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1.
J Surg Educ ; 2022 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966889

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Online education has been increasingly utilized over the past decades. The COVID-19 pandemic accelerated the transition of conventional face-to-face curricula to online platforms, with limited evidence for its teaching efficacy. This systematic review aims to assess the effectiveness of online video-based education compared with standard conventional education in teaching basic surgical skills to surgical trainees and students undergoing medical training. METHODS: We performed a literature search in Embase, Medline, Cochrane CENTRAL and Scopus from inception until February 2022. Studies included were randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and observational studies. We included randomised controlled trials only for meta-analysis. The primary outcome was surgical skill proficiency. The secondary outcomes were participant perception, confidence and satisfaction. Two authors independently assessed the search results for eligibility, extracted the data and assessed the risk of bias using the Cochrane Risk of Bias tool 2. Where appropriate, we performed random effects meta-analyses of the pooled study data to calculate a standardized mean difference. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies met the inclusion criteria totaling 715 participants; 603 were included in qualitative analysis and 380 in meta-analysis. All included studies were assessed as having a low risk of bias. The majority of studies found no significant difference between conventional and video-based education in teaching basic surgical skills, three studies found video-based education was superior and one study found conventional education was superior. There was no statistically significant difference in skill proficiency between the two groups (standardized mean difference of -0.02 (95% CI: -0.34, 0.30); p=0.90). Video-based education results in an equivalent improvement in confidence and satisfaction rates. Additional benefits of video-based education include convenience, accessibility and efficiency. CONCLUSIONS: Basic surgical skills can be taught as effectively through online video-based education as conventional teaching methods. Online education should be utilized as an adjunct to medical curricula beyond the COVID-19 era.

2.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 28(6): 768-770, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966442
3.
Med Sci Educ ; : 1-10, 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966209

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Professional identity development is a central aim of medical education, which has been disrupted during COVID-19. Yet, no research has qualitatively explored COVID-19's impact across institutions or countries on medical students' identities. Kegan proposes a cognitive model of identity development, where 'disorientating dilemmas' prompt student development. Given the potential of COVID-related disruption to generate disorientating dilemmas, the authors investigated the ways in which COVID-19 influenced students' identity development. Methods: The authors conducted an international qualitative study with second year medical students from Imperial College London, and third year students from Melbourne Medical School. Six focus groups occurred 2020-2021, with three to six students per group. Authors analysed data using reflexive thematic analysis, applying Kegan's model as a sensitising theoretical lens. Results: COVID-19 has resulted in a loss of clinical exposure, loss of professional relationships, and a shift in public perception of physicians. Loss of exposure to clinical practice removed the external validation from patients and seniors many students depended on for identity development. Students' experiences encouraged them to assume the responsibilities of the profession and the communities they served, in the face of conflicting demands and risk. Acknowledging and actioning this responsibility facilitated identity development as a socially responsible advocate. Conclusions: Educators should consider adapting medical education to support students through Kegan's stages of development. Measures to foster relationships between students, patients, and staff are likely necessary. Formal curricula provisions, such as spaces for reflection and opportunities for social responsibility, may aid students in resolving the conflict many have recently experienced. Supplementary Information: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s40670-022-01592-z.

4.
HNO ; 2022 Jul 27.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966117

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Due to the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) pandemic, postgraduate training in otorhinolaryngology in 2020 was transferred completely from face-to-face to digital teaching. This paper assesses whether this change was possible without a reduction in the quality of teaching and learning. METHODS: Results of final written examinations were compared for the years 2016-2020, and the results of the teaching evaluation by the students for 2017-2020. The evaluation by students in 2020 included additional questions related to the switch from face-to-face to digital teaching. Additionally, the lecturers and teachers were asked for their assessments. RESULTS: Results of the final written examination did not show any significant differences between 2016-2019 and 2020. Students were highly satisfied with the digital format, but values did not reach the level of former years with face-to-face-teaching. Especially the interaction with patients and the teaching of manual skills were rated lower in the digital format. Lecturers emphasized the additional workload for preparation of digital teaching. CONCLUSION: The results of written examinations showed no difference between digital and face-to-face teaching. Online communication and interaction were reduced and regarded as cumbersome by students and faculty. Digital solutions providing more interaction and active participation are required. The digital format is more appropriate for teaching basic knowledge than for teaching practical skills.

5.
Laryngo- Rhino- Otologie ; 101:S354, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967668

ABSTRACT

Background The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably catalyzed digitization processes in medical education. This opens up fields of innovative research, which must also show evidence in terms of student learning success. In particular, this applies to the acquisition of practical skills. Objective It was exmined to what extent students can acquire practical skills within a purely digitally implemented ENT mirror examination and how sustainable the learning success is when students return after one semester. By referring to the study 'Learning curve of the ENT mirror examination' by Polk et al. 2020, a comparison of online and face-to-face teaching can be drawn as well. Materials and methods Within a five-day ENT internship, 146 students were taught 6 ENT mirror examinations via a videoconferencing system. Student performance was assessed daily in a testing group (PG, n = 48) and also in a control group (KG, n = 98) on day 5 using a standardized checklist. After one semester, the examination was retaken for PG (n = 29) and KG (n = 17). Results Within the five days, PG showed a significant increase in performance on all partial examinations. For most partial examinations, PG's and KG's performance differed significantly, but these differences were largely undetectable after one semester. The results of online and face-to-face teaching showed great similarities. Conclusion Even during the COVID-19 pandemic, students were able to acquire practical skills in the ENT mirror examination at a level of performance comparable to that of face-to-face teaching. The PG's daily formative examinations seemed to ensure a better examination routine at the end of the internship, but the PG students' results became more similar to those of the KG over time.

6.
Anatomical Sciences Education ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1966026

ABSTRACT

To examine the implications of the transition from face-to-face to online learning from a psychobiological perspective, this study investigated potential differences in physiological stress parameters of students engaged in online or face-to-face learning, and determined whether these can be identified as possible mediators between learning experience and achievement emotions. In a randomized experimental field study, medical students (n = 82) attended either regular face-to-face classes of the microscopic anatomy course or the same practical course online using Zoom videoconferencing platform. The present study investigated Heart Rate Variability (HRV) and salivary cortisol concentration as stress correlates, within the contexts of online and face-to-face learning and compared these parameters with a control group that was measured at rest. Additionally, participants completed a standardized questionnaire about their experienced emotions in relation to task achievement and subjective stress levels. A significant reduction in HRV was found in face-to-face learning, suggesting stronger stress responses in the face-to-face learning environment (?2 =?0.421, P <?0.001). Furthermore, participants engaged in face-to-face learning showed significantly higher cortisol concentrations (?2 =?0.115, P =?0.032). Additionally, increased sympathetic activation correlated with the discrete positive emotion of enjoyment exclusively within the face-to-face condition (r = 0.365, P =?0.043). These results indicate that the transfer of a face-to-face practical course in microscopic anatomy to an online learning environment is associated with decreased sympathetic and enhanced vagal cardiovascular influences, together with lower cortisol concentrations in healthy medical students.

7.
Cureus ; 14(6): e26176, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964580

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The use of hydroxychloroquine has dramatically increased since being touted as a potential therapeutic in combating coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus. This newfound popularity increases the risk of accidental pediatric ingestion, whereby just one or two tablets causes morbidity and mortality from seizures, cardiac dysrhythmias, and cardiogenic shock. The unique management of hydroxychloroquine overdose makes it imperative for emergency medicine physicians to have familiarity with treating this condition. Similarly, ​​during the COVID-19 pandemic, there have been publicized cases touting extracts of oleander as being a potential therapeutic against the illness. Since it is commonly available and potentially lethal ingestion with a possible antidote, we developed a simulation case based on the available literature. The two cases were combined to create a pediatric toxicology curriculum for emergency medicine residents and medical students. Both of these treatments were selected as simulation cases since they were being touted by prominent national figures as potential cures for COVID-19. METHODS: Two series of simulation cases were conducted in a high-fidelity simulation lab with emergency medicine residents and medical students. The hydroxychloroquine simulation case involved the management of a four-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, and tachycardia after ingesting hydroxychloroquine tablets. As the case unfolded, the child became increasingly unstable, eventually experiencing QT prolongation, torsades de pointes, and ventricular fibrillation arrest requiring appropriate resuscitation to achieve a return of spontaneous circulation. The oleander simulation case involved the management of a three-year-old male who presented to the emergency department with nausea, vomiting, and tachycardia after ingesting parts of an unknown plant. As that case progresses, the child becomes increasingly unstable, eventually experiencing atrial fibrillation, bradycardia, and degenerating into pulseless electrical activity and cardiac arrest requiring appropriate resuscitation to achieve the return of spontaneous circulation. Both series of simulation cases were modifiable based on trainee level and had the ability to include ancillary emergency department staff. RESULTS: Each simulation case was performed six times at our simulation center, with a total of 22 learners for the hydroxychloroquine case, and 14 for the oleander case. Through pre- and post-simulation confidence assessments, learners demonstrated increases in knowledge of toxidromes, evaluating pediatric overdoses, treating cardiac dysrhythmias, performing pediatric advanced life support, and managing post-arrest care. Learners also demonstrated improvements in recognizing the unique treatment of hydroxychloroquine and oleander toxicity, the toxic dose of both substances in a child, and the most common electrolyte anomaly seen in each toxicity. DISCUSSION: Simulation training enables learners to manage rare and complex disease processes. These cases were designed to educate trainees in recognizing and treating rare overdoses of emerging "therapeutics" that were touted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.

8.
Antibiotics (Basel) ; 11(7)2022 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963668

ABSTRACT

Background: Antibiotic resistance (ABR) is at the top of global health threats. This paper aims to assess Polish physicians' readiness to impact ABR through prescribing routines. Methods: Surveying Polish physicians participating in specialization courses at the Center for Postgraduate Medical Education in Warsaw, Poland from October 2019 to March 2020. Results: Information was obtained from 504 physicians aged 25-59, mean 32.8 ± 5.9 years, mainly women (65%). Most doctors (78%) prescribed antibiotics at least once a week. Physicians indicated clinical practice guidelines as resources most often consulted in the management of infections (90%). However, clinical experience was also declared a powerful resource. In total, 54% of respondents recalled receiving information about the prudent use of antibiotics within 12 months, which partially translated into changing views (56%) and practice (42%). Physicians disagreed that national campaigns provide good promotion of prudent antibiotics use (75%) or that they are effective (61%). Only 40% of doctors were aware of the national campaign promoting responsible antibiotics use, 24% had heard about the European Antibiotic Awareness Day and 20% knew about the World Antimicrobial Awareness Week. Conclusions: Prescribers most often rely on clinical practice guidelines and their own experience as resources for antibiotics use. Doctors' awareness of available resources and information campaigns concerning antibiotics and antibiotic resistance should be improved.

9.
JMIR Serious Games ; 10(3): e38433, 2022 Jul 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963267

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recently, the demand for mechanical ventilation (MV) has increased with the COVID-19 pandemic; however, the conventional approaches to MV training are resource intensive and require on-site training. Consequently, the need for independent learning platforms with remote assistance in institutions without resources has surged. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to determine the feasibility and effectiveness of an augmented reality (AR)-based self-learning platform for novices to set up a ventilator without on-site assistance. METHODS: This prospective randomized controlled pilot study was conducted at Samsung Medical Center, Korea, from January to February 2022. Nurses with no prior experience of MV or AR were enrolled. We randomized the participants into 2 groups: manual and AR groups. Participants in the manual group used a printed manual and made a phone call for assistance, whereas participants in the AR group were guided by AR-based instructions and requested assistance with the head-mounted display. We compared the overall score of the procedure, required level of assistance, and user experience between the groups. RESULTS: In total, 30 participants completed the entire procedure with or without remote assistance. Fewer participants requested assistance in the AR group compared to the manual group (7/15, 47.7% vs 14/15, 93.3%; P=.02). The number of steps that required assistance was also lower in the AR group compared to the manual group (n=13 vs n=33; P=.004). The AR group had a higher rating in predeveloped questions for confidence (median 3, IQR 2.50-4.00 vs median 2, IQR 2.00-3.00; P=.01), suitability of method (median 4, IQR 4.00-5.00 vs median 3, IQR 3.00-3.50; P=.01), and whether they intended to recommend AR systems to others (median 4, IQR 3.00-5.00 vs median 3, IQR 2.00-3.00; P=.002). CONCLUSIONS: AR-based instructions to set up a mechanical ventilator were feasible for novices who had no prior experience with MV or AR. Additionally, participants in the AR group required less assistance compared with those in the manual group, resulting in higher confidence after training. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT05446896; https://beta.clinicaltrials.gov/study/NCT05446896.

10.
Journal of Xiangya Medicine ; 7, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1964905

ABSTRACT

Background: To maintain the continuity of medical education during the COVID-19 epidemic, online learning has replaced traditional face-to-face learning. But the efficacy and acceptance of online learning for medical education remains unknown. This meta-analysis aimed to assess whether online learning improves learning outcomes and is more acceptable to medical students compared to offline learning. Methods: Four databases were searched for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and comparative studies (non-RCTs) involving online learning published from January 1900 to October 2020. A total of twenty-seven studies comparing online and offline learning in medical students were included. The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations (GRADE) framework and Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS) were used to assess the methodological quality of RCTs and non-RCTs respectively. The data of knowledge and skills scores and course satisfaction were synthesized using a random effects model for the meta-analysis. Results: Twenty-one RCTs that were judged to be of high quality according to the GRADE framework and six non-RCTs studies which ranged from 6 to 8 (NOS) and can be considered high-quality were included in this meta-analysis. The revealed that the online learning group had significantly higher post-test scores (SMD =0.58, 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.91;P=0.0006) and pre-and post-test score gains than the offline group (SMD =1.12, 95% CI: 0.14 to 2.11, P=0.02). In addition, online education was more satisfactory to participants than the offline learning (OR: 2.02;95% CI: 1.16 to 3.52;P=0.01). Subgroup analysis was performed on knowledge and skill scores at the post-test level. The selected factors included study outcome, study design and type, participants, course type and country. No significant factors were observed in the subgroup analysis except for course type subgroup analysis. Discussion: Online learning in medical education could lead to higher post-test knowledge and skill scores than offline learning. It also has higher satisfaction ratings than offline education. In conclusion, online learning can be considered as a potential educational method during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, given the risk of bias of included studies such as the inclusion of non-randomized comparative studies, the conclusion should be made with cautions. Trial Registration: CRD42020220295. © Journal of Xiangya Medicine. All rights reserved.

11.
GMS Journal for Medical Education ; 39(3), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1963360

ABSTRACT

Objective: Obtaining a systematic medical history (MH) from a patient is a core competency in medical education and plays a vital role in the diagnosis of diseases. At the Faculty of Medicine at LMU Munich, students have their first course in MH taking during their second year. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the traditional bedside MH taking course had to be transformed into an online course (OC). Our objectives were to implement an online MH taking course, to evaluate its feasibility and to compare the evaluation results to a historic cohort that had undertaken the traditional bedside teaching course (BTC). Methods: 874 second-year students participated in the OC (BTC=827). After teaching the theoretical background via asynchronous online lectures, students participated in a practical exercise with fellow students using the video communication platform Zoom where they were able to practice taking a MH on the basis of fictitious, text-based patient cases. Students were then asked to evaluate the course through a standardized online survey with 31 questions on teaching quality and self-perceived learning success, which had also been used in previous years. The survey results were compared to the results of the historic cohort using the Mann-Whitney U test. Results: A total of n=162 students (18.5%) evaluated the OC. In the historic cohort, n=252 (30.5%) completed the survey. 85.3% of the OC respondents thought that the atmosphere during the practical exercise was productive and 83.0% greatly appreciated the flexibility in terms of time management. Moreover, they appreciated the online resources as well as having the opportunity to undertake a MH taking course during the COVID-19 pandemic. 27.7% of the respondents thought that traditional BTCs should be supplemented through more online activities in the future. With respect to the ability of independently taking a MH upon completion of the course, the OC was rated significantly lower relative to the BTC (mean OC=2.4, SD=±1.1 vs. mean BTC=1.9, SD=±1.1 (1=strongly agree;5=strongly disagree);p<0.0001). Conclusion: OCs are a feasible format and seem to convey the theory and practical implementation in a peer-exercise format of MH taking to medical students. The theoretical background can be acquired with great flexibility. Nevertheless, the students’ self-appraisal suggested that the traditional teaching format was more effective at teaching MH taking skills. Thus, we propose a blended learning concept, combining elements of both formats. In this context, we suggest prospective, randomized trials to evaluate blended learning approaches. © 2022 Lange et al.

12.
Update in Anaesthesia ; 36, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1960260

ABSTRACT

2020 will always be remembered as an unprecedented year with the Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic creating chaos and disruption in healthcare systems worldwide and in particular that of medical education in Anaesthesiology. We share our experience of the university affliated with the largest medical school in Singapore in mitigating the disruption on medical student education in Anaesthesiology amidst the pandemic. In Singapore, medical education is coordinated by the Ministry of Health, medical schools and the Academy of Medicine. With COVID19, undergraduate anaesthesia education was severely disrupted. Planned training programs had to adapt to a videoconferencing platform, small group teachings or E learning modules. Alterations to assessments and training had to be implemented. Constant changes and updates became the norm, adding to the stress amongst the medical students as they continued with the pursuit of training and education. As the world braces itself for a more virulent strain of the COVID-19 virus and the challenges of mass vaccination programs, the only constant in life is that of change. The task of educating the next generation of anesthesiologists and airway skills of doctors, likewise, needs to adapt and evolve to ensure quality and competencies of our specialty. © World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists 2022.

13.
Update in Anaesthesia ; 36, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1960259

ABSTRACT

Simulation-based education (SBE) has a long history in medical education. SBE is now widely used to train individuals and teams in technical as well as social and cognitive skills. Much of the simulation literature is developed in well-resourced universities and hospitals with a dedicated simulation center, staff, consumables, and other assets. Looking at simulation from a global viewpoint, simulation centers are very hard to establish since the opportunity cost of investing in simulators, mannequins, equipment, a physical space and staff to run the center, is high. There also exists other barriers, for example time and training opportunities needed to develop expertise amongst simulation educators in the institution. Understanding that fidelity is not equal to benefit and that scenarios can be conducted in actual clinical settings, such as using in-situ simulation, rather than specialist simulation facilities, can help anesthesiologists begin to train using simulation without the need for significant financial investment. We provide practical tips for getting started with SBE and argue that the most important investment is in faculty development and engagement of the team. We also discuss the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in necessitating the simulation world to be creative and develop new ways to train, for example through remote simulation. © World Federation of Societies of Anaesthesiologists 2022.

14.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e060347, 2022 07 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962294

ABSTRACT

Realist evaluation is a methodology that addresses the questions: 'what works, for whom, in which circumstances, and how?'. In this approach, programme theories are developed and tested against available evidence. However, when complex interventions are implemented in rapidly changing environments, there are many unpredictable forces that determine the programme's scope and architecture, as well as resultant outcome. These forces can be theorised, in real time, and included in realist evaluation outputs for current and future optimisation of programmes. Reflecting on a realist evaluation of first-contact physiotherapy in primary care (the FRONTIER Study), five important considerations are described for improving the quality of realist evaluation outputs when studying rapidly changing health service delivery. These are: (1) ensuring that initial programme theories are developed through creative thinking sessions, empirical and non-empirical literature, and stakeholder consultation; (2) testing the causal impact of formal and informal (eg, emergent) components of service delivery models; (3) contrasting initial programme theories with rival theory statements; (4) envisioning broad system impacts beyond the immediate implementation setting; and (5) incorporating rapidly evolving service developments and context changes into the theory testing process in real-time (eg, Additional Role Reimbursement Scheme, COVID-19). Through the reflections presented, the aim is to clarify the benefit of realist evaluation to assess emerging models of care and rapidly changing health service delivery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services , Humans , Referral and Consultation
15.
BMJ Open ; 12(7): e060079, 2022 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962291

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of an interprofessional case-based training programme to enhance clinical knowledge and confidence among clinicians working in high HIV-burden settings in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). SETTING: Health professions training institutions and their affiliated clinical training sites in 12 high HIV-burden countries in SSA. PARTICIPANTS: Cohort comprising preservice and in-service learners, from diverse health professions, engaged in HIV service delivery. INTERVENTION: A standardised, interprofessional, case-based curriculum designed to enhance HIV clinical competency, implemented between October 2019 and April 2020. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The primary outcomes measured were knowledge and clinical confidence related to topics addressed in the curriculum. These outcomes were assessed using a standardised online assessment, completed before and after course completion. A secondary outcome was knowledge retention at least 6 months postintervention, measured using the same standardised assessment, 6 months after training completion. We also sought to determine what lessons could be learnt from this training programme to inform interprofessional training in other contexts. RESULTS: Data from 3027 learners were collected: together nurses (n=1145, 37.9%) and physicians (n=902, 29.8%) constituted the majority of participants; 58.1% were preservice learners (n=1755) and 24.1% (n=727) had graduated from training within the prior year. Knowledge scores were significantly higher, postparticipation compared with preparticipation, across all content domains, regardless of training level and cadre (all p<0.05). Among 188 learners (6.2%) who retook the test at >6 months, knowledge and self-reported confidence scores were greater compared with precourse scores (all p<0.05). CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the largest interprofessional, multicountry training programme established to improve HIV knowledge and clinical confidence among healthcare professional workers in SSA. The findings are notable given the size and geographical reach and demonstration of sustained confidence and knowledge retention post course completion. The findings highlight the utility of interprofessional approaches to enhance clinical training in SSA.


Subject(s)
Curriculum , HIV Infections , Clinical Competence , Cohort Studies , HIV Infections/therapy , Health Personnel/education , Humans
16.
BJU International ; 129:115, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956729

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The outbreak of the Wuhan Covid-19 virus has had a significant impact across all industries. How we practice, medicine has seen substantial change. Consequently, medical education has diminished as it has not been deemed essential given the current climate. Here in Australia and other parts of the globe, experienced education restrictions across all the Health Science Universities and university hospitals. Given the substantial research output in Urology and the necessity of local, national, and global conferences, education within the specialty has suffered. Therefore, there has been significant demand for medical education to be delivered through alternative mediums. In contrast to the Spanish flu of 1918- 1920, we have the luxury of modern technology and a plethora of platforms to deliver education in the field of Urology. One such platform is podcasts. Aim: We aim to investigate whether the Urology industry has invested in podcasts since the outbreak of COVID-19 to combat this educational dilemma. Methods: On October 12th, 2021, we searched the term Urology on Spotify. We excluded all non-English podcasts that were not Urology-focused, podcasts that didn't make Urology the focus, and channels that didn't show continued and consistent output, i.e., < 5 episodes. We included all podcasts that focused on Urology education, non-English podcats that were clearly Urology focused (i.e., Anotomia Urologica), and included podcats on sexual health that had a Urology focus (i.e. 'The Full release'). Results: We obtained 97 podcasts on the Spotify search engine using the above criteria. After excluding podcats based on our above methodology, we had 63 results. Of the 63 results, 33 were in English. Out of the 33 in English, one was on andrology, four on urological products, one on sexual health, two on Urology anecdotes, two on prostate health, 14 on general Urology education for trainees, two on urology pediatrics, 3 were patientfocused, three were for guideline updates and one on the news in Urology. Of the 63 podcasts, 53 were created post the outbreak of the COVID-19 outbreak. Conclusion: In conclusion, 84% of educational Urology podcasts today have been created post the outbreak of the COVID-10 outbreak, confirming our hypothesis.

17.
Journal of Digestive Endoscopy ; 13(2):77-81, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1956439

ABSTRACT

Introduction The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the healthcare system. The residents who are at the frontline of this pandemic have suffered the most. The extent of the training loss due to the COVID-19 pandemic on gastroenterology (GE) training is not studied in India. Methods We designed a 36-question based google survey and distributed it to the GE residents all across India, via email. All the responses collected were analyzed using appropriate statistical methods. Results A total of 140 responses were received. No significant decrease in teaching sessions/ classes was reported. Most of the residents (83.5%) reported inability to complete the target thesis enrolment. The number of patients seen by the residents in outpatient department, patients managed in wards and endoscopic procedures done by residents have decreased significantly (p -valve <0.001 for all). An overwhelming 89.9% (n = 125) of the GE residents were posted for COVID-19 duties. Almost half (50.4%) of them were COVID-19 positive. Conclusion The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the training of GE residents in India immensely and an extension period of 3 months may be offered to them.

18.
International Journal of Pharmaceutical and Clinical Research ; 14(6):720-727, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1955696

ABSTRACT

Background: Due to the inclusion of respiratory tract and aerosol-generating procedures, oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) is regarded one of the high-risk specialty. COVID19's impact on inpatient illness patterns and operations in OMFS, on the other hand, has yet to be investigated. Aim: To look at the effect of COVID-19 on disease patterns in OMFS inpatients, as well as to identify context-relevant important services in the OMFS field for future policy and resource distribution considerations. Methods and Materials: A total of 149 patients were included in the study after obtaining written informed consent from the relatives of patients. RT-PCR tests were carried out for all the study participants included in the study. Further there was collection of data regarding the stay in hospitals, administration of antifungal drugs like injection amphotericin, pocasonazole and tablet pocasonazole. Then there was tabulation of data regarding various surgical interventions carried out. There was comparison of these data between the COVID and non COVID patients. Results: When there analysis of study participants in which administration of oxygen was carried out then it was found that 49.23% of study participants getting oxygen were NON COVID patients while 50.77% of such study participants were COVID patients. The difference was not significant statistically. When there analysis of study participants in which administration of steroids was carried out then it was found that 45.56% of study participants getting steroids were NON COVID patients while 54.54% of such study participants were COVID patients. The difference was significant statistically. When there analysis of study participants who got discharged from hospital then it was found that 60.42% of study participants getting normal were NON COVID patients while 39.58% of such study participants were COVID patients. The difference was significant statistically Conclusion: In a comparative investigation, we first provided epidemiological findings on the effect of COVID19 on oral and maxillofacial surgery illness pattern. During the pandemic, the shift in illness pattern and burden will have a long-term influence on OMFS patient care, education, and training. Our research provides data for health policymakers to think about relocating medical resources and improving medical education and services.

19.
Digit Health ; 8: 20552076221114195, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957031

ABSTRACT

Objective: We aimed to explore the factors that influence medical students' intention to integrate dHealth technologies in their practice and analyze the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on their perceptions and intention. Methods: We conducted a two-phased survey study at the University of Montreal's medical school in Canada. The study population consisted of 1367 medical students. The survey questionnaire was administered in two phases, that is, an initial survey (t0) in February 2020, before the Covid-19 pandemic, and a replication survey (t1) in January 2021, during the pandemic. Component-based structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test seven research hypotheses. Results: A total of 184 students responded to the survey at t0 (13%), whereas 138 responded to the survey at t1 (10%). Findings reveal that students, especially those who are in their preclinical years, had little occasion to experiment with dHealth technologies during their degree. This lack of exposure may explain why a vast majority felt that dHealth should be integrated into medical education. Most respondents declared an intention to integrate dHealth, including AI-based tools, into their future medical practice. One of the most salient differences observed between t0 and t1 brings telemedicine to the forefront of medical education. SEM results confirm the explanatory power of the proposed research model. Conclusions: The present study unveils the specific dHealth technologies that could be integrated into existing medical curricula. Formal training would increase students' competencies with these technologies which, in turn, could ease their adoption and effective use in their practice.

20.
Anat Sci Educ ; 2022 Jul 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1955887

ABSTRACT

The study of anatomy is a team-driven field in which anatomy instruction occurs in small groups in the laboratory with one faculty member guiding students through each anatomical region. One laboratory experience may include several small group instructors in one simultaneous learning session. In comparison, the education of future gross anatomists often happens in an apprenticeship model, where the optimal learning outcomes are met through training with an experienced mentor. It was the vision of the authors to further their education through initiating an inter-institutional exchange to apprentice with innovative mentors in order to bring new ideas back to their own gross anatomy courses. The Southeastern Conference, a consortium of the Universities in the Southern region of the United States often associated with intercollegiate sports, has a host of academic initiatives in addition to the athletic emphasis. The Southeastern Conference Faculty Travel Program is one mechanism by which the organization promotes scholarly excellence. In this case, the Faculty Travel Program provided a way for authors from the University of Kentucky to visit a nearby institution, Vanderbilt University, and learn from like-minded anatomy educators, with the goal of incorporating changes in their courses geared toward quality improvement. After this implementation, positive themes emerged in the student feedback on course evaluations. However, the collaboration was interrupted by the onset of the Covid-19 pandemic. This article examines the strengths of interinstitutional apprenticeship and the benefits of such practices in a time of accelerated change in anatomical instruction.

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