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1.
HEM/ONC Today ; JOUR(13):1-1,8, 23.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2101703

ABSTRACT

"From 1991 to 2019, this accounts for 3.5 million cancer deaths that were avoided." [...]significant inroads have been made in research against previously recalcitrant cancers such as melanoma. The new anticancer agents approved during that period include: * tebentafusp-tebn (Kimmtrak, Im-munocore), the first T-cell receptor therapeutic to receive regulatory approval for treatment of uveal melanoma, the most common form of ocular cancer in adults;* belzutifan (Welireg, Merck), the first FDA-approved molecularly targeted drug against hypoxia-inducible factor-2 alpha for patients with solid tumors linked to von Hippel-Tindau syndrome, a rare inherited genetic disorder;and * relatlimab-rmbw (Opdualag, Bristol Myers Squibb), the first new immune checkpoint inhibitor against a novel target in 8 years, for treatment of unresectable or metastatic melanoma. Disruption or delay in cancer treatment due to concerns over terminating a pregnancy could cause cancer progression. [...]global crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic and ongoing wars have affected all aspects of cancer research and patient care.

2.
The American Journal of Managed Care ; JOUR(11), 28.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2101613

ABSTRACT

The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020 led to a significant reduction of both high-value and low-value care. This once-in-a-century disruption that nearly shut down all elective medical care provided an unprecedented opportunity to restructure and align provider- and consumer-facing incentives with the value of care delivered, reallocating more resources to high-value, underutilized services and decreasing utilization of low-value care. Shahzad and colleagues report that this silver lining of the pandemic may have been partially achieved. As we reset post pandemic, providers and payers are in an excellent position to develop, implement, and evaluate policies that serve public interests first and foremost. In addition to the aforementioned accountability programs for providers, plans should also experiment with more widespread rollout of value-based insurance design (VBID), as has been emphasized in guidelines from CMS.

3.
HEM/ONC Today ; JOUR(14):32, 23.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2101556
4.
NeuroRegulation ; JOUR(3):135, 9.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100509

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The incomplete effectiveness of interventions demands new ways to help people diagnosed with schizophrenia who experience auditory verbal hallucinations (SZ-AVH). We aimed to perform a feasibility study of low-resolution electromagnetic tomography analysis (LORETA) neurofeedback with people exhibiting treatment-resistant SZ-AVH. Methods: We examined changes in resting-state quantitative electroencephalogram (qEEG) in four people with SZ-AVH (three male, one female) after LORETA Z-score neurofeedback training. Results: The study design had to be amended due to a national COVID-19 lockdown. Neurofeedback was well tolerated and no participants dropped out. Recruitment was the main feasibility issue. Barriers included a lack of knowledge of neurofeedback by patients and mental health teams, as well as the travel and time commitment involved. For the only patient who completed all 20 sessions, elevated frontal, central, and temporal theta absolute power measured at baseline normalized after treatment, but decreased temporal delta and an increase in coherence for all frequency bands were also found. Conclusions: Two key lessons were drawn for the feasibility of trials of EEG neurofeedback in this population. First, significant effort is needed to educate mental health professionals and patients about neurofeedback. Second, the equipment employed for neurofeedback training needs to be physically based at a site where patients routinely attend.

5.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; JOUR(11):35-38, 37.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100359

ABSTRACT

Mental health support for healthcare workers will need to be extended for ‘much, much longer’ and beyond this pandemic, according to England’s chief nurse.

6.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; JOUR(11):11, 37.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100358

ABSTRACT

Front-line NHS and social care staff need support to prepare for a winter that could be challenging on two infection fronts – COVID-19 and flu – if not more.

7.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; JOUR(11):8-10, 37.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100357

ABSTRACT

Simmering discontent about how nurses were urged to have the COVID-19 vaccine may continue to influence how some feel about workforce immunisation more widely.

8.
Mental Health Practice (2014+) ; JOUR(6):10-11, 25.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100356

ABSTRACT

Mental health support for nurses and other healthcare workers will need to be extended for ‘much, much longer’ and beyond this pandemic, according to England’s chief nurse.

9.
Emergency Nurse (2014+) ; JOUR(6):12-14, 30.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100355

ABSTRACT

Mental health support for nurses and other healthcare workers will need to be extended for ‘much, much longer’ and beyond this pandemic, according to England’s chief nurse.

10.
Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Pathology : JOMFP ; JOUR(3):389-391, 26.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100043

ABSTRACT

An association of periodontal disease with the severity of COVID 19 disease has been observed during COVID 19 pandemic. This article explores the various hypotheses that link the two conditions, to understand their interrelationship. Targeted research may help elucidate evidence for screening of high-risk groups and identification of therapeutic targets.

11.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; JOUR(5):466-472, 64.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100032

ABSTRACT

Background and Aim: Pandemic and consequent lockdowns are likely to affect the drug market by the sudden disruption of the supply chain. We explored the change in the availability, access, purity, and pricing during lockdown from respondents seeking treatment for drugs, alcohol, and tobacco dependence. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 404 respondents from seven treatment centers across India. A structured questionnaire assessed the change in availability, access, quality, and price of substances used during the first phase (March 24–April 14) and the second phase (April 15–May 3) of lockdown. Results: A majority of the respondents in treatment used tobacco (63%) and alcohol (52%). Relatively few respondents used opioids (45%) or cannabis (5%). Heroin (44%) was the most common opioid the respondents were treated for. Seventy-five percent, 65%, and 60% of respondents treated for alcohol, tobacco, and opioid problems, respectively, reported a reduction in the availability and access during the first phase of the lockdown. In the second phase, respondents with alcohol and tobacco dependence reported greater availability than those with opioid and cannabis dependence. The reported price of all substances increased more than 50% during the first phase of lockdown and remained higher throughout the second phase. Deterioration in purity was reported by more than half of the people who used opioid. Conclusion: Lockdown could have affected both licit and illicit drug markets, albeit to a varying degree. The observed changes seemed short-lasting, as suggested by the recovering trends during the second phase of lockdown.

12.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; JOUR(5):497-504, 64.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100031

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The article aims to explore the studies performed on suicide because of coronavirus disease 19 through a bibliometric analysis. A quantitative analysis of the topic furnishes data on the publication pattern, influential research journals, highly cited articles, productive countries and organizations, the authorship pattern, and the collaborative pattern between authors. Methods: Data regarding the type of documents, most cited articles, influential research journals, contributions per country, and so on were extracted for the study from the Scopus database. Data analysis and visualization were performed through R-Studio and the VOSviewer application. Results: A bibliometric analysis encompassing scientific contributions based on suicide or suicide-related ideation because of the coronavirus pandemic showed a total of 494 documents published in 230 journals/books. The articles published by proficient authors in reputed journals highlighted the key areas of research in the field. USA dominated the list of scientific production of countries contributing to 340 documents. Conclusion: The results provided by this analysis could act as a steppingstone for experts to design a roadmap for mental health research during the pandemic. Studies can be designed to gather information on mental health conditions across specific age groups. Research collaborations that facilitate the publication of pooled protocols and data are encouraged.

13.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; JOUR(5):529-532, 64.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100030

ABSTRACT

Patients with post-acute sequelae after coronavirus disease (COVID-19) report a variety of non-specific neurological complications (e.g., myoclonus, limb weakness). In particular, they manifest scenarios as medically unexplained symptoms and are known as functional movement disorders (FMDs). We present three cases of FMDs in patients of the Institute of Clinical Medicine named after N. V. Sklifosovsky (Sechenov University). All patients had a history of COVID-19 infection and reported fatigue, weakness, and jerks of upper and lower limbs. In conclusion, there might be a major possibility of the virus negatively affecting the central nervous system, including such rare neuropsychiatric complications.

15.
Indian Journal of Psychiatry ; JOUR(5):473-483, 64.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100028

ABSTRACT

Background: Many studies across the globe have evaluated the adverse mental health consequences of COVID-19 in patients who suffered from COVID-19 infection. However, a comparative study of persons who suffered from COVID-19 infection and those who witnessed the COVID-19 infection in their close relatives is lacking. Aims and Objectives: This study aims to compare the psychiatric morbidity in persons who suffered from COVID-19 infections, and those who witnessed the illness in one of their close relatives. Methods: In this cross-sectional online survey, 2,964 adult participants completed the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) Scale, Fear of COVID-19 Scale (FCS-19), Brief Resilient Coping Scale (BRCS), The Brief Resilience Scale (BRS) and a self-designed questionnaire to evaluate other neuropsychiatric complications. Results: Compared to the close relatives who had witnessed COVID-19 infection, participants who developed COVID-19 infection had a significantly higher prevalence of depression (34.6%), anxiety disorder (32.3%), and fear of COVID-19 infection (18.8%), which was significantly higher than that noted in close relatives. However, BRS coping score was not significantly different between the two groups. Overall, about one-third of the participants who developed COVID-19 infection had depression and one-third had anxiety disorders. One-fifth of the participants reported high fear, post-traumatic symptoms, and obsessive-compulsive symptoms, whereas one-sixth reported other neuropsychiatric manifestations. Conclusion: Patients who suffered from COVID-19 have a higher prevalence of depression, anxiety, and fear as compared to those to witnessed COVID-19 in relatives.

16.
Indian Journal of Dermatopathology and Diagnostic Dermatology ; JOUR(2):47-53, 9.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100017

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Remdesivir and favipiravir are two antiviral medicines used in the treatment of Covid-19 infection widely. The studies pertaining to the mucocutaneous adverse events of these two drugs are scarce. Hence, we performed a systematic review to bridge the above gap. Materials and Methods: The study is performed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. All original articles, case series, and case reports pertaining to mucocutaneous adverse drug reactions caused by remdesivir and favipiravir, while any of these drugs were administered in Covid-19-infected patients, were included in the present study. Results: Six articles were identified pertaining to the mucocutaneous adverse reactions of remdesivir, of which two were original articles and four were case reports. Four case reports pertaining to the mucocutaneous adverse events of favipiravir are included in this study. The details regarding the same are elaborated in the main manuscript. Conclusion: In the present systematic analysis, the mucocutaneous adverse events of the two widely used antiviral medications in Covid-19 were described. This articles throws light on the aspects which are hardly reported or discussed in the literature.

17.
Indian Journal of Community Medicine ; JOUR(3):410-413, 47.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100016

ABSTRACT

Context: Efficient roll out of COVID-19 vaccines requires high-quality preparedness at all levels and robust planning and training regarding COVID-19 vaccination, use of CoWIN software, post-vaccination care and communication for all health functionaries. Aims: The current study attempts to fill the research gap in monitoring of COVID-19 vaccination session sites in tribal areas of UT of Dadra and Nagar Haveli (DNH) during COVID-19 pandemic. Methods and Material: It was a cross sectional observational study conducted from April to May 2021 at 36 purposively selected COVID-9 vaccination session sites. Sites were monitored independently for assessing various parameters like infrastructure, HR status, vaccine, logistics availability, and AEFI management using the WHO Session Site Monitoring Form for COVID-19 Vaccination. Results: Out of 36 session sites observed, three separate designated rooms were available at 21 (58.3%) sites. Almost two-third of the session sites (61.1%) had displayed information, education, communication (IEC) materials. Mean number of team members was 5.1 (SD 1.7). Adequate stock of vaccine vials and AD syringes, AEFI kits or anaphylaxis kits were available and biomedical waste segregation was as per guidelines at all the session sites. Conclusions: Logistics availability, safe injection practices, and COVID-appropriate behavior were adequate;however, infrastructure and post-vaccination care needs strengthening for successful rollout of COVID-19 vaccination.

18.
Indian Journal of Community Medicine ; JOUR(3):400-404, 47.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100015

ABSTRACT

Context: Adult population visiting COVID vaccination center is a potential teachable moment for screening and preventive advice on non-communicable diseases. Objectives: The objective of this study was to assess the proportion of vaccinees volunteering for screening and to know the proportion of newly detected hypertensives and diabetics among the screened vaccinees at COVID-19 vaccination center. Setting and Design: This descriptive, cross-sectional, operational research study was carried out at the COVID vaccination center at a medical college in central Gujarat from July to September 2021. Methods: After receiving the vaccine, the vaccinee was offered screening through a community-based assessment checklist for risk factors of non-communicable diseases, blood pressure, and blood sugar measurement. Those volunteering for this screening received a slip mentioning their risk score, blood pressure and blood sugar reading, and relevant health information and disease prevention advice. The study variables were acceptability (proportion of vaccinees volunteering for screening) and yield (newly detected hypertensives and diabetics among those screened). Results: Among vaccinees, 27.7% volunteered for risk scoring and blood pressure measurement, whereas 8.3% volunteered for blood sugar measurement. Around 15.5% of vaccinees had high-risk scores as per the community-based assessment checklist. The yield of freshly detected high blood pressure and high blood sugar was 19.3% and 10.5%, respectively. The yield was similar even among vaccinees under 30 years of age. Conclusions: Vaccinees demonstrated interest in undergoing screening for non-communicable diseases. Yield indicates that such screening is worth the effort.

19.
Indian Journal of Community Medicine ; JOUR(3):396-399, 47.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100014

ABSTRACT

Background: The term mucormycosis refers to any fungal infection caused by fungi belonging to the Mucorales order. The disease often manifests in the skin and also affects the lungs and the brain. A large number of Mucormycosis cases were detected in Delhi, Maharashtra and Gujarat, and Madhya Pradesh. Objectives: (1) To describe the epidemiology, management, and outcome of individuals with mucormycosis. (2) To evaluate the risk factors associated with cases and control. Methodology: A case–control study, conducted in Hamidia Hospital, Bhopal, for 5 weeks. One hundred and sixty-eight patients diagnosed clinically with radiological or pathological findings was considered a case of Mucormycosis. Control was taken from March 2020 to May 28, 2021, the list of COVID-19-positive patients obtained from IDSP, MP. Results: Majority of the study participants were among the age group of 51–60 years and comprising 69.6% of males. Diabetes mellitus is the major comorbidity found in both cases (87.58%) and in controls (20.0%). Conclusion: There is a need to stress to control hyperglycemia, and monitor blood glucose levels after discharge following COVID-19 treatment.

20.
Indian Journal of Community Medicine ; JOUR(3):461-463, 47.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100013
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