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1.
IJID Regions ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2105103

ABSTRACT

Objectives To identify factors associated with adverse maternal outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods Single-center prospective cohort study at a maternity department in a public general hospital in Rio de Janeiro. All pregnant women evaluated for emergency care, for labor and delivery, for respiratory symptoms, for obstetrical or medical reasons between May 2020 to March 2022 at the participating institution were offered enrollment. The endpoint was maternal mortality or ICU admission. Results 1609 pregnant women were enrolled;25.5% participants (n=410) were infected with SARS-CoV-2 based on RT-PCR or an antigen test. There were 21 deaths and 67 ICU admissions in 4% of the cohort. Severe maternal morbidity and mortality incidence was higher during the Gamma than Delta waves (p =0.003). Vaccination conferred protection against the endpoint (RR: 0.4, 95% CI:0.1-0.9, p=0.0169). Factors associated with severe morbidity and mortality included Cesarean section (RR: 3.7, 95% CI: 1.7-7.9, p=0.0008), SARS-CoV-2 infection in the third trimester (RR: 2.4, 95% CI: 1.1-5.6, p=0.0006) and comorbidities (RR: 3, 95% CI= 1.8-5.2, p< 0.0001). Conclusions : COVID-19 was significantly associated with the risk of severe maternal morbidity and mortality. Immunization of pregnant women against COVID-19 was highly protective against adverse outcomes and should be encouraged during pregnancy.

2.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2144039, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107203

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has severely affected adolescents. Safe and effective vaccines are pivotal tools in controlling this pandemic. We reviewed the safety profile of the BNT162b2 COVID-19 vaccine in adolescents using mostly real-world data to assist decision-making. We used random-effects model meta-analysis to derive pooled rates of single or grouped adverse events following immunization (AEFI) after each primary and booster dose, as well as after combining all doses. Reporting on over one million participants with safety data were included. The most-reported local and systemic AEFIs were pain/swelling/erythema/redness and fatigue/headache/myalgia, respectively. AESIs were rarely reported but were more frequent after the second dose than they were after the first and the booster doses. Health impact was less common among adolescents after receiving BNT162b2 vaccine. Rare life-threatening AEFIs were reported across all doses in real-world studies. Our findings highlight the significance of enhancing national and regional vaccination programs to ensure public confidence.

3.
J Public Health Policy ; 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106633

ABSTRACT

Routine immunization rates in the United States (US) declined immediately after the US declared COVID-19 a public health emergency in March 2020. Decreases in childhood vaccination place children at risk for vaccine-preventable diseases and communities at risk for outbreaks from these diseases. The US Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) launched "Catch Up to Get Ahead" in August 2020 to promote routine childhood immunization. The decline in mean coverage of the combined 7-vaccine series among children aged 19-35 months was less in Indian Health Service (IHS) federal health centers that implemented "Catch Up to Get Ahead" compared to IHS federal health centers that did not. The effort to promote catch-up vaccination may have showed promise in minimizing the decline in childhood vaccination coverage during the pandemic. However, the effort was not enough to reach pre-pandemic levels, indicating the need for more robust and sustained efforts to catch children up on all delayed immunizations.

4.
Vaccine ; 40(46): 6616-6624, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106125

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Brazil experienced moments of collapse in its health system throughout 2021, driven by the emergence of variants of concern (VOC) combined with an inefficient initial vaccination strategy against Covid-19. OBJECTIVES: To support decision-makers in formulating COVID-19 immunization policy in the context of limited vaccine availability and evolving variants over time, we evaluate optimal strategies for Covid-19 vaccination in Brazil in 2021, when vaccination was rolled out during Gamma variant predominance. METHODS: Using a discrete-time epidemic model we estimate Covid-19 deaths averted, considering the currently Covid-19 vaccine products and doses available in Brazil; vaccine coverage by target population; and vaccine effectiveness estimates. We evaluated a 5-month time horizon, from early August to the end of December 2021. Optimal vaccination strategies compared the outcomes in terms of averted deaths when varying dose intervals from 8 to 12 weeks, and choosing the minimum coverage levels per age group required prior to expanding vaccination to younger target populations. We also estimated dose availability required over time to allow the implementation of optimal strategies. RESULTS: To maximize the number of averted deaths, vaccine coverage of at least 80 % should be reached in older age groups before starting vaccination into subsequent younger age groups. When evaluating varying dose intervals for AZD1222, reducing the dose interval from 12 to 8 weeks for the primary schedule would result in fewer COVID-19 deaths, but this can only be implemented if accompanied by an increase in vaccine supply of at least 50 % over the coming six-months in Brazil. CONCLUSION: Covid-19 immunization strategies should be tailored to local vaccine product availability and supply over time, circulating variants of concern, and vaccine coverage in target population groups. Modelling can provide valuable and timely evidence to support the implementation of vaccination strategies considering the local context, yet following international and regional technical evidence-based guidance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Humans , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , Brazil/epidemiology , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Vaccination
5.
Vaccine ; 40(46): 6575-6580, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106122

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We sought to evaluate the trends of HPV vaccination between 03/2019-09/2021 and whether the impact of the COVID pandemic on HPV vaccination varied by race/ethnicity and neighborhood deprivation index (NDI). METHODS: Electronic medical records at Kaiser Permanente Southern California were used to assess monthly volume of HPV vaccine doses administered among children aged 9-12.9yrs, and up-to-date coverage (% vaccinated) by age 13 between 03/2019-09/2021. Modified Poisson models were used to evaluate the interactions between race/ethnicity, NDI and the pandemic periods on HPV vaccine coverage. RESULTS: HPV vaccine doses administered in 2020/2021 have returned to the 2019 level after the initial drop. The average up-to-date coverage in 05/2021-09/2021 (54.8%) remained lower than the pre-pandemic level (58.5%). The associations between race/ethnicity, NDI and HPV vaccine coverage did not vary due to the pandemic. CONCLUSION: HPV vaccine promotion efforts are needed to address COVID-19 pandemic's lasting impact on HPV vaccination coverage.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Ethnicity , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Social Class , California/epidemiology
6.
Iran J Med Sci ; 47(6): 517-532, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100903

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) emerged in China. This virus rapidly spread worldwide and was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) in March 2020. High incidence, long incubation period, and diverse clinical signs of the disease posed a huge challenge globally. The efforts of health systems have been focused on repurposing existing drugs or developing innovative therapies to reduce the morbidity and mortality associated with SARS-CoV-2. In addition, most of the large pharmaceutical companies are intensely working on vaccine development to swiftly deliver safe and effective vaccines to prevent further spread of the virus. In this review, we will discuss the latest data on therapeutic strategies undergoing clinical trials. Additionally, we will provide a summary of vaccines currently under development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , China
7.
Int J Equity Health ; 21(Suppl 3): 147, 2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098349

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health and care workers (HCWs) are at the forefront of COVID-19 response, at high risk of infection, and as a result they are a priority group for COVID-19 vaccination. This paper presents the global patterns in COVID-19 vaccination coverage among HCWs in 2021, how HCWs were prioritized, and identifies factors associated with the early vaccination coverage. METHODS: Using monthly data reported to the World Health Organization, the percentages of partially and fully vaccinated HCWs were computed. The rates of vaccination of HCWs for the first and second half of 2021 were compared in a stratified analysis using several factors. A multivariate analysis was used to investigate the independent associations of these factors with the percentage of HCWs fully vaccinated. RESULTS: Based on data from 139 Member States, as of end of 2021, 82% HCWs were reported as fully vaccinated with important variations by income groups: 33% for low income countries, 83% for lower-middle income countries, 79% for upper-middle income countries and 88% for high income countries. Overall 76% of countries did not achieve 70% vaccination coverage of their HCWs in the first half of 2021, and 38% of countries by end of 2021. Compared with the general population, the rate of HCWs full vaccination was 3.5 times higher, in particular for low income countries (RR = 5.9). Stratified analysis showed that beyond income group, the availability of vaccine doses was a critical factor of HCWs vaccination coverage with medians of 59.1% and 88.6% coverage in the first and second half of 2021, respectively for countries with enough doses to cover 70% of their population, compared with 0.8% and 47.5% coverage, respectively for countries with doses to cover 40% of their population. The multivariate analysis confirmed this observation with a 35.9% overall difference (95%CI 15.1%; 56.9%) between these two groups. CONCLUSION: Despite being considered a priority group, more than a third of countries did not achieve 70% vaccination coverage of their HCWs at the end of 2021. Large inequities were observed with low income countries lagging behind. Additional efforts should be dedicated to ensure full protection of HCWs through vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccination Coverage , Humans , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Vaccination , Health Personnel
8.
mBio ; : e0286222, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097928

ABSTRACT

Monkeypox, a zoonosis caused by the orthopox monkeypox virus (MPXV) that is endemic to Central and West Africa, was previously linked to sporadic outbreaks and rare, travel-associated cases. An outbreak of monkeypox in 2022 has spurred a public health emergency of international concern, and this outbreak is unprecedented in terms of its scale and epidemiology. The outbreak has been focused overwhelmingly in men who have sex with men; however, the trajectory of the outbreak remains uncertain, with spread now being reported in women and children. The mortality has been low (<1%), yet the morbidity is high. Vaccines and oral antiviral agents that have been developed to protect against smallpox are available for use against monkeypox. However, the supply has been unable to match the demand during the outbreak. Passive antibody-based therapies, such as hyperimmune globulin (HIG), monoclonal antibodies, and convalescent plasma (CP), have been used against a diverse array of infectious diseases, culminating in their extensive use during the COVID-19 pandemic. Passive antibody-based therapies could play a role in the treatment of monkeypox, either as a temporizing role amid a shortfall in vaccines and antivirals or a complementary role to direct-acting antivirals. Drawing on the collective experience to date, there are regulatory, administrative, and logistical challenges to the implementation of antibody-based therapies. Their efficacy is contingent upon early administration and the presence of high-titer antibodies against the targeted pathogen. Research is needed to address questions pertaining to how to qualify HIG and CP and to determine their relative efficacy against MPXV, compared to antecedent therapies and preventative strategies. IMPORTANCE Monkeypox is an infection caused by the monkeypox virus (MPXV). The clinical findings in monkeypox include fever and rash. Historically, most cases of human monkeypox were reported in Africa. This changed in 2022, with a massive escalation in the number of cases across multiple countries, mainly affecting men who have sex with men. Although vaccines and oral antiviral medications are available for the treatment of monkeypox, their supply has been overwhelmed by the unprecedented number of cases. Antibody-based therapies (ABTs) have long been used to treat infectious diseases. They are produced in a laboratory or from plasma that has been collected from individuals who have recovered from an infection or have been vaccinated against that infection (in this case, monkeypox). ABTs could play a role in the treatment of monkeypox, either while awaiting oral medications or as a complementary treatment for patients that are at risk of severe disease.

9.
Vaccine ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2096114

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused unprecedented disruption in health service delivery, globally. This study sought to provide evidence on the impact of the pandemic on vaccine coverage in Kilifi County, Kenya. We conducted a vaccine coverage survey between April and June 2021 within the Kilifi Health and Demographic Surveillance System (KHDSS). Simple random sampling was used to identify 1500 children aged 6 weeks to 59 months. Participants were grouped into three retrospective cohorts based on when they became age-eligible for vaccination: before the pandemic, during the first year, or during the second year of the pandemic. Survival analysis with Cox regression was used to evaluate the association between the time-period at which participants became age-eligible for vaccination and the rate of vaccination within a month of age-eligibility for the third dose of pentavalent vaccine (Pentavalent-3) and within three months of age-eligibility for the first dose of Measles vaccine (MCV-1). A total of 1,341 participants were included in the survey. Compared to the pre-COVID-19 baseline period, the rate of vaccination within a month of age-eligibility for Pentavalent-3 was not significantly different in the first year of the pandemic (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 1.03, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.90 - 1.18) and was significantly higher during the second year of the pandemic (aHR 1.33, 95% CI 1.07 – 1.65). The rate of vaccination with MCV-1 within three months of age-eligibility was not significantly different among those age-eligible for vaccination during the first year of the pandemic (aHR 1.04, 95% CI 0.88 – 1.21) and was 35% higher during the second year of the pandemic (95% CI 1.11 – 1.64), compared to those age-eligible pre-COVID-19. After adjusting for known determinants of vaccination, the COVID-19 pandemic did not adversely affect the rate of vaccination within the KHDSS.

10.
Clin Infect Dis ; 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097331

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Adults previously infected with SARS-CoV-2 develop short-term immunity and may have increased reactogenicity to COVID-19 vaccines. This prospective, multi-center active surveillance cohort study examined the short-term safety of COVID-19 vaccines in adults with a prior history of SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Canadian adults vaccinated between December 22, 2020 and November 27, 2021 were sent an electronic questionnaire 7 days post dose 1, dose 2 and dose 3 vaccination. The main outcome was health events occurring in the first 7 days after each vaccination that prevented daily activities, resulted in work absenteeism or required a medical consultation, including hospitalization. RESULTS: Among 684,998 vaccinated individuals, 2.6% (18,127/684,998) reported a prior history of SARS-CoV-2 infection a median of 4 months (interquartile range 2-6 months) previously. After dose 1, individuals with moderate (bedridden) to severe (hospitalized) COVID-19 who received BNT162b2, mRNA1273 or ChAdox1-S vaccines had higher odds of a health event preventing daily activities, resulting in work absenteeism or requiring medical consultation; adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 3.96 (95% CI 3.67-4.28) for BNT162b2, 5.01 (4.57-5.50) for mRNA1273 and 1.84 (1.54-2.20) for ChAdox1-S compared to no infection. Following dose 2 and 3, the greater risk associated with previous infection was also present but attenuated compared to dose 1. For all doses, the association was lower or absent after mild or asymptomatic infection. CONCLUSION: Adults with moderate or severe previous SARS-CoV-2 infection were more likely to have a health event sufficient to impact routine activities or require medical assessment in the week following each vaccine doses.

11.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; : 2127561, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097207

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection in pregnancy is associated with a greater risk of maternal and newborn morbidity and maternal death. In Kenya, pregnant and lactating women (PLW) were ineligible to receive COVID-19 vaccines until August 2021. How shifts in policy influence vaccine behaviors, such as health worker recommendations and vaccine uptake, is not well documented. We conducted qualitative interviews with PLW, health workers, and policymakers in Kenya to understand how different stakeholders' perceptions of national policy regarding COVID-19 vaccination in pregnancy shaped vaccine behaviors and decision-making. Policymakers and health workers described pervasive uncertainty and lack of communication about the national policy, cited vaccine safety as their primary concern for administering COVID-19 vaccines to PLW, and expressed that PLW were inadequately prioritized in the COVID-19 vaccine program. PLW perceived the restrictive policy as indicative of a safety risk, resulting in vaccine hesitancy and potentially exacerbated inequities in vaccine access. These findings support the need for the development and dissemination of effective vaccine communication guidelines and the prioritization of PLW in COVID-19 vaccination policies and campaigns. To ensure PLW do not face the same inequities in future epidemics, data on infectious disease burdens and vaccine uptake should be collected systematically among pregnant women, and PLW should be included in future vaccine trials.

12.
Nurs Womens Health ; 2022 Nov 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095862

ABSTRACT

In 2022, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) updated its Adult Immunization Schedule Recommendations for Ages 19 Years or Older to provide the most current evidence-based recommendations following comprehensive reviews of data related to vaccines. In its report, the CDC highlighted the importance of health care professionals staying up to date on the latest evidence. During the novel coronavirus pandemic, the ability to provide routine vaccinations to the adult population was limited and even halted at times. As in-person health care visits continue to resume, it is imperative for nurses to refocus on and be familiar with the most up-to-date vaccine recommendations. Here, we summarize information on vaccine guidelines, safety, and special considerations for women, and we highlight changes to the 2022 adult immunization schedule. Keeping individuals free of vaccine-preventable diseases is one of the most effective and important public health interventions in health care.

13.
Vaccine ; 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086821

ABSTRACT

The vaccine decision-making process of pregnant and lactating women is complex. Regarding COVID-19, pregnant women are at increased risk for severe disease and poor health outcomes. While pregnant and lactating women were excluded from COVID-19 vaccine trials, available evidence suggests that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and protective during pregnancy. In this study, we used a socio-ecological approach to explore factors influencing the decision-making process for COVID-19 vaccines in pregnant and lactating women in Kenya, for the purpose of informing demand generation strategies. As pregnant and lactating women are influenced by many factors, we conducted 84 in-depth interviews with a variety of stakeholders, including 31 pregnant or lactating women, 20 healthcare workers such as nurses, midwives, doctors, and frontline workers, 25 male family members of pregnant or lactating women, and 8 gatekeepers such as community leaders and faith-based leaders. These individuals were recruited from six communities in Kenya: three urban, and three rural. We applied a grounded theory approach to identify emerging themes and organized emerging themes using the SAGE Vaccine Hesitancy model, which includes three categories of determinants of vaccine acceptance, including contextual influences, individual and group influences, and vaccine and vaccination specific issues. Myths, interpersonal norms, and religion emerged as themes related to contextual influences. Safety, risk perception, and the role of the healthcare worker emerged as themes related to individual and group influences. For vaccine and vaccination specific issues, emerging themes included availability, accessibility, and eligibility. While maternal immunization can substantially reduce the effect of infectious diseases in mothers and infants, vaccine acceptance is critical. However, vaccines do not save lives; vaccination does. We hope the results of this study can be used to tailor communication efforts to increase vaccine demand among pregnant and lactating women.

14.
Vaccine ; 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086817

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is an essential public health intervention to control the COVID-19 pandemic. A minority of Canadians, however, remain hesitant about COVID-19 vaccines, while others outright refuse them. We conducted focus groups to gauge perceptions and attitudes towards COVID-19 vaccines in people who live in a region with historically low rates of childhood vaccination. Participants discussed their perception of COVID-19 vaccines and their intention to get vaccinated, and the low rate of COVID-19 vaccine uptake in Manitoba's Southern Health Region compared to other regions in Canada. We identified three drivers of vaccine hesitancy: (1) risk perceptions about COVID-19 and the vaccines developed to protect against it, (2) religious and conservative views; and (3) distrust in government and science. Participant proposed recommendations for improving communication and uptake of the COVID-19 vaccines included: public health messages emphasising the benefits of vaccination; addressing the community's specific concerns and dispelling misinformation; highlighting vaccine safety; and emphasising vaccination as a desirable behaviour from a religious perspective. Understanding the specific anxieties elicited by COVID-19 vaccines in areas with low childhood immunization rates can inform risk communication strategies tailored to increase vaccination in these specific regions. This study adds important information on potential reasons for vaccine hesitancy in areas with historically low rates of childhood vaccination, and provides important lessons learned for future emergencies in terms of vaccine hesitancy drivers and effective risk communication to increase vaccine uptake.

16.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 2022 Oct 21.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085323

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: At the beginning of the COVID-19 vaccination campaign in Germany, employees in medical facilities were prioritised for vaccination against SARS-CoV­2 due to the high risk of exposure and contact with vulnerable groups. Hospitals were therefore encouraged to organise and implement the vaccination of their employees as soon as possible. The aim of the study was to record the practice regarding the vaccination strategy for employees in German hospitals. METHODS: In a self-developed cross-sectional study, infection control practitioners of all German university hospitals as well as non-university hospitals in Lower Saxony and Bavaria were surveyed in March 2021. The data were stratified according to the characteristics of university hospitals and non-university hospitals. RESULTS: Of 416 invitations sent out, 100 questionnaires (university hospitals: 33; non-university hospitals: 67) were completed. University hospitals reported greater vaccination capacity than non-university hospitals, but a limiting factor was uncertain vaccine supply. Vaccination information campaigns were planned or had already been conducted in 89% of clinics. About two-thirds of the respondents (70%) said they did not plan to conduct antibody tests on vaccinated employees. A follow-up of vaccinated employees to detect possible SARS-CoV­2 infections by PCR was planned by 41% of the respondents. In case of detection of SARS-CoV­2 infection, 72% of the respondents had planned further diagnostic procedures. DISCUSSION: All hospitals were able to achieve rapid implementation of COVID-19 vaccination of their employees. At the time of the survey, there was also much uncertainty regarding the management of breakthrough infections as well as the need for booster vaccinations.

17.
J Med Virol ; : e28258, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085072

ABSTRACT

Waning antibody levels against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and the emergence of variants of concern highlight the need for booster vaccinations. This is particularly important for the elderly population, who are at a higher risk of developing severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) disease. While studies have shown increased antibody responses following booster vaccination, understanding the changes in T and B cell compartments induced by a third vaccine dose remains limited. We analyzed the humoral and cellular responses in subjects who received either a homologous messenger RNA(mRNA) booster vaccine (BNT162b2 + BNT162b2 + BNT162b2; ''BBB") or a heterologous mRNA booster vaccine (BNT162b2 + BNT162b2 + mRNA-1273; ''BBM") at Day 0 (prebooster), Day 7, and Day 28 (postbooster). Compared with BBB, elderly individuals (≥60 years old) who received the BBM vaccination regimen display higher levels of neutralizing antibodies against the Wuhan and Delta strains along with a higher boost in immunoglobulin G memory B cells, particularly against the Omicron variant. Circulating T helper type 1(Th1), Th2, Th17, and T follicular helper responses were also increased in elderly individuals given the BBM regimen. While mRNA vaccines increase antibody, T cell, and B cell responses against SARS-CoV-2 1 month after receiving the third dose booster, the efficacy of the booster vaccine strategies may vary depending on age group and regimen combination.

18.
Journal of the American Pharmacists Association ; JOUR
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2082371

ABSTRACT

Background Adolescents should receive timely doses of recommended vaccinations. The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination approval for adolescents presented an opportunity for community pharmacists to address gaps in adolescent immunization schedules. Objectives The objectives of this research were to: (1) identify adolescent immunization gaps, (2) identify number of patients receiving recommended vaccination(s) at the community pharmacy, (3) determine how many vaccinations were administered after the intervention. Methods Three pharmacies conducted the prospective intervention. Adolescents 11-17 years old initiating the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccination series were eligible to receive a personalized vaccination recommendation (PVR) which included up to three other vaccinations. State immunization information systems were assessed after dose one of the COVID-19 vaccine to create the recommendation(s) and reassessed six months after providing the PVR for accepted recommendations. Patient demographics and number of vaccinations administered were assessed using descriptive statistics. Results Of 225 adolescents who received COVID-19 vaccine dose one, 74.7%, 75.1%, and 83.1% were indicated to receive tetanus, diphtheria, and acellular pertussis (Tdap), meningococcal conjugate (MenACWY), or human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, respectively. Thirty-three (14.7%) adolescents were up to date on all three vaccinations assessed. Of the 225 adolescents, 180 returned to the same location for COVID-19 vaccine dose two and received a PVR. Forty-two caregivers reported their adolescent previously received one or more of the recommended vaccinations indicating that state immunization information systems were inaccurate. Six months after the PVRs were given, 24 vaccinations had been administered. Conclusion A majority of adolescents presenting for a COVID-19 vaccine were indicated, according to state immunization information systems, to receive at least one additional vaccination. Following pharmacist-provided PVR and education, vaccine uptake occurred. Considering caregiver-reported inaccuracies, pharmacists should be cognizant of potential discrepancies when providing PVRs. Additionally, this study highlights the value of a state immunization information system.

19.
Non-conventional in English | WHOIRIS, Grey literature | ID: grc-754717

ABSTRACT

The 10th meeting of the European Regional Verification Commission for Measles and Rubella Elimination (RVC) took place online over four sessions on 6 October, 2 November, 8 December 2021 and 16 February 2022 to review the 2020 annual status updates (ASUs) from Member States. The RVC evaluated 43 national ASUs for 2020 submitted by national verification committees (NVCs) by 16 February 2022. The RVC concluded that, by the end of 2020, 29 Member States had provided evidence to demonstrate that endemic transmission of measles was interrupted for at least 36 months and verified as eliminated. Similarly, endemic rubella transmission was interrupted in 41 Member States for at least 36 months and verified as eliminated. Due to large measles outbreaks in 2018 – 2019, measles transmission was considered to have been re-established in five countries that had previously achieved measles elimination status. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the customary annual RVC meeting was delayed and could not be held face to face, but the objectives of the annual meeting were met through the series of virtual meetings and teleconferences.

20.
Vaccine ; 40(47): 6689-6699, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2083239

ABSTRACT

At a workshop on 22-24 March 2022, leaders of 33 advanced vaccinology courses were invited to meet with partners to further the aims of the International Collaboration on Advanced Vaccinology Training (ICAVT) initiated in 2018 to assist courses in addressing challenges in priority areas and facilitate interactions and exchange of information. This included: an update to the landscape analysis of advanced vaccinology courses conducted in 2018, sharing experiences and good practices in the implementation of virtual training, reviewing the training needs of target audiences, informing courses of the principles, challenges, and added value of accreditation, discussing course evaluations and measurement of course impact, reviewing principles and support needed for quality cascade training, reviewing COVID-19 impact on training and identifying remaining related training needs, and identifying solutions to facilitate refresher courses and ways to facilitate networking of courses' alumni (particularly for virtual courses). The aims were to identify needs and impediments and implement necessary actions to facilitate sharing of information and resources between courses, to identify need for further developments of the e-Portal of the Collaboration (icavt.org) established to facilitate communication between the different courses and assist future course participants identify the most suitable course for them, and to discuss the formalization of the Collaboration. During the workshop, participants looked at several reports of surveys completed by courses and courses' alumni or partners. The COVID-19 pandemic impacted the delivery of some vaccinology courses leading to postponement, delivery online or hybrid training events. Lack of sustainable funding remained a major constraint for advanced vaccinology training and needs to be addressed. The Collaboration was consolidated with responsibilities and benefits for the members better defined. There was strong support for the Collaboration to continue with the organization of educational sessions at future workshops. The meeting re-enforced the view that there was much enthusiasm and commitment for the Global Collaboration and its core values.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccinology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/prevention & control , Organizations
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