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1.
Journal of Rural Development ; 41(2):198-209, 2023.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20243469

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, a large number of people moved from cities to their homes in rural areas, and a few months later, many returned to cities. These journeys were undertaken not only during the COVID-19 pandemic against the advisory of governments and public health experts, but the circumstances of travel were also under extreme hardship. How may we understand this intense response by people? By drawing on the migration theory and the roles of social ties or social organisation, we can better explain peoples' reactions during this pandemic. Notably, we find non-material values, such as the dignity of labour or responsibilities to family, are significant to decision -making, and there is a desire not to compromise on these values. Further, our analyses find that the distinction between pre-disaster and post-disaster situations may not be helpful.

2.
CEUR Workshop Proceedings ; 3395:309-313, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20241375

ABSTRACT

Microblogging sites such as Twitter play an important role in dealing with various mass emergencies including natural disasters and pandemics. The FIRE 2022 track on Information Retrieval from Microblogs during Disasters (IRMiDis) focused on two important tasks – (i) to detect the vaccine-related stance of tweets related to COVID-19 vaccines, and (ii) to detect reporting of COVID-19 symptom in tweets. © 2022 Copyright for this paper by its authors.

3.
Journal of Conflict Resolution ; : 1, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-20241037

ABSTRACT

Despite alarming predications about the Covid 19 pandemic that appear to fit the literature on the impact of natural disasters on civil wars, there are reasons to be suspicious that a rise in militant violence would likely occur quickly or uniformly. Although the COVID-19 pandemic is most definitely a disaster that caught the world by surprise, this "slow-rolling” shock differs in important ways from the more commonly studied acute onset natural disasters such as earthquakes, hurricanes, and tsunamis that often increase violent competition among groups for scarce resources. Instead, the effects of slow-rolling disasters unfold in phases that, at least in the short run, are likely to encourage a period of relative decline in violence, as actors try and assess the effects of COVID-19 on their organization and their opponents. Both statistical and qualitative evidence from the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic supports the initial phases of our theory. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Conflict Resolution is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

4.
Journal of Civil Engineering Education ; 149(4), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20238409

ABSTRACT

When the ethical responsibilities of engineers are discussed in classrooms, the focus is usually on microethics, which concentrates on individual decision-making, rather than macroethics, that addresses broad societal concerns. Pandemics (e.g., COVID-19) and natural disasters (e.g., hurricanes, derechos) have presented unique opportunities to observe engineering macroethical responsibilities, because unjust social, economic, and environmental systems have been brought to the forefront amidst the responses (e.g., inequitable transportation access). In this paper, we consider pandemics and natural disasters through the lens of engineering macroethics, aiming to understand students' perceptions about the macroethical responsibilities of engineers. In the fall of 2020, we deployed a survey to undergraduate engineering students at two universities (n=424). Students were asked to discuss what they perceived to be the role of engineering professionals in response to the global COVID-19 pandemic and natural disasters. We used a qualitative content analysis to explore the macroethical responsibilities mentioned in students' responses. Many of these responses include considerations of infrastructure resilience, resource distribution, and community equity. Logit models were used to identify which sociodemographic factors were associated with responses that included macroethical responsibilities, revealing engineering major (specifically, civil engineering), employment status, gender identity, and family size, among others as significant factors. The implications from this study include recommendations on curricular content, and identifying which student sociodemographic groups would especially benefit from macroethical content in coursework. © 2023 American Society of Civil Engineers.

5.
Nephrology and Dialysis ; 25(1):26-35, 2023.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20236957

ABSTRACT

As the rate of natural disasters and other devastating events caused by human activities increases, the burden on the health and well-being of those affected by kidney disease has been immeasurable. Health system preparedness, which involves creating a resilient system that is able to deal with the health needs of the entire community during times of unexpected disruptions to usual care, has become globally important. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a heightened awareness of the amplification of negative effects on the renal community. Paradoxically, the complex medical needs of those who have kidney diseases are not met by systems handling crises, often compounded by an acute increase in burden via new patients as a result of the crisis itself. Disruptions in kidney care as a result of unexpected events are becoming more prevalent and likely to increase in the years to come. It is therefore only appropriate that the theme for this year's World Kidney Day will focus on Kidney Health for All: preparedness for the unexpected in supporting the vulnerable. © 2023 JSC Vidal Rus. All rights reserved.

6.
Tourism Tribune ; 38(5):58-72, 2023.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20236366

ABSTRACT

Disasters and crises such as COVID-19 can have a negative effect on the images of tourism destinations. However, existing studies have mainly focused on the recovery of such images after crises;little research has examined the reasons for reversing the image of epidemic-resistant tourism destinations and their renewed popularity. This article investigates tourism destination image management in the context of epidemics. By means of the underdog effect, this paper examines the influence of two factors-the severity of an epidemic and degree of anti-epidemic efforts-on public willingness to travel following that epidemic;it does so through a pre-study and two formal experiments, and it investigates the mechanisms underlying the effect of those two factors on willingness to travel. The following findings emerged. First, public perceptions of tourism destinations' anti-epidemic efforts were mainly evident in four ways: government measures, social support, tourism labor actions, and destination residents' attitudes. Second, there was an interactive effect between the degree of tourism destinations' anti-epidemic efforts and the severity of the epidemic in tourism destinations: destinations with high epidemic severity received the same public support as those with low epidemic severity when they displayed a higher degree of anti-epidemic efforts. Third, public empathic responses played a mediating role in those processes. The theoretical contributions of this paper are as follows. First, it enhances research on the recovery of tourism destination image in the context of disasters and crises;it proposes the novel idea of underdog image building as a way of reversing tourism destination image. Second, it expands theoretical research on the underdog effect in tourism: it shows that in the context of public health events such as epidemics, the underdog effect has its own conditions and time influences. Third, this study enriches research on tourists' emotions and feelings: it clarifies the important role of tourism destinations' efforts to deal with epidemics and reverse the negative impacts of an epidemic. This paper provides suggestions for reversing the negative image of tourism destinations and promoting positive emotions for marketing following public health emergencies. This study finds that tourism destinations should do the following. First, modify information related to an underdog state to promote the image of the destination. Second, fully utilize public emotional resources and promote emotional advantages. Third, prevent problems before they arise and improve the tourism public health system.

7.
Asian Journal of University Education ; 19(2):307-319, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2324626

ABSTRACT

This study aims to investigate the challenges faced by these affected individuals, factors that motivate the students' return to school following the disaster and their ways of dealing with the challenges regarding teaching and learning. The year 2020 and 2021 witnessed how the world had to deal with the unprecedented educational circumstance prompted by a global pandemic. The swift change to online learning was stressful and taxing in many ways, for both students and teachers, affecting their physical and mental health. With the combination of pandemic and natural disasters, the distress caused by these successive events may have become a hindrance to students' deep involvement in learning and the whole teaching and learning process. The study adopted a qualitative approach using an online survey, and 409 participants were selected from stratified random sampling. A questionnaire was administered to obtain quantitative data which were analysed using descriptive statistics. Results showed that the double disaster heightened the level of stress, causing academic, behavioural, and financial pressure to increase among these students. However, financial constraint also turns out to be one of the prominent factors that restored their motivation to return to school or college. Among the dominant coping strategies employed by the students were prioritizing human interactions, positive reframing, and religious coping © 2023, Asian Journal of University Education.All Rights Reserved.

8.
Front Sociol ; 8: 983972, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319064

ABSTRACT

Rapid research is essential to assess impacts in communities affected by disasters, particularly those communities made "hard-to-reach" due to their active marginalization across history and in contemporary practices. In this article, we describe two rapid research projects developed to assess needs for and experiences of communities hard-hit by disasters. The first is a project on the COVID-19 pandemic in southern New Mexico (USA) that was developed to provide information to local agencies that are deploying programs to rebuild and revitalize marginalized communities. The second is a project on population displacement due to a volcanic eruption in Vanuatu, a lower-middle income country in the South Pacific, with mental and physical health outcomes data shared with the Vanuatu Ministry of Health. We describe the similar and unique challenges that arose doing rapid research in these two different contexts, the potential broader impacts of the research, and a synthesis of lessons learned. We discuss the challenges of rapidly changing rules and regulations, lack of baseline data, lack of survey instruments validated for specific populations and in local languages, limited availability of community partners, finding funding for rapid deployment of projects, rapidly training and working with research assistants, health and safety concerns of researchers and participants, and communicating with local and international partners. We also specifically discuss how we addressed our own personal challenges while also conducting time-intensive rapid research. In both studies, researchers shared results with governmental and non-governmental partners who may use the data to inform the design of their own relief programs. While different in context, type of disaster, and research strategy, our discussion of these projects provides insights into common lessons learned for working with communities at elevated risk for the worst outcomes during disasters, such as the need for flexibility, compromise, and good working relationships with community partners.

9.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 17: e385, 2023 04 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315480

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In January 2022, Fiji was hit by multiple natural disasters, including a cyclone causing flooding, an underwater volcanic eruption, and a tsunami. This study aimed to investigate perceived needs among the disaster-affected people in Fiji and to evaluate the feasibility of the Humanitarian Emergency Settings Perceived Needs Scale (HESPER Web) during the early stage after multiple natural disasters. METHODS: A cross-sectional study using a self-selected, non-representative study sample was conducted. The HESPER Web was used to collect data. RESULTS: In all, 242 people participated. The number of perceived serious needs ranged between 2 and 14 (out of a possible 26), with a mean of 6 (SD = 3). The top 3 most reported needs were access to toilets (60%), care for people in the community who are on their own (55%), and distress (51%). Volunteers reported fewer needs than the general public. CONCLUSIONS: The top 3 needs reported were related to water and sanitation and psychosocial needs. Such needs should not be underestimated in the emergency phase after natural disasters and may require more attention from responding actors. The HESPER Web was considered a usable tool for needs assessment in a sudden onset disaster.


Subject(s)
Disaster Planning , Natural Disasters , Needs Assessment , Humans , Fiji , Disaster Victims/psychology , Feasibility Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Floods , Tsunamis , Cyclonic Storms , Volcanic Eruptions , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged
10.
Nihon Seitai Gakkaishi = Japanese Journal of Ecology ; 72(2), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2319739

ABSTRACT

At this stage of the Great Acceleration of the Anthropocene, humanity is experiencing the global issues of worsening climate change impacts, devastating damage from more frequent and severe natural disasters and the COVID-19 pandemic, all of which are attributable to ecosystem degradation and biodiversity loss. The global community recognises that these issues pose severe societal and economic risks. “Nature-based solutions” have been posited as a means to address these threats. Nature-based solutions utilise natural terrestrial ecosystem functions to provide environmental, social and economic benefits at low cost. The growing social demand for nature-based solutions constitutes an opportunity for the field of ecology to expand beyond the conventional focus on biodiversity and conservation and shift to presenting biodiversity and ecosystem functions as the basis of human well-being and social sustainability. We sought to identify a trajectory for ecological research that is aimed at contributing to the effective implementation of nature-based solutions. First, we summarise current social needs related to terrestrial ecosystem utilisation. Next, we provide an overview of existing literature and knowledge regarding biodiversity and terrestrial ecosystem function, which are critical to nature-based solutions. Finally, we identify outstanding ecological hurdles to the implementation of these strategies and propose a way forward based on our findings. We explain that any basic presentation of ecological processes requires addressing the impacts of climate change and the interrelatedness of biodiversity, climate and social systems. Enhanced ecological process models are critical for linking biodiversity and ecosystems with climate and social systems. It is crucial to establish a framework that embeds monitoring systems, data infrastructure and delivery systems within society to mobilise terrestrial ecosystem and biodiversity data and results. Furthermore, the implementation of nature-based solutions must include acknowledging trade-offs in objectives and transdisciplinary research with other fields and stakeholders with the shared goal of transformative change. Ecological research must demonstrate more clearly how terrestrial biodiversity and ecosystems are linked to human health and well-being, as well as how they are affected by production and consumption systems. In the age of climate change, the knowledge and tools of the ecologist form the foundation of nature-based solutions and provide an indispensable theoretical basis for this approach.Alternate :æŠ„éŒ²äººæ–°ä¸–ã®å¤§åŠ é€Ÿã¨ã‚‚å‘¼ã°ã‚Œã‚‹æ°—å€™å¤‰å‹•ã®æ™‚ä»£ã«ãŠã„ã¦ã€æ°—å€™å¤‰å‹•å½±éŸ¿ã®é¡•åœ¨åŒ–ã€è‡ªç„¶ç½å®³ã®æ¿€ç”šåŒ–ãƒ»é »ç™ºåŒ–ã€COVID-19の世界的流行などの地球規模の問題が増大している。国際社会では、ã"ã‚Œã‚‰ã®å•é¡Œã¯ç”Ÿæ…‹ç³»ã®åŠ£åŒ–ã‚„ç”Ÿç‰©å¤šæ§˜æ€§ã®æå¤±ãŒè¦å› ã§ã‚ã‚‹ã"と、そして社会経済にも多大な損害ã‚'与える大きなリスクであるã"とが共通の認識となりつつある。そのような状況ã‚'åæ˜ ã—ã€é™¸åŸŸç”Ÿæ…‹ç³»ã®å¤šé¢çš„ãªæ©Ÿèƒ½ã‚'活用するã"とで、低いコストでç'°å¢ƒãƒ»ç¤¾ä¼šãƒ»çµŒæ¸ˆã«ä¾¿ç›Šã‚'もたらし、社会が抱える複数の課題の解決に貢献する「自然ã‚'基盤とした解決策」という新しい概念に大きな期待が寄せられている。ã"の解決策への社会的なニーズの高まりは、生態学が長年取り組ã‚"できた生物多様性や生態系の保全に関する課題ã‚'超えて、生態学が生物多様性や生態系が豊かな人é–"社会ã‚'継続し発展させる知的基盤となるã"とや、生態学の社会的有用性ã‚'示す機会である。そã"で本稿では、気候変動時代における「自然ã‚'åŸºç›¤ã¨ã—ãŸè§£æ±ºç­–ã€ã®å®Ÿè·µã«å‘ã‘ãŸç”Ÿæ…‹å­¦ç ”ç©¶ã®æ–¹å‘ã¥ã‘ã‚'目的とし、陸域生態系の活用に対する社会的なニーズの現状ã‚'概観する。その上で、「自然ã‚'åŸºç›¤ã¨ã—ãŸè§£æ±ºç­–ã€ã®éµã¨ãªã‚‹é™¸åŸŸç”Ÿæ ‹ç³»ã®ç”Ÿç‰©å¤šæ§˜æ€§ã‚„ç”Ÿæ…‹ç³»æ©Ÿèƒ½ã«é–¢ã™ã‚‹çŸ¥è¦‹ã‚'整理して課題ã‚'抽出し、ã"れらã‚'è¸ã¾ãˆã¦ä»Šå¾Œã®ç”Ÿæ…‹å­¦ç ”ç©¶ã®æ–¹å‘æ€§ã‚'å…·ä½"的に示す。まず、現象の基礎的な理解という観点からは、生物多様性ã‚'含む陸域生態系と気候システムや社会システムとの相äº'関係性ã‚'含めた包括的な気候変動影響のメカニズムの解明と、予測・評価のためのプロセスモデルの高度化ã‚'進めるã"と、そして同時に、陸域生態系と生物多様性の変化ã‚'ç¤ºã™ãŸã‚ã®åŠ¹æžœçš„ãªãƒ¢ãƒ‹ã‚¿ãƒªãƒ³ã‚°ã¨æƒ…å ±åŸºç›¤ã®å¼·åŒ–ã‚'行い、データや分析結果ã‚'社会に還元するフレームワークã‚'構築するã"ã¨ãŒå„ªå…ˆäº‹é …ã§ã‚ã‚‹ã€‚ã‚ˆã‚Šå®Ÿè·µçš„ãªè¦³ç‚¹ã‹ã‚‰ã¯ã€ã€Œè‡ªç„¶ã‚'基盤とした解決策」の実装や社会変革などにおいて共通の目標ã‚'ã‚‚ã¤ä»–åˆ†é‡Žã¨ã®å­¦éš›ç ”ç©¶ã‚'積極的に行うã"とにより、実装における目的é–"のトレードオフã‚'示すã"と、健康・福祉の課題や生産・消費システムの中での陸域生態系や生物多様性への影響や役割ã‚'示すã"ã¨ãªã©ãŒå„ªå…ˆäº‹é …ã¨ãªã‚‹ã€‚æ°—å€™å¤‰å‹•ã«ä»£è¡¨ã•ã‚Œã‚‹ä¸ç¢ºå®Ÿæ€§ã®é«˜ã„ç'°å¢ƒä¸‹ã§ã€åŠ¹æžœçš„な「自然ã‚'åŸºç›¤ã¨ã—ãŸè§£æ±ºç­–ã€ã®å®Ÿæ–½ãŸã‚ã«ã¯ã€ãã®ç§‘å­¦çš„åŸºç›¤ã¨ãªã‚‹ç”Ÿæ…‹å­¦ã®çŸ¥è¦‹ã¨ãƒ„ãƒ¼ãƒ«ã¯ä¸å¯æ¬ ã§ã‚ã‚Šã€ã¾ãŸãã®å®Ÿè£…ã‚'通じた社会変革へのé"筋においても生態学の貢献が期待されている。

11.
Revista Espanola de Salud Publica ; 96(e202210071), 2022.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2316985

ABSTRACT

The experience of the COVID-19 pandemic and the horizon of expectations in relation to climate change reminds us that it is a collective responsibility to anticipate to the best of our ability and knowledge the risks of foreseeable disasters and their potential impacts on vulnerable communities. The article will examine the meaning and status of moral duties regarding disaster preparedness by adopting a disaster ethics approach which draws on the interrelationship of bioethics with public health ethics and looks at the full cycle of disaster management and the corresponding cycle of protection of victims and professionals. After discussing some normative controversies accompanying well-known classifications of disasters and characterizing the ethical turn to preparedness in disaster management, it will be argued that preparedness duties include obligations relating to planning, anticipation, and prevention of disasters and that they are derivative and positive duties involving a series of prospective, shared and institutionally mediated responsibilities.

12.
57th Annual Conference on Information Sciences and Systems, CISS 2023 ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2314264

ABSTRACT

Electric vehicles (EVs) can be leveraged as power resources to support the grid operation in challenging scenarios, e.g., natural disasters or health crises such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper aims to enhance equity of power resilience in urban energy systems by means of strategic allocation of EV charging infrastructure. We first use data-driven approaches to infer the relationships between communities' power resilience equity and available EV charging infrastructure as well as other prominent social-demographic factors. This inference leads to the development of a machine learning model for power resilience inequity prediction. We further develop an optimization frame-work that jointly considers equitable resiliency and resource utilization to guide the optimized EV charging infrastructure allocation across the city. Case studies demonstrate the capability of the devised approach in enhancing power resilience equity in marginalized communities. © 2023 IEEE.

13.
Energy Economics ; : 106740, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2312661

ABSTRACT

This paper establishes electricity consumption as an indicator for tracking economic fluctuations in Bangladesh. It presents monthly data on national electricity consumption since 1993 and subnational daily consumption data since February 2010. Electricity consumption is strongly correlated with other high-frequency indicators of economic activity, and it has declined during natural disasters and the COVID-19 lockdowns. The paper estimates an electricity consumption model that explains over 90% of the variation in daily consumption based on a quadratic trend, seasonality, within-week variation, national holidays, Ramadan, and temperature. Deviations from the model prediction can act as an indicator of subnational economic fluctuations. For example, electricity consumption in Dhaka fell around 40% below normal in April and May 2020 during the first COVID-19 lockdown and remained below normal afterwards. The later lockdowns, in contrast, had much smaller impacts, in line with less stringent containment measures and more effective adaptation.

14.
Kidney Int ; 103(3): 436-443, 2023 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308955

ABSTRACT

As the rate of natural disasters and other devastating events caused by human activities increases, the burden on the health and well-being of those affected by kidney disease has been immeasurable. Health system preparedness, which involves creating a resilient system that is able to deal with the health needs of the entire community during times of unexpected disruptions to usual care, has become globally important. In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is a heightened awareness of the amplification of negative effects on the renal community. Paradoxically, the complex medical needs of those who have kidney diseases are not met by systems handling crises, often compounded by an acute increase in burden via new patients as a result of the crisis itself. Disruptions in kidney care as a result of unexpected events are becoming more prevalent and likely to increase in the years to come. It is therefore only appropriate that the theme for this year's World Kidney Day will focus on Kidney Health for All: preparedness for the unexpected in supporting the vulnerable.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Kidney Diseases , Humans , Pandemics , Kidney
15.
Journal of Hydrology ; 614(Part A), 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-2291396

ABSTRACT

Floods are the most commonly occurring natural disaster, with the Centre for Research on the Epidemiology of Disasters 2021 report on "The Non-COVID Year in Disasters" estimating economic losses worth over USD 51 million and more than 6000 fatalities in 2020. The hydrodynamic models which are used for flood forecasting need to be evaluated and constrained using observations of water depth and extent. While remotely sensed estimates of these variables have already facilitated model evaluation, citizen sensing is emerging as a popular technique to complement real-time flood observations. However, its value for hydraulic model evaluation has not yet been demonstrated. This paper tests the use of crowd-sourced flood observations to quantitatively assess model performance for the first time. The observation set used for performance assessment consists of 32 distributed high water marks and wrack marks provided by the Clarence Valley Council for the 2013 flood event, whose timings of acquisition were unknown. Assuming that these provide information on the peak flow, maximum simulated water levels were compared at observation locations, to calibrate the channel roughness for the hydraulic model LISFLOOD-FP. For each realization of the model, absolute and relative simulation errors were quantified through the root mean squared error (RMSE) and the mean percentage difference (MPD), respectively. Similar information was extracted from 11 hydrometric gauges along the Clarence River and used to constrain the roughness parameter. The calibrated parameter values were identical for both data types and a mean RMSE value of ~50 cm for peak flow simulation was obtained across all gauges. Results indicate that integrating uncertain flood observations from crowd-sourcing can indeed generate a useful dataset for hydraulic model calibration in ungauged catchments, despite the lack of associated timing information.

16.
Insight Turkey ; 25(1):13-27, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2291142

ABSTRACT

We are experiencing the rise of unprecedented opportunities as a result of the digital revolution, but regrettably this has also been accompanied by a number of novel threats. One of the most visible manifestations of these threats is the rapid spread of misinformation and disinformation. The implications of this threat extend from the individual to the national and international levels, where misinformation and disinformation bring the risk of hybrid warfare and power competition closer to home. Needless to say, the breadth of these implications makes dealing with digital misinformation even more difficult. This commentary focuses on several global events where misinformation and disinformation were used as a tactical tool, including the 2016 U.S. elections, Brexit, and COVID-19. Then, we discuss the situation involving Türkiye, one of the nations that serves as both a target and a focal point of regional disinformation campaigns. The commentary then shifts to some of the Communication Directorate's most significant initiatives, such as the creation of the Earthquake Disinformation Bulletins, the Law on the Fight Against Disinformation, and the Center for Fight Against Disinformation. Finally, above all, this commentary aims to raise awareness of the dangers of online misinformation and urges international cooperation to ensure that the truth always prevails.

17.
Cultural Studies, Critical Methodologies ; 22(4):337-341, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2290954

ABSTRACT

The essays in this Special Issue respond in part to a call to acknowledge the multiple crises we now face: the global covid-19 virus pandemic;natural disasters caused by climate change and more. The essays call for a critical collaborative engagement over issues of trauma and survival, to build new templates of sociality towards progressive futures.

18.
Journal of Marine Science and Engineering ; 11(4):732, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2305922

ABSTRACT

There are many inevitable disruptive events, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, natural disasters and geopolitical conflicts, during the operation of the container port supply chain (CPSC). These events bring ship delays, port congestion and turnover inefficiency. In order to enhance the resilience of the CPSC, a modified two-stage CPSC system containing a container pretreatment system (CPS) and a container handling system (CHS) is built. A two-dimensional resilience index is designed to measure its affordability and recovery. An adaptive fuzzy double-feedback adjustment (AFDA) strategy is proposed to mitigate the disruptive effects and regulate its dynamicity. The AFDA strategy consists of the first-level fuzzy logic control system and the second-level adaptive fuzzy adjustment system. Simulations show the AFDA strategy outperforms the original system, PID, and two pipelines for improved dynamic response and augmented resilience. This study effectively supports the operations manager in determining the proper control policies and resilience management with respect to indeterminate container waiting delay and allocation delay due to disruptive effects.

19.
Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases ; 18(3):113-115, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2305012

ABSTRACT

[17] Diseases with a long incubation period (leishmaniasis and leptospirosis) and vector-borne diseases such as malaria and dengue should be considered as possible infections during the recovery phase (> 4 weeks) of natural disasters. [20] Outbreaks of group A streptococcus infection in camps could have devastating consequences, not just as a cause of respiratory infection, but also of wound infections. [10] In the post-earthquake period, the first wave of infectious diseases is caused by food-borne and/or water-borne infections, and/or by infections transmitted by respiratory droplets. [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Journal of Pediatric Infectious Diseases is the property of Thieme Medical Publishing Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

20.
Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice ; 47(3):662-681, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2302358

ABSTRACT

Although events such as the global financial crisis, natural disasters, or the COVID-19 pandemic have large impacts on entrepreneurship, the literature lacks a differentiated analysis of such events. This editorial highlights the importance of events which are discrete and bounded in space and time, unexpected, and strong enough to produce change that can lead to subsequent events. An event based approach is well suited to integrate context and time to predict entrepreneurial activity. We provide a more systematic description of events, their characteristics, and causal mechanisms to allow more holistic and generalizable analysis of the role of events in entrepreneurship.

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