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1.
J Clin Nurs ; 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108103

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the levels of second COVID-19 booster dose/new COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among nurses and explore the potential predictors of vaccine hesitancy. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 full vaccination seems to be highly effective against highly contagious variants of SARS-CoV-2. Healthcare workers are at high-risk group since they have experienced high levels of COVID-19-associated morbidity and mortality. DESIGN: An on-line cross-sectional study was carried out in Greece in May 2022, using a self-administered questionnaire. METHODS: The study population included nurses in healthcare services who were fully vaccinated against COVID-19 at the time of study. We considered socio-demographic characteristics, COVID-19-related variables, and attitudes toward COVID-19 vaccination and pandemic as potential predictors of vaccine hesitancy. We applied the STROBE checklist in our study. RESULTS: Among 795 nurses, 30.9% were hesitant toward a second booster dose or a new COVID-19 vaccine. Independent predictors of hesitancy included lower educational level, absence of a chronic condition, good/very good self-perceived physical health, lack of flu vaccination during 2021, front-line nurses that provided healthcare to COVID-19 patients, nurses that had not been diagnosed with COVID-19 and nurses that had at least one relative/friend that has died from COVID-19. Moreover, increased compliance with hygiene measures, increased fear of a second booster dose/new COVID-19 vaccine and decreased trust in COVID-19 vaccination were associated with increased hesitancy. CONCLUSIONS: Our study shows that a significant percentage of nurses are hesitant toward a second booster dose/new COVID-19 vaccine. This initial hesitancy could be a barrier to efforts to control the COVID-19 pandemic. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses' role during the COVID-19 pandemic is essential since they are the front-line healthcare workers empowering the public with their passion and empathy. There is a need to communicate COVID-19 vaccine science in a way that is accessible to nurses in order to decrease COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: No patient or public contribution.

2.
J Adv Nurs ; 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108070

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To explore nurse-patient interactions during the Covid-19 pandemic from both nurses' and patients' perspectives. DESIGN: Qualitative study using constructive grounded theory. METHODS: A total of 34 patients and 49 nurses from acute and home care settings participated in individual or focus group interviews between December 2020 and May 2021. Data were analysed by a team of researchers using coding, memo-writing, theoretical sampling and constant comparison and integration. RESULTS: We identified the creation and maintenance of an interactive space as the main social process. This interactive space was shaped by the care context and the course of the pandemic. For nurses, four factors were key, namely protecting oneself and others, navigating communication barriers, adapting nursing actions to the evolving situation, and providing emotional care work. Patients experienced attentive caring relationships with nurses and felt that, for the most part, their individual needs had been met despite the pandemic challenges. CONCLUSION: Nurses and patients created an interactive space in which they were able to provide and receive the necessary care. Maintaining the interactive space was often challenging, and required an intentional effort by nurses, particularly in acute care settings. The findings illustrate that nurses ensured the provision of necessary care even during a public health crisis, thereby enabling patient access to good quality care. IMPACT: Nurse-patient relationships are important for effective, person-centred care delivery. Despite the pandemic challenges, nurses managed to uphold their caring imperative and ensure quality care. Findings provide further insights on the importance of nurse-patient interaction in maintaining quality care. They inform models of nursing care delivery and strategies to support quality care during public health crises.

3.
Contemp Nurse ; : 1-10, 2022 Nov 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106955

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The use of social media platforms to convey public opinions and attitudes has exponentially increased over the last decade on topics related to health. In all these social media postings related to the pandemic, specific attention has been focused on healthcare professionals, specifically nurses. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore how the keyword 'nurse' is located in COVID-19 pandemic-related tweets during a selected period of the pandemic in order to assess public perception. METHODS: Tweets related to COVID-19 were downloaded from Twitter for the period January 1st, 2020, to November 11th, 2021. Sentiment analysis was used to identify opinions, emotions, and approaches expressed in tweet which included 'nurse', 'COVID-19', and 'pandemic' as either keyword or hashtags. RESULTS: A total of 2,440,696 most used unique words in the downloaded 582,399 tweets were included and the sentiment analysis indicated that 24.4% (n = 595,530) of the tweets demonstrated positive sentiment while 14.1% (n = 343,433) of the tweets demonstrated negative sentiment during COVID-19. Within these results, 17% (n = 416,366) of the tweets included positive basic emotion words of trust and 4.9% (n = 120,654) of joy. In terms of negative basic emotion words, 9.9% (n = 241,758) of the tweets included the word fear, 8.3% (n = 202,179) anticipation, 7.9% (n = 193,145) sadness, 5.7% (n = 139,791) anger, 4.2% (n = 103,936) disgust, and 3.6% (n = 88,338) of the tweets included the word surprised. CONCLUSIONS: It is encouraging to note that with the advent of major health crises, public perceptions on social media, appears to portray an image of nurses which reflects the professionalism and values of the profession.

4.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 137: 104385, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105098

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses are at an increased risk of burnout and may have an intention-to-leave their jobs. The COVID-19 pandemic may increase this risk. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to describe the prevalence of burnout risk and intention-to-leave the job and nursing profession among ICU nurses and to analyse the relationships between these variables and the work environment after two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A national cross-sectional survey of all nurses working in Belgian ICUs was conducted between December 2021 and January 2022 during the 4th and 5th waves of the COVID-19 pandemic in Belgium. The Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index (PES-NWI) was used to measure the work environment, intention-to-leave the hospital and/or the profession was assessed. The risk of burnout was assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory scale including emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation, and reduced personal accomplishment. SETTING: Nurses in 78 out of 123 Belgian hospital sites with an ICU participated in the survey. PARTICIPANTS: 2321 out of 4851 nurses (47.8%) completed the entire online survey. RESULTS: The median overall risk of burnout per hospital site (high risk in all three subdimensions) was 17.6% [P25: 10.0 - P75: 28.8] and the median proportion of nurses with a high risk in at least one subdimension of burnout in Belgian ICUs was 71.6% [56.7-82.7]. A median of 42.9% [32.1-57.1] of ICU nurses stated that they intended-to-leave the job and 23.8% [15.4-36.8] stated an intent-to-leave the profession. The median overall score of agreement with the presence of positive aspects in the work environment was 49.0% [44.8-55.8]. Overall, nurses working in the top 25% of best-performing hospital sites with regard to work environment had a statistically significant lower risk of burnout and intention-to-leave the job and profession compared to those in the lowest performing 25% of hospital sites. Patient-to-nurse ratio in the worst performing quartile was associated with a higher risk for emotional exhaustion (OR = 1.53, 95% CI:1.04-2.26) and depersonalisation (OR = 1.48, 95% CI:1.03-2.13) and intention-to-leave the job (OR = 1.46, 95% CI:1.03-2.05). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, a high prevalence of burnout risk and intention-to-leave the job and nursing profession was observed after two years of the COVID-19 pandemic. Nevertheless, there was substantial variation across hospital sites which was associated with the quality of the work environment. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: "Burnout & intention to leave was high for Belgian ICU nurses after 2 years of COVID, but wellbeing was better with high quality work environments and more favourable patient to nurse ratios".

5.
Int J Nurs Stud Adv ; 4: 100107, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105096

ABSTRACT

Background: At the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, governmental responses varied worldwide, which resulted in healthcare professionals and organizations having different experiences. As threats of global infectious disease and disasters increase, it is important to examine the collective experiences of nurses to leverage support across international settings and systems and to tailor specific policies to their local nursing workforce. Objective: To compare and contrast nurses' experiences working in hospitals at the onset of COVID-19 in South Korea and the United States. Method: This was a qualitative descriptive study. Nurses in South Korea and the United States were recruited through social media using snowball sampling between April and May 2020. Semi-structured telephone interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated as needed. The transcripts were analyzed thematically, and each theme was compared and synthesized using NVivo 12. Results: A total of 43 nurses from South Korea (n = 21) and the United States (n = 22) participated in the study. The majority of the participants were female and working as staff nurses in both countries. The work settings were similar between the participants from two countries. However, the participants in South Korea provided less direct care to patients with COVID-19 compared to the participants in the United States. Despite cultural and infrastructure differences, the nurses shared similar experiences. Conclusion: The overlapping similarities of nurses' experience highlight the need for national and global policies for a safe work environment and psychological well-being. The differences between the two countries also emphasize that specific policies and practice implications for the local contexts are needed in addition to global policies.

6.
AORN Journal ; 116(5):450-460, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2103467

ABSTRACT

Preparing for perioperative emergency management begins with education2 and a thorough preoperative patient assessment.3 Rapid identification of cardiopulmonary arrest with an effective response to the escalating situation can positively affect patient survival.3,4 Perioperative and responding personnel should assume a role in code management that is consistent with their abilities and training, perform high-quality cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) or defibrillate as indicated, and identify and treat the underlying cause of the patient's deterioration. Before the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the survival rate of individuals who experienced a cardiac arrest in a hospital had been increasing.4 According to 2019 data, the in-hospital cardiac arrest survival-todischarge rate in the United States was 26.7% in adults and 42.3% in children versus an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest survival rate of 10.5% in adults and 11.3% in children.5 During the COVID-19 surge from March 1 to May 15, 2020, the adult in-hospital survival rate decreased to 19.6%, and during the immediate postsurge period (ie, May 16 to June 30, 2020), the rate climbed to 22.3%;however, these rates did not include patients with confirmed or suspected COVID-19 infections.6 A review of 2010 to 2013 data in the National Anesthesia Clinical Outcomes Registry showed the associated mortality from intraoperative cardiac arrest was 58.4%.7 Cardiac arrest survival rates in ORs may be higher than those in other hospital areas because perioperative personnel almost always witness such arrests and are familiar with the patient's history,8 initiation of treatment may be faster,8,9 and the underlying causes may be more easily determined.8-10 A focused review of special anesthesia-related circumstances that contribute to intraoperative cardiac arrests included severe anaphylaxis, pulmonary embolism, hypertensive crisis, trauma-related arrest, malignant hyperthermia, tension pneumothorax, severe hyperkalemia, and local anesthetic systemic toxicity.11 This article discusses basic concepts for preparing for and responding to intraoperative cardiopulmonary arrest situations. When planning for a patient's procedure, personnel should conduct a patient assessment, including * review the past medical and surgical history,15 * classify the physical status according to the American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status Classification,16 * review any existing do-not-resuscitate or allow-naturaldeath orders,17-21 * document discussion about suspending a do-notresuscitate or allow-natural-death order during surgery,17,19-21 * determine the anticipated risk of blood loss based on the procedure and patient history,22 * discuss the patient's willingness to receive various blood products if necessary,23 * identify an informed consent that covers administration of blood products,23,24 * review laboratory test results for ordered blood products (eg, type and crossmatch),24 * identify the availability and location of ordered blood products,24 and * anticipate the need for additional equipment or supplies (eg, an autologous cell-salvaging machine, a rapid infuser machine).23 Patients have the right to self-determination and involvement in making informed decisions regarding their medical care.25 During their admission process, patients must be asked if they have advance directives and documentation of any specific instructions regarding their care.26 Health care personnel must implement all legally valid advance directives recognized by state law. According to US federal regulations, "Hospitals ... must maintain written policies and procedures concerning advance directives with respect to all adult individuals receiving medical care.

7.
Aust Crit Care ; 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104403

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Intensive care unit (ICU) nurses experience high levels of burnout during the COVID-19 pandemic due to multiple stressors. It has long been known that burnout is negatively associated with patient and staff outcomes. Understanding the triggers for intensive care nurses' burnout during the pandemic can help to develop appropriate mitigation measures. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to examine intensive care nurses' experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia to develop insights into the factors that influenced burnout. METHODS: The study was informed by a constructivist grounded theory design. The study was conducted in an adult ICU in a tertiary hospital in the Makkah province in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. All participants were registered nurses with at least 6 months' experience in intensive care and experienced caring for COVID-19 patients. FINDINGS: This paper reports on preliminary findings from interviews with 22 intensive care nurses. A core category 'pandemic pervasiveness' was identified from the interview data, which makes reference to the ever-present nature of the pandemic beyond the ICU context. Family, work, and the wider world context are the three groups of contextual factors that influenced nurses' experience and perception of burnout. CONCLUSION: Many issues identified from the findings in this study can be attributed to shortages in the intensive care nursing workforce. Thus, we join others in calling for healthcare organisations and policymakers to be creative in finding new ways to meet nurses' needs, motivate, and empower them to maintain and sustain the nursing workforce in highly demanding areas, such as ICUs. Nursing managers can play a crucial role in mitigating nurses' burnout by identifying and tackling sources of stress that exist among their staff, specifically team conflict, workplace harassment, and discrimination.

8.
AORN Journal ; 116(5):416-424, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2102130

ABSTRACT

Resuming elective surgeries that were canceled during the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated a change to preprocedure patient preparation at a pediatric tertiary care center in middle Tennessee. We conducted a prospective, observational, mixed-methods study to determine the effectiveness of a preprocedure COVID-19 testing team to prevent COVID-19-related cancellations among pediatric patients receiving planned anesthesia. The intervention involved family member and patient education and a change in health record reporting to include COVID-19 test results. A team tasked with follow-up reviewed test results, consulted with families, and coordinated the administration of rapid tests if necessary. We compared preimplementation and postimplementation cancellation rates in four procedural areas and found no significant difference in the cancellation or rescheduling rates (P = .89, 95% confidence interval = -4.29 to 3.09). The team-based intervention was associated with the preservation of low procedural cancellation rates by mitigating barriers to preprocedural testing.

9.
Journal of Health Sciences ; 12(2):146-151, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2100563

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Patient safety depends on a number of factors such as teamwork, working climate, employee satisfaction, work environment, stress awareness, management perception, and attitude. Nurses have a key role to play in protecting and supporting patients, and their assessment serves as a reliable predictor of overall hospital safety. A positive attitude toward patient safety is associated with a significant reduction in complications. The aim of the study was to analyze the perception of nurses about all aspects of patient safety in relation to the workplace and length of service. Methods: The research included 647 nurses employed in health care institutions at the primary, secondary, and tertiary levels of health care. A descriptive and cross-sectional study included nurses from the Federation of Bosnia and Herzegovina. It was conducted in the period from November to December 2021, during the COVID pandemic. A standardized questionnaire on the perception of patient safety was used – Safety Attitudes Questionnaire – SAQ. Results: The analysis of the examined factors in relation to the workplace of the respondents revealed a statistically significant difference in job satisfaction (p < 0.001), as well as in the safety climate at work in relation to the workplace (p = 0.005), working conditions (p < 0.001), and management perception (p < 0.001). Stress levels showed significant differences regarding working position (p = 0.017), but also through the years of service (p = 0.012). Stress was significantly correlated with teamwork (r = 0.124;p = 0.003), showing that better teamwork will help with stress. Conclusion: The synthesis of concepts that includes patient safety and orientation toward patients should be implemented as a strategic quality orientation and set as a priority of every health-care system. © 2022 Lučkin, et al.;licensee University of Sarajevo - Faculty of Health Studies. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

10.
Journal of Health Visiting ; 10(10):428-433, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100433

ABSTRACT

During the global COVID-19 pandemic, home visiting programmes became increasingly important. The purpose of this study was to investigate levels of support provided to individual home visitors in South Carolina, US, by their lead implementing agencies, using a telephone survey. The results showed that two thirds of sites reported difficulties during the pandemic, and site leads had to be creative in providing support to their staff. It is concluded that strong, functional home visiting programmes can play a crucial role in assuring the wellbeing of vulnerable families. Therefore, levels of support for home visitors are vital, especially during a public health crisis.

11.
Journal of Health Visiting ; 10(10):420-427, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100432

ABSTRACT

The health visiting workforce, along with healthcare staff from other sectors, have reported increased rates of stress, anxiety and burnout following the COVID-19 pandemic. In response, the Institute of Health Visiting developed an Emotional Wellbeing at Work (EWW) programme in 2020. Following the successful implementation and evaluation of the original programme, a Champions cascade delivery model was adopted to increase the reach of the programme and build greater capacity to enhance the emotional wellbeing of the health visiting workforce. This article discusses the evaluation, learning and reflections from the EWW programme, developed specifically for the health visiting workforce in the UK.

12.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; 37(11):35-38, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100359

ABSTRACT

Mental health support for healthcare workers will need to be extended for ‘much, much longer’ and beyond this pandemic, according to England’s chief nurse.

13.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; 37(11):11, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100358

ABSTRACT

Front-line NHS and social care staff need support to prepare for a winter that could be challenging on two infection fronts – COVID-19 and flu – if not more.

14.
Nursing Standard (2014+) ; 37(11):8-10, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100357

ABSTRACT

Simmering discontent about how nurses were urged to have the COVID-19 vaccine may continue to influence how some feel about workforce immunisation more widely.

15.
Emergency Nurse (2014+) ; 30(6):12-14, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2100355

ABSTRACT

Mental health support for nurses and other healthcare workers will need to be extended for ‘much, much longer’ and beyond this pandemic, according to England’s chief nurse.

16.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(10)2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099444

ABSTRACT

Spiritual and emotional care is an important part of the person, especially in situations such as changes in health or a community coping with a pandemic. However, nurses report scarce university training in this area of care. The aim of the study is to define a catalogue of learning outcomes for spiritual and emotional care for undergraduate nurses. The design used a mixed method for the development and validation of learning outcomes. The first phase designs the catalogue of learning outcomes through a coordinating group and uses a bibliographic search and nursing legislation. The second phase validates the proposal through a group of experts, with a questionnaire using the modified Delphi technique in two rounds. The initial proposal was 75 learning outcomes, of which 17 were eliminated, 36 changed their wording and the experts proposed 7 new ones. The experts validated 65 learning outcomes: 14 for Assessment and diagnosis; 5 for Planning; 17 for Intervention; 4 for Evaluation and quality; 8 for Communication and interpersonal relationship and 17 for Knowledge and intrapersonal development. In conclusion, the academic curriculum can include these learning outcomes to help undergraduate nurses in the process of acquiring knowledge, skills and attitudes in spiritual and emotional care.

17.
BMC Med Ethics ; 23(1): 45, 2022 04 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1798405

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Commentators believe that the ethical decision-making climate is instrumental in enhancing interprofessional collaboration in intensive care units (ICUs). Our aim was twofold: (1) to determine the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave one's job among nurses and physicians, and between the different ICU types and (2) determine the association between the ethical climate, moral distress, and intention to leave. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional questionnaire study between May 2021 and August 2021 involving 206 nurses and physicians in a large urban academic hospital. We used the validated Ethical Decision-Making Climate Questionnaire (EDMCQ) and the Measure of Moral Distress for Healthcare Professionals (MMD-HP) tools and asked respondents their intention to leave their jobs. We also made comparisons between the different ICU types. We used Pearson's correlation coefficient to identify statistically significant associations between the Ethical Climate, Moral Distress, and Intention to Leave. RESULTS: Nurses perceived the ethical climate for decision-making as less favorable than physicians (p < 0.05). They also had significantly greater levels of moral distress and higher intention to leave their job rates than physicians. Regarding the ICU types, the Neonatal/Pediatric unit had a significantly higher overall ethical climate score than the Medical and Surgical units (3.54 ± 0.66 vs. 3.43 ± 0.81 vs. 3.30 ± 0.69; respectively; both p ≤ 0.05) and also demonstrated lower moral distress scores (both p < 0.05) and lower "intention to leave" scores compared with both the Medical and Surgical units. The ethical climate and moral distress scores were negatively correlated (r = -0.58, p < 0.001); moral distress and "intention to leave" was positively correlated (r = 0.52, p < 0.001); and ethical climate and "intention to leave" were negatively correlated (r = -0.50, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Significant differences exist in the perception of the ethical climate, levels of moral distress, and intention to leave between nurses and physicians and between the different ICU types. Inspecting the individual factors of the ethical climate and moral distress tools can help hospital leadership target organizational factors that improve interprofessional collaboration, lessening moral distress, decreasing turnover, and improved patient care.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Intention , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Job Satisfaction , Morals , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Rev. Cuerpo Méd. Hosp. Nac. Almanzor Aguinaga Asenjo ; 15(2): 252-255, Abr. 01, 2022.
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2101017

ABSTRACT

Introducción: la pandemia por SARS-CoV 2 nos demostró que no estábamos preparados, que no se repita. Objetivo: conocer el nivel de conocimiento sobre etiología, síntomas, tratamiento y prevención de la enfermedad viruela del mono en profesionales de la salud. El estudio: observacional-descriptivo, incluyó 251 profesionales de la salud, ambos sexos participación voluntaria. Se elaboró un cuestionario incluyéndose las variables edad, sexo y preguntas sobre la enfermedad viruela del mono; análisis descriptivos de los datos. Hallazgos: bajo conocimiento sobre etiología, síntomas, tratamiento y prevención de la enfermedad. Menor conocimiento sobre formas de contagio (21,9%), tiempo de incubación (21,9%), características del virus (24,3%) y diagnóstico laboratorial (25,1%); mayor conocimiento sobre contagiosidad en periodo de incubación (61,0%), presencia de erupciones como característica de la enfermedad (53,8%) y no existencia de tratamiento específico (52,2%). Conclusión: conocimiento bajo; urge la formulación de estrategias para poder enfrentar, de ser necesario, los posibles casos.


Background:the SARS-CoV 2 pandemic showed us that we were not prepared, that it will not happen again. to know the level of knowledge about Objective:the etiology, symptoms, treatment and prevention of monkeypox disease in health professionals. observational-descriptive, included 251 The study:health professionals, both sexes, voluntary participation. Aquestionnaire was developed including the variables age, sex and questions about the monkeypox disease, descriptive analysis of the data. Finding: low knowledge about the etiology, symptoms, treatment and prevention of the disease. Less knowledge about forms of contagion (21.9%), incubation time (21.9%), characteristics of the virus (24.3%) and laboratory diagnosis (25.1%); greater knowledge about contagiousness in the incubation period (61.0%), presence of rashes as a characteristic of the disease (53.8%) and lack of specific treatment (52.2%). Conclusion: low knowledge; The formulation of strategies is urgently needed to be able to face possible cases, if necessary.

19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1015316, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099276

ABSTRACT

Background: In March 2022, Shanghai, China, was hit by a severe wave of SARS-CoV-2 transmission caused by the Omicron variant strain. The medical staff was greatly infected during this period, which posed a traumatic event for them. Meanwhile, they also experience post-traumatic growth under introspection and positive change. However, the psychological coping and growth after infection with COVID-19 among medical staff have rarely been investigated. Objectives: To explore the process and influencing factors of post-traumatic growth among emergency nurses infected with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) so as to provide a new perspective and theoretical basis for psychological rehabilitation or intervention for medical staff who experienced traumatic events. Methods: The study used a qualitative design based on the phenomenological approach. A purposive sampling method was used to explore the subjective feelings and post-traumatic growth among 13 first-line emergency nurses infected with COVID-19 in Shanghai, China. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in June 2022. A Seven-step Colaizzi process was used for data analysis. Results: Themes were described and extracted from the experience and insights at different stages during the fight against the virus. Three main themes, i.e., stress period, adjustment period, and growth period, as well as several sub-themes, were identified. Conclusion: First-line emergency nurses infected with COVID-19 are a sensitive group that should be given more attention. Investigating how they achieve psychological adjustment and growth in the case of severe trauma can provide valuable references for nursing management and education in the future. Society, hospital and nursing managers should pay more attention to the PTG of nurses and establish supportive PTG strategies, which will benefit the retention rate and career development of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , China/epidemiology
20.
Work ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099079

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the perception and image of the profession are key factors in nurses' perceptions regarding their roles and their future. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the perception and image of the nursing profession among nurses working in surgical units. METHODS: This cross-sectional, correlational study was conducted with 216 nurses using the random sampling method between 10 and 30 March, 2022. The study data were collected using an information form, the Perception of Nursing Professional Scale (PNPS), and the Scale for the Image of the Nursing Profession. RESULTS: The nurses' mean age was 32.53±9.16 years (min 21, max 57) and their mean professional experience was 16.44±9.80 years (min 1, max 44). The mean PNPS score was 73.12±9.46, and the mean Scale for the Image of the Nursing Profession score was 171.11±11.16. Female nurses had significantly higher positive perception of nursing levels than male nurses. Gender, having a history of COVID-19, marginalization during the pandemic, and perception of the nursing profession significantly affected image perceptions of nursing at multiple linear regression analysis. These variables explained 43% of the total variance. CONCLUSION: Nurses working in surgical units during the COVID-19 pandemic exhibited a good level of professional and image perception concerning nursing.

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