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1.
Stress Health ; 2023 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315747

ABSTRACT

Rumours circulated quickly online and offline during the COVID-19 pandemic, but empirical research on the subject is limited. Combining qualitative (Study 1, content analysis was conducted on 2344 actual rumours extracted from a rumour-refuting website) and quantitative methods (Study 2, a three-wave study with 10-day intervals), the current study suggests that (1) rumours during the pandemic can be categorised into three types, that is, wish, dread, and aggression rumours, and (2) exposure to different types of rumours is associated with coping consequences, subjective well-being (comprising positive affect, negative affect, and life satisfaction), and interpersonal trust in different ways. Generally, wish rumours seem benign, while dread and aggression rumours are malicious. Specifically, wish rumours are believed to assist coping and to be positively associated with positive affect and interpersonal trust. In contrast, dread rumours are believed not to assist coping and to be marginally significantly and positively associated with negative affect and negatively associated with interpersonal trust. Meanwhile, aggression rumours are believed not to assist coping and are marginally significantly and positively associated with negative affect. All other relationships are nonsignificant. The results of the current study will help national governments and international agencies design and evaluate rumour control strategies and policies.

2.
BMC Psychol ; 11(1): 140, 2023 Apr 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2292305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore relationship among perceived stress regarding loneliness, interpersonal trust and institutional trust of expatriates during the early COVID-19 period (from 30th March to 30th May 2020). METHODS: Data from  21,439 expatriates were extracted from COVIDiSTRESS global survey. The outcome variable was perceived stress. The explanatory variables were age, perceived loneliness, trust (interpersonal and institutional). Pairwise correlation, and structural equation modelling were used to determine relationship among outcome and explanatory variables. RESULTS: The majority of the expatriates were female (73.85%), married (60.20%), had college degree (47.76%), and employed (48.72%). Over 63% of the total expatriates reported that the COVID-19 pandemic changed their lives. The average age of the respondents was 40.4 years (± 13.7), and the average score of perceived stress, loneliness, interpersonal and institutional trust were 25.5, 7.4, 14.2 and 40.4, respectively. We found a moderate correlation of perceived stress with age, perceived loneliness, interpersonal trust and institutional trust (p < 0.001). They were also found moderately related to each other. Structural equation modelling evaluated that a lack of trust can cause loneliness among expatriates, which later lead to perceived stress. Interpersonal trust was more likely to be associated with stress than institutional trust, whereas perceived loneliness mediated between both trusts and perceived stress. CONCLUSION: Perceived stress can be reduced through trusting others and alleviating the loneliness. Making strong linkage among migrants as well as between migrants and local community is important to ensure proper mental wellbeing of expatriates.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Loneliness , Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Pandemics , Latent Class Analysis , Stress, Psychological
3.
SSM Popul Health ; 22: 101397, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2306221

ABSTRACT

This study examines how trust was associated with social distancing during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Burkina Faso and Kenya. It fills gaps in previous research on trust and health by 1) simultaneously considering the relationship of individual- and aggregate-level indicators of trust, and 2) evaluating trust in local government and national government separately. Performance Monitoring for Action (PMA) data on COVID-precautionary measures and individual-level trust measures were spatially linked with aggregated trust data from the Afrobarometer to create a multilevel dataset. PMA data show that women in Kenya were generally more likely to report taking COVID-precautionary measures relative to Burkinabé women, although levels of these measures were high in both countries. Hierarchical logistic models for each country show levels of interpersonal trust mattered more in Burkina Faso. Although the association between individual-level trust in government and social distancing was not statistically significant, overall levels of trust in the region where an individual lived were associated with social distancing. We found a significant interaction effect between regional trust in the national government and regional trust in local government: individuals in regions where trust was high in both national and local government were the most likely to socially distance; individuals in regions with low local government trust but high national government trust were less likely to report social distancing. We unpack possible implications of these findings; they point to the importance of a unified government front within African countries in promoting health safety measures during a pandemic.

4.
Front Psychol ; 14: 1080631, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255159

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The emotional impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting public health emergency are only beginning to be understood. Methods: We assessed the contributions of emotional and cognitive factors and age-related comorbidities to greater COVID-19 fear in a community dwelling sample of 142 younger (Mage = 19.63, SDage = 2.59) and 157 older (Mage = 72.01, SDage = 7.06) adults, between July 2020 and July 2021. We hypothesized that individuals with increased loneliness, depression, and/or decreased subjective numeracy (SN) and interpersonal trust would experience more COVID-19 fear. We also predicted that females and older adults would experience more COVID-19 fear given that age-related comorbidities are associated with increased illness severity. Results: Results showed that the extent of loneliness in older adults was more strongly related to fear of COVID-19 than it was in younger adults (ß = 0.197, p = 0.016), and poorer SN was associated with increased COVID-19 fear in both age groups (ß = -0.138, p = 0.016). Further, higher interpersonal mistrust was associated with increased COVID-19 fear (ß = 0.136, p = 0.039), as was identifying as female (ß = 0.137, p = 0.013). Discussion: Given that self-described poor numeracy was a marker for greater COVID-19 fear, investigators and policy makers might consider mitigation opportunities addressing data literacy requirements imposed by the media. Further, outreach to mitigate loneliness, particularly of the elderly, might effectively lessen the negative psychological impact of this ongoing public health crisis.

5.
Psychol Res Behav Manag ; 16: 169-177, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2268651

ABSTRACT

Objective: Based on the motivated cognition account, this study aimed to explore the relationship between mental health education competency and interpersonal trust among college counselors, as well as the mediating effect of neuroticism. Materials and Methods: A total of 483 college counselors were selected, including 155 men and 328 women. The youngest college counselor was 22 years old and the oldest was 56 years old (M = 31.69, SD = 6.12). The college counselors were asked to fill out the Mental Health Education Competency Scale for College Counselors, a 10-item short version of the Big Five Inventory, and an Interpersonal Trust Scale. Results: (1) This study found a significantly positive correlation between mental health education competency and interpersonal trust. (2) Mental health education competency and interpersonal trust were negatively correlated with neuroticism. (3) The mediating role of neuroticism in the association between mental health education competency and interpersonal trust was significant. Conclusion: Mental health education competency partly affected interpersonal trust via the mediating effect of neuroticism.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(1)2022 12 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241665

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, an increase in poor mental health among Asian Indians was observed in the United States. However, the leading predictors of poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in Asian Indians remained unknown. A cross-sectional online survey was administered to self-identified Asian Indians aged 18 and older (N = 289). Survey collected information on demographic and socio-economic characteristics and the COVID-19 burden. Two novel machine learning techniques-eXtreme Gradient Boosting and Shapley Additive exPlanations (SHAP) were used to identify the leading predictors and explain their associations with poor mental health. A majority of the study participants were female (65.1%), below 50 years of age (73.3%), and had income ≥ $75,000 (81.0%). The six leading predictors of poor mental health among Asian Indians were sleep disturbance, age, general health, income, wearing a mask, and self-reported discrimination. SHAP plots indicated that higher age, wearing a mask, and maintaining social distancing all the time were negatively associated with poor mental health while having sleep disturbance and imputed income levels were positively associated with poor mental health. The model performance metrics indicated high accuracy (0.77), precision (0.78), F1 score (0.77), recall (0.77), and AUROC (0.87). Nearly one in two adults reported poor mental health, and one in five reported sleep disturbance. Findings from our study suggest a paradoxical relationship between income and poor mental health; further studies are needed to confirm our study findings. Sleep disturbance and perceived discrimination can be targeted through tailored intervention to reduce the risk of poor mental health in Asian Indians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Adult , Male , Female , United States , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Asian People
7.
Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Management ; 54:457-471, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2241617

ABSTRACT

Interpersonal trust is a critical psychological factor that reveals the quality of resident-tourist relationship in tourism destinations. However, residents' positive attitudes toward tourists are gradually taken for granted, with research on residents' psychological tendency (i.e., interpersonal trust) in providing tourism services and creating mutually beneficial resident-tourist interaction lagging behind. Based on interpersonal relationship theory and social exchange theory, this study employed a sequential mixed-methods design to examine the formation of interpersonal trust in tourists during resident participation in rural tourism. The dimensions of resident participation (i.e., decision-making, economic, and social participation) and the conceptual model were first identified through qualitative analysis. Subsequently, through the PLS-based structural equation modeling using a sample of 469 residents from Jiuzhai Valley, China, the study suggested that economic and social participation were instrumental in shaping residents' cognitive and affective trust in tourists both directly and indirectly through residents' perceived benefits of tourism. This study offers implications for academia and destination management to promote sustainable tourism development and social harmony against the crisis of trust between residents and tourists caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
Journal of Sustainable Tourism ; 31(2):442-459, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2234727

ABSTRACT

Residents' overall well-being and quality-of-life require a deeper understanding of their perceived social impacts of tourism to determine appropriate management strategies to promote behaviours in support of tourism development. Aligning with the 2030 Agenda for sustainable development, this paper proposes a new framework for residents' quality-of-life. Bringing together multi-disciplinary evidence from environmental, social and cognitive psychology, political science and tourism, this study critically examines how residents' perceived social impacts of tourism and their interpersonal trust can make them become more place attached and protect their tourism resources. The framework proposes that residents' perceived social impacts of tourism exerts a direct influence on residents' interpersonal trust. It further posits that residents' perceived social impacts of tourism and their interpersonal trust exert a direct influence on residents' place attachment. The proposed model further considers place attachment to exert a direct influence on residents' pro-social and pro-environmental behavioural intentions. Pro-social behaviour is proposed to influence pro-environmental behaviour. Further pro-social and pro-environmental behaviours are proposed to influence residents' support for tourism development. The framework then considers residents' support for tourism development to exert a direct influence on residents' overall quality-of-life. The theoretical contributions, practical implications for sustainable community tourism and sustainable tourism in general and the limitations of the study are discussed. [ FROM AUTHOR]

9.
SN Soc Sci ; 3(2): 24, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2175626

ABSTRACT

This paper investigated citizens' reactions to global crises using the COVID-19 pandemic as a natural experiment. Theories in this field are controversial and thus knowledge on such reactions, their evolution, drivers, and consequences is limited. Building on several socio-psychological foundations such as trust building theories, the fear appeal theory, the theory of planned behavior, and the spillover theory, we explain developments in three major human responses: (1) perceptual and attitudinal responses such as trust in governance and interpersonal trust; (2) emotional responses such as fear of crises; and (3) behavioral responses such as civic engagement. Using a longitudinal design, we tracked the attitudes and behaviors of Israeli citizens over 22 months (7/2019-3/2021) and at four points in time (t1-t4). Findings are based on a time-lagged analysis of 3527 participants (n1 = 602; n2 = 750; n3 = 970; n4 = 1205), and a more focused analysis of panel data (n1-4 = 256). In accordance with our theoretical foundations and specific models, we revealed a reaction pattern of shock→recognition→adjustment→reframing. We maintain that our findings improve understanding of citizens' reactions to government policies. They provide unique empirical evidence for resilience among citizens and across social structures which testify to bouncing-back capacities from global crises in various ways. Its lessons may thus direct future studies on the relationship between citizens and governments in other global crises and emergencies. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s43545-023-00610-0.

10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(24)2022 12 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2155083

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, traditional face-to-face counseling has gradually given way to online counseling. To improve the application value of online counseling and change the current situation of college students' lack of willingness to receive online counseling, this study explored factors that influence Chinese college students' willingness to receive online counseling (WROC). Based on data gathered from surveying 823 Chinese college students using self-report questionnaires, we clarified the relationships between the self-stigma of seeking help, ethical concerns about online counseling (ECOC), online interpersonal trust (OIT), and the willingness to receive online counseling (WROC). The results indicated that (1) self-stigma of seeking help and OIT negatively and positively predicted the WROC, respectively; (2) ethical concerns negatively predicted the WROC; and (3) ethical concerns mediated the relationship between self-stigma and WROC and between OIT and WROC. The results suggest that reducing the self-stigma surrounding help-seeking, perfecting the ethical norms of online counseling, and enhancing interpersonal trust can improve willingness to receive online counseling.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Counseling/methods , Social Stigma , Asian People
11.
Front Psychol ; 13: 1015900, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2109847

ABSTRACT

The global pandemic, COVID-19, has dealt a heavy blow to the tourism industry. Therefore, exploring the mechanisms influencing travel intention in the post-epidemic era can help provide management insights for the recovery of the travel market. Relying on the logic of social cognition theory, we conducted an empirical analysis from the perspective of trust and found that institutional trust and interpersonal trust can positively predict travel intention in the context of the epidemic, while travelers' health risk perception and safety self-efficacy mediate the relationship between trust and travel intention. Moreover, we verified the moderating role of tourists' psychological resilience. Further, the study confirms that China's active prevention policy not only reduces the physical health harm caused by the epidemic, but also effectively increases individuals' institutional trust in a proactive government. Through China's active anti-epidemic policy, individuals were able to counteract the negative impact of the COVID 19 epidemic on their travel intention. Further, theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

12.
Cogent Business & Management ; 9(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2070057

ABSTRACT

The current COVID-19 pandemic is a worldwide challenge, so organizationsneed to create innovative management to drive effective performance. Effective performance can be achieved, among others, by creating interpersonal trust between employees and supervisors. Therefore, examining the antecedents of this interpersonal trust is an important study. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of formal performance evaluation system and intrinsic religiosity on a person's trust toward their superiors. Data were obtained using an online questionnaire survey method. A total of 222 full-time faculty members of economics and business from 24 Christian higher education institutions across 14 provinces in Indonesia participated in this study. The data were analyzed using hierarchical regression analysis. This study provides evidence on the positive effect of formal performance evaluation systems on trust based on social exchange theory. This study also reveals that intrinsic religiosity positively influences subordinates' trust in their superiors. This study is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to introduce supernatural monitoring hypothesis as a theoretical base to examine the effect of intrinsic religiosity on trust. Further, this study provides evidence that supernatural monitoring hypothesis is the complementing theory of social exchange theory in building trust.

13.
Industrial and Commercial Training ; 54(4):647-665, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2037660

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The purpose of this study is to look at numerous mediating factors that influence innovative work behavior through cultural intelligence (CQ). The author specifically examines affective commitment, interpersonal trust and psychological well-being as three mediating pathways through which CQ predicts innovative work behavior (IWB).Design/methodology/approach>Data was collected from 355 employees working in the health-care sector of India through convenience sampling.Findings>Affective commitment, interpersonal trust and psychological well-being mediated the relationship between CQ and innovative work behavior. In addition, CQ positively relates to affective commitment (AC), interpersonal trust and psychological well-being and IWB.Practical implications>Managers and human resource (HR) professionals can potentially stimulate employee innovation by developing cultural awareness programs for their employees. An organization must seek to provide a sense of attachment, a trustworthy environment and a favorable perception of psychological well-being to its employees. This could stimulate innovation in the health-care sector.Originality/value>Although understanding the mechanism or processes by which CQ supports IWB is critical, research in this area is limited. This study theorizes and empirically examines affective commitment, interpersonal trust and psychological well-being as novel mechanisms through which CQ promotes innovative behavior in health-care organizations. Furthermore, the author presume that the intervening mediators guide the direction of social exchange.

14.
Applied Economics ; : 1-23, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1937502

ABSTRACT

Trust in the European Central Bank (ECB) is vital. However, little is known about trust in the ECB during the COVID-19 pandemic. We use the rich pilot microdata from the ECB Consumer Expectations Survey during 2020-2021 on six key euro area countries to shed light on trust in the ECB during the pandemic. Our findings suggest that there is ample room to improve consumers' trust in the ECB. Personal COVID-19 experiences play a role: respondents who reduced the number of hours worked due to COVID-19 have lower trust in the ECB than those with unchanged working hours. Trust in the ECB varies within countries. It is highest among males and people with a good financial situation. It increases with financial knowledge, education, income, and wealth.

15.
22nd European Conference on Knowledge Management (ECKM) ; : 121-129, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1732669

ABSTRACT

Purpose - Knowledge creation is a key activity for organizations in current economics, linked to successful business strategy. Particularly in pandemic situations, it is necessary to create new solutions and to adapt to changing situations. This paper focuses on how to strengthen an organization's capacity to create knowledge through employee training and development. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of training and development on knowledge creation moderated by interpersonal trust in colleagues for remote working situations. Design/methodology/approach - The research began with an in-depth literature review on knowledge creation to create a set of constructs. Based on the identified constructs, research hypotheses were derived. A sample of 220 employees form IT organizations has been used to gather data through a standardized questionnaire and test the hypotheses through simple moderation model. The data was collected during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. Findings - The results indicate that training and development influence positively knowledge creation in remote setting. Additionally the results indicate that interpersonal trust in colleagues moderates these relationship. Moreover, the findings highlight that interpersonal trust is critically important for knowledge creation, especially when there are low levels of development and training in the organization. Originality/value - From a theoretical perspective, the study contributes to literature considering a training and development and its effect on knowledge creation. This investigation, based on the theory of social constructivism, emphasizes the importance of interpersonal trust as a platform for facilitating the knowledge creation based on employees' competences. In fact, a few studies have considered the impact of training and development on other variables, such as productivity, but never on knowledge creation. From a managerial perspective, the research suggests managers to implement and involve practices strengthening training and development as well as interpersonal trust within business. The promotion of interpersonal trust can have a positive effect on the creation of knowledge.

16.
Socioecol Pract Res ; 3(4): 427-439, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682729

ABSTRACT

In this article, we integrate our authorship experiences with insights from nine interviews of knowledge exchange practitioners at the Canadian Forest Service about challenges and opportunities of digital knowledge exchange (KE) brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. We aim to inform how best to maintain effective KE practices and processes in a digital-first world. Interpersonal trust and relationships are pivotal to effective knowledge exchange; thus, removing these dimensions risks losing aspects of social learning, informal and meaningful discussions, and personal connections that affect how we interpret and respond to subtle affective and social cues. For KE practitioners, lack of in-person interactions risks internal KE coordination and relevance of KE work, and diminished ability to predict and respond to user needs. However, the accelerated digital adoption has increased reach and accessibility for diverse people to exchange knowledge, and enables more frequent and rapid response to issues and events by virtually gathering diverse people almost instantly. The acceleration in digital innovation and culture has thus resulted in new tools and diversified approaches for the KE toolbox to inform decisions and practices. The long-term sustainability and effectiveness of digital KE depend on two interconnected factors: addressing the persistence of the digital divide and people's abilities to make and maintain meaningful social connections in the absence of regular face-to-face contact. We thus offer three considerations to guide KE efforts and initiative in a digital-first world: (1) consider both digital divide and equity; (2) revisit user needs and preferences for KE to address the diversity of users, and (3) leverage the diversification of KE approaches and innovations.

17.
Sustainability ; 14(2):987, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1633655

ABSTRACT

Retrospecting articles on interpersonal trust is of great importance for understanding its current status and future development in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, especially, with the widespread use of Big Data and Blockchain. In total, 1532 articles related to interpersonal trust were collected as research database to draw keyword co-occurrence mapping and timeline mapping by VOSviewer and CiteSpace. On this basis, the research content and evolution trend of interpersonal trust were systematically analyzed. The results show that: (1) Data cleaning by code was first integrated with Knowledge Mapping and then used to review the research of interpersonal trust;(2) Developed countries have contributed the most to the research of interpersonal trust;(3) Social capital, knowledge sharing, job and organizational performance, Chinese Guanxi are the research hotspots of interpersonal trust;(4) The research hotspots on interpersonal trust evolve from the level of individual psychology and behavior to the level of social stability and development and then to the level of organization operation and management;(5) At present, the research on interpersonal trust is in the outbreak period;fMRI technology and Big Data and Blockchain technology gradually become vital research tools of interpersonal trust, which provides significant prospects for the following research of interpersonal trust under the COVID-19 pandemic.

18.
Soc Sci Med ; 293: 114677, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586482

ABSTRACT

The absence of pharmaceutical interventions made it particularly difficult to mitigate the first outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The current study investigated how interpersonal trust and institutional trust influenced the control process. Trusts and COVID-19 data in 44 countries and 50 US states were analyzed; institutional trust was associated with case fatality rate, and interpersonal trust was associated with control speed. Two independent behavioral experiments showed that institutional trust manipulation increased participants' willingness to complete the COVID-19 test and that interpersonal trust manipulation increased conscious compliance with prevention norms and decreased unnecessary outdoor activities. Agent-based modeling further confirmed these behavioral mechanisms for two types of trust in the COVID-19 control process. New interventions are needed to help countries heighten interpersonal and institutional trust as they continue to battle COVID-19 and other collective threats.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(7)2021 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154407

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus pandemic has affected the lives of people all over the world. The perception of risk and people's consequent behaviour during a pandemic are very complex and are affected by multiple cultural and psychological factors. The aim of this study was to investigate the change in risk perception, perceived self-efficacy and the perceived trust in the behaviour of others, the decisions of health authorities and government provisions, as well as the variation of self-restraint behaviours during the spread of the Covid-19 epidemic in Italy. We used a convenience sample of 707 university students (Mage = 22.99; SD = 4.01) from a central area of Italy. Participants freely joined the research by answering an online questionnaire between February and March 2020. Three time intervals defined by the progressive containment measures implemented by the Italian Government were considered. Main outcome measures were the Generalized Self-Efficacy Scale, the Risk Perception Index, the Index of Self-restraint Behaviours, and Institutional and Interpersonal Trust Measures. Results confirmed that significant changes in the time progression have occurred in the perception of risk, in the perception of individual self-efficacy, in the value attributed to social responsibility, in interpersonal trust and in trust in health authorities. The study also identified the participants' personality traits and locus of control as predictors (positive and negative) of perceived self-efficacy and tested a mediation model of trust on the effect of risk perception on self-restraint intentions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy , Trust , Young Adult
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