Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 820
Filter
1.
Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal ; 28(11):823-828, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2164599

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected blood inventory and donation worldwide. The Islamic Republic of Iran was among the first countries to report the COVID-19 pandemic and it faced a significant blood shortage during the first weeks of the pandemic. Aims: We aimed to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the number, type, and safety of blood donations, comparing the periods before and during the pandemic.Methods: This retrospective study evaluated data from all volunteers who attended the blood transfusion centres in the Islamic Republic of Iran from March to December 2020 (during the COVID-19 pandemic) and during the same period in 2019, i.e. pre-pandemic. Data on the number of blood collections, confirmed transfusion transmissible infection marker test results, and donor demographic information were collected from the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization integrated donor database.Results: Total blood donations decreased by 8.38%. The number of first-time, lapsed, and female blood donors increased by 4.41%, 0.17%, and 0.90% respectively. Regular blood donation decreased by 4.58%. The distribution of the 3 main blood products, red cell concentrate, frozen fresh plasma and platelets, decreased by 7.86%. All changes were statistically significant. The prevalence rates of hepatitis C virus and hepatitis B surface antigen increased significantly during the pandemic.Conclusion: COVID-19 had a negative effect on blood safety and availability in the Islamic Republic of Iran. To improve blood supply and enhance regular blood donation, the Iranian Blood Transfusion Organization needs to reassure blood donors of the safety and hygiene measures being observed at blood collection sites.

2.
The International Journal of Mycobacteriology ; 11(4):415-422, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2163900

ABSTRACT

Background: Recent pandemic of coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) caused limitations in the country's strategies to fight against mycobacterial infections. The aim of this study was to compare the suspected tuberculosis (TB) pulmonary patients before and during the COVID-19 pandemic (January 2018-December 2021) who were referred to the National Reference TB Laboratory (NRL TB), Tehran, Iran. The mycobacterial isolated strains were identified and compared with previous data.

3.
International Nursing Review ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2161653

ABSTRACT

Aim Background Introduction Methods Findings Discussion Conclusion Implications for nursing and health policy To explore nurses' perspectives on and experiences of safety‐related organisational challenges during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID‐19) outbreak by Iranian nurses.In different clinical contexts, nurses face numerous organisational challenges threatening their safety because of the COVID‐19 pandemic.Exploring nurses' perceptions towards safety‐oriented organisational challenges might inform nurse managers, healthcare managers, educators and policymakers on the priorities that should be considered to increase organisations' readiness and safety.This qualitative descriptive study is reported according to the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research guidelines. Through purposeful sampling, 19 participants were involved. The research data were collected from March to August 2021 by conducting semi‐structured interviews that were analysed through the content analysis approach.Three organisation‐related safety challenges experienced were related to (1) human resource, (2) educational and (3) workforce protection issues.Nurses experienced several safety issues related to the complexity faced by the health care organisations during the pandemic, exacerbated by previous frailties of the nursing system.The three challenges that emerged might be considered a priority in building pandemic plans, transforming the experiences of nurses as a source of learning for all, capitalising on their suggestions and rendering healthcare facilities ready to deal safely with future crises.Adopting appropriate measures to decrease human resource issues and that related to education, and promoting workforce health protection, are both recommended to improve nurses' work environment and satisfy their safety needs. [ FROM AUTHOR]

4.
Spatial Information Research ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2158247

ABSTRACT

Globally, the COVID-19 pandemic is a top-level public health concern. This paper is an attempt to identify and COVID-19 pandemic in Iran using spatial analysis approaches. This study was based on secondary data of confirmed cases, deaths, recoveries, number of hospitals, hospital beds and population from March 2, 2019 to the end of November 2021 in 31 provinces of Iran from hospitals and the website of the National Institute of Health. In this paper, three geographical models in ArcGIS10.3 were utilized to analyze and evaluate COVID-19, including Geographic Weight Regression (GWR), Getis-OrdGi* (G-i-star) statistics (hot and cold spot), and Moran autocorrelation spatial analysis. Moran statistics, based on the GWR model, demonstrated that deaths and recoveries followed a clustering pattern for the confirmed cases index during the study period. The Moran Z-score for all three indicators confirmed cases, deaths, and recoveries, which was greater than 2.5 (95% confidence level). The Getis-OrdGi* (G-I-Star) (hot and cold spot) data revealed a wide range of levels for six variables (confirmed cases, deaths, recoveries, population, hospital beds, and hospital) across Iran's provinces. The overall number of deaths exceeded the population and the number of hospitals in the central and southern regions, including the provinces of Qom, Alborz, Tehran, Markazi, Isfahan, Razavi Khorasan, East Azerbaijan, Fars, and Yazd, which had the largest number and The Z-score for the deaths Index is greater than 14.314. The results of this research can pave the way for future studies.

5.
Journal of Parasitic Diseases. ; 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2158191

ABSTRACT

Toxoplasmosis has been categorized as one of the long-lasting protozoan parasitic infections. It affects almost one-third of the world's population. In recent years, several documented studies have elucidated that infected individuals have a remarkably higher incidence of distinct health problems and show various adverse effects. In the PCR-positive COVID-19 patients in Gonbad-e-Kavus, Kalaleh, and Minoodasht counties in the northern part of Iran from June 2021 to December 2021, we sought to investigate any potential relationships between the severity of COVID-19 symptoms and acute and latent toxoplasmosis caused by Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii). Whole blood samples of 161 COVID-19 patients with positive PCR. The samples were centrifuged to separate serum and screened for two important antibodies against T. gondii (IgM and IgG) by using ELISA kits for human anti-T. gondii IgM and IgG. Anti-T. gondii IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in 8/161 (5.0%) and 42/161 (26.1%) COVID-19 patients, respectively. No significant relationships were found between Toxoplasma IgM and IgG results with clinical signs, age, sex, contact with animals, comorbidities, and also the mortality rate of people with COVID-19. These findings showed that acute and latent toxoplasmosis infections are common among patients with COVID-19;however, no significant associations were found between toxoplasma infections and the symptoms of COVID-19. Therefore, toxoplasmosis is not considered a risk factor for COVID-19. Copyright © 2022, Indian Society for Parasitology.

6.
European Psychiatry ; 65(Supplement 1):S484, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2153957

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19-related stigma has been raised as a crisis since the beginning of the pandemic. We intended to develop a valid and reliable questionnaire to measure COVID-19-related stigma, attributed by the non-infected general population, and applied it in Tehran from September to October 2020. Objective(s): This study measures the COVID-19-related stigma attributed by the non-infected general population using a valid and reliable questionnaire specific to COVID-19-related stigma. Method(s): A preliminary questionnaire with 18 items was developed. The score ranged from 18 to 54 while the higher score indicating a higher level of COVID-19-related stigma. Out of 1064 randomly recruited Tehran citizens without a history of COVID-19 infection, 630 participants, who completely responded to the questions on a phone call, entered the study. Result(s): The content validity was established with a scale content validity index of 0.90. Item CVI and Item content validity ratio were higher than 0.78 for all items. Internal consistency was confirmed with Cronbach's alpha of 0.625. Exploratory factor analysis revealed seven latent variables, including "blaming and penaltyseeking behavior", "social discrimination", "dishonor label", "interpersonal contact", "spreading rumors and myths", "overvalued idea", and "apathy toward the patients". The mean (SD) of the score was 25.1(4.71) in our study. 86.8% of participants reported a low level of stigma with a score below 31. 13.2% of them demonstrated a moderate level of stigma, and none of the participants showed a high level of stigma. Conclusion(s): we found a low level of stigmatizing thoughts and behavior in Tehran, which may be due to social desirability bias.

7.
BMC Infect Dis ; 22(1):906, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2153526

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study was conducted with the intension of providing a more detailed view about the dynamics of COVID-19 pandemic. To this aim, characteristics, implemented public health measures, and health outcome of COVID-19 patients during five consecutive waves of the disease were assessed. METHODS: This study was a population-based cross-sectional analysis of data on adult patients who were diagnosed with COVID-19 during five waves of the disease in Iran. Chi-squared test, One-way ANOVA, and Logistic Regression analysis were applied. A detailed literature review on implemented public health policies was performed by studying published documents and official websites responsible for conveying information about COVID-19. RESULTS: Data on 328,410 adult patients was analyzed. Main findings indicated that the probability of dying with COVID-19 has increased as the pandemic wore on, showing its highest odd during the third wave (odds ratio: 1.34, CI: 1.283-1.395) and has gradually decreased during the next two waves. The same pattern was observed in the proportion of patients requiring ICU admission (P < 0.001). First wave presented mainly with respiratory symptoms, gastrointestinal complaints were added during the second wave, neurological manifestations with peripheral involvement replaced the gastrointestinal complaints during the third wave, and central nervous system manifestations were added during the fourth and fifth waves. A significant difference in mean age of patients was revealed between the five waves (P < 0.001). Moreover, results showed a significant difference between men and women infected with COVID-19, with men having higher rates of the disease at the beginning. However, as the pandemic progressed the proportion of women gradually increased, and ultimately more women were diagnosed with COVID-19 during the fifth wave. Our observations pointed to the probability that complete lockdowns were the key measures that helped to mitigate the virus spread during the first twenty months of the pandemic in the country. CONCLUSION: A changing pattern in demographic characteristics, clinical manifestations, and severity of the disease has been revealed as the pandemic unfolded. Reviewing COVID-19-related public health interventions highlighted the importance of immunization and early implementation of restrictive measures as effective strategies for reducing the acute burden of the disease.

8.
BMJ Open ; 12(12), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2152999

ABSTRACT

ObjectiveA longer life expectancy increases the number of older adults who require long-term care. The presence of a caregiver at home prevents the placement of older adults in care facilities. Identifying the caregivers’ viewpoints around the care clarifies key factors in providing quality care.This study aimed to assess barriers to home care from the perspective of Iranian informal caregivers of older adults.DesignThis was a qualitative study with content analysis. Semistructured interviews were conducted via telephone in Persian with informal caregivers of older adults using open-ended questions.SettingSocial and health organisations in southern Tehran, Iran.ParticipantsSeventeen informal caregivers were selected on purpose. Participants were eligible to participate in the study if they were 18 years or older, and had at least 1 month of care experience for a minimum of 6 hours per week.ResultsBarriers to home care for older adults from informal caregivers’ points of view were categorised into three domains: (1) Individual barriers include the physical, mental and social burden of care as well as personal characteristics of the caregiver;(2) interpersonal barriers include psychobehavioural characteristics of the older adult and misbehaviour of people around the caregiver and (3) care system barriers include inefficient institutional/organisational infrastructure, moral issues and inefficiency in public policy.ConclusionsOur study showed multiple individual, interpersonal and care system barriers to home care for older adults. Specific contextual challenges among Iranian caregivers, such as their attitudes and beliefs, as well as a lack of social and healthcare support for families, hindered the quality of care.Trial registration numberIRCT20201012048999N1

9.
Journal of Ecotourism ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2151480

ABSTRACT

Since tourist behavior plays the primary role in protecting the environment, this study has been conducted to extend the psychological perspectives of visitors' environmentally responsible behavior (ERB) in one of the most important natural heritage sites in Iran (Damavand Mountain) in the COVID-19 pandemic timeline and provide awareness for destination environmentalists as well as managers on how to control visitors' behavior. Likewise, Robbins (2002) Organizational Behavior model has been tested on ERB in ecotourism. Generally, 260 reliable questionnaires have been analyzed by using PLS-SEM2.0. The findings showed that (1) Visitors' attitude and ability toward nature would positively affect their ERB;(2) Motivation and learning mediate the impact of visitors' attitude and ability on their ERB;(3) Ability plays a significant role in the formation of visitors' ERB. Thus, the best way to change visitors' behavior is to educate them to make ERB more like a habit. © 2022 Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

10.
New Microbes and New Infections ; : 101063, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2150354

ABSTRACT

Background Recent theories on the possible interactions between the intestinal parasites and COVID-19 have stated that these co-infections may cause immune imbalance and further complications in the affected patients. Until now, there is no data about Blastocystis subtypes as an intestinal parasite in COVID-19 patients. Therefore, the present work was done to evaluate the molecular prevalence of Blastocystis sp. and related risk factors in Iranian patients with COVID-19. Method ology: Stool samples were gathered from 200 COVID-19 patients and 200 control, being matched regarding age, gender and residence. Then, stool samples were surveyed by parasitological methods, including direct slide smear and formalin-ether concentration. In the following, PCR and sequencing were used to detect Blastocystis sp. and their subtypes. Results The frequency of Blastocystis sp. in patients with COVID-19 (7.5%;15/200 by molecular method vs. 6%;12/200 by microscopy method) was slightly higher than in individuals without COVID-19 (4.5%;9/200 by molecular method vs. 4%;8/200 by microscopy method), this difference was not statistically significant (P value = 0.57 for molecular method vs. P value = 0.81 for microscopy method). Regarding associated factors for Blastocystis sp., we found significant differences regarding the residence (rural), loose and watery stool with diarrhea, and duration of treatment (6 weeks <) in the COVID-19 group. Blastocystis ST3 was the most common subtype in the patients with COVID-19 and control group. Conclusions Based on this results, health education, improved sanitation and good personal hygiene are highly recommended to prevent Blastocystis in COVID-19 patients.

11.
Cities ; 132:N.PAG-N.PAG, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2149495

ABSTRACT

This study analyzes the compactness/sprawl index and its effects on the spread of COVID-19 in the neighborhoods of Ahvaz, Iran. Multiple Criteria Decision Making and GIS techniques were used to develop the index. Also, the effects of compactness/sprawl on COVID-19 were investigated using a regression model. It was found that when considering the number of COVID-19 cases per 1000 people, the compactness/sprawl index did not affect the spread of the disease. However, it had a low but significant effect if the raw number of cases was considered. Results also showed that the compactness index significantly affected the raw number of cases, with a coefficient of 0.291, indicating that more compact neighborhoods had more COVID-19 cases. This is unsurprising as more people live in compact areas and, therefore, the raw number of cases is also likely to be higher. In the absence of proper control measures, this could result in further contact between people, thereby, increasing the risk of virus spread. Overall, we found that compactness had a dual effect on the spread of COVID-19 in Ahvaz. We conclude that proper development and implementation of control measures in well-designed compact neighborhoods are essential for enhancing pandemic resilience. • We examine the effects of urban compactness/sprawl on the spread of COVID-19. • We determine the level of compactness/sprawl using Multiple Criteria Decision Making and GIS techniques. • We investigate the effects of compactness/sprawl on COVID 19 using a regression model. • Results show that compactness does not necessarily increase the risk of virus spread. • We provide recommendations for improving the pandemic resilience of compact neighborhoods. [ FROM AUTHOR]

12.
J Diabetes Metab Disord ; 21(2): 1913-1921, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2129473

ABSTRACT

Background: Proper synthesis of existing epidemiologic studies on diabetes in Iran can guide future research efforts. We aimed to conduct a comprehensive scoping review on all research articles that investigated any aspect of diabetes epidemiology in Iran during 2015-2019. Methods: This work was conducted as a part of the Iran Diabetes Research Roadmap and completed under Arksey and O'Malley's framework for scoping reviews. The Scopus and PubMed databases were searched on Feb 15th, 2020. Eligible document types on diabetes epidemiology in the Iranian population, in Persian or English, that published during the 2015-2019 period underwent eligibility assessment. A total of 315 relevant articles were included and further analysis was performed on the original studies (n = 268). Through classifying them into six domains: Diabetes incidence; the prevalence of diabetes and associated factors; the incidence/prevalence of complications/comorbid conditions; mortality/survival; burden; and prediction modeling. Results: In total, 64 (20.3%) papers were published in Q1 journals, and 40 (12.6%) were international collaborations. No clear annual trend was present in the number of published primary or secondary articles, the portion of papers published in Q1 journals, international collaborations or relative domain proportions. Few review articles were found on prediction modeling, mortality or burden (excluding global studies). Conclusions: Our findings show a minor portion of works on diabetic epidemiology in Iran meets the quality standards of Q1 journals. Researchers have neglected some critical subjects and have occasionally fallen for common pitfalls of epidemiologic research. In particular, adhering to established guidelines can help authors implement rigorous methods to develop, validate, and deploy practical clinical prediction models. Researchers should prioritize investigating longitudinally collected data that aid in measuring disease incidence and enable casual inference. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s40200-022-01094-0.

13.
Health Sci Rep ; 5(6): e947, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127741

ABSTRACT

Background and Aims: This research has been on the effective role of social distancing in preventing the spread of COVID-19 and the obstacles to its implementation. The results of this research can highlight the major barriers to distancing and suggest appropriate solutions to remove them. Methods: We conducted this cross-sectional study during 2020-2021 among 277 faculty members, students of medical universities and ordinary people of Khuzestan province in southwestern Iran. We included them in this study by sampling at convenience. The data collection tool was a researcher-constructed questionnaire that we distributed among the statistical sample through social networks (WhatsApp and Telegram). Results: Mean ± SD = economic barriers 4.49 (0.65), cultural barriers 4.48 (0.70), social barriers 4.40 (0.61), political barriers 4.28 (0.64), educational barriers in universities and schools 4.27 (0.53) and Educational barriers at societal level 3.82 (1.08) were the self-reported obstacles (perceived) to social distancing during the Covid-19 pandemic. Comparison of occupational groups with faculty members showed that only scores of academic barriers have a significant difference between occupational groups (p < 0.001). Conclusion: The role of economic barriers, cultural barriers and social barriers in social distancing was very prominent. One of our remarkable results was that there is adequate training for people on the proper implementation of the principles of social distance in the prevention of the Covid-19 pandemic. The responsibility of all members of society to observe social distancing as a moral and even legal duty can be the first step to protect the health of citizens against COVID-19. We can, therefore, use some planned interventions. This must be within the framework of economic, cultural, social and political structures of society.

14.
Journal of Experimental and Clinical Medicine (Turkey) ; 39(4):1038-1042, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2146837

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is a novel emerging infectious disease caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARSCoV-2). In this study, we aimed to examine the relationship between demographic indicators and mortality rates in Covid-19 disease in different Covid-19 waves in Iran. In this retrospective cross-sectional study, the study population consisted of 9874 patients of Covid-19 admitted to Hazrat Rasoul Akram Hospital of Tehran, from the beginning of the disease to the end of the fifth wave. Demographic variables such as age and sex as well as clinical variables such as hospitalization date and mortality rate were collected and evaluated. The analysis was performed using SPSS software version 26. The mean age of 9874 participants was 58.9 +/- 17.0 years. In this study 5510 (55.8%) of patients were male. 1762 (17.8%) patients died. The fifth wave had the highest number of patients (31.1%) and the trend in the number of patients was increasing from wave second to fifth. However, the percentage of death was lower in waves fourth (14.5%) and fifth (15.3%). The mean age of deceased patients was significantly greater than alive patients (69.25 +/- 14.60 vs. 56.76 +/- 16.75, P=0.0001). The frequency of male deaths was significantly higher than female deaths (P=0.0001). The results of the present study indicate that the frequency of mortality in recent waves, despite a significant increase in hospitalization, has been decreased. It can also be said that mortality increases with age as well as male gender, and males are more prone to death due to covid-19 disease with age. Copyright © 2022 Ondokuz Mayis Universitesi. All rights reserved.

15.
Romanian Journal of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases ; 29(3):293-305, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2146607

ABSTRACT

The epidemic of a new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) has emerged as a global threat. Many countries and their health care systems were caught off guard. This study aims to predict the prevalence of COVID-19 in the most infected countries in the World Health Organization (WHO) regions in order to have better preparedness in health systems. The Auto-Regressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) model was used to predict the pattern of confirmed cases based on epidemiological data from Johns Hopkins from February 25 to July 19, 2020. Mean incremental and logarithmic transfers were carried out to stabilize the series. Based on the ACF (AutoCorrelation Function) and PACF (Partial AutoCorrelation Function) charts, the first parameters of the model have been identified. The best model was chosen based on the likelihood ratio test and the least performance criteria value among all ARIMA models. Stata software version 12 was used. A number of ARIMA models have been formulated with various parameters. ARIMA (6,2,1) for South Africa, ARIMA (6,2,2) for U.S.A, ARIMA (2,1,1) for Iran, ARIMA (2,1,1) for Russia, ARIMA (5,2,2) for India, and ARIMA (3,1,2) for Australia were chosen based on the likelihood ratio tests and the values of the lower performance criteria. This research demonstrates that ARIMA models are sufficiently effective in predicting the prevalence of COVID-19 in the future. Predicting trends in COVID-19 prevalence in these countries can convince other countries to use this model in their future studies. The analysis results can help governments and health systems understand the patterns of this pandemic and plan for future waves of patients. Copyright © 2022 The Authors. Romanian Journal of Diabetes, Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases published by Sanatatea Press Group on behalf of the Romanian Society of Diabetes Nutrition and Metabolic Diseases.

16.
Archives of Iranian Medicine ; 25(8):508-522, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2146468

ABSTRACT

Background: Complete SARS-CoV-2 genome sequencing in the early phase of the outbreak in Iran showed two independent viral entries. Subsequently, as part of a genome surveillance project, we aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of SARS-CoV-2 in Iran over one year after emerging. Methods: We provided 319 SARS-CoV-2 whole-genome sequences used to monitor circulating lineages in March 2020-May 2021 time interval. Results: The temporal dynamics of major SARS-CoV-2 clades/lineages circulating in Iran is comparable to the global perspective and represent the 19A clade (B.4) dominating the first disease wave, followed by 20A (B.1.36), 20B (B.1.1.413), 20I (B.1.1.7), leading the second, third and fourth waves, respectively. We observed a mixture of circulating B.1.36, B.1.1.413, B.1.1.7 lineages in winter 2021, paralleled in a fading manner for B.1.36/B.1.1.413 and a growing rise for B.1.1.7, prompting the fourth outbreak. Entry of the Delta variant, leading to the fifth disease wave in summer 2021, was detected in April 2021. This study highlights three lineages as hallmarks of the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak in Iran;B4, dominating early periods of the epidemic, B.1.1.413 (B.1.1 with the combination of [D138Y-S477N-D614G] spike mutations) as a characterizing lineage in Iran, and the co-occurrence of [I100T-L699I] spike mutations in half of B.1.1.7 sequences mediating the fourth peak. It also designates the renowned combination of G and GR clades’ mutations as the top recurrent mutations. Conclusion: In brief, we provided a real-time and comprehensive picture of the SARS-CoV-2 genetic diversity in Iran and shed light on the SARS-CoV-2 transmission and circulation on the regional scale.

17.
Journal of Health and Social Sciences ; 7(3):256-259, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2145855
18.
Current Journal of Neurology ; 21(3):151-155, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2145789

ABSTRACT

Background: Now that the majority of the population has been immunized with two-dose vaccines, debates over the third booster dose have been raised. We studied the viewpoint of cases with multiple sclerosis (MS) on this matter. Method(s): In a cross-sectional study, a google form containing questions about participants' characteristics, the history of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection and vaccination, and opinions on the third dose was designed. Result(s): Of 1067 responders, only 16 (1.5%) were not vaccinated at all. The most used vaccine type was Sinopharm BBIBP COVID-19 vaccine (BBIBP-CorV) (n = 1002, 93.9%). Generally, 58 (5.4%) cases were hospitalized due to COVID-19. Of those with full vaccination, 134 (13.3%) got COVID-19 infection after the second dose. Only 13 participants (1%) did not agree with the third dose, while 564 (53.0%) believed that a booster dose was needed. Of all, 488 (45.7%) declared that they did not have a final idea and would follow the instructions by the experts. A significant association was found between not receiving the first two doses and not believing in the third dose (P = 0.001). 692 patients declared their reasoning for the importance of the third dose. All the cases who thought the administered vaccine was not efficient enough had received Sinopharm BBIBP-CorV. Those who got infected after full vaccination were more uncertain about the efficacy of the vaccine [odds ratio (OR): 2.6, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.6-4.2]. Conclusion(s): It seems that the majority of the Iranian patients with MS expect the authorities to administer a third booster dose, especially if scientifically validated. Copyright © 2022 Iranian Neurological Association, and Tehran University of Medical Sciences Published by Tehran University of Medical Sciences.

19.
Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research ; 27(6):587-592, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2144131

ABSTRACT

Background: Protective behaviors play a key role in reducing the incidence of COVID-19 in HealthCare Workers (HCWs), and these behaviors are related to other factors. These related factors have not been comprehensively evaluated and determined in the literature. This study aimed to determine protection behaviors against COVID-19 and their related factors using the Protection Motivation Theory (PMT) among HCWs of hospitals in Tehran, Iran, in 2021. Materials and Methods: For this cross-sectional study, 270 HCWs of different wards in 3 hospitals in Tehran, Iran, were selected through multistage sampling (April to July 2021). The participants completed a self-reporting questionnaire which consisted of a demographic characteristics form and questions about protective behaviors against COVID-19 and other constructs of the PMT (60 items). Data analysis was performed using descriptive and inferential methods. Results: The mean score of the protective behaviors of the HCWs was 4.20 (SD = 0.56) and was significantly higher in the nurses, women, married individuals, and those with a BSc degree compared with others (p < 0.05). Furthermore, the results of multiple regression analysis showed that protection behavior among HCWs could be strongly predicted by the type of profession, protection motivation/intention, and self-efficacy constructs (F14, 255 = 16.34, p < 0.001). Conclusions: The protection behaviors of HCWs against COVID-19 were relatively desirable and these behaviors were related to and predicted by various factors. These results could apply to developing plans for protective behaviors against COVID-19 and possibly other infectious diseases among HCWs. Further research in this regard is recommended.

20.
Iranian Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Research ; 27(6):560-566, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2144130

ABSTRACT

Background: Psychological Distress (PD) is one of the most common mental disorders during pregnancy and involves stress, anxiety, and depression. According to the literature, High-Risk Pregnancy' (HRP) is a major physiological risk factor associated with PD during pregnancy. The main purpose of this study was to explore the perception and experience of women with HRP who, based on standard questionnaires, had moderate-to-severe stress and anxiety scores. Materials and Methods: This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis from December 2020 to June 2021. To this aim, 16 women with HRP were purposefully selected from Imam Khomeini Hospital in Ahvaz, Iran, with maximum diversity. In-depth, semi-structured, individual interviews were conducted to collect the data. The MAXQDA software was used for data analysis. Results: Data analysis led to the extraction of two main categories and nine subcategories. “Disrupted peace” and “inefficient adaptation to the situation” were the two extracted categories. The former included the five subcategories of concerns about pregnancy complications, concerns about the parenting process, concerns about the couple's relationship, fear of Covid-19, and occupation-related stress. The latter included the three subcategories of unpleasant feelings, current pregnancy experiences, and previous pregnancy experiences. Conclusions: This study highlighted a wide range of psychosocial factors involved in the PD of women with HRP. These findings can be used to design appropriate prevention strategies to manage the mental health problems of these women in order to turn their pregnancy into a pleasurable experience.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL