess for poverty 34% would ask about employment, 24% about housing and 41% about benefits and additional supports. All respondents would like further education and support around poverty. Conclusion Overall there was good understanding of the health implications associated with poverty and the risk factors for poverty, but an under-appreciation of the scale of the problem. The majority of doctors do not feel comfortable asking patients and families about poverty, and do not regularly ask about poverty when assessing patients. In order to identify children living in poverty and be able to signpost families to resources that could be beneficial to them, we need to equip paediatricians with the knowledge and skills to assess for poverty and what resources are available for families in the local area. To aid this we have produced a poster to be used to in the local Emergency Department and outpatients to remind doctors about poverty, advice on how to approach the topic and resources available in the hospital and in the local area that be used to sign post families.

13.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 1893, 2022 10 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to mitigate transmission resulted in sudden and widespread socioeconomic disruptions including school and child care closures, unemployment and underemployment, and housing precarity. Understanding the extent to which these disruptions may have contributed to adverse health outcomes is critical for establishing policy priorities that can mitigate further harm. METHODS: We explored the associations between pandemic-related child care, employment, and housing disruptions with depressive symptoms, self-rated health, and food security status among a sample of economically disadvantaged and racially diverse female caregivers of young children (n=464). Data were derived from the Assessing California Communities' Experiences with Safety Net Supports (ACCESS) study, which conducted survey-based interviews with California caregivers with low-income from August 2020 - May 2021. We implemented a series of multivariable Poisson regressions with robust standard errors to assess the potency of each exposure, independently and within the context of one another. RESULTS: Most caregivers experienced disruptions to child care (70%) and employment (63%); few experienced major housing disruptions (8%). Women that experienced child care and housing disruptions had greater depressive symptoms, lower self-rated health, and greater food insecurity, although the relationships for housing and depressive symptoms were modified by the timing of participants' interviews. Employment disruptions were not associated with any of the examined adverse health outcomes. CONCLUSION: In the wake of socioeconomic stressors brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic, attending to structural deficits in the child care system and increasing housing supports may be critical for protecting the health of caregivers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child, Preschool , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Food Supply , Humans , Poverty
14.
Clinical Toxicology ; 60(Supplement 2):121, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2062721

ABSTRACT

Background: Palytoxin poisoning is an uncommon exposure in the US, and is most frequently encountered amongst hobbiests and professionals in the aquarium industry. The toxin is produced by the microalgae Ostreopsis as well as the coral Palythoa toxica. Discovered in Hawaii, the name limu-make-o-Hana translates to "seaweed of death from Hana." Palytoxin interrupts Na+/ K+ ATPase pump, resulting in widespread cellular dysfunction. Persons are at highest risk when cleaning a fish tank housing the coral that produces palytoxin, resulting in cutaneous or inhalational exposure. We present a case of palytoxin inhalational exposure with computed tomography (CT) imaging. Case report: A 41-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED) with dyspnea, cough, and wheezing after cleaning his saltwater fish tank. He reported that he maintains Zoanthid corals in his home saltwater fish tank and typically wears personal protective equipment when cleaning the tank. He had taken off his mask directly after using hot water to clean the tank, and quickly developed shortness of breath. He contacted Poison Control and was instructed to take loratadine with initial improvement in his symptoms. He then developed decreased appetite, nausea, and chills. The following day, in addition to these symptoms, he developed a fever of 102.5 degreeF and an oxygen saturation of 88% measured with an at-home pulse oximeter. He then proceeded to the ED where he was found to be hypoxic to 91% on room air, tachycardic to 120 bpm, hypotensive to 93/ 70mmHg, febrile to 100.9 degreeF and tachypneic at a respiratory rate of 30. Physical exam revealed clear lung sounds. Application of supplemental oxygen at 2 L resulted in improvement in his oxygen saturation and his hypotension and tachycardia responded to intravenous fluids. Significant laboratory results included WBC count of 20.4 with bands of 14%, elevated lactate of 2.4mmol/L, elevated D-dimer of 0.48 mug/mL and a negative COVID PCR test. CTA thorax revealed patchy ground-glass opacities in the bilateral upper and lower lobes with mosaicism. The patient received doxycycline in addition to broad spectrum antibiotics due to concern for inhalational marine toxicity. He was also started on 60mg prednisone, inhaled steroids, and bronchodilators for symptomatic treatment, with improvement in his symptoms. During his hospitalization, a respiratory viral panel was negative for common viruses associated with atypical pneumonia including influenza, coronavirus, metapneumovirus, rhinovirus, enterovirus, adenovirus, parainfluenza, bocavirus, Chlamydophila pneumoniae, and Mycoplasma pneumonia. His dyspnea gradually improved and he was weaned off supplemental oxygen prior to discharge home on hospital day 2. Discussion(s): It is unclear what changes are expected on thoracic imaging in patients with inhalational palytoxin exposure. Chest radiographs in two previous cases displayed scattered infiltrates, and a chest CT in another case showed pleural based consolidations. The ground-glass mosaicism suggests that a more diffuse reactive airway process after an inhalational palytoxin insult. Conclusion(s): Patients with inhalational palytoxin exposure may be found to have reactive airway symptoms along with ground glass opacities with mosaicism on CT imaging.

15.
Gesundheitswesen, Supplement ; 84(8-9):820, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2062341

ABSTRACT

Einleitung The EU project SonarGlobal was conducted in five countries, including Germany, to reveal contributing factors to vulnerability and resilience in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. The data obtained in Munich indicated that the characteristics of the city and its suburban districts are crucial determinants of vulnerability. This study questions the aspects of environment, housing, tolerance, and inclusion of the Munich metropolitan area to explore the mechanisms that increase vulnerabilities or resilience during the pandemic. Methoden In this qualitative study, in-depth interviews were performed with 82 people living in Munich and its suburban districts and who were faced with at least one mechanism that has the potential to create a biological or social disadvantage, such as age, gender, disability, health problems, occupation, or immigration status. We also interviewed 19 experts and community representatives on specific vulnerability and resilience mechanisms. Living conditions were questioned according to the physical and social environment, housing, stigma, discrimination, and support for inclusion. After the first round of coding, subcodes were created and the second round of coding was done as. This was followed by developing categories covering challenges and resilience factors. Ergebnisse 29 participants were from rural districts surrounding Munich while 53 were living inside urban districts. They originated from 22 different countries. Nine challenges (1. Common places for socialization and inclusion being closed;2. Interruption of organized support for inclusion;3. Isolation in over-centralized institutions and shelters;4. Limited access to IT technology;5. Limited solidarity between neighbours;6. Worsened housing conditions;7. Housing insecurity;8. Increased racism;9. Discrimination and stigma regarding adherence to COVID-19 rules) and four resilience factors (1. Being close to green places;2. Having outdoor spaces at home;3. Solidarity initiatives and strong relationships in neighbourhoods;4. Alternative means for organized support) were determined. For international students, refugees, seasonal workers and other immigrants, the challenges were more intense, while they reported the only significant resilience factor as being close to nature. The alternative support ways developed by the organizations could not be strong in the face of challenges. Stigma towards the disabled, immigrants and Muslims has increased, against which a significant resilience factor did not develop. In rural districts, challenges played a minor role while resilience factors were more effective. Schlussfolgerung The COVID-19 pandemic has deepened the inequalities in people living in the metropolitan area of Munich and with a greater extent in people living in the urban district in terms of environment and housing, reduced the tolerance towards and inclusion of the most disadvantaged segments of society, and aggravated discrimination.

16.
Fifty Years of Peeling Away the Lead Paint Problem ; : 351-371, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2060252

ABSTRACT

Three traditional frameworks in health, environment, and housing were reformed because of the new healthy housing experience. Lead poisoning, asthma, mold-induced illness, and other housing-related diseases and injuries were typically classified as “noncommunicable,” because they were associated with behavior, environmental (including housing), and genetic or physiological factors. Yet deficiencies in homes transmitted (“communicated”) certain health problems. “Communicable” diseases are those mainly originating in organisms and transmitted to humans as illnesses. Most health investments went to combatting these communicable diseases. Historically, this framework left housing and health divided, even though early housing codes in the late 1800s were driven largely by communicable disease prevention (cholera, typhoid, and tuberculosis). The successful control of these diseases included better medical treatments and control of organisms, but also changes in housing such as better ventilation, reduced crowding, and improved drinking water supply. The emergence of lead paint poisoning in the mid-1900s, Title X in 1992, and the healthy housing movement in 2000 all demonstrated both the failure of the communicable/noncommunicable framework and the promise of a new one. Most recently, the Covid-19 pandemic led to integrated medical (vaccine) and housing interventions (temporarily ending housing evictions). Social determinants of health (which included housing) increasingly replaced the antiquated communicable disease framework. Similarly, the traditional environmental framework of the “shared commons” and “polluters pay” that underpinned environmental regulations failed in the case of healthy housing, because houses were not traditionally considered to be part of those commons and there were no clear housing polluters. This led to fragmentation. Each municipality developed its own housing code (unlike nationwide environmental and public health standards and laws) and those codes often explicitly refused to address healthy housing hazards. Each housing owner had to pay the remediation cost, and many could not afford them, or chose to ignore them, or did not recognize them at all, with disastrous consequences. Pollution standards were developed for outdoor air and workplaces because they were “shared” spaces that could be measured with scientifically validated methods, but no such standards were developed for housing conditions. Yet the California and Rhode Island lead paint legal cases created a new precedent, in which the cost of lead paint remediation was borne not solely by the public or the homeowners, but instead by the industries that created the pollution and disease in the home. A third traditional framework held that the main purpose of housing policy and programs was to build individual wealth and social stability, but not health or environmental quality, because the latter were neither “communicable diseases” nor “shared commons.” The 2008 financial crisis that originated in housing showed this framework failed and the rising cost of housing also led to health and environmental problems. There was new evidence that higher housing costs resulted in avoided healthcare and environmental degradation. The housing market failed to include health investments in the price of housing, making healthy housing interventions unlike any other housing improvement, a clear market failure. Owners did not make health investments in housing because the owner could not recoup the investment upon sale, even though there were large savings to health, environmental, and other sectors. These three disconnects in health, environmental, and housing frameworks led to widespread social problems and large disparities by race, ethnicity, and income. A new social determinant framework emerged showing that housing, health, and environment could no longer remain confined to different worlds, implemented by different professions with their own specialized training, with their own terminology, studied by different arts of the academy, with differing workforces, policies, programs, and financing systems, with different citizen advocacy groups, with differing philanthropic initiatives, and with budgets far too small and disjointed to meet the need. This new consensus resulted in major reforms in housing, health, and environment, emergence of new environmental justice, health and housing citizen movements, new research agendas, record government appropriations, and larger private sector investment in healthy homes and lead paint remediation.

17.
Green Energy and Technology ; : 3-16, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2059701

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has caused numerous variations in the global economies with repercussions in all sectors. Once the emergency phase has finished, the entire worldwide population has changed its lifestyle and has had to adapt to live with the pandemic. In particular, the several modifications that have occurred in the job market and in schools and universities have determined a necessary reorganization of domestic spaces. The present study represents the first phase of a wider research aimed at verifying the transformation in the Italian residential market demand resulted by the Covid-19. The analysis carried out in this work has been performed at the municipal level, by considering the data published by the National Institute of Statistics collected for the 15th General Census of the population and housing in 2011. The dataset collected has been processed through an advanced econometric technique in order to identify the functional relationships between the residential average unit market value and the main architectural, socio-demographic and territorial factors. Further developments of this research will concern the application of the same methodological approach proposed to data detected by the National Institute of Statistics for the 16th Census scheduled for 2021. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

18.
J Urban Health ; 2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2060015

ABSTRACT

Early in the pandemic, New York City's public hospital system partnered with multiple philanthropic foundations to offer an unconditional cash transfer program for low-income New Yorkers affected by COVID-19. The $1000 cash transfers were designed to help people meet their most immediate health and social needs and were incorporated into healthcare delivery and contact tracing workflows as a response to the public health emergency. To better understand program recipients' experiences, researchers conducted 150 telephone surveys with randomly sampled cash transfer recipients and 20 in-depth qualitative interviews with purposefully sampled survey participants. Survey participants were predominantly Latinx (87%) and women (65%). The most common reported uses of the $1000 were food and rent. Most participants (79%) reported that without the $1000 cash transfer they would have had difficulty paying for basic expenses or making ends meet, with specific positive effects reported related to food, housing, and ability to work. The majority of survey participants reported that receiving the cash assistance somewhat or greatly improved their physical health (83%) and mental health (89%). Qualitative interview results generally supported the survey findings.

19.
Management Accountant ; 57(10):64, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2058155

ABSTRACT

Supply Chain (SC) has gained popularity in this globalized era, and is especially relevant today to tide over the slump caused due to Covid pandemic. SC is now a key economic infrastructure too and businesses remodel their SCs to be future-ready. Focusing on housing and real estate sector, this study seeks to design the SC strategy that can quickly recover this sector and hence the whole economy, given its vast linkage effects.

20.
Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science ; 63(7):3402-F0302, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2057641

ABSTRACT

Purpose : To evaluate the effectiveness of modified housing on fogging of reusable wide angle contact lens during vitreoretinal surgery Methods : Wide angle contact lens provides panoramic view of retina and enables successful vitreoretinal surgery in complex retinal detachments through improved visualization of vitreoretinal periphery upto and beyond ora serrata. However frequent steam sterilization erodes the glue that holds lens elements, allows fogging due to migration of steam in between lens elements and result in poor visualization of the fundus. In this study, we altered the housing and evaluated its effectiveness. Modified housing has two modes;open mode during sterilization and closed mode after completion of sterilization (Figs 1&2). The lens system has two lens groups. The first group has a concave posterior surface [Radius of curvature (ROC) = 7.8 mm], for placement on the patient's cornea. This group acts to direct light rays originating from the posterior chamber towards the second lens group II for focusing. The group I lens system collimates the light rays. Group II is located in a spaced-apart relationship with respect to first lens group I. This allows an air space between them. The group II focuses the light rays and provides panoramic visualization of retina. Housing that holds the two lens systems has a rotational window that is open during steam sterilization and closed during surgery Results : The lens system provided real and inverted panoramic image of the fundus. The lens system is configured to minimize chromatic aberration and provide improved image as compared to the other lens systems. It provides 160 degrees of fundus view during static viewing and 170 degrees during dynamic view with excellent depth of focus. Modified housing has facilitated fog free visualization of retina during surgery while allowing effective steam sterilization compliant with standard operating room regulations. Conclusions : This modified wide angle contact lens provides a real inverted panoramic fog free view of the retina and allow repeated usage without deterioration of image and prolonged the life of wide angle contact lens system. It has added significance in covid era, as stringent sterilization is essential for prevention of disease.

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