Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 12 de 12
Filter
1.
Med Intensiva (Engl Ed) ; 2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076524

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if the use of corticosteroids was associated with Intensive Care Unit (ICU) mortality among whole population and pre-specified clinical phenotypes. DESIGN: A secondary analysis derived from multicenter, observational study. SETTING: Critical Care Units. PATIENTS: Adult critically ill patients with confirmed COVID-19 disease admitted to 63 ICUs in Spain. INTERVENTIONS: Corticosteroids vs. no corticosteroids. MAIN VARIABLES OF INTEREST: Three phenotypes were derived by non-supervised clustering analysis from whole population and classified as (A: severe, B: critical and C: life-threatening). We performed a multivariate analysis after propensity optimal full matching (PS) for whole population and weighted Cox regression (HR) and Fine-Gray analysis (sHR) to assess the impact of corticosteroids on ICU mortality according to the whole population and distinctive patient clinical phenotypes. RESULTS: A total of 2017 patients were analyzed, 1171 (58%) with corticosteroids. After PS, corticosteroids were shown not to be associated with ICU mortality (OR: 1.0; 95% CI: 0.98-1.15). Corticosteroids were administered in 298/537 (55.5%) patients of "A" phenotype and their use was not associated with ICU mortality (HR=0.85 [0.55-1.33]). A total of 338/623 (54.2%) patients in "B" phenotype received corticosteroids. No effect of corticosteroids on ICU mortality was observed when HR was performed (0.72 [0.49-1.05]). Finally, 535/857 (62.4%) patients in "C" phenotype received corticosteroids. In this phenotype HR (0.75 [0.58-0.98]) and sHR (0.79 [0.63-0.98]) suggest a protective effect of corticosteroids on ICU mortality. CONCLUSION: Our finding warns against the widespread use of corticosteroids in all critically ill patients with COVID-19 at moderate dose. Only patients with the highest inflammatory levels could benefit from steroid treatment.

2.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(5): e844, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041220

ABSTRACT

Background: Timely identification of patients at risk of worse clinical outcomes is vital in managing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) calculated from complete blood count can predict the degree of systemic inflammation and guide therapy accordingly. Hence, we did a study to investigate the role of NLR value on intensive care unit (ICU) admission in predicting clinical outcomes of critically ill COVID-19 patients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health records of COVID-19 patients admitted to ICUs at Hazm Mebaireek General Hospital, Qatar, from March 7, 2020 to July 18, 2020. Patients with an NLR equal to or higher than the cut-off value derived from the receiver operating characteristic curve were compared to those with an NLR value below the cut-off. The primary outcome studied was all-cause ICU mortality. The secondary outcomes evaluated were the requirement of mechanical ventilation and ICU length of stay (LOS). Results: Five hundred and nineteen patients were admitted to ICUs with severe COVID-19 infection during the study period. Overall, ICU mortality in the study population was 14.6% (76/519). NLR on ICU admission of ≥6.55 was obtained using Youden's index to predict ICU mortality, with a sensitivity of 81% and specificity of 41%. Mortality was significantly higher in patients with age ≥60 years (p < 0.001), chronic kidney disease (p = 0.03), malignancy (p < 0.002), and NLR ≥ 6.55 (p < 0.003). There was also a significant association between the requirement of mechanical ventilation (34.7% vs. 51.8%, p < 0.001) and increased ICU LOS (8 vs. 10 days, p < 0.01) in patients with ICU admission NLR ≥ 6.55. Conclusion: Higher NLR values on ICU admission are associated with worse clinical outcomes in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

3.
Cureus ; 14(4): e24201, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1856243

ABSTRACT

Background and aims Pregnant women are one of the vulnerable groups affected by COVID-19. With the mutation of the virus, the severity of the disease in this vulnerable group may vary in different waves of COVID-19 subtypes. The aim of this study is to define the demographic, clinical, laboratory, and mortality results of pregnant COVID-19 patients according to three time frames (March to December 2020, January to June 2021, and July to November 2021). Materials and methods The data of patients admitted to the ICU between March 23, 2020, and November 30, 2021, were retrospectively scanned. Pregnant patients with SARS-CoV-2 PCR test positivity or pregnant patients with COVID-19 who have a negative PCR test but symptoms of COVID-19 and radiological findings consistent with COVID-19 on thorax CT who need intensive care were included in the study. The patients were divided into three groups according to the dates when the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Turkey reported the variants of COVID-19 in Turkey. The nonvariant type was dominant in the first period (March to December 2020), alpha and beta variants were dominant in the second period (January to June 2021), and the delta variant appeared in the last period (July to November 2021). Demographic, clinical, and laboratory findings at the first admission to the ICU and mortality rates of the patients were recorded. Results PCR test was performed in all 109 patients, of whom 101 were PCR test positive. In other eight patients, despite the negative PCR test, thorax CT findings were typical of COVID-19 pneumonia, and other bacterial and viral agents were also excluded. The mean age of the patients was 30.53 years, the mean APACHE II score was 9.68, and the mean gestational age was 28.55 weeks. Around 72.5% of the patients were in the third trimester. Of the 101 PCR-positive patients, 20.2% were delta variants, 16.5% alpha or beta variants, and 63.3% were of unknown variants. Five of the patients were vaccinated. The most common symptom was dyspnea (94.5%), and the most common comorbidity was hypothyroidism (9.17%). Invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) was needed in 44.95% of pregnant patients. The distribution of pregnant patients admitted to the ICU according to the periods March to December 2020, January to June 2021, and July to November 2021 was 16.5%, 21.1%, and 62.4%, respectively (p<0.001). Two groups of patients were compared: those that survived versus those that deceased. Variables predicting mortality were APACHE score, IMV requirement, length of stay in the ICU, prone positioning, Anakinra treatment, and ECMO (extracorporeal membrane oxygenator) requirement, which were significantly higher in the deceased group than in the living group (p<0.001, p<0.001, p=0.001, p<0.001, p<0.001, and p=0.001, respectively). There was no significant difference between the patients' age, gestational age, variants, treatments other than Anakinra, and the number of patients admitted to the ICU in the three periods (p=0.667, p=0.174, p=0.904, and p=0.605, respectively).In the multiple logistic regression analysis for mortality, high APACHE II score and IMV requirement were found as risk factors for mortality. Conclusion In the last period of delta variant predominance, pregnant COVID-19 patients were admitted to the ICU significantly more frequently than in the first two periods. Mechanical ventilation requirement and high APACHE II score were determined as risk factors for mortality.

4.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 25(12): 1343-1348, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1559072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: India, along with the rest of the world, faced the challenging severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic. The second wave in India lagged behind that in the Western world, due to different timing of seasons. There is scarce data about the differences between the two waves, for intensive care unit (ICU) patients. We present the data of 3,498 patients from 9 ICUs of western Maharashtra. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We collected prospective data of hospitalized, RT-PCR confirmed, coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) patients, from nine tertiary centers, after institutional ethics committee (IEC) approval. Then, we segregated and analyzed the data of patients admitted to the ICU, for comorbidities, high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) score, ventilatory support, etc. The primary outcomes were ICU and hospital mortality. We also performed multivariable analysis for predictors of ICU mortality. RESULTS: Overall, there were 3,498 ICU patients. In the first wave, 1,921 patients needed ICU admission, while in the second wave, 1,577 patients. Patients in the second wave had significantly higher ICU (26.1 vs 13.4%, p <0.001) and hospital mortality (29.9 vs 18.2%, p <0.001) and need for ventilatory support of any type. More patients received steroids during the second wave. On multivariable regression, male gender, ICU admission during the second wave, increasing HRCT score, and need for intubation and mechanical ventilation were significant predictors of ICU mortality. CONCLUSION: ICU patients admitted during the two waves were of the similar age, but there were more females, and more patients had comorbidities during the second wave. The ICU and hospital mortality were significantly higher during the second wave. HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE: Zirpe KG, Dixit S, Kulkarni AP, Pandit RA, Ranganathan P, Prasad S, et al. The Second- vs First-wave COVID-19: More of the Same or a Lot Worse? A Comparison of Mortality between the Two Waves in Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Units in Nine Hospitals in Western Maharashtra. Indian J Crit Care Med 2021; 25(12):1343-1348.

5.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(4): 1665-1674, 2021 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526879

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a disease with a high rate of progression to critical illness. However, the predictors of mortality in critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) are not yet well understood. In this study, we aimed to investigate the risk factors associated with ICU mortality in our hospital. Materials and methods: In this single-centered retrospective study, we enrolled 86 critically ill adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to ICU of Dokuz Eylül University Hospital (Izmir, Turkey) between 18 March 2020 and 31 October 2020. Data on demographic information, preexisting comorbidities, treatments, the laboratory findings at ICU admission, and clinical outcomes were collected. The chest computerized tomography (CT) of the patients were evaluated specifically for COVID-19 and CT score was calculated. Data of the survivors and nonsurvivors were compared with survival analysis to identify risk factors of mortality in the ICU. Results: The mean age of the patients was 71.1 ± 14.1 years. The patients were predominantly male. The most common comorbidity in patients was hypertension. ICU mortality was 62.8%. Being over 60 years old, CT score > 15, acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) II score ≥ 15, having dementia, treatment without favipiravir, base excess in blood gas analysis ≤ ­2.0, WBC > 10,000/mm3, D-dimer > 1.6 µg/mL, troponin > 24 ng/L, Na ≥ 145 mmol/L were considered to link with ICU mortality according to Kaplan­Meier curves (log-rank test, p < 0.05). The APACHE II score (HR: 1.055, 95% CI: 1.021­1.090) and chest CT score (HR: 2.411, 95% CI:1.193­4.875) were associated with ICU mortality in the cox proportional-hazard regression model adjusted for age, dementia, favipiravir treatment and troponin. Howewer, no difference was found between survivors and nonsurvivors in terms of intubation timing. Conclusions: COVID-19 patients have a high ICU admission and mortality rate. Studies in the ICU are also crucial in this respect. In our study, we investigated the ICU mortality risk factors of COVID-19 patients. We determined a predictive mortality model consisting of APACHE II score and chest CT score. It was thought that this feasible and practical model would assist in making clinical decisions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/methods , Hospital Mortality , Intubation, Intratracheal/methods , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Time Factors , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
BMC Pulm Med ; 21(1): 354, 2021 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1505545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) has been used as an immunomodulatory therapy to counteract severe systemic inflammation in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). But its use in COVID-19 related acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is not well established. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of electronic health records of COVID-19 patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) at Hazm Mebaireek General Hospital, Qatar, between March 7, 2020 and September 9, 2020. Patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation for moderate-to-severe ARDS were divided into two groups based on whether they received IVIG therapy or not. The primary outcome was all-cause ICU mortality. Secondary outcomes studied were ventilator-free days and ICU-free days at day-28, and incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI). Propensity score matching was used to adjust for confounders, and the primary outcome was compared using competing-risks survival analysis. RESULTS: Among 590 patients included in the study, 400 received routine care, and 190 received IVIG therapy in addition to routine care. One hundred eighteen pairs were created after propensity score matching with no statistically significant differences between the groups. Overall ICU mortality in the study population was 27.1%, and in the matched cohort, it was 25.8%. Mortality was higher among IVIG-treated patients (36.4% vs. 15.3%; sHR 3.5; 95% CI 1.98-6.19; P < 0.001). Ventilator-free days and ICU-free days at day-28 were lower (P < 0.001 for both), and incidence of AKI was significantly higher (85.6% vs. 67.8%; P = 0.001) in the IVIG group. CONCLUSION: IVIG therapy in mechanically ventilated patients with COVID-19 related moderate-to-severe ARDS was associated with higher ICU mortality. A randomized clinical trial is needed to confirm this observation further.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Immunologic Factors/therapeutic use , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Administration, Intravenous , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/mortality , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Retrospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
7.
Med Intensiva ; 2021 Oct 26.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482804

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine if the use of corticosteroids was associated with Intensive Care Unit (ICU) mortality among whole population and pre-specified clinical phenotypes. DESIGN: A secondary analysis derived from multicenter, observational studySetting: Critical Care UnitsPatients: Adult critically ill patients with confirmed COVID-19 disease admitted to 63 ICUs in Spain. INTERVENTIONS: corticosteroids vs no corticosteroidsMain variables of interest: Three phenotypes were derived by non-supervised clustering analysis from whole population and classified as (A: severe, B: critical and C: life-threatening). We performed a Multivariate analysis after propensity optimal full matching (PS) for whole population and weighted Cox regression (HR) and Fine-Gray analysis(sHR) to assess the impact of corticosteroids on ICU mortality according to the whole population and distinctive patient clinical phenotypes. RESULTS: A total of 2,017 patients were analyzed, 1171(58%) with corticosteroids. After PS, corticosteroids were shown not to be associated with ICU mortality (OR:1.0,95%CI:0.98-1.15). Corticosteroids were administered in 298/537(55.5%) patients of "A" phenotype and their use was not associated with ICU mortality (HR=0.85[0.55-1.33]). A total of 338/623(54.2%) patients in "B" phenotype received corticosteroids. No effect of corticosteroids on ICU mortality was observed when HR was performed (0.72[0.49-1.05]). Finally, 535/857(62.4%) patients in "C" phenotype received corticosteroids. In this phenotype HR (0.75[0.58-0.98]) and sHR (0.79[0.63-0.98]) suggest a protective effect of corticosteroids on ICU mortality. CONCLUSION: Our finding warns against the widespread use of corticosteroids in all critically ill patients with COVID-19 at moderate dose. Only patients with the highest inflammatory levels could benefit from steroid treatment.

8.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-5, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275831

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess ability of National Early Warning Score 2 (NEWS2), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), quick Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (qSOFA), and CRB-65 calculated at the time of intensive care unit (ICU) admission for predicting ICU mortality in patients of laboratory confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. METHODS: This prospective data analysis was based on chart reviews for laboratory confirmed COVID-19 patients admitted to ICUs over a 1-mo period. The NEWS2, CRB-65, qSOFA, and SIRS were calculated from the first recorded vital signs upon admission to ICU and assessed for predicting mortality. RESULTS: Total of 140 patients aged between 18 and 95 y were included in the analysis of whom majority were >60 y (47.8%), with evidence of pre-existing comorbidities (67.1%). The most common symptom at presentation was dyspnea (86.4%). Based upon the receiver operating characteristics area under the curve (AUC), the best discriminatory power to predict ICU mortality was for the CRB-65 (AUC: 0.720 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.630-0.811]) followed closely by NEWS2 (AUC: 0.712 [95% CI: 0.622-0.803]). Additionally, a multivariate Cox regression model showed Glasgow Coma Scale score at time of admission (P < 0.001; adjusted hazard ratio = 0.808 [95% CI: 0.715-0.911]) to be the only significant predictor of ICU mortality. CONCLUSIONS: CRB-65 and NEWS2 scores assessed at the time of ICU admission offer only a fair discriminatory value for predicting mortality. Further evaluation after adding laboratory markers such as C-reactive protein and D-dimer may yield a more useful prediction model. Much of the earlier data is from developed countries and uses scoring at time of hospital admission. This study was from a developing country, with the scores assessed at time of ICU admission, rather than the emergency department as with existing data from developed countries, for patients with moderate/severe COVID-19 disease. Because the scores showed some utility for predicting ICU mortality even when measured at time of ICU admission, their use in allocation of limited ICU resources in a developing country merits further research.

9.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 25(2): 245-246, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106299

ABSTRACT

How to cite this article: Rai N, Baidya DK. Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) Pandemic: Is Sequela the Bigger Threat? Indian J Crit Care Med 2021;25(2):245-246.

10.
Int J Infect Dis ; 105: 180-187, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080412

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) manifested by a broad spectrum of symptoms, ranging from asymptomatic manifestations to severe illness and death. The purpose of the study was to extensively describe the clinical features and outcomes in critically ill patients with COVID-19 in Saudi Arabia. METHOD: This was a multicenter, non-interventional cohort study for all critically ill patients aged 18 years or older, admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) between March 1 to August 31, 2020, with an objectively confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19. The diagnosis of COVID-19 was confirmed by Reverse Transcriptase-Polymerase Chain Reaction (RT-PCR) on nasopharyngeal and/or throat swabs. Multivariate logistic regression and generalized linear regression were used. We considered a P value of <0.05 statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 560 patients met the inclusion criteria. An extensive list of clinical features was associated with higher 30-day ICU mortality rates, such as requiring mechanical ventilation (MV) or developing acute kidney injury within 24 hours of ICU admission, higher body temperature, white blood cells, blood glucose level, serum creatinine, fibrinogen, procalcitonin, creatine phosphokinase, aspartate aminotransferase, and total iron-binding capacity. During ICU stay, the most common complication was respiratory failure that required MV (71.4%), followed by acute kidney injury (AKI) and thrombosis with a proportion of 46.8% and 11.4%, respectively. CONCLUSION: Among patients with COVID-19 who were admitted to the ICU, several variables were associated with an increased risk of ICU mortality at 30 days. Respiratory failure that required MV, AKI, and thrombosis were the most common complications during ICU stay.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Illness , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Critical Illness/mortality , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial
11.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 24(6): 383-384, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736804

ABSTRACT

How to cite this article: Chaddha U, Kaul V, Agrawal A. What is the True Mortality in the Critically Ill Patients with COVID-19? Indian J Crit Care Med 2020;24(6):383-384.

12.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 128, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691143

ABSTRACT

Background: Myocardial injury is a severe complication of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), and inflammation has been suggested as a potential cause of myocardial injury. However, the correlation of myocardial injury with inflammation in COVID-19 patients has not been revealed so far. Method: This retrospective single-center cohort study enrolled 64 critically ill patients with COVID-19. Patients were categorized into two groups by the presence of myocardial injury on admission. Demographic data, clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, treatments, and outcomes were analyzed in this study. Result: Of these patients, the mean age was 64.8 ± 12.2 years old, and 34 (53.1%) were diagnosed with myocardial injury. Compared with non-myocardial injury patients, myocardial injury patients were older (67.8 ± 10.3 vs. 61.3 ± 13.3 years; P = 0.033), had more cardiovascular (CV) risk factors such as smoking (16 [47.06%] vs. 7 [23.33%]; P = 0.048) and were more likely to develop CV comorbidities (13 [38.2%] vs. 2 [6.7%]; P = 0.003). Scores on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (median [interquartile range (IQR)] 19.0 [13.25-25.0] vs. 13.0 [9.25-18.75]; P = 0.005) and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment systems (7.0 [5.0-10.0] vs. 4.5 [3.0-6.0]; P < 0.001) were significantly higher in the myocardial injury group. In addition, patients with myocardial injury had higher mortality than those without myocardial injury (29 [85.29%] vs. 18 [60.00%]; P = 0.022). Cox regression suggested that myocardial injury was an independent risk factor for high mortality during the time from admission to death (hazard ratio [HR], 2.06 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.10-3.83]; P = 0.023). Plasma levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), interleukin (IL)-1ß, interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R), IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) exceeded the normal limits, and levels of hs-CRP, IL-2R, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α were statistically higher in the myocardial injury group than in the non-myocardial injury group. Multiple-variate logistic regression showed that plasma levels of hs-CRP (odds ratio [OR] 6.23, [95% CI, 1.93-20.12], P = 0.002), IL-6 (OR 13.63, [95% CI, 3.33-55.71]; P < 0.001) and TNF-α (OR 19.95, [95% CI, 4.93-80.78]; P < 0.001) were positively correlated with the incidence of myocardial injury. Conclusion: Myocardial injury is a common complication that serves as an independent risk factor for a high mortality rate among in-ICU patients with COVID-19. A high inflammatory burden may play a potential role in the occurrence of myocardial injury.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL