Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.240
Filter
1.
Eur J Neurol ; 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2161593

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess neurological complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection and compare phenotypes and outcome in infected patients with and without selected neurological manifestations. METHODS: Data source was a registry established by the European Academy of Neurology during the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic. Neurologists collected data on patients with COVID-19 seen as in- and out-patients and in emergency rooms in 23 European and seven non-European countries. Prospective and retrospective data included patient's demographics, lifestyle habits, comorbidities, main COVID-19 complications, hospital and ICU admissions, diagnostic tests, and outcome. Acute/subacute selected neurological manifestations in patients with COVID-19 were analysed comparing individuals with and without each condition for several risk factors. RESULTS: By July 31st 2021, 1523 patients (758 men, 756 women, and nine intersex/unknown, aged 16-101 years) were registered. Neurological manifestations were diagnosed in 1213 infected patients (79.6%). At study entry, 978 subjects (64.2%) had one or more chronic general and neurological comorbidities. Predominant acute/subacute neurological manifestations were cognitive dysfunction (N=449, 29.5%), stroke (N=392, 25.7%), sleep-wake disturbances (N=250, 16.4%), dysautonomia (N=224, 14.7%), peripheral neuropathy (N=145, 9.5%), movement disorders (N=142, 9.3%), ataxia (N=134, 8.8%), and seizures (N=126, 8.3%). These manifestations tended to differ with age, general and neurological comorbidities, infection severity and non-neurological manifestations, extent of association with other acute/subacute neurological manifestations, and outcome. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with COVID-19 and neurological manifestations present with distinct phenotypes. Differences in age, general and neurological comorbidities, and infection severity characterize the various neurological manifestations of COVID-19.

2.
Nurs Open ; 2022 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2157879

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to explore how patients with neurological disease experienced a COVID-19 visitor ban and to identify ways of improving the quality of care. BACKGROUND: In March 2020, a temporary visitor ban was introduced in Danish hospitals to reduce the spread of COVID-19. This led to changes in clinical practice, leaving patients without their loved ones beside them. Since neurological patients are already considered vulnerable due to physical, and sometimes cognitive impairment, we urgently wished to investigate these circumstances to facilitate appropriate support. DESIGN: This study was conducted using a qualitative explorative design. METHODS: Fourteen patients with neurological disease were interviewed using a semi-structured interview guide. Data were analysed through inductive thematic analysis. RESULTS: For most patients, being hospitalized during the COVID-19 visitor ban was a painful experience with the potential to negatively influence both their mental and physical health.

3.
Front Vet Sci ; 9: 911026, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2148130

ABSTRACT

To provide students of veterinary medicine with the necessary day 1 competences, e-learning offerings are increasingly used in addition to classical teaching formats such as lectures. For example, virtual patients offer the possibility of case-based, computer-assisted learning. A concept to teach and test clinical decision-making is the key feature (KF) approach. KF questions consist of three to five critical points that are crucial for the case resolution. In the current study usage, learning success, usability and acceptance of KF cases as neurological virtual patients should be determined in comparison to the long cases format. Elective courses were offered in winter term 2019/20 and summer term 2020 and a total of 38 virtual patients with neurological diseases were presented in the KF format. Eight cases were provided with a new clinical decision-making application (Clinical Reasoning Tool) and contrasted with eight other cases without the tool. In addition to the evaluation of the learning analytics (e.g., processing times, success rates), an evaluation took place after course completion. After 229 course participations (168 individual students and additional 61 with repeated participation), 199 evaluation sheets were completed. The average processing time of a long case was 53 min, while that of a KF case 17 min. 78% of the long cases and 73% of KF cases were successfully completed. The average processing time of cases with Clinical Reasoning Tool was 19 min. The success rate was 58.3 vs. 60.3% for cases without the tool. In the survey, the long cases received a ranking (1 = very good, 6 = poor) of 2.4, while KF cases received a grade of 1.6, 134 of the respondents confirmed that the casework made them feel better prepared to secure a diagnosis in a real patient. Flexibility in learning (n = 93) and practical relevance (n = 65) were the most frequently listed positive aspects. Since KF cases are short and highlight only the most important features of a patient, 30% (n = 70) of respondents expressed the desire for more specialist information. KF cases are suitable for presenting a wide range of diseases and for training students' clinical decision-making skills. The Clinical Reasoning Tool can be used for better structuring and visualizing the reasoning process.

4.
Current Neurology ; 22(2):86-86–92, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2164334

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 virus was first identified in 2019 in Wuhan (China) and is responsible for the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. Although the virus causes mild, transient symptoms of an upper respiratory tract infection in most cases, it can also lead to severe pneumonia, respiratory failure and/or death. Approximately 85% of patients experience central and peripheral neurological symptoms. In the acute phase of the disease, ischaemic strokes, intracranial haemorrhages, meningitis and encephalitis, acute demyelinating diseases and acute inflammatory polyneuropathies may occur. However, mild neurological symptoms that can persist for months and significantly affect daily functioning are much more common. These include headache and dizziness, olfactory and gustatory dysfunction, mild cognitive disturbances, as well as depressive, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Some of them are encompassed by popular terms "post-covid syndrome” and "brain fog.” The pathogenesis of neurological complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection is still not fully understood;overproduction of cytokines induced by viral infection may be of great importance. There is no causal treatment, while symptomatic treatment is of limited effectiveness. Primary prevention in the form of SARS-CoV-2 vaccinations is of great importance. In the following review, we would like to present the current knowledge on epidemiology, pathology, pathogenesis and treatment of neurological complications after SARS-CoV-2 infection. Further multi-centre, large-scale clinical studies are necessary to identify the exact pathogenetic mechanisms.

5.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1208-1210, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163885
6.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1170-1173, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163884

ABSTRACT

Background: Hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH) is a potentially fatal hyperinflammatory condition that presents with fever, hepatosplenomegaly, and characteristic laboratory findings. Mutations in the perforin gene PRF1 have been implicated in cases of familial HLH (fHLH) and can cause isolated CNS-HLH in the absence of systemic HLH. Results: A five year-old boy presented with three weeks of headache, blurry vision, and emesis. He was diagnosed with acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), thought to be triggered by SARS-CoV-2 given positive nasopharyngeal testing. He completed a five day course of high dose IV methylprednisolone and plasma exchange. In the subsequent months, he was admitted twice due to worsening clinical and radiological activity and after several courses of IV pulse steroids, plasmapheresis, and IV immunoglobulin (IVIG), his condition stabilized with rituximab and monthly IVIG. A few months later, his younger brother presented with a similar syndrome. It was discovered that his parents were second cousins, leading to concern for a genetic disorder. Genetic testing revealed a homozygous mutation for PRF1 in both siblings (variant c.4422G>A). Conclusions: This is the first presentation of CNS-isolated familial HLH triggered by SARS-CoV-2 in the pediatric population. Furthermore, this is the first report of this specific PRF1 mutation, the variant c.4422G>A, as pathogenic. It highlights the relevance of genetic testing in pediatric neuroinflammatory disorders that do not respond adequately to conventional treatments. It is possible that as our knowledge in neurogenetics develops, certain genes will be identified as predisposing factors to syndromes such as ADEM.

7.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1223, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163882
8.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1099-1103, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163881

ABSTRACT

Context: COVID-19 pandemic continues to be a serious threat to humanity even after the last 2.5 years and multiple reported waves. Post-COVID-19 cognitive impairment has a detrimental effect on the quality of life, education, occupation, psychosocial as well as adaptive functioning and independence. Aims and Objective: Profiling the cognitive impairment in the mild COVID-19 recovered patients. Settings and Design: Interview-based case-control study. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted at a secondary healthcare center in a hilly region of north India. Group A included mild COVID-19 recovered patients and Group B included local non-COVID healthy individuals. Both groups of participants were interviewed using Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) to identify global and domain-wise cognitive impairment. Statistics Used: Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the demographic and clinical variables. The Chi-square test was used to evaluate these results and statistical analysis was done using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (version 23) program. Results: A total of 284 individuals were enrolled in our study, equally split into Groups A (cases) and B (controls). No global cognitive decline was found in any participant. However, 40 cases scored low on MoCA. The decrease in domain-wise cognitive function was statistically significant for visuospatial skill/executive function and attention. Conclusion: Our results have demonstrated that there is domain-wise cognitive impairment associated with mild COVID-19 disease. We recommend lowering the threshold of the MoCA to identify the early cognitive impairment and the inclusion of detailed cognitive assessment in post-COVID-19 follow-ups to initiate early cognitive rehabilitation among these patients.

9.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1116-1121, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163879

ABSTRACT

Introduction/Aims: Studies conducted during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported varied data regarding the incidence of Guillain–Barre syndrome (GBS). The present study investigated demographic and clinical features, management, and outcomes of patients with GBS during a specified period of the COVID-19 pandemic, and compared these features to those of GBS in the previous year. Methods: A multicenter, ambispective cohort study including 26 centers across India was conducted. Data from a pre-COVID-19 period (March 1 to August 31, 2019) were collected retrospectively and collected ambispectively for a specified COVID-19 period (March 1 to August 31, 2020). The study was registered with the Clinical Trial Registry India (CTRI/2020/11/029143). Results: Data from 555 patients were included for analysis: pre-COVID-19 (n = 334) and COVID-19 (n = 221). Males were more commonly affected during both periods (male:female, 2:1). Gastroenteritis was the most frequent antecedent event in 2019 (17.4%), whereas fever was the most common event in 2020 (10.7%). Paraparesis (21.3% versus [vs.] 9.3%, P = 0.001) and sensory involvement (51.1% vs. 41.3%;P = 0.023) were more common during COVID-19 in 2020, whereas back pain (26.3% vs. 18.4%;P = 0.032) and bowel symptoms (20.7% vs. 13.7%;P = 0.024) were more frequent in the pre-COVID period. There was no difference in clinical outcomes between the two groups in terms of GBS disability score at discharge and 3 months after discharge. Independent predictors of disability in the pre-COVID period included areflexia/hyporeflexia, the requirementfor intubation, and time to bulbar weakness;in the COVID-19 period, independent predictors included time from onset to admission, intubation, and intubation requirement. The mortality rate was 2.3% during the entire study period (13/555 cases). Discussion: Results of this study revealed an overall reduction in the frequency of GBS during the pandemic. The lockdown likely reduced the risk for antecedent infections due to social distancing and improved hygiene, which may have resulted in the reduction of the frequency of GBS.

10.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1224-1225, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163878
11.
Annals of Indian Academy of Neurology ; 25(6):1047-1055, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163872

ABSTRACT

Background: Though severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS CoV 2) virus primarily affects respiratory system, neurological involvement is well known. Aims: To describe the neurological manifestations of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) during three waves of the pandemic. Methodology: This was an ambispective observational single-centre study to describe the neurological manifestations of COVID-19 infection among inpatients from a tertiary care referral centre in Western India from March 2020 to January 2022. Results: Out of 14,822 patients admitted with COVID-19, 307 (2.07%) had neurological manifestations. Neurological manifestations were seen in 1.87% in first wave (onset to 10 Feb 21);2.37% in second wave (Feb 11, 2021 to Dec 31, 2021) and 6.26% in third wave (Jan 1, 2022 to Jan 31, 2022). The most common neurological manifestations were encephalopathy (34.5%), ischemic stroke (32.1%), and acute symptomatic seizures (8.8%). Encephalopathy (p = 0.028) was more common in first wave while seizures were more common in third wave (p = 0.001). In patients with encephalopathy, hypoxia (p = 0.0001), shock (p = 0.001), renal involvement (p = 0.002), and sepsis (p = 0.033) were associated with higher mortality;while those with no systemic involvement had better survival (p = 0.0001). Among patients with ischemic stroke, 32.1% did not have any traditional vascular risk factors. These patients were 9 years younger and required 6 days less hospitalization than patients of stroke with vascular risk factors. Conclusion: SARS-CoV-2 produces many central and peripheral nervous system manifestations. Encephalopathy was more common in first wave while acute symptomatic seizures were more common in third wave. Encephalopathy was most common neurological manifestation with progressively higher mortality with increased number of systemic comorbidities. Ischemic stroke was seen in patients who had vascular risk factors as well as in patients without them.

12.
Frontiers in Neuroscience ; 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2163065

ABSTRACT

Background and purpose: Long-COVID describes the long-term effects of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). In long-COVID patients, neuropsychological alterations are frequently reported symptoms. Research points to medial temporal lobe dysfunction and its association with anosmia in long-COVID patients. This study aims to investigate the acquisition and consolidation of declarative and procedural memory in long-COVID patients and to explore whether anosmia is related to these dissociated memory functions. Methods: Forty-two long-COVID participants and 30 controls (C) were recruited. The sample of long-COVID patients was divided into two groups based on the presence or absence of anosmia, group A and group NA, respectively. Objective performance in verbal declarative memory (Paired-Associate Learning, PAL), procedural memory (Mirror Tracing Test, MTT), general cognitive function (Montreal Cognitive Assessment scale), psychomotor speed, and incidental learning (Digit Symbol Substitution Test) were assessed and compared among the A, NA, and C groups. Long-term retention of PAL and MTT were assessed 24 hours after acquisition. Results: Lower scores in general cognition, psychomotor speed, and sustained attention were found in A and NA compared with C. However, incidental learning, both cue-guided and free-recalled, was diminished in group A compared with C, with no differences with group NA. General cognition and incidental learning were related to declarative memory function exclusively in long-COVID groups. Long-COVID groups presented lower long-term retention of verbal declarative memory than controls in recall tests but no differences in recognition tests. No group differences were found in the acquisition of procedural memory. However, long-term retention of this memory was worse in group A as compared to the NA and C groups, respectively, when errors and time of execution were considered. Conclusion: Findings support that consolidation of both procedural and declarative memories is more affected than the acquisition of these memories in long-COVID patients, who are also more vulnerable to deficits in delayed recall than in recognition of declarative memories. Deficits in the consolidation of procedural memory and immediate recall of declarative information are especially relevant in long-COVID participants with anosmia. This indicates that anosmia in COVID-19 could be associated with a long-term dysfunction of the limbic system.

13.
Revista Latinoamericana de Psicopatologia Fundamental ; 25(3):731-751, 2022.
Article in Portuguese | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2162693

ABSTRACT

Para compreender melhor a percepçao de desgoverno e o sentimento de desamparo que se alastraram no Brasil sob a Covid-19, este artigo examina dois momentos históricos relativos a interface peste-desamparo, das perspectivas psicanalítica e política. O primeiro momento trata do entrelaçamento entre vida e obra de Freud e culmina com sua experiencia com a pandemia da gripe espanhola, em 1920;o segundo, trabalha a forma pela qual estamos lidando com o advento da pandemia do coronavirus, desde março de 2020, que - até o momento em que escrevo este artigo (Janeiro de 2022) - matou mais de 600 mil brasileiros e trouxe o luto para mais de cinco milhoes de familias no mundo. A hipótese deste trabalho assevera que o sentimento de desamparo que estamos vivenciando desvela o negacionismo e o desgoverno que, inclusive, poem em xeque o estado democrático de direito no país.Alternate :To better understand the widespread perception of misgovernment and helplessness in Brazil during the COVID-19 pandemic, this article examines two historic moments referring to the interface between plague and helplessness, from the psychoanalytic and political perspectives. Firstly, it addresses the intertwining between Freud's life and work, culminating with his experience during the Spanish flu pandemic, in 1920. Secondly, it analyses the measures put in place to combat the coronavirus pandemic, since March 2020, which - until the moment I am writing this article (January 2022) - killed more than 600,000 Brazilians and left more than five million families around the world in mourning. This paper asserts that the feeling of helplessness unveils a state of denialism and misgovernment, which calls into question the Brazilian rule of law.Alternate :Pour mieux comprendre la perception répandue de la mauvaise administartion et de l'impuissance au Brésil pendant la pandémie de Covid-19, cet article examine deux moments historiques liés a ¡'interface peste-impuissance, du point de vue psychanalytique et politique. Premierement, il traite de ¡'imbrication entre la vie et l'œuvre de Freud, qui culmine avec son expérience pendant la pandémie de grippe espagnole en 1920. Deuxiemement, il analyse les mesures misen en place pour combattre la pandémie du coronavirus, depuis mars 2020, qui - jusqu'au moment de la rédaction de cet article (janvier 2022) - a fait plus de 600 000 victimes brésiliennes et endeuillé plus de cinq millions de familles dans le monde. Cet essai affirme que le sentiment d'impuissance dévoile un état de négationnisme et de mauvaise gouvernance, qui remet en question l'État de droit et la démocratie au Brésil.

14.
The Neurohospitalist ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2162246

ABSTRACT

Background Venous thromboses have been linked to several COVID-19 vaccines, but there is limited information on the Moderna vaccine's effect on the risk of arterial thrombosis. Here we describe a case of post-Moderna COVID-19 vaccination arterial infarct with vaccine-associated diffuse cortical edema that was complicated by refractory intracranial hypertension. Case Summary 24 hrs after receiving her first dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine, a 30-year-old female developed severe headache. Three weeks later she was admitted with subacute headache and confusion. Imaging initially showed scattered cortical thrombosis with an elevated opening pressure on lumbar puncture. An external ventricular drain was placed, but she continued to have elevated intracranial pressure. Ultimately, she required a hemicraniectomy, but intractable cerebral edema resulted in her death. Pathology was consistent with thrombosis and associated inflammatory response. Conclusion Though correlational, her medical team surmised that the mRNA vaccine may have contributed to this presentation. The side effects of COVID-19 infection and vaccination are still incompletely understood. Though complications are rare, clinicians should be aware of presentations like this one.

15.
Practical Neurology ; 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2161977

ABSTRACT

Functional cognitive disorders (FCDs) are a common cause of subjective and mild cognitive impairment. Isolated FCDs commonly present to the cognitive clinic, but examination of the nature of the symptoms suggests that they can also be understood as a transdiagnostic feature of many other conditions. This article examines methods of formulating the cognitive difficulties in order to identify treatment targets in people with FCDs.

16.
BMJ Case Reports ; 15(12), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2161824

ABSTRACT

A woman in her late 70s with a history of liver transplant presented with ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, areflexia, positive Babinski's sign and reduced consciousness. This followed an antecedent illness in the form of a herpes zoster infection. MRI of the brain/spinal cord, cerebrospinal fluid analysis with viral PCR and routine blood tests were normal, and tacrolimus neurotoxicity was ruled out. Serum anti-GQ1b antibodies were positive. A diagnosis of Bickerstaff's brainstem encephalitis was made, forming part of the continuum that involves Miller-Fisher syndrome, entitled the ‘anti-GQ1b syndrome'. Complete recovery ensued without intravenous immunoglobulins or plasma exchange. The role of monitoring anti-ganglioside pattern change to predict or confirm disease recurrence and disease severity is further discussed.

17.
Telemed J E Health ; 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2160906

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common progressive neurological condition with onset in young adulthood. Because people with MS (PwMS) are often separated from specialty care by distance or disability, telemedicine can help alleviate that burden by removing obstacles to accessing care. Methods: We surveyed 762 PwMS in the iConquerMS research network about their use of in-person and telemedicine services prepandemic (January-February 2020) and during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic (September-November 2020). The survey asked PwMS about their use of in-person and telemedicine services, technology access, perceptions and preferences of telemedicine, their most recent telemedicine encounter, and reasons for not using telemedicine. Results: Prepandemic, the most cited reason for not using telemedicine was providers not offering remote visits. During the pandemic, there was a decrease in the use of in-person health care (100% to ∼78%) and an increase in telemedicine utilization (25% to ∼80%). Most participants had access to telemedicine-enabling technologies and a large portion indicated a preference for using telemedicine for some or most/all of their MS health care (41-57%). Before the pandemic, telemedicine utilization was highest for primary care, while during the pandemic, utilization of telemedicine was greatest for general MS care. Mental health telemedicine encounters increased during the pandemic. Discussion: The dramatic increase in telemedicine utilization during the COVID-19 pandemic has provided access for PwMS to multispecialty care. Maintaining the policy changes that enabled remote health care to expand during the pandemic will be critical for sustained access to MS specialty care for this vulnerable population.

18.
The Lancet Neurology ; 22(1):17-19, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2159970

ABSTRACT

Over 1 year, the PASADENA trial tested treatment with two different doses of prasinezumab, a humanised monoclonal antibody targeting aggregated α-synuclein, and compared them with placebo in 316 participants.1 Antibody treatment did not affect clinical scores (primary outcome: sum of the Movement Disorder Society's Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale [MDS-UPDRS] parts I-III) or dopamine transporter activity (as a secondary outcome measure of disease progression). Another novel marker based on a kinase assay, combined with a cellular assay of downstream substrate phosphorylation, identified 23 out of 100 LRRK2 variants as robustly stimulating kinase activity, thereby enabling the classification of variants previously considered of unknown significance as pathogenic or benign.4 This high-throughput marker of pathogenicity has direct translational implications for counselling and for stratification of participants in the imminent leucine-rich-repeat kinase inhibitor trials. A digital approach was suggested by the PASADENA study, in which a newly developed, exploratory digital outcome (combined home-based signals from a smartwatch and smartphone, which were used by all study participants) showed less decline for both active treatment arms (ie, two different doses of prasinezumab) compared with placebo.1 However, pending validation, this result is only hypothesis generating.

19.
The Lancet Neurology ; 22(1):9-10, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2159969

ABSTRACT

The CHOICE trial6 investigated whether, in patients with endovascular thrombectomy and successful angiographic reperfusion, intra-arterial alteplase can improve rates of excellent functional outcome (mRS 0–1). Because of enrolment problems related to the COVID-19 pandemic and no placebo being available, this randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was stopped before completion of planned enrolment. Furthermore, the approved dose of alteplase in Japan (0·6 mg/kg) was used for intravenous thrombolysis, which differs from the approved dose in North America (0·9 mg/kg). [...]these results might have been different if CT would have been used as the imaging modality, whereas the use of a low alteplase dose might have led to an underestimation of the risk of intracranial haemorrhage. During the enrolment period (2014–16), most centres started to use antiplatelet and statin therapy immediately after stroke, especially in patients with intracranial atherosclerotic disease. [...]although the findings provide valuable guidance for clinicians and guideline committees, the question remains as to whether the results are applicable to patients nowadays, because they often receive a more aggressive medical treatment than for patients in 2016.

20.
Discover Mental Health ; 2(1):22, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2158290

ABSTRACT

[...]these studies examined language from a neurological point of view and perspective, and no study so far has assessed the influence of the pandemic on students' language/expression, linguistic adoption, and communicative competence. [...]the effect of the pandemic and the subsequent disruption of education and socialization on the linguistic abilities of this group is yet to be investigated. The five main questions-domains were the following: (1) Have you observed changes in your language during pandemic concerning introduction of foreign terms/words? (2) Can you assess how many different foreign languages and phrases do you use every day? (3) Do you think that potential changes in the vocabulary of students will have an impact on their future linguistic competence? (4) If you were an educator, the teaching of which school lesson would you enhance? (5) Do you think that the health crisis will have a negative permanent impact on national languages after the pandemic ends? Recently, the World Youth Organization hosted an event to stand for ‘‘linguistics rights'' highlighting that public health officials should provide information in a range of languages and provide public health information for indigenous people all over the world [8]. [...]the coronavirus outbreak and the new words and phrases born out of it and adopted by large populations worth more research attention in the foreseeable future.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL