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1.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; JOUR(2-A):No Pagination Specified, 84.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2102231

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to build upon existing research that explored teachers? professional learning expectations and how teachers can utilize social media platforms or social learning environments to aid their professional learning. This information may be used to support thinking differently about time and space for both student and adult learning. Understanding to what extent and why teachers engaged in professional learning experiences in a social media environment can inform future learning options in utilizing these asynchronous platforms. Data generated may aid in the design of engaging professional learning experiences, through social media, that give teachers a venue for rapid, focused, personalized, and asynchronous learning. This qualitative study was limited to a non-random sample of interview participants, which ensured participants had a guaranteed proficiency in using social media environments for professional learning experiences. A survey was conducted to identify individuals who actively engaged in using social media platforms for professional learning, and six qualifying educators were invited to expand upon their experiences through their participation in semi-structured interviews. The open-ended questions inspired a dialogue about their lived experiences, resources located on social media platforms, and interests regarding professional learning during the 2020 pandemic time frame. Responses to the interview questions were coded to examine how and to what extent the teacher participated in a social media platform as a venue for professional learning during the pandemic. A theoretical, thematic analysis was used to identify how teachers participated in a social media environment for professional learning. The responses were coded based on CHAT?s Four C?s of Participation Taxonomy: Contemplator, Curator, Crowdsourcer, or Contributor (Trust, 2017). Additionally, the responses were coded to identify the type of informal learning experience the teachers described. Similarities and differences across demographic areas were reviewed and discussed. The data compiled had several implications. Understanding how teachers interacted in informal social learning environments provided insight into teachers? engagement and how their pedagogical practices were impacted or changed. Results of the study may be used to inform how social-media-based professional learning can be developed or expanded to meet the just-in-time needs of K-12 educators. Ultimately, the feedback received could help districts develop a framework for constructing and evaluating social-media-based professional learning and more educators to interact online as contemplators and as contributors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

2.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1629-1642, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2102185

ABSTRACT

In mid spring 2020, an unprecedented Covid-19 induced switch of learning mode, from face-to-face instruction to online learning, disrupted not only teachers, but also students, both cognitively and emotionally. This study seeks to understand how students felt about their capabilities to succeed in the online learning environment (OLE) and which online learning features (OLF), offered to them by their instructors, positively, negatively, or neutrally impacted their learning. Three research questions guided this study: (1) What online learning features did students perceive as contributing positively, negatively, or neutrally to their learning and how were these perceived contributions related to students' demographics?;(2) How did students feel about their capabilities to succeed in the OLE?;and (3) How did students' feelings change during their online learning experiences and how did these changes relate to students' gender, academic performance, and prior online experience? An online survey was designed and face-validated to solicit information about students' perceptions about online learning features and feelings about their capabilities to succeed in the OLE. The 13-item survey consisted of 10 multiple-choice/multiple-answer and 3 open-ended questions. One thousand two hundred and thirty-seven (N = 1237) students taking 27 different courses, from 6 different institutions participated in the study. Presentation of the qualitative analyses of open-ended survey responses is outside the scope of this paper. Findings suggest that the three most frequent OLFs provided to students were electronic homework submission, recorded video lectures, and electronic exams. While video lectures, homework electronics submission, and downloadable documents or files were reported to be the top three OLFs that contributed positively to students' learning, poor internet performance, online exams, and projects were the top three OLFs that were reported to have contributed negatively to student learning. Changes in students' feelings during the online learning experience were also reported.

3.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; JOUR(2-A):No Pagination Specified, 84.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2102016

ABSTRACT

Social and emotional learning has been recognized for positively impacting students' social, emotional, behavioral, and academic outcomes (Durlak et al., 2011;Dusenbury & Weissberg, 2017;Taylor et al., 2017). State departments of education have taken this research and implemented statewide social and emotional learning standards for educators to incorporate into their curriculum (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning [CASEL], 2019;Ecklund et al., 2018;Yoder et al., 2020). However, there is a dearth of research on the experiences of educators who plan, prepare, deliver, and evaluate the SEL standards. Additionally, the 2020-2021 school year was profoundly impacted by the COVID-19 health pandemic that created additional challenges for educators trying to meet academic and SEL standards (Darling-Hammond & Hyler, 2020). The purpose of this study was to explore the lived experiences of elementary educators who were implementing the state SEL standards during the COVID-19 health pandemic. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 elementary educators licensed as either general education classroom teachers, principals, or school counselors and worked for at least two years. Participants were from a midwestern state that had kindergarten through twelfth grade SEL state standards. Moustakas' (1994) phenomenological reduction process was utilized to describe the essence of the participants' experience that included: a need to prioritize SEL, a focus on relationship building while navigating barriers to connection, awareness of adult SEL needs, and educational inequities highlighted by COVID-19. Implications for elementary educators, educational training programs, and educational policy makers are discussed in addition to recommendations for future research. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

4.
International Journal of Innovation and Learning ; JOUR(4):380-396, 32.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101877

ABSTRACT

This study evaluates the impact of changes in the learning environment due to the COVID-19 restrictions at the university level in Singapore. Data is based on the grades and student evaluations of 282 students from two cohorts who in 2020 experienced in-class and online teaching consecutively, and compares academic performance in both learning environments considering the existing relationship between student evaluations and teacher-student interaction. Results show differences in academic performance on the final exam between the two modes, however, these differences are not related to the student evaluation of the lecturer nor teacher-student interaction as these remained unalterable despite the transition from in-class to online learning. The conclusion is that it is possible to maintain an optimum quality of education without alterations in student evaluations or in teacher-student interaction in both online and in-class contexts. However, it is necessary to design a course appropriate assessment strategy consistent with the specific learning environment.

5.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1523-1535, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101735

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 crisis transformed students' campus lives into a new normal. With telemeeting applications, the regular face-to-face lectures are being converted into online lectures. However, the conventional online/offline simulation and remote laboratory cannot provide a real experience of laboratory apparatus and investigations, including cooperative learning. Therefore, the telepresence laboratory is established and utilized for the 2103-360 Mechanical Engineering evaluation and Laboratory II class, which was fabricated for third-year undergraduate mechanical engineering students. To satisfy seven outcomes, students must examine the accuracy, repeatability, and resolution of an IGUS Drylin linear motion system in this lab. The lab, with a telepresence laboratory, is conducted 10 times in a semester where there are two groups of 4-5 students participating in Lab A at a time. Based on the students' findings of the analysis, it can be concluded that the telepresence laboratory can provide all learning outcomes to students. Also, regarding the investigation, more than 86% of students agreed that the lab assisted them in defining issues, designing experiments, conducting experiments, analyzing, concluding, and reporting skills. More than 77% of students agreed that they learned about the equipment from the lab. Also, 89% of students are satisfied with the lab, and 91% of students would recommend other students to take the telepresence laboratory. In conclusion, the telepresence laboratory can be employed in place of the regular face-to-face lab. It succeeds in promoting collaborative learning, where students discuss and work together to complete a task. The investigations are designed with a real-time web interface. Students can utilize their mobile devices to access and control the equipment. This practice complies with the new normal.

6.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1595-1605, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101726

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has brought many changes in learning methodologies at all educational levels, including higher education. Under these circumstances, one of the most difficult challenges to face is to approach practical and laboratory learning at university when students' attendance to the physical laboratory space is restricted. The future graduates of Bachelor's Degree in Biotechnology are appealed to master many instrumental techniques related to this field. The article describes the scaffolding actions carried out to successfully adapt onsite laboratory sessions to virtual ones and evaluate the students' perception about the contribution of the online methodologies to the practical skills of bioprocess engineering. Two voluntary groups of students were formed, one to attend the practical lessons on site and the other online. The suggested scaffolding was structured in four different types of materials and resources: screencasts, pedagogical articles, calculation sheet templates and online assessment tests. Students' perception was collected by means of an e-questionnaire. About 70% of students thought the online platform allowed them to follow the practical tasks in a way equivalent to face-to-face teaching and 62.1% found that online model presents more advantages than disadvantages than the onsite model. 85.7% of students considered that practical tasks highly contributed to their capacity of solving complex problems and master mathematical tools, while 65.7% of them associated the practical task with their availability to understand the principles of bioengineering. However, 40% of them thought that the online model satisfactorily contributes to the acquisition of these specific skills.

7.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1606-1614, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101668

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has influenced most of us either directly or indirectly. In ensuring the education is always in line with the National Education Philosophy in developing holistic, entrepreneurial, and balanced graduates, the Civil Engineering Program of Universiti Malaysia Sabah utilizes the UMS-OBE system, particularly in course outcome (CO) input to the program outcomes (PO) in the assessment and reporting of student's performance. As the main stakeholders, learners and lecturers must be actively engaged in the rationale and motivation of implementing the OBE mechanisms. Hence this paper evaluated the course learning outcome and measured their perceptions by categorizing the ranked perception feedback on project-based learning (PBL). This paper highlights the modification in implementing PBL that previously involved physical work on-site. Due to the movement control order (MCO) enforced due to the covid-19 pandemic, the course assessment targeted to instill the program outcome (PO) of Environment and Sustainability attribute was strategized into 3 phases. The analysis found that the course outcome has been successfully achieved, even though a slight decrease was observed from the previous regular face-to-face mode. A slight decrease was observed in the overall grade achievement and course outcome analysis. The instructional modification and intervention in Project-Based-learning to improve online learning strategies, despite the requirement for engineering community fieldwork through the learner's feedback responses during the three phases in model strategies for course outcome pedagogy, have shown optimistic input by learners and has continuously engaged them through the Project-based-Learning completion.

8.
Narratives in the Anthropocene Era ; CHAP: 266-283,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101653

ABSTRACT

In this chapter we will analyse how we can initiate a process of transformation in our ways of perceiving the relationships with living ecosystems in the context of the global health crisis unfolding in the Anthropocene era. More specifically, we will examine the narratives produced by the students at Paul Valery University in Montpellier, France, in the frame of an international project of writing workshops (ECONARRATIVE) centered on the pandemic and ecology, held from January to March 2021, with the support of the MSH-SUD (Maison des Sciences de l'Homme) in Montpellier.

9.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1677-1688, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101627

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated the teaching challenges of engaging students, building a learning community, and creating enriching learning experiences. Here, we present an authentic, asynchronous assessment method applied as a peer-assessed virtual conference task. The peer assessment and facilitation effectively generated a strong sense of community and teamwork (95% agreement) and enabled the students to generate a deeper understanding of the course content (73% agreement) by fostering critical self-reflection (87% agreement). Student engagement excelled whereby many choose to engage in additional presentations outside of their allocated peer markings. Consistently positive feedback highlighted the task's utility as an online learning tool and its efficacy in shaping a collaborative class community besides remote teaching condition. Additionally, the multi-faceted nature of the assessment promoted a broad range of effective teaching qualities, including collaboration, communication, and application of theory in innovative contexts which lends itself to higher education. Overall, the virtual conference tool and its peer-based facilitation can be considered for effective engineering education practice, which may also apply to other scientific disciplines to improve student learning and experiences.

10.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1484-1494, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101569

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has generated the largest disruption of the present century, forcing mankind to evaluate many paradigms. Educators have faced the challenge to develop teaching strategies suitable for distance learning, which is particularly complex for those engineering concepts where service learning is an effective approach. This paper presents a remote service based learning strategy, used to teach seismic vulnerability assessment to fourth-year Civil Engineering students at Universidad de La Sabana in Colombia. This strategy involved five stages and was adapted to be carried out remotely by students in their homes using a combination of several tools such as remote maps. The main activities were the seismic vulnerability assessment of the students' houses and the remote assessment of the building stock of Cajica & PRIME;, a municipality close to the University campus. The learning outcomes were assessed using evaluation rubrics. The results show that the proposed strategy is effective, as 100% of students scored at the top level of the rubric at the fifth stage. In addition, they indicate that service learning in a close context like the family generates motivation and commitment in students to their learning process. Overall, this experience demonstrated that service learning is an effective strategy for teaching engineering concepts in a remote environment. It also showed that although COVID-19 required the development of new teaching strategies, this did not become a limitation to fulfill the learning outcomes.

11.
Dissertation Abstracts International Section A: Humanities and Social Sciences ; JOUR(2-A):No Pagination Specified, 84.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2101493

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic induced a global educational emergency that abruptly threatened the continuity of education. Teachers and students were thrust into distance instruction, leaving many feeling unprepared to facilitate engaging reform-minded science, undermining their science identity, attitude, and self-efficacy. Even with the unprecedented instructional challenges, some elementary teachers were able to maintain their positive science beliefs and effectively continue to engage students. To understand the effectiveness of science teaching, science beliefs may serve as proxy data when evaluating teaching practices. To help guide education leaders and policymakers in their efforts to continue the momentum of reform-minded science, regardless of the teaching modality, the purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with elementary teachers who were able to maintain their positive science attitude and self-efficacy during the education emergency. Utilizing a sequential explanatory mixed-method design with a phenomenological approach, data were collected through both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews. Semi-structured interviews emphasized the types of factors that led to teachers' positive science attitude and self-efficacy in distance learning. Findings from this study indicate the factors associated with elementary teachers' belief maintenance included a combination of actions (interest and enjoyment in science and science teaching, voluntary pursuit of knowledge, prioritization of engaging reform-minded science instruction, and creating innovative instruction through leveraging technology and flexibility in free choice of supplies, projects, and overall student engagement), and dispositions (risk-taking, flexibility, embracing failure, and self-determination). These findings are discussed to help ensure effective reformed-minded science continues despite any future threat to education. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

12.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1562-1576, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101488

ABSTRACT

Research suggests that online learning should be more engaging and collaborative to provide a compatible alternative to in-person learning. Many educators have implemented active learning in their in-person classrooms, while only a few assess how effective similar techniques are in virtual environments. The authors hypothesize that virtual learning, including active learning components, can improve student learning in virtual environments. Furthermore, the authors hypothesize that learning in virtual settings would be affected by students' gender, ability, and familiarity with the topic. The authors conducted a quasi-experimental study involving eighty-seven students from two institutions who participated in an online workshop covering fundamental concepts in construction scheduling. They were split into two groups: one group had no prominent active learning component, while the other was exposed to an active learning component. All participants completed pre and post-workshop surveys to assess their learning of the workshop outcomes and explore the effectiveness of virtual workshops and active learning components in online course delivery. The results of this study suggest that virtual workshops are effective in teaching construction scheduling, while active learning in the form of virtual pair-work does not have a significant positive impact on student learning. Furthermore, student performance in virtual workshops significantly differs based on gender, ability, and familiarity with the topic. Therefore, instructors need to be aware of significant student performance challenges, particularly for males and those with some familiarity with the topics covered in virtual workshops. Since this study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, the authors present further challenges and recommendations for educators and institutions under similar emergency circumstances.

13.
International Journal of Engineering Education ; JOUR(5):1577-1583, 38.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101482

ABSTRACT

This study was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic to explore whether team-based, online learning activities play a role in enhancing undergraduate engineering students' critical thinking skills. To conduct the study, we distributed a Google Form-based online survey among undergraduate engineering students through Tecnolo & PRIME;gico de Monterrey learning management system platform during the fall semester of 2020. In total, we received 50 complete responses through a convenient sampling approach. To analyze the quantitative data, we applied a hierarchical regression technique using the IBM SPSS 26.0 statistical software program. The findings of this study affirm that participation in team-based online learning activities meant to improve (1) the quality of learning and (2) reasoning ability have a significant positive correlation with critical thinking skills of undergraduate students in engineering programs. We also conclude that quality of learning has higher significant association with critical thinking skills as compared to reasoning ability

14.
Artseduca ; JOUR(33): 97-108,
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2100312

ABSTRACT

The study examines the features of the distance learning system of the university in the field of choreography training. The purpose of the study is to analyze the Kazakhstan experience of organizing distance learning in higher education in the field of choreography training. As an example, the experience of the [BLINDED] in the distance learning process has been analyzed and practical recommendations on teaching professional disciplines in this field of training have been given. To analyze distance learning, surveys among teachers and students have been conducted. In addition, based on international scientific literature, dance lessons have been analyzed in accordance with COVID-19 restrictions. The disadvantages and advantages of the online learning system for students have been identified based on a questionnaire. The survey involved teachers and students of ballet pedagogy, choreography pedagogy, choreography directing, ballroom dance pedagogy, as well as undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral students. A total of 20 teachers and 75 students have been interviewed, and the effectiveness of the platforms used in distance learning has been determined. On the basis of available research, the opinion that in the field of choreography pedagogical skills of rising professionals and performers cannot be formed exclusively through distance learning has been substantiated.

15.
BMC Nurs ; 21(1): 100, 2022 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1813328

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Simulation is an alternative or complementary method for students who cannot obtain sufficient direct care experience, as they allow students to experience various clinical situations. Mixed learning is becoming increasingly common as a way to provide students with opportunities to experience real-life clinical scenarios. This study compared the learning effects of a virtual simulation and a high-fidelity simulation in a different order of presentation, with a focus on training for premature rupture of membranes in the field maternity nursing. Through this comparison, this study aimed to obtain evidence to support decision-making regarding the most effective way to utilize mixed simulation strategies. METHODS: A quasi-experimental, crossover-design study was performed with two randomly allocated groups of 26 junior nursing students each. The virtual simulation used the vSim® for nursing, and the high-fidelity simulation used a scenario developed by the research team. The learning effects were measured in terms of the problem-solving process, clinical reasoning, reflective thinking, satisfaction with the practicum, and self-confidence. The data collected with a structured questionnaire were analyzed using the Mann-Whitney test. RESULTS: The virtual simulation-first, high-fidelity simulation-second order led to significantly higher scores for reflective thinking (z = 3.53, p < .001) and self-confidence (z = 2.47, p = .013) than the other order. CONCLUSIONS: The initial application of virtual simulation seemed to improve students' thought processes, and then high-fidelity simulation seemed to allow them to perform actual practice better. Further trials of mixed learning methods are necessary to maximize learning effects in nursing education. TRIAL REGISTRATION: KCT0005767  at 2021-01-12 registered.

16.
BMC Med Educ ; 22(1): 302, 2022 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798406

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Medical humanities courses that incorporate the visual arts traditionally require in-person instruction and visits to museums. The COVID-19 pandemic afforded medical educators a unique opportunity to implement and evaluate virtual visual arts programming. METHODS: A two-week, 7-module visual arts and medicine elective course for third and fourth-year medical students was conducted virtually in the Spring of 2021. The course included traditional didactic components as well as a range of hands-on creative art activities including painting, graphic medicine, photovoice, and Kintsugi (Japanese craft). Digital tools including Canvas, Google Jamboard, and Zoom facilitated student engagement. Student feedback was collected through anonymous post-course surveys. RESULTS: We successfully conducted a virtual visual arts and medicine elective which integrated hands-on creative art activities. Most students "strongly agreed" that remote instruction was sufficient to meet course objectives. However, all students also "agreed" that in-person instruction may promote more in-depth engagement with the visual arts. The hands-on creative art activities were appreciated by all students. CONCLUSION: Visual arts-based medical humanities courses can be delivered virtually and can include hands-on creative art activities such as painting. Future visual arts and medicine courses may benefit from incorporating a range of pedagogical methodologies, digital tools, control groups, and pre-/post-course assessments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Medical , Curriculum , Humanities/education , Humans , Pandemics
17.
Scand J Trauma Resusc Emerg Med ; 29(1): 145, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098399

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sepsis is a life-threatening organ dysfunction and a major healthcare burden worldwide. Although sepsis is a medical emergency that requires immediate management, screening for the occurrence of sepsis is difficult. Herein, we propose a deep learning-based model (DLM) for screening sepsis using electrocardiography (ECG). METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 46,017 patients who were admitted to two hospitals. A total of 1,548 and 639 patients had sepsis and septic shock, respectively. The DLM was developed using 73,727 ECGs from 18,142 patients, and internal validation was conducted using 7774 ECGs from 7,774 patients. Furthermore, we conducted an external validation with 20,101 ECGs from 20,101 patients from another hospital to verify the applicability of the DLM across centers. RESULTS: During the internal and external validations, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of the DLM using 12-lead ECG was 0.901 (95% confidence interval, 0.882-0.920) and 0.863 (0.846-0.879), respectively, for screening sepsis and 0.906 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.877-0.936) and 0.899 (95% CI, 0.872-0.925), respectively, for detecting septic shock. The AUC of the DLM for detecting sepsis using 6-lead and single-lead ECGs was 0.845-0.882. A sensitivity map revealed that the QRS complex and T waves were associated with sepsis. Subgroup analysis was conducted using ECGs from 4,609 patients who were admitted with an infectious disease, and the AUC of the DLM for predicting in-hospital mortality was 0.817 (0.793-0.840). There was a significant difference in the prediction score of DLM using ECG according to the presence of infection in the validation dataset (0.277 vs. 0.574, p < 0.001), including severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (0.260 vs. 0.725, p = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: The DLM delivered reasonable performance for sepsis screening using 12-, 6-, and single-lead ECGs. The results suggest that sepsis can be screened using not only conventional ECG devices but also diverse life-type ECG machines employing the DLM, thereby preventing irreversible disease progression and mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Learning , Sepsis , Electrocardiography , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Sepsis/diagnosis
18.
Frontiers in Water ; JOUR, 4.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2099283

ABSTRACT

The CUAHSI Virtual University is an interinstitutional graduate training framework that was developed to increase access to specialized hydrology courses for graduate students from participating US institutions. The program was designed to capitalize on the benefits of collaborative teaching, allowing students to differentiate their learning and access subject matter experts at multiple institutions, while enrolled in a single course at their home institution, through a framework of reciprocity. Although the CUAHSI Virtual University was developed prior to the COVID-19 pandemic, the resilience of its online education model to such disruptions to classroom teaching increases the urgency of understanding how effective such an approach is at achieving its goals and what challenges multi-institutional graduate training faces for sustainability and expansion within the water sciences or in other disciplines. To gain faculty perspectives on the program, we surveyed (1) water science graduate program faculty who had served as instructors in the program, (2) water science graduate program faculty who were aware of the program, but had not participated, and (3) departmental chairs of participating instructors. Our data show widespread agreement across respondent types that the program is positive for students, diversifying their educational opportunities and increasing access to subject matter experts. Concerns and factors limiting faculty involvement revolved around faculty workload and administrative barriers, including low enrollment at individual institutions. If these barriers can be surmounted, the CUAHSI Virtual University has the potential for wider participation within hydrology and adoption in other STEM disciplines.

19.
Frontiers in Education ; JOUR, 7.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2099124

ABSTRACT

BackgroundThe COVID-19 pandemic and associated preventative measures introduced a shock to the teaching paradigm in Saudi Arabia and the world. While many studies have documented the challenges and perceptions of students during the COVID-19 pandemic, less attention has been given to higher education staff. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the staff's perception and experiences of online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic. Materials and methodsA validated survey was conducted between December 2021 and June 2022 in Saudi Arabian Universities to assess the status of online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic among faculty members. The collected responses were exploratively and statistically analyzed. ResultsA total of 1117 response was received. About 66% of the respondents were male and 90% of them hold postgraduate degree. Although rarely or occasionally teach online pre-COVID-19, only 33% of the respondents think the transition was difficult and 55% of them support the move. Most respondents received adequate training (68%) and tools (80%) and 88% of the respondents mentioned that they did not accrue additional workload in online study design. While the perception of online teaching was mostly positive (62%) with high satisfaction (71%). However, 25% of the respondents reported that a poor internet bandwidth was an obstacle and 20% was unable to track students' engagement. Respondents with more years of experience, previous training, support, or perceived online transition as easy were also more likely to be satisfied with the process. Also, older respondents, those who support the transition and those with previous training were less likely to report barriers (all p < 0.001). ConclusionThe perception and experience of transition to online teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia were positive. Low internet bandwidth and inability to track students' limited effective online teaching. Work experience, previous training, and positive perception are the main factors that influence staff online teaching satisfaction.

20.
Family Court Review ; JOUR(4):818-835, 60.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2097755

ABSTRACT

The restrictions of pandemic teaching served as a catalyst for the authors' integration of the skills-based and client-centered teaching. Their refurbished models of teaching family law aspire to capture the needs of under- and unrepresented populations of society, build students' lawyering skills including "soft" skills like client interviewing, contemplate what a satisfying career in family law could look like, and deliver instruction on the theoretical underpinnings of the law governing the creation and dissolution of familial units. The article summarizes the authors' methods for incorporating such "hands-on" learning into our classes, and demonstrates how these ideas are malleable enough to work in in-person, remote, concurrent, asynchronous, and synchronous classes.

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