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1.
Narratives in the Anthropocene Era ; : 72-90, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2101963

ABSTRACT

Across the world, the coronavirus pandemic may have prepared us for a new ecological paradigm: we are confined on Earth with other living beings. But we still need to know how to tell the stories of these beings. In recent decades, scholars in the environmental humanities and social sciences have experimented with new ways of paying attention to the world and all its narratives. They have thus invented practices of narration to thwart our insensitivity to the fate of other living beings with whom we are linked. These practices cannot be reduced to human representations or projections, but are rather proposals for imagining various common causes and, ultimately, what Bruno Latour calls a common world. My inquiry in this chapter is to collect these narratives as real methods of knowledge about the connections between humans and non-humans. To illustrate these new knowledge experiences, I discuss the narrative practices offered by Vinciane Despret's work, as well as the importance of entangled stories in Donna Haraway, Baptiste Morizot, and Deborah Bird Rose's writing. By telling stories about the lives of animals and plants, these researchers have become the spokespersons for those with whom we live together but who cannot testify alone. These narratives are therefore capable of multiplying our world through diverse existences, stories of dependence, and other ways of living in a damaged planet. The hope is that they inspire us to regain a terrestrial footing.

2.
SSRN;
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-346204

ABSTRACT

The study concerns psycho-social domains experienced in the context of a diverse suburban middle-class community, reporting the most positive cases and deepest suffering, and interactions towards adaptation in stressful situations, such as the Coronavirus pandemic. This qualitative investigation used a descriptive design, with a strengths-based perspective directing a two-phased method. Non-probability convenience sampling selected 80 participants who 1, completed a web-based qualitative questionnaire, from those, 2) 20 purposely selected volunteers participated in individual, open-ended unstructured interviews. Themes, interpreted as one set, show how strengths and resilience appear despite shock and uncertainty. Transitional processes in psycho-social spheres reveal conscious decisions towards dynamic engagement, embracing change, reflecting on life’s value, and regarding novel meaningful priorities in contrast with 'before'. The relational sphere is the most prominent with human connections in the close and community circles. Personal, meaningful relationships strengthen social bonds. Appreciative Inquiry (AI) assisted in the transitional process to co-construct awareness of the positive core, emotional agility, and pride in embracing and expanding on newly developed strengths. Interpreted inductively, meaning described in abstracted knowledge can be transferred to and integrated with other contexts, identifying new initiatives and trans-, multi-, and inter-disciplinary debates mitigating psycho-social consequences and fostering resilience during disasters. Funding Information: This research did not receive any specific grant from funding agencies in the public commercial or not-for profit sectors. Declaration of Interests: The author declares no conflict of interest in conceptualization, design, data collection, interpretation, the writing of the manuscript or in the decision to publish results. Ethics Approval Statement: Participants signed informed consent before taking part and gave oral informed consent during the audio-recorded interviews, as required by the North-West University HREC ethics committee preventative strategy of privacy, anonymity, and confidentiality criteria. Ethical clearance (HREC- NWU-00160-21-S1).

3.
Vaccine ; 40(48): 6908-6916, 2022 Nov 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076797

ABSTRACT

Interactive stories are a relatively newer form of storytelling with great potential to correct misinformation while increasing self-efficacy, which is crucial to vaccine acceptance. To address COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy and medical mistrust in young Black adults (BYA), we sought to adapt a pre-existing application ("app"; Tough Talks) designed to address HIV disclosure decision-making through choose-your-own adventure (CYOA) narratives and other activities. The adapted app (Tough Talks - COVID) uses a similar approach to situate COVID-19 vaccination decision-making within social contexts and to encourage greater deliberation about decisions. To inform content for the CYOA narratives, we conducted an online survey that was used to elicit the behavioral, cognitive, and environmental determinants influencing COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among 150 BYA (ages 18-29) in Georgia, Alabama, and North Carolina. The survey included scenario questions that were developed with input from a youth advisory board to understand responses to peer and family influences. In two scenarios that involved discussions with family and friends about vaccination status, most respondents chose to be honest about their vaccination status. However, vaccinated individuals perceived more social pressure and stigma about not being vaccinated than unvaccinated respondents who were not as motivated by social pressure. Personal choice/agency in the face of perceived vaccine risks was a more common theme for unvaccinated respondents. Results suggest that relying on changing social norms alone may not impact barriers to vaccination in unvaccinated young adults without also addressing other barriers to vaccination such as concerns about autonomy and vaccine safety. Based on these findings, CYOA narratives in the app were adapted to include discussions with family and friends but also to touch on themes of personal choice as well as other topics that influence behaviors besides norms such as safety, side effects, and risk of COVID-19 in an evolving pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Adolescent , Young Adult , Humans , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Alabama , Georgia , North Carolina , Trust , Vaccination/methods
4.
Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes ; 172, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2061730

ABSTRACT

How do individuals react to the sudden public moralization of their work and with what consequences? Extant research has documented how public narratives can gradually moralize societal perceptions of select occupations. Yet, the implications of how workers individually respond and form self-narratives in light of—or in spite of—a sudden moralizing event remain less understood. Such an understanding is even more critical when workers are weakly socialized by their organization, a situation increasingly common today. During the COVID-19 pandemic, radically shifting public narratives suddenly transformed grocery delivery work, previously uncelebrated, into highly moralized “heroic” pursuits. Drawing on interviews (n = 75), participant artifacts (n = 85), and archival data (e.g., newspaper articles), we find that these workers (here, shoppers on the platform organization Instacart), left mainly to themselves, exhibited varying responses to this moralizing and that their perceived relations to the organization, customers, and tasks shaped these responses. Surprisingly, those who facilely adopted the hero label felt morally credentialled, and they were thus likely to minimize their extra-role helping of customers and show low commitment to the organization;in contrast, those who wrestled with the hero narrative sought to earn those moral credentials, and they were more likely to embrace extra-role helping and remain committed to moralized aspects of the work. Our study contributes to literatures on the moralization of work and narratives by explaining why some workers accept a moralized narrative and others reject or wrestle with it, documenting consequences of workers’ reactions to such narratives, and suggesting how a moralized public narrative can backfire. © 2022 Elsevier Inc.

5.
The International Journal of the Inclusive Museum ; 15(1):85-98, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2056689

ABSTRACT

In heritage sites and museums, souvenir shops are of considerable commercial importance;furthermore, they add to the overall experience of visitors. This contribution explores the narrative quality of some souvenirs that seek to reflect a country’s history and heritage. Three examples will serve as case studies: (1) souvenirs depicting the Berlin Wall (Germany)—moving from a historical event toward wider-reaching generic ideas, such as freedom;(2) souvenirs commemorating the First World War and their role in the context of the War’s centenary (England);and (3) souvenirs that reflect aspects of dark tourism (various locations). In each case, the narrative attached to the items for sale potentially removes them from the experience of the exhibition. As such, souvenirs in the shop offer an experience in their own right, but they do not necessarily echo the culture, heritage, or history of a region or a country.

6.
Can J Nurs Res ; : 8445621221129689, 2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053639

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Islamophobia or, anti-Muslim racism, and more specifically, gendered islamophobia targeting Muslim women who wear a hijab is rising globally and is aggravated by the COVID-19 pandemic. However, anti-Muslim racism is not well understood in Canadian nursing. PURPOSE: This study utilized narrative inquiry to understand anti-Muslim racism through the experiences of nurses who wear a hijab with the goal of putting forward their counter-narrative that disrupts anti-Muslim racism in Canadian nursing. METHODS: Narrative inquiry informed by Critical Race Feminism, care ethics, and intersectionality were used to analyze the factors shaping anti-Muslim racism and composite narratives were used to present the results. RESULTS: The three composite narratives are: 'This is Who I Am: A Muslim Nurse with a Hijab and an Accent'; 'I Know What is at Play: Unveiling Operating Power Structures and Power Relations'; and 'Rewriting the Narrative: Navigating Power Structures and Power Relations'. These composite narratives constituted the nurses' counter-narrative. They revealed intersections of gendered, racial divisions of labour and religious narratives that shape anti-Muslim racism, as operating power relations in nursing, and how Muslim nurses reclaimed control to resist their racialized stereotypes. CONCLUSION: Findings suggest that anti-Muslim racism in nursing operates through multiple intersecting power relations. Using stories can mobilize transformational change so that anti-racist practices, policies, and pedagogy can be embraced.

7.
Drug Safety ; 45(10):1203, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046903

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Uppsala Monitoring Centre (UMC) manage VigiBase;the largest global database of reports of suspected adverse events (side effects) to medicines, on behalf of the World Health organisation (WHO). Following the emergency rollout of the vaccines against COVID-19, combined with a global focus on monitoring their safety, UMC saw a sharp increase in the volume of reports of suspected side effects of the vaccines. UMC sometimes receives multiple reports corresponding to the same suspected adverse event. This can have undesirable effects when it comes to both statistical signal detection and manual review of cases. Duplicate detection of vaccines has historically been especially challenging, due to homogeneity of patients. However, the extreme quantity of COVID-19 vaccine reports has highlighted the necessity for automated duplicate detection to be performant for them. Detecting duplicate reports is a non-trivial problem. Since reports do not always contain the same level of detail, and data errors can lead to different values in corresponding fields for duplicate reports, reports cannot simply be compared field by field. Several methods have been proposed for detecting duplicates based on information provided in structured form (sex, age, date of onset etc) (1,2). In our study we additionally incorporate free text information into a duplicate detection model. Objective: To leverage the free text information in suspected adverse event reports to identify duplicate reports which are referring to the same adverse event. Methods: Our method ensembles state-of-the-art machine learning methods.Narratives are placed in a spacewhere a smaller distance between two narratives conveys higher semantic similarity. This is done with vector embeddings using the SapBERT model, fine-tuned on a set of known duplicate reports (3). Two reports are then compared using the cosine similarity between the vector embeddings for the two narratives. This similarity is combined with representations of the structured information used in othermethods in a gradient boosted decision tree model, calibrated by a logistic regression model to fine tune the probability output (4). These methods are evaluated on a set of curated datasets of COVID- 19 vaccine reports comprising 1239 pairs of known duplicates. We use random pairs of COVID-19 vaccine reports as examples of nonduplicates. Results: Our model successfully identifies 78.9% of known duplicate pairs. It achieved a false positive rate (the number of non-duplicates erroneously marked as duplicates) of 0.001%. The full results can be seen in table 1. Conclusion: Not Applicable.

8.
Dissertation Abstracts International: Section B: The Sciences and Engineering ; 83(11-B):No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2046297

ABSTRACT

This qualitative study examined how undergraduate engineering students studying in the U.S. experienced failures during their cooperative education (co-op) and how they recovered from them. Six students attending a private research university in the Northeast participated in two semi-structured interviews via Zoom. The narrative inquiry approach was used to analyze the data. Four superordinate themes emerged from the data: (1) students' view of failure evolved from childhood to post-co-op experience, (2) learning from failures during co-op, (3) self-advocacy during the recovery process, (4) family, friends, and colleagues as students' main resources during co-op. Resilience was the theoretical framework in this study. The findings align with literature about the standard grading system in the U.S., learning from failures, self-advocacy, resources that helped students develop resilience, and the impact of the COVID-19 global pandemic on students' co-op experiences. The findings and literature suggest opportunities for co-op faculty and advisors to teach students about failure and resiliency. There are also opportunities for future research involving students, co-op supervisors, and co-op advisors. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

9.
Sociologia y Tecnociencia ; 12(2):307-322, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2044955

ABSTRACT

: This paper aims to understand how Coronavirus as a pandemic is mis-utilized in constructing a false narrative, which has encouraged religious hatred and subsequent discrimination, as well as hate crimes against the minority community in India. More specifically, the paper looks into the role of various social media platforms and news agencies (in spreading half-baked information, false information, and misinformation) to unfold the root cause behind demonizing a particular community. The design is exploratory, and the data collected are from secondary sources. The approach is to understand the impact from a new point of view. The study's findings reveal that the false creation of a narrative has led Muslims to face severe hardships' thereby destroying the true meaning of secularism. The study shows that Muslims as a community were already discriminated and the pandemic has added voluminously to their woes. This paper tries to give a new perspective on the impact of the pandemic. Most of the research papers have tried to understand the impact of the pandemic on the social aspects;however, no research paper has attempted to understand the social hatred due to COVID-19

10.
Mezinárodní Vztahy ; 56(4):77-90, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2040660

ABSTRACT

The discourse on the infodemic constructs the combination of the pandemic and disinformation as a new source of insecurity on a global scale. How can we make sense - analytically and politically - of this newly politicized nexus of public health, information management, and global security? This article proposes approaching the phenomenon of the infodemic as an intersecting securitization of information disorder and health governance. Specifically, it argues that there are two distinct frames of security mobilized in the context of infodemic governance: information as a disease and information as a weapon. Drawing on literatures on global health and the emerging research on disinformation, the paper situates the two framings of the infodemic in broader discourses on the medicalization of security, and securitization of information disorder, respectively. The article critically reflects on each framing and offers some preliminary thoughts on how to approach the entanglements of health, security, and information disorder in contemporary global politics.

11.
Journal of Futures Studies ; 27(1):1-17, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2040340

ABSTRACT

The management of the COVID-19 pandemic is a novel global challenge being addressed in real time. While some countries and regions of the world have had more recent experience managing similar viruses (such as SARS), all have had to deal with the new corona virus and the novel challenges that it presents. Public policy responses are rapidly changing, sometimes daily. This article focuses on how foresight narratives have impacted policymaking as related to the COVID-19 pandemic. More specifically, it provides an overview of the use of foresight within the public sector prior to the pandemic. It also investigates the key narratives in circulation during the implementation of governments' strategic objectives and the realization of visions of a 'pandemic-free' society. The approach used here is that of narrative foresight which predominantly focuses on the stories that individuals, organizations, states and civilizations tell themselves about the future. In addition to the overarching narratives, the article also investigates more specifically the most commonly used metaphors prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic. The goal of the article is to ascertain which lessons we can learn in terms of successes and failures of narrative 'foresight in action', so as to be able to utilise this knowledge for future global problems. Finally, the article argues that many current metaphors and narratives are linked to 'futures fallacies' - detrimental thinking patterns about the future. It then concludes by briefly investigating alternative narratives and metaphors which are more likely to facilitate the desired future of adequate pandemic preparedness. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Futures Studies is the property of Journal of Futures Studies and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

12.
Journal of Global Faultlines ; 9(1):21-32, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2030362

ABSTRACT

Given the fractured reality of pandemic, the people's history needs to be written and understood. This paper provides a historical narrative on pandemics based on a literature review and makes inferences from the past and present. This narrative also reflects the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in the world and India. The narratives provide a novel perspective to understand public health practices in a global context. It suggests the need for a more synchronized health response in pandemics while highlighting the uncertainties and challenges of using historical diseases as comparisons for the COVID-19 pandemic. The emphasis is on learning from historical evidence and ascertaining how these retrospective diagnoses help make arguments about health and illness in our present moment.

13.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-343354

ABSTRACT

Solidarity is still important in modern societies and it gains even more relevance during crises, such as ecological crises, health crises or during armed conflicts. This paper focuses on political narratives on solidarity and measures to overcome the crises during the COVID-19 pandemic. Referring to four examples, it describes cases that contradict or call political narratives into question. As a result, this paper demonstrates how strong political narratives can be. This goes along with a reduced acceptance of deviating communication and a desire to correct or sanction people whose statements deviate from political narratives. Finally, several social implications of this pressure to conform are discussed.

14.
Journal of Media Research ; 15(2):43-55, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026303

ABSTRACT

Social media is widely considered to be a breeding ground for misinformation and disinformation. The current paper looks at some of the most important Romanian influences on Facebook to analyze their networks - how many followers engage with the content they are posting how active their followers are, and to what extent are followers shared among different influences. To perform the analysis, 360 posts have been downloaded, together with comments and shares;there have been 126,784 comments and shares in the final analysis from 75,519 distinct followers. Results show that overlap of followers is not significant, with only a few clusters (i.e., influences sharing many of theirfollowers) being visible. Graphical visualization of some networks and clusters are also provided, using the Gephi specialized software.

15.
AI Practitioner ; 24(3):66-74, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2025569
16.
Canadian Social Work Review ; 37(2):167-174, 2020.
Article in French | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025300

ABSTRACT

Cet article présente la recherche « Personnes aînées, incapacités et confinement : expériences relatives à la participation sociale et contexte de COVID-19 », amorcée en septembre 2020. La méthodologie et des thèmes émergeant des premiers entretiens seront introduits. Enracinée dans la théorie du parcours de vie, cette recherche utilise une approche narrative pour reconstruire la trajectoire de participation sociale des personnes aînées depuis le début des mesures gouvernementales de confinement et de distanciation sociale.Alternate :This article presents the study “Elderly people, disability and confinement: Experiences of social participation and COVID-19” initiated in September 2020: methodological elements and emerging themes from the first interviews are presented. This research uses a narrative approach to reconstruct the personal trajectory of seniors’ social participation since the beginning of the gouvernment confinement and social distancing measures.

17.
Social Sciences ; 11(8):355, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024068

ABSTRACT

The essays you are about to engage are beautifully curated to provoke/invite/reveal new lines of analysis, new ways of seeing/writing/researching/imagining/resisting this moment of what Massey and Hall (2010) would call conjunctural crisis—when seemingly autonomous forces converge, fracturing into rupture and rage, releasing the deadly and unevenly catastrophic, and also stirring the aesthetic imagination for what else might be possible. [...]we arrive at our first narrative conviction—no matter what the topic—critical narrative scholars have a response-ability to destabilize the “construct” or “question” under scrutiny;leave it open, let it breathe like a good wine;listen closely to the nuances;consider what is being foreclosed by this seemingly open question. COVID-19 metasticized, for some, into ressentiment against women, immigrants, communities of color;COVID-19 accompanied the endless video looping of the state sponsored murder of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, and marked a(nother) moment of racial uprising, in the U.S. and globally, pouring into streets, demanding justice. [...]at another scale, Mastoureh Fathi, Mark Davis and Catarina Kinnvall and Amit Singh theorize and deconstruct the duplicitous nature and stickiness of state-sponsored ideologies and fantasies, designed to deflect, delude and deny;to shift blame, avoid accountabilities and torque public rage away from the state or racial capitalism.

18.
Arts ; 11(4):71, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023106

ABSTRACT

Dennis Cutchins (2018) Studying the transformative journey of content from one genre or medium to another is of interest to academics, members of the public who are avid consumers of media, and practitioners of adaptation—and we are all practitioners, whether delivering a message by email originally intended to be spoken, or adapting a book (like S. A. Corey’s science fiction novel Leviathan Wakes) into a television series (like Mark Fergus and Hawk Ostby’s The Expanse) into a video game (like The Expanse: A Telltale Series). Thomas (2021b) also discusses Star Wars video games as part of a wide-ranging interview with acclaimed game designer Ryan Kaufman, who is currently VP of Narrative at mobile game studio Jam City, and former Creative Director at Telltale Games. (2020) study three texts relating to Finnish forests—the film Tale of a Forest (2012), the book Tale of a Forest (2013), and a series of short documentaries called Tales from the Forest (2013)—with a focus on how each works as an environmentally conscious narrative. The film, for instance, presents images of primeval Finnish forests (which can be considered nostalgic and escapist, but still promote awareness about ecological issues), while the book and documentary series take alternative approaches, such as discussing contemporary forestry practices in an attempt to educate audiences.

19.
Profesional de la Informacion ; 31(4), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2022547

ABSTRACT

Blood donation in Spain is an altruistic, voluntary and unpaid process. Despite its social and health significance, this process has suffered a standstill in recent years that has been aggravated by the coronavirus pandemic. To promote the generation of new donors, it is necessary to carry out campaigns aimed at younger age groups to improve the information they have and reduce their fears. This research analyses the effectiveness of different frames of a persuasive narrative to increase blood donation. These frames have been constructed from two variables: an emotional appeal (empathy awakened by a recipient protagonist versus the pride experienced by a donor protagonist) and the identification of the beneficiary of the donation (identifiable victim versus generic beneficiary). The manipulated narratives incorporate fea-tures of edutainment and are adapted to the tone and language of the target population, young people, in the format of a Twitter thread. To test the effectiveness of these narratives, an experimental study was conducted among 600 partici-pants aged 18–30 years. The results show the effectiveness of the emotional appeal, specifically in the threads that are led by a recipient of the blood donation. This appeal induces greater identification among people who perceive them-selves as a little or somewhat similar to the protagonist. This outcome in turn positively affects information recall, the intention to share the message and the attitude towards donation, and reduces the perceived risk. All in all, it increases the donation intention. The data confirm a moderated mediation model with identification as a mediator and similarity as a moderator. On the contrary, no statistically significant effects were found regarding the second manipulated vari-able. No evidence was found that the use of an identifiable beneficiary in the donation appeal obtained better results than the call to donate supported by generic data. © 2022, El Profesional de la Informacion. All rights reserved.

20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(17)2022 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023714

ABSTRACT

Cancer screening programs are public health interventions beneficial to early diagnoses and timely treatments. Despite the investment of health policies in this area, many people in the recommended age groups do not participate. While the literature is mainly focused on obstacles and factors enabling access to health services, a gap from the point of view of the target population concerns healthcare providers. Within the "Miriade" research-action project, this study aims to explore the dimensions that mediate the relationship between healthcare providers and preventive practices through the narrations of 52 referents and healthcare providers involved in breast, cervical and colorectal cancer screening. We conducted ad hoc narrative interviews and used theory-driven analysis based on Penchansky and Thomas' conceptualization and Saurman's integration of six dimensions of healthcare access: affordability, availability, accessibility, accommodation, acceptability and awareness. The results show that 21 thematic categories were representative of the access dimensions, and 5 thematic categories were not; thus, we have classified the latter as the dimension of affection. The results suggest trajectories through which psychological clinical intervention might be constructed concerning health, shared health decisions and access to cancer screening.


Subject(s)
Early Detection of Cancer , Neoplasms , Health Personnel , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Narration , Qualitative Research
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