Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 10 de 10
Filter
1.
Journal of the Intensive Care Society ; 23(1):81-82, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043064

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Acquire new knowledge whilst thinking over the old, and you may become a teacher of others1 Critical care nursing in the 21st Century is at a crossroads. COVID-19 has demonstrated more than ever the central importance of well-educated critical care nurses to the delivery of high quality and safe care. The world has woken up to the fact that neither beds nor ventilators an intensive care unit make. There is much to learn from the past two years that will inform our future. But I believe there is another history -an earlier one that has not yet been told. This is equally important to our learning and identity as nurses. But is in danger of being lost. The contemporary history of intensive care medicine in Britain describes how innovations and advancements in medicine, surgical techniques, pharmacology, engineering, and science have -since the 1950s -interconnected to create today's 21st Century critical service.2 We read of the medical greats, the barriers they overcame to become the 'firsts' in application of techniques that are commonplace and readily accepted canons in treating the critically ill in our care. The history occasionally alludes to the nursing role or misses it completely. There is no doubt nursing was fundamental to the proliferation of intensive care in Britain from the 1960s. Yet, this is largely missing from the historical record or written from the medical perspective. A nurse contributor to the Wellcome Witnesses Seminar reflecting on the nursing contribution wrote: 'If you did a nursing/ICU seminar you'd get another perspective and more nurses attending'2 This is the basis for this research. The finding of nurses lost voices. Captured critical care nurses' stories will, through a process of narrative analysis, be critically evaluated and shared. Not simply as interesting anecdotes -but as a basis for enhancing professional identity and belonging -to learn from, inspire, and inform the future. 'Thinking historically does not just mean thinking about the past;it involves seeing oneself in time, as an inheritor of the legacies of the past and as a maker of the future'3 Objectives: Research aim -to explore this history form the perspective of retired nurses and one ICU at North Manchester General Hospital working between 1967 & 2000. To share with conference emerging findings. To stimulate a conversation about this hidden history and the possibilities it offers future professional learning. Methods: Oral history and narrative analysis. Oral history is described as a research methodology that collects histories of neglected ordinary people that would otherwise be lost.4 And deemed crucial to the capturing of nursing work.5 Results: Ongoing archival work -13 interviews recorded (2 male nurses/1 consultant). Thematic analysis. Emerging themes: unique professional relationships built as hierarchies flattened. Shared education. Increased autonomy. Separate. Special. Pushed boundaries. Conclusion: Incomplete, yet this work and sharing stories from the foundations of critical care nursing has the power to motivate and inspire the professional critical care nurse of 2021 - more than education -history, legacy, pride.

2.
Aust Crit Care ; 2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041584

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has deeply impacted patient and family communication and patient- and family-centred care in the intensive care unit (ICU). A new role-the ICU Family Liaison Nurse (FLN)-was introduced in an Australian metropolitan hospital ICU to facilitate communication between patient and family and ICU healthcare professionals, although there is limited knowledge about the impact of this from the ICU healthcare professionals' perspectives. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore the impact of the ICU FLN role on communication with patients and their family during the COVID-19 pandemic, from the ICU healthcare professionals' perspectives. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted. Seven participants including ICU FLNs, ICU doctors, nurses, and social workers who worked with the ICU FLNs were interviewed. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Two main themes related to the ICU FLN role were identified. First, the COVID-19 pandemic posed challenges to patient and family communication, but it also created opportunities to improve patient and family communication. Second, the ICU FLN role brought beneficial impacts to the ICU healthcare professionals' workflow and work experience, as well as patient and family communication. The ICU FLN role has potential benefits that extend beyond the pandemic. CONCLUSION: We found that during the COVID-19 pandemic, the ICU FLN role was acceptable, beneficial, and appreciated from the ICU healthcare professionals' perspectives. Further research should continue the evaluation of the ICU FLN role during and post the pandemic.

3.
Archives of Health Science and Research ; 9(2):138-143, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1912814

ABSTRACT

The effectiveness of prone positioning in the management of hypoxic respiratory failure has come to the fore again with the coronavirus disease-2019 pandemic. Intensive care nurses, together with the intensive care team, have considerable responsibilities for the implementation of the position, the follow-up of the patient, obtaining effective results, and the prevention of possible complications. In this direction, it is important to establish valid and reliable protocols prepared by the relevant authoritative institutions regarding the prone position. In order to follow these protocols, it is necessary to train the nurses together with the members of the intensive care team and to inform the patients and their relatives that the prone position will be applied. In this review, the physiological effect of prone positioning, its use in intubated and non-intubated intensive care patients, its indications and contraindications, care recommendations about the implementation, monitoring, and termination of the positioning, the duration of the use of the position, barriers to its use, and recommendations to increase the effectiveness of its clinical use was discussed. © 2022 the American Physiological Society.

4.
Nursing Children and Young People ; 34(2):5-5, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1744657

ABSTRACT

Children's nurses are tired and under pressure, but continue to provide the best care for children, young people and their families. The emotional cost to them is yet to be measured, but the latest annual report of the Paediatric Intensive Audit Network shows there has been a decline in units attaining the Paediatric Critical Care Society standards for the numbers of nurses and healthcare assistants employed over the previous 12 months (news, page 6). [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Nursing Children & Young People is the property of RNCi and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

5.
Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy Journal ; 33(1):e8, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1677321

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This presentation will describe an evidence-based development and implementation of a multi-disciplinary approach for a novel program for the early mobilization of COVID-19 positive patients receiving VV-ECMO in a medical intensive care unit (MICU). DESCRIPTION: During previous viral pandemics, patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) have been treated with advanced modalities, including ECMO. Many programs were quickly created to meet patient needs during each outbreak. It was anticipated that non-ECMO centers would have increased referrals to ECMO programs for patients with impending clinical deterioration, which disproportionately affects hospitals with ECMO programs. The current COVID-19 pandemic began at a time when worldwide ECMO research is more developed than a decade ago. In addition, there is increasing literature that shows the benefits of engaging in early mobilization for patients in the ICU, including the feasibility and safety of early mobilization of patients receiving ECMO. A reoccurring theme in the literature of successful early mobilization of patients receiving ECMO is the implementation of a well-trained multidisciplinary team led by an advanced trained physical therapist. Studies have also emphasized the importance of well-defined roles, inclusion, exclusion, and termination of therapy criteria, and mobilization progression guidelines. Using guidance from recent literature for safe mobilization of the patient receiving ECMO, our hospital developed and implemented a novel multi-disciplinary approach for early mobilization for COVID-19 positive patients receiving VVECMO. SUMMARY OF USE: Our program's multidisciplinary team consisted of cardiothoracic surgeon, ICU intensivists, ICU nursing staff, nursing educators, perfusionist, respiratory therapists, and physical therapists. Nursing staff completed didactic and simulation lab training prior to being assigned to patients receiving ECMO. All members of the team presented at the didactic class. In addition, the team developed a mobility check list and simulation video for mobilizing patients receiving VVECMO. Physical therapy also utilized a competency check off for observation and demonstration to train additional staff, along with a set of guidelines for inclusion and exclusion for therapy. IMPORTANCE TO MEMBERS: This presentation can provide education based on our hospital's approach to addressing the rehabilitation needs of critically ill patients receiving ECMO due to COVID-19, and assist others in developing and refining their programs. It provides a description of our protocol based on evidencebased practice to develop and implement a unique protocol, while maintaining safety, providing multidisciplinary treatment, improving communication, and advocating for early rehabilitation in the intensive care unit.

6.
Acta Medica Iranica ; 60(1):67-70, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1619346

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all people in the world, especially those at risk of kidney disorders. Early kidney damage in patients born with unilateral renal agenesis (URA) or solitary kidney can happen. These patients are at risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), high blood pressure, and developing proteinuria. Unilateral renal agenesis is a cause of CKD. Therefore, it is very interesting that observe a unilateral renal Patient that Suffers from COVID-19. Hence, the management of these patients with COVID-19 is an area of interest, and a unique approach is warranted. A 43-year-old male patient with unilateral renal presented to our hospital for corona disease. The case was discussed between the nephrologists, Infectious disease specialists, and nursing head nurses for a care plan daily. The patient had unilateral renal disease, and COVID-19 could have a detrimental effect on the renal, but renal tests were normal, and the patient recovered without acute renal complications. The treatment of such patients is the need for teamwork contain nephrologists, critical care nurses, and specialists in infectious and tropical diseases. This was a new experience in Iran. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Acta Medica Iranica is the property of Tehran University of Medical Sciences and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

7.
J Clin Nurs ; 31(5-6): 601-611, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268127

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Faced with this critical situation and directly involved in the treatment and care of COVID-19 patients, front-line healthcare workers are at high risk in terms of mental health symptoms. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the stress, anxiety, depression, and insomnia levels of intensive care nurses during the pandemic with a structural equation model. DESIGN: A multi-site survey study. METHODS: The study was performed with 194 nurses working in the intensive care units of five hospitals in Istanbul in July 2020. Data were collected using the Depression Anxiety Stress-21 Scale and Insomnia Severity Index electronically. The data were evaluated with descriptive statistics in SPSS package program. In order to test the structural model and hypotheses of the research, path analysis was performed with LISREL statistical software program. A validation study for the suitability of these scales to the study sample was done by the researchers using the confirmatory factor analysis method. The study conforms to the TREND checklist. RESULTS: In this study, the majority of the intensive care nurses had moderate to extremely severe depression (65.5%), anxiety (58.3%) and stress (72.3%) scores; in addition, 39.7% of the nurses experienced moderate or severe insomnia. Within the framework of a structural model; the effects of stress, anxiety and insomnia on depression, which is the dependent variable, were found to be statistically significant (p < .001). CONCLUSIONS: It was found that the majority of the intensive care nurses fighting COVID-19 on the front-line experienced stress, anxiety, depression and insomnia at levels ranging from moderate to extremely severe; in addition, it was determined that there is a positive relationship between stress, anxiety, insomnia and depression. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: This study, in which we have determined the mental health symptoms and insomnia levels of intensive care nurses, who are in the front-line during the COVID-19 pandemic, constitutes the scientific basis for the effective coping strategies that the authorities will take in this subject.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
9.
Ethik Med ; 33(1): 51-70, 2021.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059832

ABSTRACT

DEFINITION OF THE PROBLEM: The COVID-19 pandemic poses a considerable challenge to the capacity and functionality of intensive care. This concerns not only resources but, above all, the physical and psychological boundaries of nursing professionals. The question of how care for others and self-care of nurses in intensive care units are related to each other in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic has not been addressed in public and scientific discourse so far. ARGUMENTS: The present contribution reflects this relationship with reference to the Code of Ethics of the International Council of Nurses, particularly considering principlism and the Care Ethics according to Joan Tronto. As a result, it shows a corridor of ethically justifiable care with several borders, above all: (1) self-care must not be given up completely for the benefit of care for others, and (2) a categorical subordination of care for others to self-care is ethically not justifiable. CONCLUSION: The article makes an important contribution to a differentiated ethical consideration of the rights and responsibilities of intensive care nurses as moral actors within the pandemic in Germany. It, thus, provides a first starting point for a broad social and political discourse which is urgently needed not only during but also after the pandemic in order to improve the situation of intensive care nurses and those who are cared for.

10.
Br J Nurs ; 29(21): 1232-1236, 2020 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948244

ABSTRACT

In this article, an intensive care unit (ICU) nurse provides some reflections on caring for patients with COVID-19 and relates her lived experience to the concept of resilience. Similarities and differences to pre-pandemic understandings of resilience are drawn out and factors that mediate acute stress, resilience and psychological recovery during a pandemic are considered. Resources to support ICU nurses and other healthcare staff to manage stress and promote wellbeing are signposted, and important research directions that warrant attention are recommended. The story is one of learning and hope and, importantly, it captures key lessons that can equip healthcare staff with positive coping strategies in a time of unprecedented pressure.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Critical Care Nursing/methods , Health Personnel/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL