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1.
Journal of Physical Education and Sport ; 22(7):1570-1580, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2067179

ABSTRACT

Background: Nowadays, there is great concern about gender inequality in many areas of the recent scenario;an aspect that is being pursued through the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), exactly through SDG 5;cooperative learning seems to be one of the ways to achieve gender equality in secondary school students. It is essential to investigate new methodologies to try to curb many of the problems that have been active for many years, and it is crucial to promote and encourage these values in society at the educational stages. However, there is still not enough research that has been carried out on this subject, so there is still much to learn. Therefore, the aim of this research is to analyse whether the effect of a didactic unit of Physical Education through cooperative learning shows improvements in the attitudes of coeducation in secondary school students. Method: A total of 131 secondary school students (74 females), with a mean age of 14.46 ± 0.64 years, carried out the study. A quasi-experimental, pre-post study was carried out using a control and experimental group. The sample was not randomised. For 5 weeks, the control group maintained normal Physical Education sessions, following a more traditional methodology based on direct command. Results: The experimental group, on the other hand, carried out the 5 sessions of the didactic unit based on the cooperative learning methodology, through mixed groupings. To assess the normality of the sample, the Kolmogorov Smirnov test was used to confirm that the sample was non-parametric. To measure the effect of the intervention, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests were performed. The statistics showed that the experimental group was significantly higher than the control in two of its factors in the pre, but no significant differences were shown in the post. Conclusions: These findings do not verify the main objective of the study, perhaps as a consequence of the quantitative difference of the samples between groups and between stages (pre-post), or as a consequence of insufficient or erroneous programming. Finally, it would be interesting to evaluate the same results by segmenting by gender to see if more significant differences are shown.

2.
Front Hum Neurosci ; 16: 988021, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065601

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the entire world. The SARS-CoV-2 virus is wreaking havoc globally, leading to serious health problems and even death. The purpose of this study is to present the brainwave variability pattern using QEEG after exposure to COVID-19 and to introduce the subject of the Sudarshan Kriya Yoga (SKY)-based breathing technique. QEEG is one of the basic neurological examinations through which we can compare the changes in the nervous system after SARS-CoV-2 virus infection and observe the variation of brainwave frequencies with a breathing technique.

3.
Journal of Integrated Care ; 30(4):413-433, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2063196

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The purpose of this study is to understand virtual care use (e.g. telephone and video visits) during the COVID-19 pandemic across three hospital-based ambulatory clinics (i.e. mental health, renal and respiratory care) and to describe associated patient and provider experiences.Design/methodology/approach>A mixed-methods convergent study was conducted including quantitative electronic medical records data on virtual care use, electronic surveys assessing domains of experience (e.g. satisfaction, acceptance and technology use) among patient and providers and semi-structured interviews exploring the associated barriers and facilitators of virtual care adoption.Findings>Virtual care adoption rates and relative modality use (telephone vs video) varied across specialty clinics. Mental health clinics) showed the greatest use of virtual care and greater use of video over telephone, as compared to renal and respiratory care, where telephone was used almost exclusively. Patients and providers reported an overall good satisfaction and acceptance of virtual care (60–72%) across clinics, but commonly observed barriers (technical problems, behavioral adaptations needed and inequity) persisted. Good value propositions, tech support and the presence of early adopters who can support others in workflow re-design and highlight value propositions of virtual care were listed as adoption facilitators.Originality/value>The study provides a unique opportunity to compare the rate of virtual care adoption before and during the COVID-19 pandemic across distinct specialties that operate within the same organizational and political setting. This study showed that the nature of the condition (e.g. mental health conditions) and the characteristics of the users (e.g. younger patients) may drive models of care with higher rate of video use. Focusing on removing common barriers, like providing tech support and ensuring equitable access to patients, continues to be important even in the context of high virtual care adoption rates during the pandemic.

4.
Chest ; 162(4):A519, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2060618

ABSTRACT

SESSION TITLE: COVID-19 Infections: Issues During and After Hospitalization SESSION TYPE: Original Investigations PRESENTED ON: 10/17/2022 01:30 pm - 02:30 pm PURPOSE: To characterize the health care utilization (HCU) of patients after discharge from a hospitalization due to Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHODS: Retrospective analysis from a national cohort using the Optum Clinformatics Data Mart. Included all adults hospitalized with a primary diagnosis of COVID-19 between April 2020 and March 2021, with prior 12 months of continuous enrollment. HCU of patients discharged to a home setting was evaluated in three periods (0-90 days;91-180 days;181-275 days post-discharge). HCU was defined as emergency department (ED) visits, inpatient (IP) admissions, rehabilitation/skilled nursing facility (SNF) admissions, outpatient (OP) and telemedicine visits and was expressed as the number of visits per 10,000 person-days to adjust for time from discharge. We also examined the distribution of office visits by provider specialty RESULTS: We identified 91,374 unique patients who were discharged alive after a hospitalization due to COVID-19. A greater percentage of patients was discharged to a home setting (n=63,674 or 65.6%: home 41.54%;home with home health services 14.65%: home with outpatient services 4.42%) than to a non-home setting (26.23%: i.e., SNF, hospice, rehabilitation facility, etc.). The patients discharged to a home setting were mostly white (58.8%), females (53.4%), whose mean age was 72.4 (SD± 12). The percentage of office visits to Primary care provider (57.8%;48.3%, 47.7%), Cardiology (7.7%;8.0%;7.4%) Pulmonary medicine (4.7%;3.9%;3.1%) varied in the 3 time periods evaluated. Additionally, the outpatient visits to endocrinology (1.3%, 1.6%, 1.7%), Neurology (1.1%, 1.5%, 1.5%), Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation (0.7%, 1.0%, 1.2%), Psychiatry (0.7%, 0.9%, 1.1%) and other mental health professionals (0.4%, 0.5%, 0.5%) increased over time. CONCLUSIONS: In our nationally representative study, health care utilization remains high among patients discharged to a home setting after a hospitalization due to COVID-19. Additionally, the use of mental health services increased overtime among survivors. CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Understanding post-discharge health care utilization of patients after an index hospitalization due to COVID-19 will help health systems prepare and allocate resources for the most likely to be used services. DISCLOSURES: No relevant relationships by Alexander Duarte No relevant relationships by Yong-Fang Kuo No relevant relationships by Shawn Nishi, value=Consulting fee Removed 04/03/2022 by Shawn Nishi No relevant relationships by Efstathia Polychronopoulou No relevant relationships by Daniel Puebla Neira No relevant relationships by Gulshan Sharma No relevant relationships by Mohammed Zaidan

5.
Australian Journal of Primary Health ; 28(4):xlvi, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2058301

ABSTRACT

Background: Wait times for in-person mental health treatment are a national crisis for young people. Long wait times are associated with many negative consequences such as lower treatment satisfaction and discontinuation, symptom deterioration and relapse, and lower likelihood of future help-seeking. With the onset of COVID-19, wait times have become longer. General Practitioners (GPs) are the primary referrers to in-person mental health treatment, however, their ability to care for their youth patients' mental health is often negatively impacted by long wait times, often resulting in GPs engaging in significantly high levels of management, with little resources to do so. Brief, low-intensity digital interventions may provide accessible, evidence-based, and cost-effective care while young people await in-person mental health care. Aim/Objectives: This study aims to examine the impact of service wait times on GPs' treatment of mental health problems in youth patients and explore their openness to recommending digital interventions as support during this time. Method(s): A national cross-sectional survey conducted among 430 GPs (currently recruiting). Finding(s): This presentation will outline the survey results. Preliminary results (N=53) indicate that wait times impact GP decisions and management of young patients. Specifically, participants reported that due to long wait times, they often increase their care rather than refer patients to services (M=4.08, SD=.79) and often refer patients to different services than their preferred service (M=4.00, SD=.69), are very open to recommending mobile mental health apps to their patients (M=4.24, SD=.84), but are only somewhat confident in doing so (M=3.57, SD=1.27). Implications: This research is the first in Australia to examine mental health service wait times on GP treatment care and decisions specifically for youth. It will inform how young patients can be best supported and which interventions GPs consider to be most ideal for supporting young people while they await in-person mental health care.

6.
Australian Journal of Primary Health ; 28(4):xliv, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2058253

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has created social and medical disruptions to the Australian community. The introduction of telehealth Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) item numbers in early March 2020 has shifted mental health consultations from face-to-face to telehealth. There is a literature gap pertaining to the ongoing trends that extend past the initial 'first wave' of the pandemic in the context of an Australian landscape. Aim/Objective: To describe the pattern of mental health care consultations in a university-based general practice in Sydney, specifically, the distribution of face-to-face, telephone and tele-video consultations, according to the change in socio-political landscape and lockdowns. The secondary aim is to explore the effect of age, ethnicity, birth sex and student status, and the severity of patient symptoms via K10/DASS21 scores. Method(s): Retrospective data will be obtained from records of 456 patients attending a university-based general practice in Sydney, Australia between four different 35-day time periods: baseline pre- COVID-19 (1st February 2019 to 8th March 2019);first COVID-19 lockdown (31st March 2020 to 5th May 2020);second COVID-19 lockdown (20th August 2021 to 24th September 2021);post COVID-19 lockdown (1st February 2022 to 8th March 2022). Attendances will be defined by mental health MBS codes that correspond to mental health consultations, mental health care plans, and mental health care plan reviews, for face-to-face, telephone and tele-video consultations. K10/DASS21 scores will also be obtained. Statistical analysis will be performed using the two-sample t-test on SPSS. Finding(s): Data analysis is currently in progress. Results will be available by July 2022. Implications: Given the recent temporary telehealth extension announced by the Australian Government on 16th January 2022, the findings of our study will illustrate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health consultations in various subgroups and provide additional data for policymakers to facilitate further examination in continuing MBS subsidisation.

7.
JMIR Ment Health ; 9(9): e38067, 2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While mental health applications are increasingly becoming available for large populations of users, there is a lack of controlled trials on the impacts of such applications. Artificial intelligence (AI)-empowered agents have been evaluated when assisting adults with cognitive impairments; however, few applications are available for aging adults who are still actively working. These adults often have high stress levels related to changes in their work places, and related symptoms eventually affect their quality of life. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the contribution of TEO (Therapy Empowerment Opportunity), a mobile personal health care agent with conversational AI. TEO promotes mental health and well-being by engaging patients in conversations to recollect the details of events that increased their anxiety and by providing therapeutic exercises and suggestions. METHODS: The study was based on a protocolized intervention for stress and anxiety management. Participants with stress symptoms and mild-to-moderate anxiety received an 8-week cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) intervention delivered remotely. A group of participants also interacted with the agent TEO. The participants were active workers aged over 55 years. The experimental groups were as follows: group 1, traditional therapy; group 2, traditional therapy and mobile health (mHealth) agent; group 3, mHealth agent; and group 4, no treatment (assigned to a waiting list). Symptoms related to stress (anxiety, physical disease, and depression) were assessed prior to treatment (T1), at the end (T2), and 3 months after treatment (T3), using standardized psychological questionnaires. Moreover, the Patient Health Questionnaire-8 and General Anxiety Disorders-7 scales were administered before the intervention (T1), at mid-term (T2), at the end of the intervention (T3), and after 3 months (T4). At the end of the intervention, participants in groups 1, 2, and 3 filled in a satisfaction questionnaire. RESULTS: Despite randomization, statistically significant differences between groups were present at T1. Group 4 showed lower levels of anxiety and depression compared with group 1, and lower levels of stress compared with group 2. Comparisons between groups at T2 and T3 did not show significant differences in outcomes. Analyses conducted within groups showed significant differences between times in group 2, with greater improvements in the levels of stress and scores related to overall well-being. A general worsening trend between T2 and T3 was detected in all groups, with a significant increase in stress levels in group 2. Group 2 reported higher levels of perceived usefulness and satisfaction. CONCLUSIONS: No statistically significant differences could be observed between participants who used the mHealth app alone or within the traditional CBT setting. However, the results indicated significant differences within the groups that received treatment and a stable tendency toward improvement, which was limited to individual perceptions of stress-related symptoms. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04809090; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04809090.

8.
Handbook of rural, remote, and very remote mental health ; : 191-215, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2048165

ABSTRACT

There is a growing burden of disease nationally and internationally from mental illness, both as a stand-alone problem and also comorbid with the growing epidemic of chronic, non-communicable diseases. The advent of the COVID-19 pandemic in early 2020 and ongoing climate change sequelae have exacerbated these mental health risks exponentially, creating massive service delivery dilemmas globally. In many countries, people in regional and particularly rural and remote areas, bear a greater disease burden from mental health conditions, due largely to the unique stressors inherent in rural life and inequitable access to appropriate services. This chapter canvases these issues and includes a brief discussion of optimally integrated care, risk factors and needs specific to rural people, the impact of Indigeneity, the role of socioeconomic factors in general and mental health, and inequity of access to primary mental healthcare services. These factors are illustrated by focusing on Australia as a case study, exemplifying both generic characteristics and those unique to that country that are relevant to service delivery in rural areas. The chapter was accepted for publication prior to Australia's worst bushfires on record (in the summer of 2019-2020), subsequent floods in early 2020, and the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic in February-March 2020 (ongoing). Most of the highlighted factors, however, remain the same -albeit greatly exacerbated by these extraordinary events. Information is provided in relation to the distribution of four relevant mental health specialties, with recommendations made-specific to Australia and also in the global context-with regard to optimally integrated primary mental health care.Across the settled world, there is a huge need to systematically roll-out integrated mental health services, using a number of modalities, to meet rural need. It is recommended that changes include: interprofessional education to facilitate team-based care;co-location of multidisciplinary primary healthcare teams;development and integration of culturally appropriate health services for Indigenous clients;mapping of required services in regional, rural, and remote areas;and optimal and strategic use of available funding and telehealth options. It is also strongly recommended that integration of lifestyle interventions be included in all mental health treatment, to facilitate optimal outcomes. These initiatives are now particularly pertinent, given the post-COVID "mental health pandemic" predicted by health experts globally. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
NeuroQuantology ; 20(10):676-685, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2044244

ABSTRACT

Mental health issues impose an enormous disease burden on societies across the world. Despite its enormous social burden, mental disorders continue to be driven into the shadows by stigma, prejudice and fear. The issue is becoming ever more urgent in light of the forced migration and sustained conflict in many countries of the world. The status of mental health care varies widely from country to country. Many countries already have policies to deliver services for mental health conditions in primary care settings but require system strengthening to achieve integration. Many countries deliver care mainly in institutional settings and need dedicated advocacy and support in phasing out long-stay institutions and developing community-based alternatives. Some countries may require support for policy development or to implement mental health reform efforts. Concerns about potential increases in mental health conditions had already prompted 90% of countries surveyed to include mental health and psychosocial support in their COVID-19 response plans, but major gaps and concerns remain.For much of the pandemic, services for mental, neurological and substance use conditions were the most disrupted among all essential health services reported by WHO Member States. Many countries also reported major disruptions in life-saving services for mental health, including for suicide prevention. Various legislative provisions and Policies have been formulated. Post pandemic, the government of India paid more attention to the concern of mental health and introduced initiatives hitting the target areas. World Health Organization’s most recent Mental Health Atlas showed that in 2020, governments worldwide spent on average just over 2% of their health budgets on mental health and many low-income countries reported having fewer than one mental health worker per 100000 people. The addition of National Tele Mental Health Programme will bridge the critical gap and make the whole digital health ecosystem holistic. Respecting the rights of persons with mental health problems will reduce stigmatizing and discriminatory behaviours.

10.
Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science ; 21(4):719-730, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2043410

ABSTRACT

Objective. The need for scientific understanding of the revolutionary changes that have occurred associated with the situation of the COVID-19 pandemic, both in the organization of psychological and psychiatric care, and in the direction of developing effective treatment and prevention measures, determines the relevance of this study, the purpose of which is to study the clinical manifestations of psychopathological symptoms in patients, survivors of the COVID-19 disease, and develop a conceptual model for providing them with medical care in telemedicine. Materials and methods. We studied the psychopathological manifestations of post-covid syndrome in 129 patients who had recovered from COVID-19 and who applied to us for remote medical counseling psychological and psychiatric help for 10 months, from March to December 2020, using clinical psychopathological and psychodiagnostic test research methods. Results and Discussion. The high level of stress, anxiety and depression identified in the studied patients is primarily associated with the negative situation of the pandemic and the COVID-19 disease. A follow-up study proved the effectiveness of a treatment carried out in a telemedicine setting and combining cognitive-behavioral therapy with antidepressants and non-benzodiazepine tranquilizers. In patients who underwent a severe form of COVID-19, in the presence of premorbid chronic bronchopulmonary pathology, in addition to long-lasting psychopathological symptoms, somatic post-covid complications were also observed, and the stressfulness of the situation was perceived at a deeper personal level. For such patients, the course of treatment in telemedicine conditions should be extended and medical and psychological support provided during the entire period of convalescence. Conclusion. Chronic premorbid diseases of the bronchopulmonary and immune systems are predictors of long-term psychopathological symptomatology and the occurrence of post-covid somatic complications. The treatment tactics of patients with post-covid mental health disorders in telemedicine should be based on the protocols of cognitive-behavioral therapy for hypochondriacal and generalized anxiety disorder, in combination with antidepressants and tranquilizers of the non-benzodiazepine series, which ensures the stability of the positive results of therapeutic interventions, confirmed by our studies. The conceptual patientcentered model developed by us for the provision of psychological and psychiatric care for post-covid syndrome in telemedicine can be recommended as a universal algorithm for psycho-psychiatric interventions when providing remote assistance to patients with post-covid mental disorders.

11.
The European Journal of Psychiatry ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2041678

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives This paper reviews Australia's take-up of digital mental health interventions, including some specific reference to their application in relation to employment. Use of these interventions in Australia was already significant. Under COVID-19 they have exploded. The Australian experience offers useful lessons for European and other countries, and these are summarised. Methods This paper presents a narrative review of key texts, resources, policies and reports, from government and other sources. It also presents data reflecting the take-up of digital mental health services and the employment of people with a mental illness in Australia. Results We present data showing the explosion in uptake of digital mental health services. There is very limited evidence about the impact of these services in improving employment outcomes for people with a mental illness in Australia. The Government has moved to make them a permanent feature of mental health care, in addition to traditional face-to-face care. Conclusion Key lessons emerge from the Australian experience, including the need for target clarity;the importance of blending digital services into broader frameworks of mental health care;the need for quality and safety standards to be developed and applied to digital services;and the need for better evaluation of the outcomes of digital interventions in the workplace. The digital mental health genie is out of the bottle. New capacity for evaluation of the outcomes of digital mental health services is vital to ensure value and quality of such investments.

12.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 619, 2022 09 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2038691

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Home treatment (HT) is a treatment modality for patients with severe mental illness (SMI) in acute mental crises. It is frequently considered equivalent to psychiatric inpatient treatment in terms of treatment outcome. Peer Support (PS) means that people with lived experience of a mental illness are trained to support others on their way towards recovery. While PS is growing in international importance and despite a growing number of studies supporting its benefits, it is still not comprehensively implemented into routine care. The HoPe (Home Treatment with Peer Support) study investigates a combination of both - HT and PS - to provide further evidence for a recovery-oriented treatment of psychiatric patients. METHODS: In our randomized controlled trial (RCT), HT with PS is compared with HT without PS within a network of eight psychiatric clinical centers from the North, South and East of Germany. We investigate the effects of a combination of both approaches with respect to the prevention of relapse/recurrence defined as first hospitalization after randomization (primary outcome), disease severity, general functioning, self-efficacy, psychosocial health, stigma resistance, recovery support, and service satisfaction (secondary outcomes). A sample of 286 patients will be assessed at baseline after admission to HT care (data point t0) and randomized into the intervention (HT + PS) and control arm (HT). Follow-Up assessments will be conducted 2, 6 and 12 months after admission (resulting in three further data points, t1 to t3) and will be analyzed via intention-to-treat approach. DISCUSSION: This study may determine the positive effects of PS added to HT, prove additional evidence for the efficacy of PS and thereby facilitate its further implementation into psychiatric settings. The aim is to improve quality of mental health care and patients' recovery as well as to reduce the risk of relapses and hospitalizations for patients with SMI. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT04336527 , April 7, 2020.


Subject(s)
Mental Disorders , Mental Health , Counseling/methods , Humans , Mental Disorders/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Personal Satisfaction , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Treatment Outcome
13.
Lessons from COVID-19: Impact on Healthcare Systems and Technology ; : 241-262, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2027807

ABSTRACT

The provision of services to people with mental health problems and their families has been substantially affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Often face-to-face clinical work had to be replaced with telehealth, in line with COVID-19 regulations of social distancing. Currently, different types of online services have been implemented to meet the mental health needs of the population. This change from face-to-face to online service provision has been disruptive to many South Africans and at times resulted in people not being able to access these services. Aim: This chapter aims to describe specifically the use of online psychological service delivery pre-COVID-19 and during the lockdown. Method: We conducted a literature review exploring the delivery of psychological services through online channels pre-COVID-19 and during the lockdown. We highlight lessons learned and opportunities for psychological service provision beyond the pandemic. Conclusion: We conclude that online service platforms can increase access to psychological services and identify strategies that can be adopted to strengthen service provision. © 2022 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

14.
International Journal of Health Sciences ; 6:12086-12098, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2026868

ABSTRACT

Background - Mental health care and concerns are usually overlooked when there are limited resources available to contain the pandemic. In this global COVID-19 crisis, mental health issues have increased and became one of the most underrated and widespread health concerns globally. Objectives - This study is an attempt to review the existing mental health concerns in the post-pandemic era through various strategies related to mental health care and global experiences with special emphasis on the context of India. By reviewing existing evidence, this study proposes recommendations and conceptual framework for mental health concerns in the pandemic. Methodology - The researchers have searched through Google Scholar and various electronic databases like PubMed, Web of Science, SCOPUS, etc. with the search terms like "psychiatry", "mental health", "COVID-19", "Coronavirus", "SARS-CoV-2", "anxiety", "stress", "depression", etc. in several combinations. They compiled information from published magazines, newspaper articles, journals, official websites of several NGOs and institutions and web pages, press releases, verified pages on social media, etc. Results - Some of the common health concerns reported were anxiety, stress, insomnia, depression, anger, denial, and fear. Some of the most vulnerable groups were older people and children, people with current mental health problems, and frontline workers. Suicide attempts were also very common amidst the pandemic. A lot of measures are taken across the world to address issues related to mental health by using intervention strategies and guidelines. Social media has played a great role in this context. State-sponsored intervention, toll-free numbers to address behavioral and psychological problems and tele-psychiatry consultations have been provided by the Indian government. Conclusion - A need-based intervention approach is needed that is specific to vulnerable groups with a positive approach and risk management strategies at par with epidemiology of Coronavirus evolving these days. Prioritization and planning of mental health care would be instrumental in serving the most vulnerable population. © 2022 International Journal of Health Sciences. All rights reserved.

15.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 7(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026488

ABSTRACT

As telehealth is a growing form of healthcare delivery across the world, particularly after the COVID-19 pandemic, it’s impact on patient populations particularly in aboriginal and rural communities boasts many questions. As the health disparities between aboriginal groups living in rural areas on reserves and the rest of the Canadian demographics remain to be mountainous, telemedicine is often seen as the new way forward in reducing these healthcare gaps. Presently, much research has been conducted on these cohorts, particularly in the health equity atmosphere. However, much of this research lacks a comprehensive framework or tool in which it analyzes the efficacy of outcomes. In this review paper, the quadruple aim – the ideal standard of care which North American health systems seek to conform to – will be used to analyze telemedicine performance, and assert evidence-based recommendations for improvement. Therefore, this paper seeks to conduct a thematic analysis on the various issues and barriers to telemedicine delivery and usage in aboriginal populations with respect to the quadruple aim as well as identifying evidence-based solutions to alleviate some of these concerns and bolster care.

16.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 6(2), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026473

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Recent advancements in information technology and access to smartphone have expanded the scope of healthcare delivery services across the globe. Telemedicine is making healthcare affordable and more accessible to the needy in situations like the present pandemic. Although telepsychiatry services were underutilised initially in India due to various barriers, its role in delivering healthcare services, has gained pace since the last few years. During the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, India introduced telemedicine practice guidelines (March, 2020), and telepsychiatry operational guidelines (May, 2020), to remove barriers and promote equitable access. In the wake of COVID-19 pandemic various mental health institutes across India relied heavily upon telepsychiatry services to provide care. National Institute of Mental Health and Neuro Sciences, Bangalore being an Institute of National Importance has introduced different modules to provide clinical care to the mentally ill. Objectives: In this article, the authors provide an experiential account of various clinical services provided by our institute through telepsychiatry means across India during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusion: These clinical service modules have tremendous potential to increase the use of technology in providing quality care to the unreached population, bridging the treatment gap for psychiatric disorders globally and developing countries in particular.

17.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 6(2), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026472

ABSTRACT

Objective: To provide a glimpse of various digital programs and modules that are being implemented across the country by the National Institute of Mental Health and Neurosciences (NIMHANS), Bengaluru, India (an institution of national importance under the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India;one of its mandates is to develop innovative strategies to improve mental health capacity building as part of the National Mental Health Program, a publicly funded health program to cater to the public health need posed by psychiatric disorders). Design: The information is presented in a narrative fashion by organizing the activities into three categories of digital training methods: webinar mode, blended mode and hybrid mode. Results: Cadres ranging from lay-counsellors (volunteers in the community), non-specialist health workers to professionals including medical officers are covered with these initiatives. During the period from August 2016 till December 2020, more than 16 million man hours of training is delivered for more than 35,000 participants from across the country. Conclusions: These have a tremendous potential to exponentially increase skilled human resources capable of providing quality care to hitherto unserved remote areas of the rural hinterland and ultimately reduce the burgeoning treatment gap. In-depth outcome assessments are the need of the hour.

18.
Telehealth and Medicine Today ; 6(1), 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026464

ABSTRACT

Objective: The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs has a robust telehealth program supported by a training infrastructure for VA clinicians and staff. In fiscal 2019, over 909,000 VA patients received a portion of their VA care through telehealth, and over 60% of VA’s primary and mental health care providers participated in one or more Clinical Video Telehealth (CVT) appointments to a patient’s home. In March 2020, during the initial spread of COVID-19, Veterans Health Administration leadership issued guidance for providers to transition from in-person care to virtual modalities for routine care not requiring a physical encounter. VA’s comprehensive training infrastructure helped providers quickly become capable of delivering CVT care to meet the needs of their patients, and the VA Office of Connected Care Quality and Training (QT) Division adjusted the program as providers’ needs evolved. Design: As clinical staff faced new and increasing demands to respond to needs during the pandemic, the QT Division streamlined existing training programs to deliver essential content and enable providers to acquire necessary telehealth skills more quickly. This included reducing the number of core courses required to become telehealth-capable from four to two by introducing an integrated course. The QT Division reorganized and edited content from other accredited courses to convey key topics. To shorten courses for providers with full schedules, the QT Division removed accreditation from some courses, such as the COVID-19 VA Video Connect for Providers course. Results: The QT Division’s pandemic response resulted in over 80,000 new course completions in the first month and over 20% more primary care and mental health providers conducting CVT visits in the first five months. During this period, the number of CVT appointments increased by over 1,000%. Conclusion: VA’s telehealth training infrastructure, implemented by the QT Division, enabled VA to enter the COVID-19 public health emergency fully prepared for the rapid growth in telehealth care. As CVT became increasingly important during the COVID-19 response, the QT Division made necessary curriculum adjustments to meet provider and patient needs. ____________________________________________________________________________ Fireside Chat with Authors Moderator: Lyle Berkowitz, MD, FACP, FHIMSS, Editor-in-Chief, Telehealth and Medicine Today

19.
Canadian Social Work Review ; 37(2):185-195, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025302

ABSTRACT

The Psychiatry Emergency Services (PES) virtual clinic is an innovative clinical program that was established to enhance access to psychiatric crisis follow-up care during COVID-19. The clinic provides psychiatric follow-up via scheduled phone calls or videoconference for patients that have been seen by the PES team. The social worker has an important role on the PES virtual clinic team: they initiate initial assessments, collaboratively develop follow-up plans, and facilitate community care. The clinic meets the provincial agenda to reduce Emergency Department (ED) visits, ED/PES wait times, ED/PES overcrowding, and inappropriate admissions, while addressing both psychiatric needs and social determinants of health in an acute care setting. Throughout our survey of relevant literature, we found little research to inform the implementation of virtual care in Canadian healthcare emergency services (Hensel et al., 2020;Serhal et al., 2017). More specifically, there is a void in research regarding a collaborative psychiatric and social work care model in the context of a global pandemic. Further robust studies are needed and encouraged that use emergency psychiatric settings as critical prevention sites of mental health crises.Alternate :La clinique virtuelle des Psychiatry Emergency Services (PES) est un programme clinique innovant qui a été mis en place pour améliorer l’accès aux suivis lors des crises psychiatriques pendant la pandémie de la COVID-19. La clinique assure un suivi psychiatrique par le biais d’appels téléphoniques ou de vidéoconférences pour les patients qui ont été vus par l’équipe des PES. La travailleuse sociale joue un rôle important au sein de l’équipe de la clinique virtuelle du PES : elle initie les évaluations initiales, élabore en collaboration des plans de suivi et facilite les soins de proximité. La clinique répond au plan provincial visant à réduire les visites aux services d’urgence, les temps d’attente aux services d’urgence/PES, l’engorgement des services d’urgence/PES et les admissions inappropriées, tout en répondant à la fois aux besoins psychiatriques et aux déterminants sociaux de la santé dans un contexte de soins aigus. Lors de la recension des écrits, nous avons trouvé peu de recherches permettant d’informer la mise en oeuvre des soins virtuels dans les services d’urgence canadiens (Hensel et coll., 2020;Serhal et coll., 2017). Plus précisément, il n’existe pas de recherche concernant un modèle de soins psychiatriques et sociaux collaboratifs dans un contexte de pandémie mondiale. D’autres études approfondies au sujet des milieux psychiatriques d’urgence utilisés comme sites de prévention des crises en santé mentale sont nécessaires.

20.
Social Work and Christianity ; 49(2):164-180, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024384

ABSTRACT

The perception of mental health directly impacts an individual's acceptance and utilization of counseling services. Mental health challenges are increasingly common among college students. The purpose of this case study is to examine the perception of mental health and the receptiveness to receiving mental health services among Christian college students. This study surveyed both professors and students from a Christian college in Central Pennsylvania. The two key themes that emerged from this study were a perceived stigma attached to mental health challenges and receiving mental health services and a lack of support from the Christian community. The survey results inform the recommendations including expanding education surrounding mental health and mental health services, accessibility of mental health services, and destigmatizing mental health.

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