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1.
Era's Journal of Medical Research ; 8(2):185-189, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1964967

ABSTRACT

In China and India, Nelumbo nucífera, a perennial aquatic plant, has been used as a medicinal herb. The various sections of plants, such as leaves, seeds, flowers and rhizomes, have been reported to have beneficial effects in the treatment of pharyngopathy, pectoralgia, spermatorrhoea, leucoderma, smallpox, dysentery, cough, haematemesis, epistaxis, haemoptysis, haematuria, metrorrhagia, hyperlipidaemia, fever, cholera, hepatopathy and hyperdipsia in the traditional medicine system. Different pharmacological activities such as anti-ischaemic activity, antioxidant activity, hepatoprotective activity, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-fertility activity, antiarrhythmic activity, anti-fibrosis activity, antiviral activity, anti-proliferative activity, anti-diarrhoeal activity, psychopharmacological activity, antipyretic activity, immune-modulatory activity, hypoglycaemic activity, aldose reductase inhibitory activity, antibacterial, aphrodisiac activity, anti-platelet activity, cardiovascular activity, anti-obesity activity, lipolytic activity, hypo-cholesterolaemic activity, hepato-protective activity, anticancer activitydiuretic activity, antioxidant activity have been clinically evaluated for N.nucifera. Different pharmacological activities such as anti-ischaemic activity, antioxidant activity, hepato-protective activity, anti-inflammatory activity, anti-fertility activity, anti-arrhythmic activity, antifibrosis activity, antiviral activity, anti-proliferative activity, anti-diarrhoeal activity, psychopharmacological activity, diuretic activity, antioxidant activity have been clinically evaluated for N.nucifera. A wide number of phytoprinciples from the plant have been isolated. The present review seeks to consolidate the traditional, ethno-botanical, phytochemical and pharmacological data available on N.nucifera stem and to explore its role as an immunity booster and anti-inflammatory food.

2.
J Trace Elem Med Biol ; 73: 127044, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1936888

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a rapidly spreading disease, which has caught the world by surprise. Millions of people suffer from illness, and the mortality rates are dramatically high. Currently, there is no specific and immediate treatment for this disease. Remedies are limited to supportive regiments and few antiviral and anti-inflammatory drugs. The lack of a definite cure for COVID-19 is the reason behind its high mortality and global prevalence. COVID-19 can lead to a critical illness with severe respiratory distress and cytokine release. Increased oxidative stress and excessive production of inflammatory cytokines are vital components of severe COVID-19. Micronutrients, metalloids, and vitamins such as iron, manganese, selenium, Zinc, Copper, vitamin A, B family, and C are among the essential and trace elements that play a pivotal role in human nutrition and health. They participate in metabolic processes that lead to energy production. In addition, they support immune functions and act as antioxidants. Therefore, maintaining an optimal level of micronutrients intake, particularly those with antioxidant activities, is essential to fight against oxidative stress, modulate inflammation, and boost the immune system. Therefore, these factors could play a crucial role in COVID-19 prevention and treatment. In this review, we aimed to summarize antiviral properties of different vitamins and minerals. Moreover, we will investigate the correlation between them and their effects in COVID-19 patients.

3.
Electronic International Fertilizer Correspondent ; 66:12-28, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1918996

ABSTRACT

As the world's population approaches eight billion people, there is an increasing demand for cereals, grains, vegetables, animal protein, as well as energy. At the same time, in the shadow of the COVID-19 pandemic, world hunger has increased. After remaining virtually unchanged for five years, the prevalence of malnutrition (PoU) increased from 8.4% to about 9.9% in just one year, further adding to the challenge of achieving the Zero Hunger target by 2030. Research Findings To sustainably increase agriculture productivity, the use of best plant nutrition practices is essential. The shortage of any one nutrient has the potential to limit the growth, productivity, and quality of crops, as stated in Justus von Liebig's "Law of the Minimum". In addition to nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K), attention must be paid to other macronutrients including calcium (Ca), magnesium (Mg), and sulfur (S), and to the management of micronutrients as well. Balanced fertilization is essential to obtain the maximum potential for crop yield. Since 2015 a new natural mineral fertilizer, polyhalite, has stood out as an alternative fertilizer. Polyhalite provides four macronutrients in a single granule: K, Ca, Mg, and S. Polyhalite has several differential characteristics, such as a low salt content and prolonged availability of nutrients. Polyhalite has a lower carbon footprint than similar fertilizers and can be used in organic production systems. Reviewing the research into the use of polyhalite as a sustainable multi-nutrient fertilizer consistently reveals its potential to increase agricultural productivity, where it consistently and significantly improves the yield, health, and quality of a wide range of crops.

4.
Nutrients ; 14(13)2022 Jun 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1911492

ABSTRACT

People's intake of some minerals does not meet the nutrient reference values even in high-income countries. Recently, the deficiency of zinc and/or selenium has been considered to cause greater risk of COVID-19 infection and severity. To investigate consumer awareness, we conducted a cross-sectional questionnaire online survey among Japanese people (7500 males and 7500 females) concerning their perceptions of each mineral and the prevalence of mineral-fortified foods and/or mineral supplements. People's perception of each mineral varied: the highest was for calcium (91.8%) and the lowest was for selenium (44.7%). In addition, only a portion of participants believed that they consumed a sufficient amount of each mineral; the highest was sodium (23.7%), and the lowest was manganese (5.2%). In addition, 18.2% of them felt that they could not consume enough sodium, even though most of the Japanese's intake is excessive. Among mineral-fortified-food and/or mineral-supplement users, the purposes for these products were to maintain health (80.6%), supplement nutrients (48.0%), and prevent infectious diseases (23.2%). Only 18.4% of participants knew what amount they took. In conclusion, education is needed to prevent not only the insufficiency/deficiency of each mineral but also an excess intake of sodium.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Selenium , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dietary Supplements , Female , Food, Fortified , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Minerals , Perception , Prevalence , Sodium
5.
Acta Montanistica Slovaca ; 27(1):190-200, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1897369

ABSTRACT

Mineral resources form the basis of production in the metallurgical, electrical, chemical, construction, ceramic and glass industries, as well as in other industries. However, they are still non-renewable and depletable raw material resources, which also have restrictive uses due to their uneven geological and geographical distribution. Manufacturing and construction in Europe are largely dependent on the extraction of non-energy raw materials in terms of basic raw materials. This fact is further emphasized by the related sectors, which depend on a stable supply of raw materials. But building tomorrow's economy also means we need to take care of our environment today. Therefore, raw materials need to be mined in such a way that we protect the natural environment in order to ensure sustainability. In particular, the current time, but also the historically emerging geopolitical strife in the world or the COVID-19 pandemic prove, that raw materials are the driving force of many countries. Therefore, at the end of these new events, but also in view of the fourth industrial revolution, it is necessary, at the same time desirable, to look for new alternatives, possibilities and sources of raw materials in non-traditional areas. Such are waste, until now unused remnants of old mining activities, or the search for completely new materials. Innovation is a fundamental concept that is increasingly linked to the field of raw materials, as well as with many countries that are characterized by a high level of innovation activity. Therefore, in the article we focused on an extremely current topic, the analysis of the innovation potential of OECD countries in connection with the level of Construction minerals consumption.

6.
Diabetes Research and Clinical Practice ; 186, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1894947

ABSTRACT

Background: The rising incidence of diabetes mellites is a growing health concern in Kuwait, placing an overwhelming burden on the healthcare system. The overall prevalence of diabetes was estimated to be 19.1% according to last published data in 2020. As a result, the Kuwait National Diabetes Registry (KNDR) was established in the year 2018 by the Ministry of Health in collaboration with the Dasman Diabetes Institute to provide insight on the nature of the disease in this population. Aim: The aim of establishing the national web-based registry is to provide a sound database to investigate disease diagnosis, management, and outcomes and enable evaluation of clinical improvement focusing on identifying risk factors, treatment interventions and disease complications and assess morbidity in the adult and pediatric population. Method: Patients of all ages and nationalities residing in Kuwait diagnosed with any form of diabetes (type 1, type 2, gestational and atypical) were included in the KNDR. Data sources include electronic health records from primary healthcare centers (PHC), hospital outpatient clinics, Kuwait Diabetes Society (KDS) and patient self-register on the webpage. The register includes data on demographics, diabetes type, comorbidities, smoking habits, treatment modality, blood pressure, weight, height, and blood profile including glucose status, renal and lipid profile. Patient data was collected from one governorate as a pilot phase before extending the platform to other regions in Kuwait. Descriptive analysis was performed. Results: A sample of 36,447 patients with diabetes from PHCs in one Kuwaiti governorate, Al-Farwaniyah, collected from September 2019 to March 2020 (pre-SARS-CoV-2 pandemic) was studied. The median age was 54 years, most were men (63.4%), 33.4% were Kuwaiti and 11.3 % were smokers. The majority had type 2 diabetes (82.3%) and hypertension and dyslipidemia were found in 20.2% and 22.2% of the population, respectively. Over half the population (56.4%) with type 2 diabetes were on oral medication only, 3.7% on insulin only, 21.8% on oral and insulin medication and 18.1% were not on any medication and were recommended lifestyle modifications. Of the patients on insulin 60% were using long acting and 30% were using mixed insulin. In the registry, only 20% of those who have diabetes have a recorded HbA1c. Discussion: Creating a diabetes registry gathers invaluable information, aids as an essential tool for monitoring patients with diabetes and supports planning better healthcare services. However, the high missing data requires increased physician data entry training and improved and incorporated hospital information systems into the registry to ensure high ascertainment. The registry can be utilized to estimate incidence and prevalence, to translate into policy and improve standard of care.

7.
Current Research in Nutrition and Food Science ; 9(3):755-769, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1856347

ABSTRACT

World Health Organization (WHO) declared a global public health emergency due to the recent spread of COVID-19 throughout the world. Millions of people are affected daily and thousands died. Almost all countries are now paying attention to control this pandemic outbreak. Therefore, researchers are trying to identify the pathophysiology of the disease, appropriate prognosis, effective management and prevention of COVID-19. Based on current published evidence, this review article specifies the role of different nutrients in the possible prevention and management of COVID-19 and viral infections. Balanced nutrition including adequate vitamin C, vitamin A, vitamin D, magnesium, selenium, zinc and phytonutrients have shown promising immune-boosting roles in COVID-19 and other respiratory infections due to their potential anti-inflammatory and antioxidants properties. These micronutrients act against COVID-19 infections both individually and synergistically.

8.
Journal of Asia Business Studies ; 16(3):428-447, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1853367

ABSTRACT

Purpose>This study aims to find and evaluate the impact of COVID-19 in India’s mining activities. From the literature survey and input from experts, 14 important factors and ten green recovery strategies are identified. These 14 factors and 10 strategies are examined in a real industrial environment.Design/methodology/approach>In this research study, fuzzy-complex proportional assessment is used to compare the identified strategies with the selected factors. Based on the outcome, this study identifies the optimum strategy that could assist the mining industry in handling both COVID-19 and sustainability issues.Findings>The study’s outcome reveals that a large group of workers, collapse of demand and disruption, and suffered contractual workers are the top three factors that need to be considered regarding COVID-19 and sustainability issues. Effective strategies for eco-innovation practices, an emphasis on health and safety, and environmental awareness, education and training are the three primary strategies to be implemented for the greatest impact.Originality/value>This research study is the first of its kind to coordinate both issues of COVID-19 and sustainability. In this regard, this study sheds a timely light on the precautions that need to be taken in tackling COVID-19 and sustainability issues. This study’s outcome will enhance the managerial capability in developing robust and effective strategies for handling difficult situations.

9.
Resources Policy ; 77:102759, 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-1852000

ABSTRACT

Natural resource commodities are considered an important factor for economic growth and development. However, volatility in these commodities is a topic of interest, which currently has the attention of scholars. In this regard, the current study investigates volatility in global natural resource commodities while undertaking the Covid-19 pandemic. This study used coal rents (CR), forest rents (FR), mineral rents (MR), natural gas rents (NGR), oil rents (OR), and total natural resource rents (TNRR) to comprehensively measure volatility in natural resource commodities during the period from 1971 to 2020. For empirical investigation of volatility, this study employed autoregressive conditional heteroscedasticity (ARCH) specification, which indicates that CR, FR, MR, and NGR hold no volatility throughout the study period. However, OR and TNRR are found to be volatile throughout the period and during the Covid-19 pandemic. Besides, the generalized threshold ARCH (TGARCH) and exponential generalized ARCH (EGARCH) provide no evidence of positive-negative shocks asymmetry. Also, the results do not provide evidence that negative shock enhances volatility in natural resource commodities more than that of positive shock having the same magnitude. Based on the empirical findings, this study recommends some policy implications in the end.

10.
Arab Gulf Journal of Scientific Research ; 39(Special Issue (2):15-36, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837230

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The novel coronavirus disease namely COVID-19 is a viral disease induced by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2). The cases were first reported in Wuhan, China, by the end of 2019 and subsequently spread worldwide. The virus can be transferred through direct or indirect contact and leads to several manifestations;the most common are fever, dry cough, pneumonia, and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). COVID-19 has caused massive human and economic losses, posing an ongoing threat. Understanding the current situation and developing a treatment which can be both safe and effective has become essential. In this regard, natural products could be an important resource in the development of treatment for COVID-19, as they have contributed to the treatment of other viruses in the past. This review aims to understand the cellular machinery of SARS-CoV-2 and to identify its drug targets.

11.
Journal of International Studies ; 15(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835976

ABSTRACT

This article was inspired by current events. The shopping craze generated by the coronavirus pandemic raised some questions that this article aims to answer by analysing a variety of suppositions. The coronavirus pandemic caused panic shopping amongst consumers, whose motivation for increasing the volumes of shopping revolved around ensuring a safety margin of groceries while also reducing the number of shopping trips. The consumers did most of their shopping in hyper, and supermarkets, as well as in bigger ABCs and grocery stores (Lidl), where there’s a wider range of products and larger stock. The average consumer bought much more than the basic groceries during this period. Our research started in March 2020 and ended in May 2020. To validate our assumptions, primary information is derived from the statistical processing of a large number of data from a representative questionnaire survey of 724 respondents. The results show that for many people this period was about stockpiling storages of groceries. Flour saw the biggest increase in purchase volumes, but chicken and pastas were also amongst the more popular items. Stores with the biggest range of selection were able to satisfy this demand. As evidenced by data, consumers also purchased items, which are needed for any household during an emergency and are easy to store in higher volumes. These items include different oils and fats, which are required for cooking, and non-perishables, such as salamis, canned foods, rice and mineral water.

12.
Natural Volatiles & Essential Oils ; 9(1):805-822, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1787242

ABSTRACT

COVID-19, a worldwide epidemic, is afflicting the whole planet. Vaccines have been developed;however, they will not be able to eliminate the COVID-19 virus. As a result, the only approach to address the problem is to the disease is to have a robust immune system. A well-balanced diet can help enhance immunity, which is necessary for preventing and treating viral illnesses. Vitamins A, C, and D and minerals like Selenium and Zinc found in fruits, herbs, and vegetables have been demonstrated to have beneficial immunity-enhancing effects in viral respiratory infections. In this publication, we have attempted to describe the advantages of medicinal herbs, vitamins, minerals, nutraceuticals, and probiotics in combating the new Coronavirus. The dietary concept based on existing evidence might help inhibit and regulate COVID-19.

13.
Cancer Research ; 82(4 SUPPL), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1779455

ABSTRACT

Background: When the first wave of COVID-19 hit globally in early 2020, concerns were raised about access to surgical interventions for cancer patients. It was considered that neoadjuvant therapy (NAT) although conventionally given to locally advanced breast cancer may need to also be provided to earlier-stage disease. In addition, due to the temporary closure of breast cancer screening programs during the pandemic, concerns were raised about patients presenting with later-stage disease at initial diagnosis. This project aims to assess the impact of COVID-19 on the volume of neoadjuvant referrals at a large cancer centre, as well as any stage migration, impact on treatment timelines and impact on outcomes for breast cancer patients compared to the pre-pandemic population. Methods: The BC Cancer Vancouver centre has a neoadjuvant breast cancer program to ensure high quality of care is maintained. This program's prospective database of breast cancer patients referred for and treated with NAT between the years 2012-2021 was queried to assess data on neoadjuvant referrals, clinical stage, receptor status, treatment timelines, and outcomes between January 1, 2019-December 31, 2020. Data from the years 2019 and 2020 were compared to evaluate the impact of COVID-19 on NAT. Summary data available from earlier years were also utilized as reference. Results: The COVID-19 pandemic resulted in a 51% increase in Sthe number of patients referred to the neoadjuvant program, with 102 patients referred for NAT in 2019, whereas 154 patients were referred in 2020. This proportional increase in referrals is higher than any other year since the database inception. Of note, during 2020 there were no COVID related closures for cancer surgeries in the province. The proportion of patients referred who received NAT remained similar between 2019 and 2020 (69.1% vs 70.8% in 2020). The trend in referrals by month varied between the two years. In 2019, the majority of patients were referred between April to July with the lowest proportion of referrals in October to December. In 2020, the opposite occurred with the lowest proportion of referrals transpiring between January-June, and the greatest proportion in October to December. The proportion of patients who presented with de-novo metastatic disease was consistent between the two years (7.8% in 2019 vs 9.7% in 2020). Despite the closure of all screening mammography programs between March-June of 2020, the clinical stage and receptor status are equivalent between 2019 and 2020. With regards to treatment timelines, there was a 3 day increase in the median time between referral date and medical oncology consultation in 2020 compared to 2019. No other treatment timeline delays were found between 2019 and 2020. With regards to outcomes, 34.9% of patients achieved pCR in 2019, but only 24.1% achieved pCR in 2020, despite similar stage and receptor subtypes. Conclusion: During the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, a higher volume of patients were referred for NAT than had ever before been referred, despite the fact that there were no closures of operating rooms in our province for COVID-19. From a quality of care perspective there was a delay in referral to consultation for medical oncology, but no delay on referral to treatment, treatment to surgery, or surgery to radiation. However, and a significantly lower pCR rates was seen in 2020 compared to 2019. The 10% decrease in pCR rates may have resulted from increased complexity in breast cancer cases. This trend may continue, as the impact of COVID-19 on breast cancer outcomes will likely take many years to fully appreciate. Attention should be paid to encouraging women to return to regular breast screening programs to decrease the number of patients needing neoadjuvant therapy.

14.
Front Immunol ; 13: 837290, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775670

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, a novel Corona virus strain, was first detected in Wuhan, China, in December 2019. As of December 16, 2021, almost 4,822,472 people had died and over 236,132,082 were infected with this lethal viral infection. It is believed that the human immune system is thought to play a critical role in the initial phase of infection when the viruses invade the host cells. Although some effective vaccines have already been on the market, researchers and many bio-pharmaceuticals are still working hard to develop a fully functional vaccine or more effective therapeutic agent against the COVID-19. Other efforts, in addition to functional vaccines, can help strengthen the immune system to defeat the corona virus infection. Herein, we have reviewed some of those proven measures, following which a more efficient immune system can be better prepared to fight viral infection. Among these, dietary supplements like- fresh vegetables and fruits offer a plentiful of vitamins and antioxidants, enabling to build of a healthy immune system. While the pharmacologically active components of medicinal plants directly aid in fighting against viral infection, supplementary supplements combined with a healthy diet will assist to regulate the immune system and will prevent viral infection. In addition, some personal habits, like- regular physical exercise, intermittent fasting, and adequate sleep, had also been proven to aid the immune system in becoming an efficient one. Maintaining each of these will strengthen the immune system, allowing innate immunity to become a more defensive and active antagonistic mechanism against corona-virus infection. However, because dietary treatments take longer to produce beneficial effects in adaptive maturation, personalized nutrition cannot be expected to have an immediate impact on the global outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dietary Supplements , Humans , Immune System , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamins/therapeutic use
15.
Genetics in Medicine ; 24(3):S312, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1768098

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, the cause of the COVID-19 pandemic, in late 2019 put every country on high alert and led to major changes in global diagnostic testing capability in infectious disease. From the outset it was apparent that local health authorities were under-prepared and under-staffed to cope with the rapid onset and spread of the disease. Demand for SAR-CoV-2 testing soared, highlighting the limitations of capacity in existing infectious disease laboratories along with requests from governments to support growing testing need. We partnered with US and UK Governments to establish, supply, staff and operate three large-scale, high-throughput SARS-CoV-2 testing facilities. These were ultimately established in Valencia, CA, offering testing of up to 150k samples per day, and in Loughborough and Newport, UK, offering a combined testing of up to 70k samples per day. The biggest challenge faced globally was the unprecedented scale of testing required and the timeframe to deliver a reliable and sensitive high-throughput assay. The benefits of industry and government partnerships become evident along with having a dedicated supply chain to feed the reagent and consumable needs for high-throughput testing as well as a highly accurate test with a fast turnaround time. Experts from multiple divisions, including R&D, Genomics, Enterprise, and regional centres were bought into the project, resulting in the establishment of SARS-CoV-2 testing within the three facilities in approximately eight weeks. Clinical testing experts in high-throughput, newborn screening, and rare disease testing, built molecular testing pipelines for the facilities based around the use of real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays and sequencing. Laboratories were setup to meet the requirements set by various regulatory and accreditation agencies such as Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments, College of American Pathologies, the UK National Health Service validation group and ISO15189. Methods: Underpinning the testing was the massive IT and bioinformatics effort to enable reporting of the testing outcomes to the relevant authorities. We were able to deploy a novel LIMS system that is used throughout the laboratories to maintain sample chain of custody from arrival at the facility to reporting of results and incorporating interpretive software to support clinical interpretation of the resulting RT-PCR data. The LIMS systems are constantly undergoing improvement to support interpretation and troubleshooting. Local experts in clinical interpretation and reporting were onboarded to augment data analysis and ensure high-quality and reliable reporting whilst ensuring that clinical governance remains at the centre of all activities. Results: Before any SARS-CoV-2 testing was able to commence, several significant challenges were overcome by combining the expertise of our global teams with the local knowledge and support of the respective Governments. Experts in logistics and program management were able to convert three empty facilities with no pre-existing laboratory infrastructure into fully functional clinical testing laboratories within eight weeks. Our assay manufacturing capacity was majorly expanded to accommodate the requirements of SARS-CoV-2 testing, with all three facilities operating on automated platforms and utilizing chemistry with a dedicated secure supply chain. The final major challenge was rapid onboarding and training of staff for the facilities, and a year out, the two active facilities are currently employing over 600 individuals. Conclusion: To date the three facilities have performed over 12 million SARS-CoV-2 RT-PCR assays and SARS-CoV-2 testing will continue into 2022. The number of cases is again growing globally, and with the emergence of new variants and continual uncertainty about the impact on existing vaccines, there is an ongoing requirement for this scale of testing. From the experience of the SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic, the benefits of industry and government collaboration or the public has become much clearer, including greater access to large-scale testing options, significant reductions in time-to-testing and reporting and the rapid deployment of modern, cutting edge technology in diagnostic and monitoring programmes and eventually reduced costs to health services from mass-production. Ultimately the longevity of the individual testing facilities is unclear, but the future of large-scale clinical testing has changed forever and the legacy of this is the clear benefit to everybody when industry and governments work together to provide the public high quality and reliable testing operations.

16.
Saglik Bilimlerinde Ileri Arastirmalar Dergisi / Journal of Advanced Research in Health Sciences ; 5(1):50-54, 2022.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1761593

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which emerged in December 2019 and quickly became a worldwide pandemic, has become an important public health problem. COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by a novel virus called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. There is a mutual relationship between infectious diseases and the effect of nutrition on the immune system. Malnutrition can reduce the defenses of the immune system, increase the risk of contracting infectious diseases, and increase the severity of symptoms of these diseases. Minerals are necessary for the healthy functioning of the immune system. They are effective in both innate and acquired immunity. It is thought that the need for minerals in nutrition may increase in COVID-19. In the light of all these factors, it may be necessary to use some mineral supplements in COVID- 19 cases to deal with the increasing demand . Currently, there are no guidelines on mineral supplements for the treatment of the disease due to its very new nature. This study highlights problems in the immune system caused by deficiency of copper, zinc, iron and selenium minerals and discusses whether the supplements of these minerals can be effective in the treatment of COVID-19.

17.
Minerals ; 12(3):349, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1760781

ABSTRACT

Carbon capture is among the most sustainable strategies to limit carbon dioxide emissions, which account for a large share of human impact on climate change and ecosystem destruction. This growing threat calls for novel solutions to reduce emissions on an industrial level. Carbon capture by amorphous solids is among the most reasonable options as it requires less energy when compared to other techniques and has comparatively lower development and maintenance costs. In this respect, the method of carbon dioxide adsorption by solids can be used in the long-term and on an industrial scale. Furthermore, certain sorbents are reusable, which makes their use for carbon capture economically justified and acquisition of natural resources full and sustainable. Clay minerals, which are a universally available and versatile material, are amidst such sorbents. These materials are capable of interlayer and surface adsorption of carbon dioxide. In addition, their modification allows to improve carbon dioxide adsorption capabilities even more. The aim of the review is to discuss the prospective of the most widely available clay minerals in the Baltic States for large-scale carbon dioxide emission reduction and to suggest suitable approaches for clay modification to improve carbon dioxide adsorption capacity.

18.
5th International Conference on Information Systems and Computer Networks, ISCON 2021 ; 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1759102

ABSTRACT

Convalescent Plasma (CP) therapy is an efficient method in the treatment of COVID-19 patients who either have a weak immune system or who are early in their illness. The notable setback for the implementation of the CP therapy lies in understanding the availability and spatial distribution of plasma donors. A multi-agent-based expert system is proposed in this paper to identify a suitable plasma donor in a short span and also in an efficient manner. Moreover, the issues with blood banks are twofold in connection with uneven intra-state and interstate distribution and lacuna of necessary facilities like the Component Blood Separation Units (CBSU) and Apheresis. The proposed expert system would remove the barriers of non-uniform distribution of blood banks and facilities across the country, and will provide a suitable solution to overcome the pandemic using multi-agent systems if implemented systematically. © 2021 IEEE.

19.
Parameters ; 52(1):57-72, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1755686

ABSTRACT

This article delivers a novel economic analysis of US dependence on China for rare-earth elements and sheds lights on how Western nations may exploit "limit pricing" to break China's global monopoly in rare-earth element production and refinement. This analytical framework, supported by a comprehensive literature review, the application of microeconomic and industrial organization concepts, and two case-study scenarios, provides several policy recommendations to address an important foreign policy challenge for the United States.

20.
Rocks and Minerals ; 97(2):178, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1743646

ABSTRACT

he 2021 Denver Gem I and Mineral Showcase (herein meaning the collection of gem, mineral, and fossil shows and events happening in Denver, Colorado, in the first half of September) saw a lot of changes this year, and speculation about the show proved to be an enduring topic of conversation in the mineral community during the past year. Thankfully, we can say now that, COVID-19 pandemic-related challenges aside, the show turned out to be an excellent constellation of events that were well received and well attended. This year, the biggest change to the Denver Gem and Mineral Showcase was the birth of a new show called the "HardRock Summit" (16-19 September), which combined both the former Denver Fine Mineral Show (run by Dave Waisman of Fine Mineral Shows, LLC) and the traditional Denver Gem & Mineral Show, the nonprofit show organized by a group of Denver-area gem and mineral clubs and currently in its fifty-fifth year (started in 1967).

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