Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 110
Filter
1.
Land ; 11(10), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2099628

ABSTRACT

The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic and the Russia-Ukraine crisis on the world economy are real. However, these implications do not appear to be symmetric across countries and different economic sectors. Indeed, the consequences of these two shocks are more severe for some countries, regions and economic activities than for others. Considering the importance of the agricultural sector for global food security, it is important to understand the impacts of the pandemic and the conflict on the different dimensions of agriculture, namely land use. Given the scarcity of data for the last few years available from the various statistical databases, this research mainly considers the insights highlighted in the literature on the implications, in agricultural dimensions, of the most recent shocks. The study here presented shows that the Russia-Ukraine crisis has had more impact on land use changes than the pandemic, namely promoting adjustments in the decisions of farmers and policymakers to deal with constraints in agri-food chains. Nonetheless, the impacts of the conflict on land use were not totally explored.

2.
6th International Conference of Transportation Research Group of India, CTRG 2021 ; 273:31-51, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2094557

ABSTRACT

Indian cities are witnessing rampant growth in terms of population and economic growth. The urban population percentage increased from 28.6% in 2001 to 37.7% in 2011. Being a leading IT exporter, Bengaluru sees an increasing number of commercial buildings burdening the existing road infrastructure, leading to heavy congestion in particular areas of Bengaluru. This calls for an understanding of any upcoming commercial development before it is thoroughly established to take adequate measures to reduce the negative impacts. However, the Traffic Impact Assessment (TIA) using the traditional four-stage modeling cannot be used in the current context due to the impact of COVID-19 on the existing traffic. This paper adopts an improved methodological framework that can be used to evaluate the impact of traffic in any situation. An average of 6.6% percentage increase (maximum 25% on some roads) in V/Cs is observed before and after the new development on the adjoining roads. To improve the level of service, several scenarios are considered and analyzed to provide the best mitigation strategies. This improved methodological framework can help to evaluate a new development’s impact for any given situation, and what mitigation strategies and types of transportation improvements may be essential to maintain a smooth moving traffic with a satisfactory level of service. © 2023, Transportation Research Group of India.

3.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12618, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066437

ABSTRACT

The global expansion of urbanization is posing associated environmental and socioeconomic challenges. The capital city of Ethiopia, Addis Ababa, is also facing similar threats. The development of urban green infrastructures (UGIs) are the forefront mechanisms in mitigating these global challenges. Nevertheless, UGIs in Addis Ababa are degrading and inaccessible to the city residents. Hence, a 56 km long Addis River Side Green Development Project is under development with a total investment of USD 1.253 billion funded by Chinese government aid. In phase one of this grand project, Friendship Square Park (FSP), was established in 2019 with a total cost of about USD 50 million. This paper was initiated to describe the establishment process of FSP and assess its social, economic, and environmental contributions to the city. The establishment process was described in close collaboration with the FSP contractor, China Communications Construction Company, Ltd. (CCCC). The land use changes of FSP’s development were determined by satellite images, while its environmental benefits were assessed through plant selection, planting design, and seedling survival rate. Open and/or close ended questionnaires were designed to assess the socioeconomic values of the park. The green space of the area has highly changed from 2002 (8.6%) to 2019 (56.1%) when the park was completed. More than 74,288 seedlings in 133 species of seedlings were planted in the park. The average survival rate of these seedlings was 93%. On average about 500 people visit the park per day, and 400,000 USD is generated, just from the entrance fee, per annum. Overall, 100% of the visitors were strongly satisfied with the current status of the park and recommended some additional features to be included in it. In general, the park is contributing to the environmental and socioeconomic values of the city residents, and this kind of park should be developed in other sub-cities of the city as well as regional cities of Ethiopia to increase the aesthetic, environmental and socioeconomic values of the country, at large.

4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1016701, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065651

ABSTRACT

Land is an indispensable factor of production and the basic support for all social and economic activities. The COVID-19 epidemic has a great impact on China's macro-economy and land market. As a unit with a high concentration of economic entities, urban agglomeration is closely related to its land use economic efficiency. Under the impact of epidemic and the rigid constraints of the relative scarcity of land resources, improving the land use economic efficiency is crucial to the sustainable development of urban agglomerations. Taking the 10 major urban agglomerations in China as a case study, this paper constructs a theoretical and empirical analysis framework for the land use economic efficiency and its driving mechanism of urban agglomerations, and measures the land use economic efficiency of urban agglomerations from the aspects of single factor productivity and total factor productivity. The results show that the COVID-19 epidemic has a great impact on the land market of various cities in China's urban agglomerations. Whether single factor productivity or total factor productivity is used to measure land use economic efficiency of urban agglomerations, the driving effects of industrial agglomeration, industrial structure change, technological progress, and transportation infrastructure are all significant. It is necessary to take a series of measures to reform the market-oriented allocation of land elements, and improve a long-term mechanism for the smooth operation of the land market. It is necessary to improve the land use economic efficiency through a combination of industrial agglomeration, industrial structure adjustment, technological progress, and transportation infrastructure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cities , Humans , Industry
5.
Sustainability ; 14(19):11798, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066370

ABSTRACT

Sustainable development and urban resilience are dominant urban planning paradigms that have become buzzwords in urban planning and policy domains over the past 2–3 decades. While these two paradigms have been analyzed and scrutinized in different studies, the interconnection between them in policy realms is understudied. Compact development policy is expected to contribute to a variety of sustainability goals. However, these goals’ alignment with the principles and goals of urban resilience is under question. This research tries to shed some light on this issue. A critical review method is employed to understand how compactness as a sustainable urban development policy relates to different principles and dimensions of urban resilience. First, the conceptual and theoretical relationship between urban resilience and compact city is established. Next, the resulting framework is used to critically analyze 124 articles to understand how the compact city policy relates to urban resilience from different dimensions and principles. Densification and intensification, mixed land use and diversity, and spatial connectivity and public transportation are identified as principles of the compact city. Finally, the interconnection between compact city policy and urban resilience dimensions and principles is explored and assessed through examining the selected literature. The results of the review show some alignments between compact city policy outcomes and urban resilience. However, the level of alignment may vary depending on the context, scale, or dimension. In other words, while compact city in one scale/dimension can increase urban resilience to a specific adverse event or stressor, it might increase vulnerability to others in another scale/dimension. From the policy perspective, compact development policy and urban resilience principles should clearly be defined a priori to reach favorable outcomes.

6.
5th International Symposium on New Metropolitan Perspectives, NMP 2022 ; 482 LNNS:594-602, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2048017

ABSTRACT

The paper starts from the possibility of a cyclical spread of the pandemic and the need for a review of urban and regional planning tools. In this perspective, the paper proposes a series of programming and planning suggestions for the protection from the risks of Covid, based on an integration between revision of times, spaces and flexible organization of the city and the regional territory. In this context, the relationship between medium / large cities and systems of small urban and rural centres of inland areas is reset. The results and conclusions highlight the close dependence between European Union objectives, consequent urban-territorial objectives, new tools and procedures for the transition from the protection of seismic risks to the global one. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Switzerland AG.

7.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112:S241-S244, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2047012

ABSTRACT

Public health Is Increasingly threatened by global warming, land use, and changing wildfire patterns that shape vegetation type, structure, and biodiversity and ultimately affect ecosystem services and our society.1 Uncontrolled large wildfires emit greenhouse gases and aerosols that induce direct and indirect climate feedback through radiative forcing in the atmosphere2 and irreversible changes of natural vegetation, thereby further accelerating climate change and associated fire risks.3 Wildfires are also harmful to human health because they create high pollution concentrations of fine particulate matter that are 2.5 micrometers or smaller (PM2.5) and concentrations of coarse particulate matter that are between 2.5 and 10 micrometers in size. When inhaled, particulate matter significantly increases a myriad of health outcomes, including overall mortality, cardiovascular mortality, and emergency department visits for respiratory morbidity, congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and angina.4,5 Between July and October 2020, high PM2.5 concentrations from massive wildfires surrounding a large regional hospital in the western United States were associated with a 6% increase in COVID-19 cases.6 Risks for developing adverse health effects from wildfire smoke are greatest among people who are living with chronic conditions;who are experiencing intergenerational racial, economic, and housing discrimination;and who are facing social inequities from the COVID-19 pandemic.4The unprecedented recent wildfires in the western United States and their ill effects on human health and society, as well as the multiple other threats to people and places brought about by climate change, draw attention to the increasing urgency of developing new public health approaches and long-term adaptation strategies to support future population health. Observational fire data covering the past few decades give valuable information on current wildfire events.1 However, these data hardly capture long-term trends (i.e., centennial to millennial time scales) of wildfires and associated atmospheric emissions that may help to improve future fire models and thereby provide the base to adapt public health systems.3 To understand long-term trends, natural archives preserve fire history on a wide range ofspatial scales in the past beyond the period of observational fire data;examples include polar and highalpine ice cores;lake, peat, and marine sediment cores.3,8,9 Such paleofire records are based on measurements of the gaseous tracers ammonium and nitrate or particulate matter, such as levoglucosan and black carbon, and charcoal that reflect different components of wildfire-induced atmospheric smoke pollution.8,9 These paleofire records have previously identified complex regional interactions of humans, ecosystems, and climate change.3 Submicron-sized (100-500 nm in diameter) black carbon particles from wildfires and fossil fuel during the industrial era (i.e., the past 250 years) measured in ice cores and lake sediments can be used as a direct tracer for the release of harmful PM2.5 to the atmosphere.8,10 Such paleo black carbon records have been established from both polar and high-alpine glaciers on several continents and are recently developed from lake sediments.10 These found significant changes of fire activity in response to climate and human impact and enhanced pollution levels varying both in time and space. With public health nurses being well positioned to understand population health needs, planetary health, and the health consequences of wildfires, public health nurses can improve upon wildfire adaptation planning and essential public health services by understanding historical perspectives from past fires.9,11,13 Paleofire data provide direct estimates of historical atmospheric emissions from past wildfires and associated harmful concentrations of particulate matter over long distances.

8.
Bioscience ; 72(11): 1099-1104, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2042523

ABSTRACT

A hallmark of the media publicity surrounding COVID-19 has been the message that land change causes zoonotic diseases to spill over from wild animals to humans. The secondary peer-reviewed literature sends a similar message. However, as indicated in the primary peer-reviewed literature, the complexity of interacting variables involved in zoonotic disease spillover makes it unlikely for such a claim to be universally applicable. The secondary peer-reviewed literature and the mainstream media also differ markedly from the primary peer-reviewed literature in their lack of nuance in messaging about the relationship between land change and spillover risk. We advocate accurate, nuanced messaging for the sake of the local communities at greatest risk from zoonotic disease, for the sake of scientific credibility, and so that proportionate attention may be given to other possible drivers of spillover risk.

9.
Tourism Recreation Research ; : 1-12, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2042415

ABSTRACT

This study investigates empirically if land characteristics (especially forests and mountains) are of importance for the local ability to withstand the shock of the Covid-19 on domestic tourism demand during the summer of 2020. A second step of the analysis focuses on the recovery stage in the subsequent summer. Three tourism indicators are considered: arrivals, overnight stays and length of stay. Official data on land use characteristics of 2029 villages in the Federal state of Bavaria (South Germany) are employed for the analysis. Estimations using the Spatial Durbin model combined with the Heckman selection model reveal that there is a significant relationship between the proportion of forest within as well as surrounding the village and the demand for domestic tourism compared with the 2019 baseline. There is also a significant relationship with the altitude of the surrounding areas. The importance of mountains and forests is present in both the initial year of the pandemic and in the recovery year of 2021, although the magnitude is lower in the summer of 2021. Direct and spatial effects can also be found for lakes and rivers on overnight stays and length of stay.

10.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1039(1):012066, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2037330

ABSTRACT

A watershed plays significant roles for maintaining the balance of ecosystem, particularly on the fluvial landform dynamics. Bedog Sub-Watershed as a part of Progo Watershed flows across 11 sub-districts from Sleman and Bantul Regency. This sub-watershed indicates rural-urban characteristics and multi-aspects problems, such as the loss of croplands, a massive land-use changes into built-up area, and the decrease of environmental carrying capacity. On the purposes of preventing the negative aftermaths, this research aimed to create the strategies of sustainable environmental management in case of Bedog Sub-Watershed. This research used secondary data from regional planning products, PODES data, and the relevant literature. Primary data was acquired from in-depth interview with BPDASHL Serayu-Opak-Progo and agricultural-related government agency to gain governmental perspective of watershed management. This research used qualitative descriptive technique to analyse the result of interview. Livelihood assets were calculated by scoring index. The SWOT and DPSIR analysis were conducted to create the relevant strategies implying physical, social-economy, and regional development perspectives in the post-COVID-19 pandemic. The strengthening of government’s institutional aspects was the key to the management followed by necessary comprehensive study in Bedog Sub-Watershed management.

11.
IOP Conference Series. Earth and Environmental Science ; 1039(1):012013, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2037319

ABSTRACT

Appropriate strategies on urban climate mitigation should be formulated by considering the physical morphology of the urban landscape. This study aimed to investigate, analyze, and promote possible strategies to mitigate Jakarta’s urban heat island (UHI) phenomena. Jakarta’s local climate zone (LCZ) was classified into 17 classes using Landsat 8 data and the random forest method. Land surface temperature (LST) characteristic in each LCZ class was analyzed from 2018, 2019 and 2020. The result revealed that most of the local climate zone in Jakarta is dominated by LCZ 6 (open low-rise) and LCZ 3 (compact low-rise), which is the typical residential area in Jakarta. However, the mean LST in 2018, 2019 and 2020 showed that LCZ 3 (compact low-rise) and LCZ 7 (lightweight low-rise) are the areas that were most likely causing high surface temperature with the highest UHI intensity. During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, LST in Jakarta decreased drastically in some parts of the area, especially in public facility such as airport. However, the LST value in low-rise areas (LCZ 3 and LCZ 7) remains higher than the other LCZ classes. Materials of the building and land cover play a significant role in raising the land surface temperature. Therefore, mitigation strategies for urban heat islands in Jakarta should be focused on such particular areas mentioned.

12.
Transportation Letters ; : 1-14, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2028939

ABSTRACT

This study combines an integrated transport, land-use, and energy (iTLE) modeling system with traffic microsimulation model and emission simulator for a holistic analysis of COVID-19 pandemic related changes in traffic flows and emissions. An activity-based travel demand model within iTLE informs pandemic traffic operation scenarios for traffic microsimulation modeling. Link-based simulation outputs inform a finer-grained emission estimation process within a MOtor Vehicle Emission Simulator. Results suggest that the overall network performance improves during lockdown as average delays and queue time decrease by 42.04% and 5.9% respectively compared to pre-COVID condition. Emission results reveal that GHG emissions significantly decrease (64%) in lockdown while it starts increasing gradually in post-pandemic period. Link-based emission analysis indicates that major arterial streets achieve a significant reduction in air pollutant emission. The findings of this study will help transportation planners, engineers, and policymakers to devise effective policies for the improvement of transport operations and emissions. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Transportation Letters is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

13.
Sustainability ; 14(16):10354, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024160

ABSTRACT

Although island tourism is vital to the economy of developing countries, many islands with great potential for tourism development do not plan for it adequately. The objective of this paper is to establish an island tourism value mining and promotion model from the tourist perspective by selecting the status value indicators of basic conditions, vacation tourism resources, and sightseeing tourism resources, as well as the promotion indicators of five types of recreational fisheries, including beach activities, recreational fishing, marine sports, rock climbing, and sightseeing platforms. Then, we evaluate the whole island and develop suitable areas by using an analytic hierarchy process. This study took Tianheng Island as an example and divided the study area into grids and land use types. The results indicate that the basic conditions and tourism resources of Tianheng Island are in a general level, and the vacation tourism resources are in high quality, while there is further room to improve them. We identified that the island has four areas which are suitable for scenic development, two sandy beaches, two recreation fishing areas, one marine sports area, and one island rock climbing area. Our findings are consistent with the actual situation in Tianheng Island, demonstrating that the model is practical and can provide an essential reference for the scientific protection and utilization of island tourism resources.

14.
Sustainability ; 14(16):9990, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024125

ABSTRACT

Environmental problems due to human activities such as deforestation, urbanisation, and large scale intensive farming are some of the major factors behind the rapid spread of many infectious diseases. This in turn poses significant challenges not only in as regards providing adequate healthcare, but also in supporting healthcare workers, medical researchers, policy makers, and others involved in managing infectious diseases. These challenges include surveillance, tracking of infections, communication of public health knowledge and promotion of behavioural change. Behind these challenges lies a complex set of factors which include not only biomedical and population health determinants but also environmental, climatic, geographic, and socioeconomic variables. While there is broad agreement that these factors are best understood when considered in conjunction, aggregating and presenting diverse information sources requires effective information systems, software tools, and data visualisation. In this article, we argue that interactive maps, which couple geographical information systems and advanced information visualisation techniques, provide a suitable unifying framework for coordinating these tasks. Therefore, we examine how interactive maps can support spatial epidemiological visualisation and modelling involving distributed and dynamic data sources and incorporating temporal aspects of disease spread. Combining spatial and temporal aspects can be crucial in such applications. We discuss these issues in the context of support for disease surveillance in remote regions, utilising tools that facilitate distributed data collection and enable multidisciplinary collaboration, while also providing support for simulation and data analysis. We show that interactive maps deployed on a combination of mobile devices and large screens can provide effective means for collection, sharing, and analysis of health data.

15.
Remote Sensing ; 14(17):4330, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024038

ABSTRACT

Keelung Harbor, which is the most important center of sea freight in northern Taiwan, suffers from deteriorating urban development due to limited land supply. A dilemma arose from the Asahikawa River and the Tianliao River fronts, which evolved from cultural landscapes to buried and truncated rivers. This research was aimed at resolving the urban dilemma of the two adjacent rivers through a dialogue between the physical and augmented interaction of fabrics in three scenarios: GIS to AR, AR to GIS, and both. The physical dynamics were used to trace development chronologically by the area and length assessed from historical maps of hydrogeography, architecture, and the railroad. The augmented dynamics involved AR-based simulations and comparisons in terms of skyline overlay, fabric substitution, and fabric disposition. The dynamics involved AR models made by UAV images and 3D drawings. The assessments and simulations determined the key event in Keelung history when the Asahikawa River was leveled up. The dilemma verified from the augmented dynamics facilitated comprehension of the evolvement of the physical dynamics. With the assistance of AR and GIS, we concluded that the specific instance of riverfront reconstruction was an important landmark of meta-relationship.

16.
Land ; 11(8):1192, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023850

ABSTRACT

Ecosystem service spatial transfer is considered a feature that can deliver ecosystem services at a distance to meet the demands in areas with uneven spatial distribution of natural and social economic development. The natural ES spatial transfer distance and intensity were simulated by using the modified breaking point model in the Central Plains urban agglomeration (CPUA) with the cities of Luoyang, Zhengzhou, Shangqiu, and Huaibei stretching across. It is shown that there is a spatial mismatch between ES supply from ecospace and its demands from cities;relying only on natural spatial transfer, none of the ESs of the ecospace can be transported to corresponding population centers;and a spatial gap between ES supply and demand is illustrated in urban agglomeration areas. Intercity cooperation in ecosystem management and landscape planning based on ES spatial transfer would be good choices for cities, giving full play to comparative advantages to achieve sustainable development for the entire CPUA.

17.
Land ; 11(8):1161, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023849

ABSTRACT

Green and blue infrastructure, nature-based solutions, and cultural and built heritage play a key role in enhancing ecosystem services provision and shaping urban quality and communities’ wellbeing calling for an integrated approach to ecosystem services in urban policy and planning and decision-making. On the other side, under-used spaces and buildings have social, cultural, economic, as well as ecological functions and benefits, which are essential to sustainable urban development. The EU has been developing and implementing policies for an integrated approach to urban development and sustainable land use through the implementation of the Urban Agenda for the EU and fourteen associated Partnerships. Thus, it engaged a broad range of institutions and stakeholders across Europe in promoting local projects and sharing best practices on sustainable land use and nature-based solutions, the circular economy, and cultural heritage. This paper reviews the experiences of cities involved in the Partnerships of the Urban Agenda for the EU by illustrating how they related to different modes of ecosystem governance and associated challenges, discussing how three case studies integrate different dimensions of ecosystem services and regeneration in under-used areas and what type of knowledge as well as regulation and governance modes they have developed for supporting innovation in land use planning and management for urban ecosystem services. The results show that appropriate alternative regulations and policies are little explored and that cities adopt an integrated approach, combining cultural, environmental, economic, and social dimensions in their interventions, directly or indirectly enhancing the benefits of built and natural heritage and urban ecosystems in under-used areas. However, some issues, such as nature-based solutions and climate change, are still partially integrated into the projects while priority is given to the cultural, aesthetic, and economic dimensions.

18.
ISPRS International Journal of Geo-Information ; 11(8):450, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023729

ABSTRACT

Confronted with the spatial heterogeneity of the real estate market, some traditional research has utilized geographically weighted regression (GWR) to estimate house prices. However, its predictive power still has some room to improve, and its kernel function is limited in some simple forms. Therefore, we propose a novel house price valuation model, which is combined with geographically neural network weighted regression (GNNWR) to improve the accuracy of real estate appraisal with the help of neural networks. Based on the Shenzhen house price dataset, this work conspicuously captures the variable spatial regression relationships at different regions of different variables, which GWR has difficulty realizing. Moreover, we focus on the performance of GNNWR, verify its robustness and superiority, and refine the experiment process with 10-fold cross-validation. In contrast with the ordinary least squares (OLS) model, our model achieves an improvement of about 50% on most of the metrics. Compared with the best GWR model, our thorough experiments reveal that our model improves the mean absolute error (MAE) by 13.5% and attains a decrease of the mean absolute percentage error (MAPE) by 13.0% in the evaluation on the validation dataset. It is a practical and powerful way to assess house prices, and we believe our model could be applied to other valuation problems concerning geographical data to promote the prediction accuracy of socioeconomic phenomena.

19.
Energies ; 15(16):6042, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023310

ABSTRACT

Conventional and emerging paradigms of urbanism require new responses under the current circumstances, especially in relation to the integration of sustainability dimensions and technology advances. The escalating rate of urbanization, coupled with the climate emergency, fundamentally indeed disrupt the challenges that urbanism research and practice deal with, calling for adopting more innovative approaches to urban planning and design. With cities contributing around 65% of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions and experiencing an unprecedented growth of population, contemporary urban policy needs to be redefined and re-assessed accordingly. While numerous urban models, such as the Compact City, the Eco-City, the Sustainable City, and the Smart City, have emerged in response to the challenges of sustainability and urbanization, the 15-Minute City has recently gained a steep popularity. This paper explores the theoretical, practical, and technological foundations of the 15-Minute City, with a particular focus on the proximity dimension of mixed land-use and its environmental, social, and economic benefits of sustainability as supported by smart technologies. We argue that this evolving model of urbanism has the potential to gain more expansion and success in regard to building more sustainable, efficient, resilient, equitable, and inclusive cities in line with the global agendas of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 11, as it adds a strategic value to the amalgam of the prevailing and emerging paradigms of urbanism and their synergies with respect to increasing the benefits of sustainability while emphasizing its environmental dimension.

20.
Journal of Urban Planning and Development ; 148(4), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2017001

ABSTRACT

The impacts of COVID-19 on for-hire vehicle (FHV) (e.g., Uber/Lyft, often referred to as transportation network companies in other locations) and taxi use have been relatively understudied compared with transit and personal vehicles. This study analyzed and estimated the changes in ridership for taxis and FHVs in New York City during the COVID-19 pandemic to determine whether it had disproportional impacts on these competing modes, how these impacts varied over time and space, and the associated factors. Data supporting the analyses came from the Taxi and Limousine Commission, the COVID-19 Data Repository, Google's Community Mobility Reports, the American Community Survey, and the Primary Land Use Tax Lot Output. Temporal change was measured by the daily taxi/FHV ridership deviation from a defined baseline, which showed that COVID-19 more negatively impacted taxis than FHVs. Temporal moving average models were then employed, which showed that COVID-19 had different temporal impacts on taxis and FHVs in relation to the parameters’ significance, magnitude, and temporal correlation patterns. In general, taxi/FHV ridership dropped when people spent more time at home and the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases was greater. The spatial variation in taxi/FHV ridership was measured by the coefficient of variation. Spatial regression models indicated that the land use of a zone affected taxi/FHV ridership during the pandemic. In addition, a zone with more carless/car-free households, older persons, or more children enrolled in school was more likely to experience a decrease in taxi/FHV ridership. A zone with more workers who commuted by walking or taking transit (excluding taxis) in pre-COVID times was more likely to see a decrease in taxi/FHV ridership. A zone with more people working from home pre-COVID, was more likely to see an increase in FHV ridership. The models showed that COVID-19 had greater spatial impacts on taxis than FHVs. Based on these results, this study provides insights as to what factors affected ridership of the two competing travel modes and suggests actions that transportation authorities could take to reduce temporal and spatial impact disparities.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL