Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 19 de 19
Filter
1.
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science ; 11(6):451-457, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067468

ABSTRACT

Poverty as defined in the literature is generally a deprivation to the basic needs of life (Dunga, 2019;Mdluli & Dunga, 2021;World Bank, 2020a) In order for households to avoid deprivation of the basic needs, they need an income as most of these basic needs can be bought from a market place. Gender, Age, marital status, and population group/race are among some of the variables that are considered in understanding the employment status of heads of household. The number share of care work between males and females is such that, women are forced to withdraw from the labour market to take care of the elderly and the children at the expense of a career in the job market (ILO, 2018;OECD, 2017). [...]gender and the demographic composition of a household has a bearing on who gets to remain in employment especially in the pandemic times. According to the Marriages and Divorce, 2020 report released by Statistics South Africa, the total number of people getting married has fallen steadily from 2011 to 2020. Besides the high decline in 2020 that may have resulted from the restrictions on gatherings in that year, the number of civil marriages have been consistently declining.

2.
International Journal of Research in Business and Social Science ; 11(6):307-313, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067460

ABSTRACT

Very few studies on the firm's financial performance impact on the Indonesia Stock Exchange during the Covid-19 pandemic, and some research findings only measure company performance in specific sectors or qualitative analysis with limited information. The novelty of this research is that it will investigate the firm financial performance on the Indonesia Stock Exchange during the Covid-19 pandemic based on a quantitative approach, especially on LQ-45 companies, which represent the most significant market capitalization and most active transactions. The purpose of the LQ45 stock index is to complement the Composite Stock Price Index (CSPI), which is evaluated every six months as reliable, objective information for financial analysis, investment managers, and investors. The LQ 45 index is a group of 45 firms selected based on considerations of liquidity and market capitalization, with the following criteria (www.idx.co.id ): i. Has been listed on the Indonesia Stock Exchange for at least 3 months. ii.

3.
International Journal of Gender and Entrepreneurship ; 14(4):468-488, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2063168

ABSTRACT

Purpose>Most feminists policies are aspirational. Deficiencies include vague terms of what constitutes ‘feminist’ within policy, ambiguous investment criteria, lack of consultation and the use of the binary definition of gender negating gender-diverse people (Tiessen, 2019). The purpose of this study is to identify parameters that characterize feminist entrepreneurship policies and to advance recommendations to operationalize these policies.Design/methodology/approach>The COVID-19 pandemic has unveiled fragilities in the socio-economic gains that women entrepreneurs have achieved. Gender-regression is, in part, the product of entrepreneurship policies that fail to recognize the nature and needs of women entrepreneurs. To inform recovery measures, this article considers two research questions: what are the parameters of feminist entrepreneurship policies? and how can parameters of feminist entrepreneurship policy be operationalized in pandemic recovery measures? To inform the questions, the study draws on the academic literature and thematic analysis of three collective feminist action plans to operationalize ten parameters that characterize feminist entrepreneurship policy.Findings>Supplanting ‘feminist’ for women in the construction of entrepreneurship policies, without specifications of how parameters differ dilutes government's efforts to achieve gender quality and women's economic empowerment. To inform policy, recommendations of three feminist recovery policies clustered under seven themes: importance of addressing root causes of inequality;need to invest in social and economic outcomes;economic security;enhancing access to economic resources;investment in infrastructure;inclusive decision-making;and need for gender disaggregated data to inform policy. Differences in policy priorities between collective feminist recovery plans and the academic literature are reported.Research limitations/implications>The parameters of feminist entrepreneurial policy require further interpretation and adaptation in different policy, cultural and geo-political contexts. Scholarly attention might focus on advisory processes that inform feminist policies, such as measures to address gender-regressive impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic. Research is also needed to understand the impacts of feminist policies on the lived experiences of diverse women entrepreneurs. Limitations: The study design did not incorporate viewpoints of policymakers or capture bureaucratic boundary patrolling practices that stymie feminist policies. Thematic analysis was limited to three feminist recovery plans from two countries.Practical implications>Recommendations to operationalize feminist entrepreneurship policies in the context of pandemic recovery are described.Originality/value>Ten parameters of feminist entrepreneurship policy are explored. The conceptual study also advances a framework of feminist entrepreneurship policy and considers boundary conditions for when and how the parameters are applicable.

4.
Online Information Review ; 46(7):1335-1352, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2051904

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This study examined the association between media consumers' attitudes toward COVID-19-related content on mainstream, on-demand and social media and trust in the government's ability to handle the pandemic crisis.Design/methodology/approach>The study is based on an online survey of a representative sample of 1,005 Israelis aged 18 and over and focused on consumers' perceptions of media contents as a source of information, social solidarity, criticism and anxiety.Findings>Findings indicate that mainstream media were the primary source of pandemic information. A positive association was found between perceptions of mainstream media as a source of criticism and trust in government's actions. This association was negative regarding social and on-demand media. The more mainstream media contents were perceived as anxiety evoking, the lower participants' trust in government's actions. A positive association was found between perceptions that social media encouraged social solidarity and trust in governmental action.Practical implications>Policymakers should take into consideration that various media operate synergistically to continually construct reality.Originality/value>This study focuses on consumers' perceptions of COVID-related media contents, which are especially important in the current era of media outlet proliferation, distribution and impact on the government. The unique contribution is in the integrated application of media malaise theory, virtuous circle theory and echo chamber theory to explain the correlation between media consumption and public trust during a global crisis in the era of diverse media outlets.Peer review>The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-06-2021-0299.

5.
Equality, Diversity and Inclusion: An International Journal ; 41(8):1225-1242, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2051849

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The aim of this article is twofold: (1) to identify gender equality organizational interventions implemented by a selected number of Dutch companies to increase the number of women at the corporate top and (2) to identify how these interventions overcome barriers to women's advancement and contribute to more women at the corporate top.Design/methodology/approach>A comparative case study method was applied through conducting qualitative research. The research was conducted at four large Dutch companies.Findings>The research identified 23 organizational interventions that were classified in four categories. The cross-case analysis focuses on specific themes, such as the type of interventions, the identified barriers, the successfulness of the interventions and factors contributing to increasing the number of women at the corporate top. The research shows that top-level commitment to this topic is important for the success of interventions and for increasing the number of women at the corporate top and throughout the rest of the organization. Some of the barriers could be overcome by the interventions identified.Practical implications>This research provides companies with better insight into the quality and quantity of gender equality organizational interventions implemented by Dutch companies to increase the number of women at the corporate top. It can assist them in deciding which interventions could be implemented in order to achieve gender equality at their corporate top.Originality/value>The research provides in-depth insight into the types and number of implemented gender equality organizational interventions for women at the corporate top and into the results and perceived effectiveness of such interventions.

6.
Academy of Marketing Studies Journal ; 26(S5), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045510

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus within a short span of time has done enough to disrupt the global supply chains, investor sentiments, financial markets, and economic activity on a massive scale. The global economy of the entire world has been hamstrung and lies in tatters. Further, hundreds of millions of workers are being locked up in homes and face pay cuts and lay-offs if there is no respite in the fear pandemic. The viral wave moving across continents taking a massive toll as governments fight an unfamiliar and unanticipated fight against the virus, companies shutting operations, and normal life coming to a screeching halt. The COVID-19 crisis is catastrophic as we are unequipped to deal with the magnitude of the challenges thrown at us and severe time constraints to get equipped with the medical machinery to fight it. The baffled governments globally initiated rapid action but failed to have any bearing on the financial markets or ameliorate the situation in any way, except the lock-downs that potentially scuttle any efforts in ramping up capacities to effectively tackle the lethal virus, apart from colossal economic and societal costs. This exploratory study attempts to review and evaluate the unusual virus to humankind, its economic and policy effects, and suggest some practical policy prescriptions to tide over the public health-cum-economic crisis. The first and second sections bring out the uniqueness of the COVID19-triggered health emergency and accordingly set the objectives of the study and methods used. The third and fourth sections evaluate the socio-economic and financial fallout of the crisis and the unprecedented fiscal-monetary stimulus strategies resorted to globally. The fifth section specifically focuses on the highly populated Indian economy and the visionary ways of the largest ever fiscal-monetary impetus in the backdrop of a potentially high fiscal deficits scenario. The sixth section evaluates the impact on the Corporate Sector and success tactics of the FMCG & Pharmaceutical sectors. The last section essentially weighs various policy actions, impacts, and a few recommendations for policy effectiveness, besides conclusions.

7.
Washington International Law Journal ; 31(2):251-291, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026953

ABSTRACT

[...]a number of these asylum seekers will turn to Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights, which provides broader nonrefoulement protections. "3 It reported "dozens" of COVID-19 cases.4 In Germany, asylum seekers are required to live in reception centers, and authorities have reported outbreaks at multiple facilities.5 An administrative judge ruled that protections against the coronavirus were "inadequate" at a facility in the town of Rheine.6 One facility was placed on lockdown with a mix of infected and uninfected residents,7 an approach the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control later deemed inappropriate.8 In Italy, reception centers lack sufficient space, ventilation, water, and electricity.9 The health and lives of thousands of detained asylum seekers are at risk. [...]it proposes changes to current jurisprudence to provide relief to more such individuals. About 5% of those who contract COVID 19 become critically ill,27 and medical professionals do not yet know all of the possible long-term effects of COVID-19.28 One study found that 13.5% of participants were still using oxygen at home a month after discharge from the hospital.29 The virus affects many organs besides the lungs, and the Centers for Disease Control ("CDC") has emphasized the risk of heart damage.30 Medical professionals who have studied COVID-19 patients also fear longterm damage to the immune system and brain.31 Potential long-term symptoms are not just physical: a small number of COVID-19 patients report a lasting inability to think clearly.32 Patients of all ages around the world have reported lingering symptoms over eight months after contracting COVID19.33 Thus, asylum seekers in the EU risk developing long-lasting health consequences.

8.
Asian Journal of International Law ; 12(2):405-407, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1991481

ABSTRACT

Commenting on international law in the domestic space, Crisis Narratives contains contributions that flag the marginalisation of science in crisis management, due in part to the supremacy of politics over expertise (Józefiak), the incompatibility of some domestic policy responses to the pandemic with state obligations under international human rights law (Pinto), and the repeated failures to adequately protect those who are already at the margins (Fitzmaurice). Revisiting three disasters in the eighteenth century: the 1920 Marseille plague outbreak, the 1755 Lisbon earthquake, and the 1770 famine in Bengal, All is Well gives nuances to accounts such as those given by Naomi Klein, that the making of contemporary developmentalist-security states is a US invention of the post-World War II era, pioneered by Chicago school economists, US conservatives, and the Central Intelligence Agency.2 The book illustrates the centrality of disaster management to creating and holding on to the authority necessary for state making and remaking. Lessons drawn from this account for contemporary international law and policy are that disaster management mechanisms, such as climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction, serve to remake and reshape states in the Global South for the purposes of sustaining a global state of hegemonic normalcy.

9.
Asian Journal of International Law ; 12(1):189-190, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1991477

ABSTRACT

By examining the framework of export restrictions and pertinent concepts of export controls and restraints, the book unveils intertwined areas of WTO law, public international law, investment and competition law. The detailed analysis of case law on export restrictions and the national security exception in trade and investment law particularly benefits academic research and legal practice. [...]in addressing export control regimes, the book predominantly underscores US and EU legislation, which form the basis for most of the legal compliance issues.

10.
China Economist ; 17(4):2-25, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1970626

ABSTRACT

The world today is facing turbulence and change, and global development is at a crossroads. At this critical juncture, President Xi Jinping put forth the Global Development Initiative (GDI) with the theme "implementing the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda for more robust, greener and healthier global development" at the 76th General Assembly of the United Nations, which sheds light on the direction of global development. The GDI, proposed by China, has galvanized support from the international community as an international public goods to promote common development. Following the historical trends of human development, the GDI breaks through the limitations of the hegemonic stability theory and the free-riding curse to expand and innovate the theoretical perception of international public goods with the right approach to principles and interests. With a people-oriented approach and the basic principles of green and innovative development, the GDI both addresses urgent challenges and attaches importance to enhancing development capabilities and creating supporting conditions to offer a holistic solution to global challenges. Through the implementation of multiple pathways under international cooperation, the GDI will build a consensus on global development, increase the momentum of global development, and play an important role in creating a community with a shared future for mankind.

11.
New Zealand International Review ; 47(4):31-33, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1929170

ABSTRACT

The article discusses the annual general meeting of the New Zealand Institute of International Affairs (NZIIA) held at the Wellington Club in New Zealand on May 3, 2022. The president of the organization, Sir Anand Satyanand pointed to the upgrading of the website as a highlight of the year, an important element in the NZIIA's media strategy. Sir Anand noted the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the NZIIA's activities over the two years but commended the enthusiasm of branches.

12.
Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences Quarterly ; 38(4):1056, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1918918

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the vulnerability of countries worldwide and their abilities to cope with the fast-paced demands of the research and medical community. A key to promoting ethical decision-making frameworks is by calibrating the sustainability at regional, national, and global levels to incorporate coordinated reforms. We performed a sustained ethical analysis and critically reviewed evidence addressing country-level responses to practices during the COVID-19 pandemic using PubMed (MEDLINE), Scopus, and CINAHL. The World Health Organization's ethical framework proposed for the entire population during the pandemic was applied to thematically delineate findings under equality, best outcomes (utility), prioritizing the worst off, and prioritizing those tasked with helping others. The findings demarcate ethical concerns about the validity of drug and vaccine trials in developing and developed countries, hints of unjust healthcare organizational policies, lack of equal allocation of pertinent resources, miscalculated allocation of resources to essential workers and stratified populations.

13.
Contemporary Southeast Asia ; 43(3):585-588, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1910460

ABSTRACT

Hiebert reviews The US-Thai Alliance and Asian International Relations: History, Memory and Current Developments by Gregory Raymond and John Blaxland.

14.
Economic and Social Development: Book of Proceedings ; : 346-357, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1876950

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic strike overturned the international relations to create a new global order with a common enemy, the coronavirus. However, at the organizational level, it constitutes a call for change of entrepreneurial and managerial practices. Certainly, the current crisis impact vary from one business to another according to several factors such as the size and the structure. In result, rapid advances in technology and digitalization driven by health crisis has become a core part of new organizational approaches. Henceforth the external environment has become more uncertain. In addition, conspicuously, faced with these market conditions, entrepreneurs are required to take decisions. These changes are for specific entrepreneurs a development and innovation opportunities, and for other, new challenges to increase with well define, new and complex goals that can be identified as stretch goals.

15.
New Zealand International Review ; 47(3):30-32, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1871368

ABSTRACT

The article presents views of Hamish McDougall, director at New Zealand Institute of International Affairs (NZIIA), on NZIIA's role in issues like Ukraine Conflict and Covid-19 pandemic and mentions plans for improving NZIIA's performance. Topics discussed include dialogue on foreign policy, security and geopolitical events, a new website featuring articles on international affairs, and annual general meeting in New Zealand on May 3, 2022 featuring New Zealand minister Damien O'Connor.

16.
Perspectives of Law and Public Administration ; 11(1):11-15, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1870882

ABSTRACT

The beginning of this stage was marked by institutions that significantly influenced the banking activity: the Institute for International Finance, the Bank for International Settlements, the Cooke Committee and other supervisory groups, the Community Contact Group European Economic Community (Contact Group of the European Economic Community), joined by the International Monetary Fund (IMF), the World Bank, the Paris Club and the advisory committees of private banks. With regard to international financial cooperation, the idea was supported that cooperation in this field could be conceptualized as a product of power and purpose;in particular, the combination of power in the US (and to a lesser extent British) financial market with the common or convergent purpose of banking supervisors to provide greater financial stability to their home markets while addressing competitive concerns In all situations, a cooperation based on harmonization between the multitude of concepts and knowledge acquired indirectly increases, as stated, the probability of general stability in the international banking system6. In 1977, the EEC Council of Ministers adopted the First Banking Coordination Directive, which set out the minimum authorization criteria for credit institutions, the uniform calculation of prudential solvency and liquidity rates (initially for observational purposes only) and details of the Advisory Committee. banking role to support further coordination efforts. [...]in 2021, the European Commission will adopt a revision of EU banking rules (the Capital Requirements Regulation and the Capital Requirements Directive), which are important for banking reform, both for Europe's recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic and for the transition to climate neutrality.

17.
CoRe ; 6(1):56-68, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1704813

ABSTRACT

The European Commission sees the control of foreign subsidies as a top priority set out in its 2021 Work Programme. According to the Commission, there are three general areas where such distortions manifest themselves – acquisitions of European undertakings;public procurement procedures;and the general market operation of economic operators active in the European Union. Consequently, on May 5, 2021 the Commission has adopted its legislative proposal for a Regulation on Foreign Subsidies Distorting the Internal Market aimed at ‘levelling the playing field’ in these three areas. This paper will focus on the third area. It seeks to answer the question whether the proposed solution is capable of solving the problem of an unfair advantage to foreign companies over their European competitors in the Internal Market, or whether it will remain a dead letter. The EU has its own ‘internal’ anti-subsidy system – the State aid law. Its vast acquis will serve as a conceptual lens in this paper. Firstly, because of the Commission's extensive experience in this area suggesting the likelihood that the new framework will be interpreted with a ‘State aid mindset’. Secondly, because many relevant subsidy-related problems were initially encountered there. And in this regard, thirdly, will provide a reference point for analysing challenges of international subsidy control in the absence of enforcement similar to that available in the EU.

18.
J Med Ethics ; 47(11): 775-776, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219239
19.
J Med Ethics ; 2020 Dec 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975720

ABSTRACT

Although a safe, effective, and licensed coronavirus vaccine does not yet exist, there is already controversy over how it ought to be allocated. Justice is clearly at stake, but it is unclear what justice requires in the international distribution of a scarce vaccine during a pandemic. Many are condemning 'vaccine nationalism' as an obstacle to equitable global distribution. We argue that limited national partiality in allocating vaccines will be a component of justice rather than an obstacle to it. For there are role-based and community-embedded responsibilities to take care of one's own, which constitute legitimate moral reasons for some identity-related prioritisation. Furthermore, a good form of vaccine nationalism prioritises one's own without denying or ignoring duties derived from a principle of equal worth, according to which all persons, regardless of citizenship or identity, equally deserve vaccine-induced protection from COVID-19. Rather than dismissing nationalism as a tragic obstacle, it is necessary to acknowledge that a limited form of it is valuable and expresses moral commitments. Only then can one understand our world of competing obligations, a world where cosmopolitan duties of benevolence sometimes conflict with special obligations of community membership. Once these competing obligations are recognised as such, we can begin the work of designing sound ethical frameworks for achieving justice in the global distribution of a coronavirus vaccine and developing practical strategies for avoiding, mitigating or resolving conflicts of duty.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL