Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 875
Filter
1.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(17)2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2200287

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has negatively impacted millions of lives, despite several vaccine interventions and strict precautionary measures. The main causative organism of this disease is the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) which infects the host via two key players: the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and the transmembrane protease, serine 2 (TMPRSS2). Some reports revealed that patients with glycemic dysregulation could have increased susceptibility to developing COVID-19 and its related neurological complications. However, no previous studies have looked at the involvement of these key molecules within the hypothalamus, which is the central regulator of glucose in the brain. By exposing embryonic mouse hypothalamic neurons to varying glucose concentrations, we aimed to investigate the expression of ACE2 and TMPRSS2 using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction and western blotting. A significant and time-dependent increase and decrease was observed on the viability of hypothalamic neurons with increasing and decreasing glucose concentrations, respectively (p < 0.01 and p < 0.001, respectively). Under the same increasing and decreasing glucose conditions, the expression of hypothalamic ACE2 also revealed a significant and time-dependent increase (p < 0.01). These findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 invades the hypothalamic circuitry. In addition, it highlights the importance of strict glycemic control for COVID-19 in diabetic patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Glucose , Hypothalamus/metabolism , Mice , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2
2.
J Drug Target ; : 1-14, 2022 Aug 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2186805

ABSTRACT

Developing numerous nanotechnological designed tools to monitor the existence of SARS-CoV-2, and modifying its interactions address the global needs for efficient remedies required for the management of COVID-19. Herein, through a multidisciplinary outlook encompassing different fields such as the pathophysiology of SARS-CoV-2, analysis of symptoms, and statistics of neurological complications caused by SARS-CoV-2 infection in the central and peripheral nervous systems have been testified. The anosmia (51.1%) and ageusia (45.5%) are reported the most frequent neurological manifestation. Cerebrovascular disease and encephalopathy were mainly related to severe clinical cases. In addition, we focus especially on the various concerned physiological routes, including BBB dysfunction, which transpired due to SARS-CoV-2 infection, direct and indirect effects of the virus on the brain, and also, the plausible mechanisms of viral entry to the nerve system. We also outline the characterisation, and the ongoing pharmaceutical applications of quantum dots as smart nanocarriers crossing the blood-brain barrier and their importance in neurological diseases, mainly SARS-CoV-2 related manifestations Moreover, the market status, six clinical trials recruiting quantum dots, and the challenges limiting the clinical application of QDs are highlighted.

3.
Cytokine ; 157: 155962, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2177976

ABSTRACT

Considerable evidence supports that cytokines are important mediators of pathophysiologic processes within the central nervous system (CNS). Numerous studies have documented the increased production of various cytokines in the human CNS in various neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders. Deciphering cytokine actions in the intact CNS has important implications for our understanding of the pathogenesis and treatment of these disorders. The purpose of this study is to discuss the recent research on treating cytokine storm and amyloids, including stroke, Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's condition, Multi-sclerosis (MS), Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Neuroinflammation observed in neurological disorders has a pivotal role in exacerbating Aß burden and tau hyperphosphorylation, suggesting that stimulating cytokines in response to an undesirable external response could be a checkpoint for treating neurological disorders. Furthermore, the pro-inflammatory cytokines help our immune system through a neuroprotective mechanism in clearing viral infection by recruiting mononuclear cells. This study reveals that cytokine applications may play a vital role in providing novel regulation and methods for the therapeutic approach to neurological disorders and the causes of the deregulation, which is responsible for neuroinflammation and viral infection. However, it needs to be further investigated to clarify better the mechanisms of cytokine release in response to various stimuli, which could be the central point for treating neurological disorders.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease , Nervous System Diseases , Virus Diseases , Cytokines/physiology , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/therapy , Neuroinflammatory Diseases
4.
Medicina-Lithuania ; 58(12), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2200504

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: Recent findings demonstrate that the transmigration of severe acute respiratory syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) to the nervous system implicates severe neurotropic pathologies, including the onset of the rare disease called Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) which is characterized by immune-mediated polyneuropathy. This study aimed to identify the predisposing factors and the clinical features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-induced GBS. Materials and Methods: We have performed an analysis of 147 cases. A systematic review of the published research work was performed per the PRISMA statement to obtain individual participant data (IPD) for the meta-analysis. The search was conducted through PubMed, using the combined search terms "Guillain-Barre syndrome" and "COVID-19". All case reports and series in the English language with accessed full text were included in the search. Results: A systematic database search led to the retrieval of 112 peer-reviewed articles published between 1 April 2020, and 8 February 2022. The articles comprised 16 case series and 96 case reports containing IPD for 147 patients. Our findings showed that 77.6% of all cases were 40 years or older. Males comprised most of the cases (65.3%;n = 96). The intensive care unit (ICU) admission was 44.9%, and the need for mechanical ventilation (MV) was 38.1%. The patients presented with hyporeflexia or areflexia (84.4%;n = 124), lower limb strength and sensation impairment (93.2%;n = 138), upper limb strength and sensation impairment (85.7;n = 126), and somatic sensation impairment (72.8%;n = 107). The patients presented with increased cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) protein levels (92%;n = 92) and the presence of CSF albuminocytological dissociation (83.5%;n = 71). The most common variant of GBS observed was acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (AIDP). We found that predisposing factors concomitant with COVID-19 and GBS were male gender and older age. Among the cases, patient mortality was 10.9%. Conclusions: A gap of knowledge exists regarding the complete spectrum of clinical characteristics of COVID-19-related GBS. Recent findings suggest that SARS-CoV-2 triggers GBS, as it follows a similar para-infectious pattern as the other viral agents contributing to the onset of GBS.

5.
Frontiers in Neurology ; 13, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2199044

ABSTRACT

Apart from common respiratory symptoms, neurological symptoms are prevalent among patients with COVID-19. Research has shown that infection with SARS-CoV-2 accelerated alpha-synuclein aggregation, induced Lewy-body-like pathology, caused dopaminergic neuron senescence, and worsened symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, SARS-CoV-2 infection can induce neuroinflammation and facilitate subsequent neurodegeneration in long COVID, and increase individual vulnerability to PD or parkinsonism. These findings suggest that a post-COVID-19 parkinsonism might follow the COVID-19 pandemic. In order to prevent a possible post-COVID-19 parkinsonism, this paper reviewed neurological symptoms and related findings of COVID-19 and related infectious diseases (influenza and prion disease) and neurodegenerative disorders (Alzheimer's disease, PD and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), and discussed potential mechanisms underlying the neurological symptoms and the relationship between the infectious diseases and the neurodegenerative disorders, as well as the therapeutic and preventive implications in the neurodegenerative disorders. Infections with a relay of microbes (SARS-CoV-2, influenza A viruses, gut bacteria, etc.) and prion-like alpha-synuclein proteins over time may synergize to induce PD. Therefore, a systematic approach that targets these pathogens and the pathogen-induced neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration may provide cures for neurodegenerative disorders. Further, antiviral/antimicrobial drugs, vaccines, immunotherapies and new therapies (e.g., stem cell therapy) need to work together to treat, manage or prevent these disorders. As medical science and technology advances, it is anticipated that better vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 variants, new antiviral/antimicrobial drugs, effective immunotherapies (alpha-synuclein antibodies, vaccines for PD or parkinsonism, etc.), as well as new therapies will be developed and made available in the near future, which will help prevent a possible post-COVID-19 parkinsonism in the 21st century.

6.
Music and Science ; 6, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2195669

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 continues to strain healthcare systems around the globe. Research has shown a relationship between COVID-19 and an inflammatory response, including neuropathological outcomes. Additionally, studies have shown positive effects of engagement with music on inflammatory responses;music may have potential, as a method, to reduce inflammation triggered by COVID-19. This review compiles exhaustive research from multiple disciplines to account for this possibility. The authors utilized a meta-narrative approach to complete this review. The search was conducted using PubMed, Embase, OneSearch, Primo, Google Scholar, Clinicaltrials.gov, and the bibliographies of relevant articles. In total, 84 articles were included for full-text review, discussion, and analysis. Articles pertaining to music and acoustics encompassed a date range from 1964–2020. Articles referencing COVID-19 spanned the years 2019–2021. This work focused on associations between engagement with music, stress response, blood-brain barrier integrity, inflammation, COVID-19, and neuropathology in preclinical and clinical models. Detailed analysis revealed that engagement with music has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of COVID-19, particularly in the inflammation and blood clotting pathways associated with a range of pathophysiological and neuropathological issues. Further work is warranted to standardize and validate existing methods associating positive effects of engagement with music on the negative effects of COVID-19. © The Author(s) 2023.

7.
Advances in Gerontology ; 12(4):407-416, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2193599

ABSTRACT

Based on available publications, the article systematizes information about some forms of lesions of the central nervous system (CNS), their pathogenesis and clinical manifestations in the case of COVID-19. The risk factors, mechanisms of development, diagnostic approach, and the age characteristics of patients with neurological complications of COVID-19 are discussed. The specific mechanisms of the neuroinvasiveness and neurovirulence of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, regardless of the age of patients and the presence of risk factors, lead to systemic damage to the endothelium of small-caliber vessels, generalized thrombovasculitis, and an increased risk of ischemic and hemorrhagic strokes. At the same time, the most vulnerable category is elderly and senile patients with cardiovascular and metabolic disorders (arterial hypertension, obesity, diabetes mellitus), which sharply worsen treatment outcomes. The clinical experience accumulated during the COVID-19 pandemic indicates the development of the following most frequent post-covid neurological complications and consequences in mainly elderly and senile patients: cranial mononeuropathies, chemosensory dysfunction, encephalopathy, insomnia, stroke, acute meningoencephalitis, acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, acute polyneuropathy Guillain-Barre syndrome, and transverse myelitis. The benefits of vaccination against COVID-19 far outweigh the risks of possible post-vaccination neurological complications and consequences, especially in elderly and senile patients.

8.
Scientific Reports (Nature Publisher Group) ; 12(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2186011

ABSTRACT

Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) is an emerging enterovirus that can cause neurological complications. Enhanced serum IL-1β levels were observed in EV-A71 patients with severe neurological symptoms. However, the roles of sensors in enterovirus-induced IL-1β production are unclear. In this study, we identified that pattern recognition receptors, including RIG-I, TLR3, and TLR8, are implicated in EV-A71-triggered IL-1β release in human macrophages. EV-A71 infection results in caspase-1 and caspase-8, which act as regulators of EV-A71-induced NLRP3 and RIG-I inflammasome activation. Moreover, knockdown of the expression of TLR3 and TLR8 decreased the released IL-1β in an NLRP3-dependent manner. Since TLR3 and TLR8 ligands promote NLRP3 inflammasome activation via caspase-8, the alternative pathway may be involved. In summary, these results indicate that activation of the NLRP3 and RIG-I inflammasomes in EV-A71-infected macrophages is mediated by caspase-1 and caspase-8 and affected by TLRs, including TLR3 and TLR8.

9.
Psychoanalytic Psychology ; : No Pagination Specified, 2022.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2185606

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to many months of school closures, quarantining, and social isolation for children and their families. This disruption of routine had significant implications for the mental health of children and adolescents, leading to a parallel mental health pandemic among this vulnerable population (Fegert et al., 2020). While these psychosocial effects were most acute during the initial phase, the ripples of the pandemic continue to be felt during the time of this writing (2022), as we continue to be confronted with the ever-evolving virus and its myriad aftereffects. A review of the literature suggests an increase in depression and anxiety among children and adolescents as a result of the sweeping changes to their environment (Barendse et al., 2022;Vizard et al., 2020;Waite et al., 2021). Fear of contagion, boredom, loneliness, increased social anxiety, irritability, inattention, and increased disruptive behaviors were all observed (de Figueiredo et al., 2021;Jiao et al., 2020). For children with neurocognitive impairments, the impact was even more severe due to a proliferation of factors that will be discussed below (Korpa et al., 2021). Nonetheless, despite the pandemic's pointed impact on mental health, some children and adolescents were actually able to thrive and even noted improvements in their social and emotional functioning (Chawla et al., 2021;Silk et al., 2022). This article will examine the specific impact of the pandemic on young learners with the most common types of neurocognitive disorders and provide recommendations for intervention. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

10.
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care ; 38(S1):S102, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2185355

ABSTRACT

IntroductionWe aimed to map and synthesize the available evidence on neuron-specific biomarkers related to COVID-19.MethodsA systematic review and qualitative evidence mapping synthesis was performed (PROSPERO-CRD42021266995). Searches were conducted in PubMed and Scopus, and complemented by manual search (July 2021). We included observational studies of any design assessing neurological biomarkers in adult patients (>18 years;with or without neurological comorbidities) diagnosed with COVID-19. Methodological quality of nonrandomized studies (case-control, cohorts) was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale.ResultsOverall, 14 studies (n=485 patients) conducted in Sweden (n=4 articles, 28.5%), Germany (n=3;21.4%), USA (n=3;21.4%), Canada, France, Italy and Norway (n=1 study each) were included. The most reported neurological symptoms (n=13 studies, 92.8%) were headache, confusion, general weakness, loss of smell/taste, cognitive impairments and behavioral changes. Prevalent neurological conditions included encephalopathies, neuropathies, myopathies, and delirium;most critical cases presented cerebrovascular events (n=4 studies, 28.5%). Hypertension, diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and chronic lung disease were the most reported comorbidities. Eight different neuron-specific biomarkers were found in primary studies: neurofilament-light chain – NfL (n=10 studies;71.4%), glial fibrillary acidic-protein – GFAp (n=5;35.7%), tau protein (n=5;35.7%), neurofilament-heavy chain – NfH, S100B protein, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L1 - UCH-L1, neuron-specific enolase and beta protein-amyloid – Aβ (n=1 study each). These biomarkers were found both in cerebrospinal fluid and blood/plasma samples even without an evident cytokine storm. In patients with COVID-19, NfL and GFAp can act as sensitive indicators of neuroaxonal and astrocytic damages, respectively. Increased levels of NfL were significantly associated with severe COVID-19, unconsciousness and longer stay in the intensive care unit (p<0.05). Studies had an overall poor to moderate methodological quality.ConclusionsWe identified eight neuron-specific biomarkers that should be further studied as prognostic factors of COVID-19. These findings can also guide the development of targeted therapies against SARS-CoV-2. Additional well-designed clinical trials are needed to strengthen this evidence and help understand the mechanisms of neurological symptoms and sequelae after COVID-19 infection.

11.
International Journal of Technology Assessment in Health Care ; 38(S1):S88, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2185352

ABSTRACT

IntroductionTelemedicine strategies have been broadly introducing in health services during the COVID-19 pandemic, including in care of neurological diseases.MethodsA rapid realist review was conducted using EUnetHTAs Core Model 3.0 and GRADE evidence to decision frameworks were used as frameworks to describe the ethical, legal, organizational, social and patient aspects (ELSI+) related to the use of teleneurology (TN) A scoping multistakeholder meeting helped defined the scope and research questions of the assessment. Patient representatives, clinicians, scientific society representatives with relevant experience in TN were invited and participated. Industry representatives were also present. Systematic searches for ethical, legal, organizational, social and patients related aspects were conducted. Additional manual searches contributed to contextualize these dimensions in the Spanish context. A narrative synthesis was undertaken.ResultsMain results of the assessment of the ELSI+ aspects of TN were described. TN applications are diverse depending on the condition, objective of care and technology used. The implementation of TN lacks specific legal frameworks which implies legal uncertainty. TN may increase geographical accessibility to neurological care in remote areas and by reducing difficult commuting to specialized care centers. Nevertheless, accessibility is challenged by reduced access to technology, the digital divide, lack of health literacy or technologies not adapted to functional diversity. Therefore, equity is not guaranteed if it is offered as a non-voluntary basis or with no support. TN tends to be accepted by patients and carers if it has enough quality, saves travelling time and costs and does not dehumanize care as it is perceived as more flexible and convenient. Quality of TN needs an interdisciplinary team with skills to coordinate organizational aspects of the implementation which include among others, the planification of the support to patients and carers before, during and after the consultation. Health professionals may also need to learn adapted communicational and technological skills.ConclusionsThe implementation of TN poses many ethical, legal, organizational, social or patient-centered challenges.

12.
Critical Care Clinics ; 38(4):xv, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2184660
13.
Clinical Neurophysiology ; 141(Supplement):S77, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2177653

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Neurological manifestations in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have been reported from early features of anosmia and dysgeusia to widespread involvement of the central nervous system, peripheral nervous system, as well as the neuromuscular junction and muscle. Our study objective is to evaluate the electromyography and nerve conduction study (EMG/NCS) findings among COVID-19 patients and look for possible correlations. Method(s): This is a hospital-based retrospective observational study. All COVID-19 patients between the period of 1st January 2020 to 31st December 2020 undergoing an EMG/NCS were included. Result(s): Eighteen patients (12 male and 6 female) were included. Mean age was 55 +/- 12 years. 11 patients required intubation for a mean period of 18.6 days (range: 3-37 days). Electrodiagnostic findings were consistent with a myopathy in a majority of these patients (82%). Five of them also had a concurrent axonal neuropathy. In the remaining patients who did not require intubation (n = 7), three patients had myopathic EMG changes and one had Guillain-Barre syndrome. Conclusion(s): At this time, there are no neuromuscular-specific recommendations for patients who contract COVID-19. Only time and additional data will unveil the varying nature and potential neurological sequelae of COVID-19. Copyright © 2022

14.
Der Nervenarzt ; : 1-7, 2022.
Article in German | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2174002

ABSTRACT

Zusammenfassung: Die vorliegende Übersichtsarbeit fasst wichtige Erkenntnisse der Schnittstellen Corona-virus-disease-2019(COVID-19)-Pandemie und Neurologie mit Fokus auf Neurointensivmedizin zusammen. Insbesondere werden auf Prävalenz, Pathomechanismen und Auswirkungen neurologischer Manifestationen eingegangen. Die häufigsten Manifestationen schwer kranker Intensivpatienten sind zerebrovaskuläre Komplikationen, Enzephalopathien und die „intensive care unit-acquired weakness" (ICUAW). Ein direkter, neurodestruktiver Effekt durch das Virus an sich konnte bisher nicht sicher nachgewiesen werden. Vielmehr kommen ursächlich durch die virale Infektion ausgelöste systemische inflammatorische Prozesse sowie Nebenwirkungen der intensivmedizinischen Therapie infrage. Die Auswirkungen der Pandemie auf Patienten mit neurologischen Erkrankungen und die Neurointensivmedizin sind weitreichend, aber noch nicht ausreichend untersucht. (German) [ FROM AUTHOR]

15.
Clinical Case Reports ; 10(12), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2172746

ABSTRACT

A 67-year-old female was hospitalized due to right-sided hemiparesis and neck pain with rapid deterioration to a deep coma. She had received the Sinopharm vaccine 2 days earlier. MRI showed extensive cervicothoracic hematomyelia. She received intensive medical care for 2 months and was discharged. An 18-month follow-up showed significant neurological recovery.

16.
Biofactors ; 2023.
Article in English | Publisher | ID: covidwho-2172688

ABSTRACT

The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial properties of curcumin have made it a valuable herbal product for improving various disorders, such as COVID-19, cancer, depression, anxiety, osteoarthritis, migraine, and diabetes. Recent research has demonstrated that encapsulating curcumin in nanoparticles might improve its therapeutic effects and bioavailability. To our knowledge, the efficacy of nano-curcumin on different aspects of health and disease has not been summarized in a study. Therefore, this review aimed to evaluate nano-curcumin's efficacy in various diseases based on the findings of clinical trials. In order to review publications focusing on nanocurcumin's impact on various diseases, four databases were searched, including PubMed, Scopus, Web of Science, and Google Scholar. This review highlights the potential benefits of nano-curcumin in improving a wide range of human diseases including COVID-19, neurological disorders, chronic disease, oral diseases, osteoarthritis, metabolic syndrome, and other diseases, especially as an adjunct to standard therapy and a healthy lifestyle.

17.
Journal of Current Pharma Research ; 13(1):18-26, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169263

ABSTRACT

The "Coronavirus disease 2019" has resulted by infecting millions of people globally and indirectly affect the individuals through disruption of daily routine. Since the diagnosis of index case, linked to sea food and wet animal wholesale market in Wuhan, China, in December 2019.The discharge of this virus has spread worldwide and has threatened the whole world and considered as pandemic recently. World Health Organization (WHO] has declared COVID-19 Pandemic on March 2020. Long term health outcomes of COVID-19 have been reported with the similar diseases from other coronaviruses. "Middle East Respiratory Syndrome" and "Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome". Major adverse outcomes was found to affect different body systems in humans (neurological system, GIT, hepatic an renal system, CVS, muscle pain, mental health outcomes, pulmonary outcomes, fungal infection and many more chronic symptoms were observed in patients in Post-COVID-19 recovery. Globally the community is focusing on trialing COVID-19 vaccines and its treatment, and its equally important to focus on recovered patients an possible events faced by patients in post recovery period. Thus this article emphasizes long-term COVID-19 health complications in patients during Post recovery period.

18.
Netherlands Journal of Critical Care ; 30(6):200-203, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2168854

ABSTRACT

Encephalopathy is a severe and underestimated neurological complication of COVID-19 infection, with a high prevalence in COVID-19 patients in intensive care. We present a case of a 68-year-old male with severe COVID-19 encephalopathy and prolonged lowered consciousness, without showing any brain imaging abnormalities. There are multiple mechanisms of cause, such as inflammatory, hypoxic-metabolic and sepsis-related factors, and residual sedation, which were treated as described without effect on the encephalopathy. Interestingly, our patient showed no abnormalities on brain imaging and the encephalopathy only disappeared a full month after respiratory recovery. Encephalopathy considerably prolonged his ICU stay and after discharge from the medical rehabilitation clinic, he still showed mild neurological impairment. The late neurological recovery suggests that the severity of encephalopathy may not only be related to the severity of the COVID-19 pneumonia and there might be an inflammatory neurological response, without showing brain imaging abnormalities. Copyright © 2022, Netherlands Society of Intensive Care. All rights reserved.

19.
European Journal of Molecular and Clinical Medicine ; 9(7):7120-7145, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2168843

ABSTRACT

Background: About two-thirds of the benign intraspinal neoplasms are intradural extramedullary spinal cord tumours (IESCT). On rare occasions, they exhibit neurological involvement ranging from acute to chronic, necessitating urgent surgical intervention. Method(s): Here, we examined a group of 10 intradural extramedullary tumours treated between 2020 and 2022 by a single orthopaedic surgeon at Rajshree Medical and Research Institute, Bareilly's department of orthopaedics. Patients were followed up forat least two years. Clinical and functional outcome of these patients were evaluated by Karnofsky Performance Score [KPS], and Modified McCormick scale. Result(s): Thoracic spine 07 (70%) and junctional tumours 3 (30%) were the major sites of the majority of IESCT tumour in our study. There were 5 meningiomas, 2 schwannomas, 2 inflammatory, and 1 benign cyst on histo-pathological analysis. Meningiomas were typically found dorsal spine and dorso-lumbar junction, while schwannomas were found in the middle of the dorsal region. Both KPS and the Modified McCormick scale were significantly improved after surgery. Conclusion(s): MRI scan with constrast can easily identify the majority of benign intradural extramedullary tumours. It was observed that earlier diagnosis of neurological involvement were associated with good prognosis. Notably, surgical intervention is followed by positive functional outcomes. Copyright © 2022 Ubiquity Press. All rights reserved.

20.
Neurology Asia ; 27(4):899-908, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2207121

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 was declared as a pandemic by World Health Organization on March 11, 2020, and still constitutes a serious health problem affecting millions of people across the world. The evaluation and follow-up of ongoing and/or newly developing neurological involvement after recovery from COVID-19 are important. This study aims to reveal post-COVID-19 neurological symptoms and risk factors for their development. Method(s): Patients over the age of 18 years who applied to centers, at least 4 weeks after COVID-19 infection and agreed to participate in the study were included in this cross-sectional study between January 20 and March 15, 2021. The patients were evaluated face to face, and their sociodemographic data, medical history, post-COVID-19 neurological symptoms, treatments, and Beck Depression Inventory scores were recorded. All statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 23 for Windows software package (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL). Result(s): Four hundred patients were included in this study, an average of 108+5.12 days had passed after the onset of COVID-19. The rate of post-COVID-19 neurological involvement was 73.3%, and the top 3 most common symptoms were headache (47%), myalgia (43%), and sleep disturbance (39%). Having depression (OR: 4.54, 95% Cl:1.88-10.96), female gender (OR:2.18, 95% Cl:1.36-3.49), hospitalization (OR: 2.01, 95% Cl:103-3.64), and usage of favipiravir (OR:2.07 95 Cl:1.15-3.72) were determined as independent predictors of developing prolonged neurological symptoms. Conclusion(s): The long-term consequences of COVID-19 remain uncertain. It should be remembered that neurological symptoms are very common in post-infectious patients and long-term follow-up may be required in the management of this condition. Copyright © 2022, ASEAN Neurological Association. All rights reserved.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL