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1.
Saúde Soc ; 32(1): e220605es, 2023. graf
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20232179

ABSTRACT

Resumen En este artículo proponemos visibilizar las estrategias de vinculación comunitaria de trabajadores/as de salud pública relativas a la producción del cuidado en el contexto crítico de la pandemia de la covid-19, signado por la profundización de la pobreza, la restricción de los servicios de salud y las tensiones del sistema sanitario en Argentina. Con un diseño metodológico cualitativo y enfoque etnográfico, entrevistamos a trabajadoras/es de distintas disciplinas, ocupaciones y géneros que se desempeñan en centros de salud y hospitales públicos en Mar del Plata y zonas rurales circundantes, entre los meses de marzo y diciembre de 2021. A partir de sus narrativas, analizamos las dimensiones de acceso a la alimentación, medicación y terapias holísticas, las dificultades encontradas y su contribución a la producción social del cuidado en salud. Concluimos que las estrategias generadas conllevan el potencial instituyente para la reorientación de los servicios públicos de salud de acuerdo con los desafíos del derecho a la salud desde la perspectiva de género y derechos en el tránsito a la postpandemia.


Abstract In this article we propose to make visible the strategies of community engagement of public health workers related to the production of care in the critical context of the covid-19 pandemic, marked by the deepening of poverty, the restriction of health services and the tensions of the health system in Argentina. With a qualitative methodological design and ethnographic approach, we interviewed workers from different disciplines, occupations and genders, who work in health centers and public hospitals in Mar del Plata and surrounding rural areas, between the months of March and December 2021. Based on their narratives, we analyze the dimensions of access to food, medication and holistic therapies, the difficulties encountered and their contribution to the social production of health care. We conclude that the strategies generated carry the instituting potential for the reorientation of public health services in accordance with the challenges of the right to health from the perspective of gender and rights in the transition to the post-pandemic.

2.
Societies ; 13(5), 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20245050

ABSTRACT

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, digital interactions ceased to be "just another form of communication”;indeed, they became the only means of social interaction, mediated and driven by information and communication technologies (ICTs). Consequently, working in a digital context switched from being a phenomenon to be studied to the primary means of socializing and the primary workspace for researchers. This study explores four different methodologies to question how discursive interactions related to power and newsworthiness may be addressed in digital contexts. The multimodal approach was reviewed through the affordances of critical discourse analysis, issue ownership and salience, morphological discourse analysis, and protest event analysis. It starts by theoretically addressing concepts of multimodality and phenomenology by focusing on the implications of both perspectives. It examines publications and interactions in digital contexts in Ecuador from March 2017 to December 2020 within three political phenomena. The results of the analysis of these publications and interactions suggest that when analyzing political participation and newsworthiness, the virtual becomes a subjective space. Moreover, qualitative research is one of the primary ways to combine multimodality with other forms of discourse analysis. This paper concludes that perceptions, practices, and meanings assigned to social online representations can be better analyzed through multimodality, which tackles the intertwined characteristics of virtual discourses. © 2023 by the authors.

3.
Journal of Ethnic and Cultural Studies ; 10(2):147-165, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244717

ABSTRACT

Over the years, citizens' expectations of the healthcare sector have increased, especially after the sudden outbreak of COVID-19. Additionally, citizens are becoming more conscious of having a healthier lifestyle based on several environmental and economic issues prevailing worldwide. Hence, empirically testing the predictors of providing excellent public healthcare services and enhancing the resultant citizens' trust in such services is of utmost significance. Simultaneously, the critical role of healthcare workers' capacity in providing quality services to patients in public health institutions and improving healthcare services to develop citizens' trust needs has been considered in this study. Based on a quantitative survey, the current study collected data from 460 individuals regarding three collaborative governance practices and resultant improved public healthcare services. The results revealed the significance of all three collaborative governance of public health practices. Citizen participation was the most impactful, followed by democratic accountability and procedural legitimacy. The study results are valuable to practitioners, policymakers, healthcare service providers, and governments. Among the recommendations are that collaborative governance practices should be developed, the healthcare system should be decentralized to provide the best services to citizens, and public healthcare workers' capabilities should be improved by providing proper training. © 2023, Florida Gulf Coast University. All rights reserved.

4.
Applied Clinical Trials ; 30(1/2):4, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244567

ABSTRACT

More recent policies aim to offset years of underenrollment of minority groups by expanding enrollment criteria, including more research sites in minority communities, and engaging investigators with diverse backgrounds. FDA has also sought to promote research diversity through its Drug Trials Snapshots program, established in 2015 to increase the visibility of clinical trial enrollment by age, sex, ethnicity and race. According to a recent report on the program's impact, though, there still may be a ways to go for clinical trials to reflect the diversity of the US population.

5.
European Journal of Risk Regulation : EJRR ; 14(2):371-381, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244344
6.
Perspectives in Education ; 41(1):137-154, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20244159

ABSTRACT

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, technology-enhanced learning and its relation to student engagement, and the necessity of good student-staff relationships for creating a successful education environment were evident. The COVID-19 pandemic forced higher education to adapt to a challenging technology-led learning environment that demanded, inter alia, high levels of flexibility and human-centredness. Valuable lessons were learned that highlighted new perspectives on curriculum design and delivery in a normalised, technology-driven environment. Against the background of COVID-19-related literature on teaching and learning, the authors reflect on their insights regarding curriculum design and delivery of two quantitative skills modules during the COVID-19 pandemic, and its impact on further curriculum planning. The focus of the article is on the intentional flexibility built into curriculum offerings during 2020-2022. The study reviewed flexibility on three levels, namely student, facilitator (staff) and delivery levels, through a multi-method research methodology. Quantitative data related to the academic performance of 2 949 students enrolled for the two quantitative skills modules from 2020 to 2022. Qualitative data related to themes through thematic analysis of student and facilitator surveys, focusgroup discussions and semi-structured interviews. The improved student academic performance reported by the study could be attributed to, amongst other factors, 1) flexibility of the selected delivery option, 2) positive staff and student experiences and engagement, and 3) intentional inclusion of activities promoting student-staff relationships. The good academic results obtained during the pandemic led to important curriculum decisions for a normalised future for these modules, which will be built on flexibility and human-centredness. Among these decisions is to continue presenting the modules in an online environment, even though traditional face-to-face teaching options are available.

7.
International Journal of Contemporary Educational Studies ; 8(2):561-580, 2022.
Article in Turkish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-20244101

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to determine the motivation of high school students to participate in physical activity and their eating attitude levels during the COVID-19 period as well as to examine the relationship between the two variables. In addition, it was also determined whether the motivation for participate in physical activity and eating attitudes differ according to gender, weekly exercise, spending time with technology, family communication times, and participation in exercise during and before the pandemic. A total of 576 high school students, including 406 girls and 170 boys, participated in the study. "Motivation Scale for Participation in Physical Activity (MSPPA)", "Eating Attitude Test (EAT-40)" and "Personal Information Form (KBF)" were used as data collection tools. Data were evaluated using correlation, multiple linear regression, MANOVA and t-test analysis techniques. It was concluded that the motivation of the students to participate in physical activity was moderate, and they did not have eating disorders. It was observed that physical activity motivation did not predict eating attitude, but there were positive and low relationships between sub-factors in relational dimension. According to gender, it was determined that the eating attitudes of female students were more positive than male students. It has been found that the motivation to participate in physical activity is higher for those who exercise before and during the pandemic than those who do not. Consequently, it can be said that during the COVID-19 process, high school students' motivation to participate in physical activity is at a moderate level, and their eating attitudes are generally not at the level of behavioral disorders.

8.
Teaching in the Post COVID-19 Era: World Education Dilemmas, Teaching Innovations and Solutions in the Age of Crisis ; : 433-442, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20244052

ABSTRACT

Ensuring students remain active and engaged in online sessions is one of the core challenges for teaching faculty. COVID-19 has thrown challenges at educators, but it has also opened many opportunities to be more practical and creative in our teaching styles. This chapter is based on the practical transformations needed to deal with what we call "ghost students" in remote synchronous online teaching - that is, nervous students behind the dark lens of webcams, sometimes "free riders," and occasionally "write-off" students hanging on in a class due to lack of previous performance and learning. This paper offers insights into complex situations and practical solutions. Different learning activities and techniques are explained to improve the learning curve of such students. © Springer Nature Switzerland AG 2021. All rights reserved.

9.
Perspectives in Education ; 41(1):211-227, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243485

ABSTRACT

This study examined issues related to students' participation and online absenteeism among students at Zimbabwe's universities during COVID-19 induced online teaching and learning. More specifically, the study examined some of the ethical issues related to students' participation and assessment during online learning in selected universities in Zimbabwe. The study also examined some of the strategies that can be adopted to optimize students' participation during online learning to make online learning a more honest and interactive endeavour. To fully understand the challenges related to participation and online absenteeism, the study extrapolated the perspectives of students and academic staff who had adopted online learning since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. The research was a mixed-methods study, employing a descriptive-analytical approach which utilised three main methods of data collection. Firstly, semi-structured questionnaires distributed electronically among participants in the selected universities were used to collect research data. Secondly, follow-up online focus-group discussions (FGDs) were conducted to elicit participants' views on some of the ethical challenges posed by online learning and possible strategies for dealing with the challenges. Finally, follow-up telephone interviews were also conducted with lecturers with the same objective as the FGDs. The study's population consisted of 110 students and 77 academic staff randomly selected from six universities in Zimbabwe. Two of the selected universities were privately owned and four were public universities. The study showed some of the technological and pedagogical issues regarding students' participation and strategies for optimising students' participation during online learning. The study also shared some of the ethical challenges that arose from the adoption of online teaching and assessment systems and the policy, resource and training interventions needed to make online learning more interactive, while at the same time safeguarding academic integrity. The findings of this study, therefore, have implications for universities, learners and academic staff if online learning programmes are to be successful. Firstly, universities for instance, need to ensure that students and academic staff have the prerequisite technological resources to ensure that optimal active learning takes place. Secondly, to address the shortage of resources, universities should ensure that their libraries migrate from physical to digital libraries. Universities should also ensure that both academic staff and students receive the necessary training to access these digital libraries and the services they offer.

10.
Applied Clinical Trials ; 30(1/2):22, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243192

ABSTRACT

Virtual studies can increase trial speed and efficiency when scaled to meet the needs within individual therapeutic spaces C OVID-19 has reemphasized the importance of clinical research on individual patients and families and society as a whole. [...]pre-pandemic, study investigators in the US expressed interest in the use of digital tools/technologies (62%), remote monitoring methods (52%) and telehealth (25%) in study processes. Given the unknowns around COVID-19 and the urgency for resolution, sponsors made study design and protocol details public-creating information transparency among stakeholders like never before.

11.
Teaching Public Administration ; 41(1):122-142, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241818

ABSTRACT

Public administration education is traditionally known for its emphasis on interaction, discussion and experiential learning, which require effective in-person instructions. With COVID-19 pushing many programmes across the globe to be delivered online rather than in person, how this shift has affected the student experience in public administration programmes has been a pertinent and important consideration. This paper addresses the question through two surveys of 147 students in total, at a graduate-level public policy school in Singapore. Two distinctive waves of data collection allow us to capture a nuanced picture of student perceptions both when online teaching was introduced as an emergency response and when it was planned as a deliberate strategy later on. Our findings suggest that students consistently reported a decline in participation and interaction in an online setting, compared with a face-to-face setting. Our study fills a critical gap in the literature related to online public administration education in Asia, while the immediate constraints it highlights and lessons it offers on maintaining a highly interactive and engaging public administration education are likely to apply for educators elsewhere both during and beyond the COVID-19 era.

12.
Journal of International Women's Studies ; 25(3):1-15, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241803

ABSTRACT

In Sri Lanka, womens labor force participation has never exceeded 35% in over three decades. As of 2022, the country was ranked 110 out of 146 countries in the World Economic Forums Gender Gap Index. The gaps in womens participation in the formal economy alongside womens limited political empowerment are two leading causes for the country to be lagging in such global gender equality indicators. At a large cost to the economy, the existence of archaic gender norms that promulgate womens unpaid care work often exclude women from the formal labor force. This paper dissects the socio-economic and socio-political factors that lead to the invisibility of women in Sri Lankas economy, while seeking to understand how such underlying causes have been aggravated within the precarity of the post-pandemic context. It is important, now more than ever, to recognize the invisibility of women in Sri Lankas formal economy, while bringing about a transformative vision with a multi-pronged approach to address existing gaps and challenges. With reference to key principles of feminist economics, including the theoretical foundations of Claudia Goldin, Nancy Folbre, and Diane Elson, among others, the paper will make a case for inclusivity and intersectionality in policy recommendations aimed at encouraging womens entry, active engagement, contribution, and retention in Sri Lankas economy. The paper reaches a conclusion that when women lead, participate, and benefit equally in all aspects of life, societies and economies will thrive, thereby contributing to sustainable development and inclusive economic growth.

13.
The International Migration Review ; 57(2):505-520, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20241317

ABSTRACT

Every government in the world introduced restrictions to human mobility – that is, the movement of persons across and within state borders – in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Such restrictions thus constituted a global phenomenon, but they were by no means globally uniform;rather, they varied significantly between and within states, as well as over time. This research note presents different data sources for studying the drivers and outcomes of mobility restrictions, highlighting specific ways in which the data can be used. We begin by surveying seven new databases capturing various aspects of the regulation of human movement during the COVID-19 pandemic. Drawing inspiration from research on previous pandemics, we then outline five possible research avenues prompted by these data. We suggest that explaining the causes and consequences of such restrictions, as well as the differences between them, can significantly advance research on the governance of mobility, migration, and citizenship.

14.
Reimagining Prosperity: Social and Economic Development in Post-COVID India ; : 79-96, 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-20241114

ABSTRACT

This paper focuses on the pandemic's impact on women's participation in the economy. The author outlines the various barriers to the full and equal participation of women in the Indian economy such as the gender division of labour which requires women to shoulder the burden of unpaid domestic work, the occupational segregation of the labour market, gender-blind development policies, regressive social norms and patriarchal attitudes. The challenge facing women only increased with the pandemic which led to large numbers of women dropping out of the workforce. The author suggests that in the immediate future the State has a crucial role in redressing this injustice. In the longer term, she calls for rethinking the dominant models of development that pursue economic growth and rise in GDP as the panacea for all problems. Such models have given rise to the rampant exploitation of labour, among whom women are the most vulnerable. © The Editor(s) (if applicable) and The Author(s), under exclusive license to Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2023.

15.
The Rural Educator ; 44(2):69-72, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20240670

ABSTRACT

Each student selected books during the last week of school and during the last days of the summer program, so that they had access to books when school was not in session. Since book ownership is an important motivator for reading, the students kept their books and were treated to one additional book on the last day of the program, when they took a field trip to a bookstore. Study Design Reallocating school resources required a research focus with data collection and analysis for continued approval of summer program funding. The mixed-methods design of the study included quantitative data (e.g., registration, attendance, STAR reading scores, Likert scale questions on student and parent questionnaires) and qualitative data (e.g., student focus groups, open-ended questions on student and parent questionnaires). Parents' written consent and students' assent were provided for STAR reading, focus group, and questionnaire data collection each summer.

16.
Forest Policy and Economics ; 154:103009, 2023.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-20240538

ABSTRACT

Forest governance in Poland is characterised by the dominance of public forest ownership and hierarchical, top-down policy-making. These governance arrangements, characteristic of post-socialist countries, have traditionally been challenged by environmental NGOs, advocating stronger protection of old-growths. Recently, institutional stability of the forest policy field has been increasingly influenced by numerous citizen initiatives responding to technocratic local forest management decisions. These initiatives, so far not analysed scientifically, vary in terms of the issues addressed, actions employed, and the local actors involved. In the paper we use a data base of 274 such initiatives to explore their manifestation, actors involved, main postulates, and the responses of forest managers. Based on this, we explored whether these initiatives pose challenges to the traditional forest management and, if so, what kind. We imply that the growth of bottom-up initiatives indicates a growing diversity of beliefs and values regarding forests and the increasing determination of local people to impact local environmental decisions. Furthermore, informed by the institutional theory, we argue that the growth of local initiatives, particularly during and after Covid-19 pandemics, suggests the eroding legitimacy of dominant rules and discourses. This process is particularly visible in sub-urban forests, which are increasingly seen through a ‘well-being discourse' that highlights cultural, regulative and supportive functions of forests, while putting less emphasis on provisioning functions. We also identify a networking trend among the initiatives that unifies their discursive background and enhances their influence at the national level. Therefore, local activists can be seen as a new advocacy group in the Polish forest policy subsystem. In response to local demands public forest administration has introduced institutional changes enhancing participation but their impact is still to be assessed. We recommend establishing a monitoring programme to track new participatory practices and to identify and promote best practices.

17.
Applied Clinical Trials ; 30(4):14-17, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20240471

ABSTRACT

[...]this critical step is receiving the attention it deserves, maybe even an overhaul, as the wave of clinical trial decentralization surges on. With this regulatory foundation, the site feasibility process involves choosing sites that not only conform to these requirements, but can also offer the best fit for specific studies, based on past performance, access to a database of appropriate patients, and the bandwidth to perform the study at hand. A recent article by Kurbegov et al. of the American Society of Cancer Oncology (ASCO) describes a Task Force that was convened to evaluate the burdens and challenges of site feasibility, which often lead to delayed study start-up and act as a barrier to site participation.6 With input from sites, sponsors, and CROs in the form of surveys and in-person meetings, the Task Force developed three recommendations for improvement, with a goal of speeding patient access to clinical trial participation, and ultimately, much needed new treatments, as shown in Table 1 on the facing page. According to Comis, "We now have 146,000 users of SIP, which represents 125,000 site researchers.

18.
Diabetic Medicine ; 40(Supplement 1):124, 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-20240032

ABSTRACT

Aims: To bridge the gap between evidence synthesis research into the impact of the pandemic on people with diabetes (PWD) and the reality of lived experience, and give PWD space to share and reflect on their experiences. Method(s): Through a socially-distanced public engagement project, working with artists, clinicians, researchers, and PWD, we created a physical art installation and digital interactive exhibition to capture individual experiences of living through the pandemic with diabetes. PWD could submit art or written work in any form for inclusion. We evaluated public engagement by participant numbers and demographics, visitors to the digital exhibition, and written feedback. Viewers could complete an optional survey sharing thoughts about the project. Result(s): 26 people aged 16-74 years submitted to the project;58% had had type 1 diabetes, 27% had type 2 diabetes. 708 people viewed the digital exhibition (diabetescovid. art) in the first 2 months. Their responses to the exhibition included: brave, overwhelming, scary, resonating with personal experience, community giving voice, thought provoking, moving, emotional, motivating, insightful, interesting, fascinating;all respondents said they had learned from the exhibition. Summary: Our PPI representative summarised her experience of the project: "Health research is not just about the clinical, it is also about recognising, empathising with and learning from the experiences of people as demonstrated in this project. Patient involvement in research is about helping to bring about progress. It is about learning more about one's own health and well-being and also about giving something back. Above all, it is about hope.".

19.
Applied Clinical Trials ; 29(10):20-22, 2020.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20240025

ABSTRACT

Bringing the trial to the patient Industry guidelines advise sponsors to reduce the emotional and physical burden of study participation and to consider the convenience of participation for both patients and their caregivers.1 With mobile research nursing, a nurse goes to that patient's home -or any other location that is convenient for the patient-to conduct off-site visits and perform studyrelated assessments and data collection. According to the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions, more than 70% of all clinical trial participants live more than two hours away from the clinical research site. [...]one survey of clinical trial participants found that 38% of those who dropped out of a study did so because they found site visits to be stressful.2 Mobile research nursing contributes to reductions in patient stress without compromising study design or data quality. Altogether, it makes the mechanics of clinical trial participation less disruptive to a patient's family life, as well as to their educational and professional lives. [...]mobile research nursing offers the patient-centric features of customization and personalization of the clinical trial experience, delivering care in a manner that reflects a patient's individual preferences and personal situation.

20.
Perspectives in Education ; 41(1):103-118, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239930

ABSTRACT

An Applied Drama and Theatre pedagogy is rooted in principles of embodiment, participation and collaboration, praxis and immersion in social contexts. Over the past fourteen years, the Drama for Life department at the University of the Witwatersrand prioritised the implementation of an Applied Drama and Theatre teaching and learning practice that is premised on our bodies operating within social and cultural contexts. Furthermore, the experiential pedagogy is reliant on physical presence and human contact for the purposes of reflection, transformation and education. With the arrival of the COVID-19 pandemic, this complex pedagogy faced a threat. How can we migrate an Applied Drama and Theatre curriculum to online learning platforms? Can we fully honour its pedagogical objectives remotely? The study explored how Applied Drama and Theatre educators re-envisioned and implemented strategies to maintain the integrity of the embodied pedagogy as it moved online. These collective approaches transpired amidst a disruptive digital divide within a South African context, which impacted connectivity, access and the hopes of a synchronous learning experience. From 2020 to 2021, the ethnographic study tracked and observed Drama for Life and its Applied Drama and Theatre educators as they;1) responded to the pandemic and identified its threats to the pedagogy;2) through processes of experimentation, transitioned the curriculum to online learning platforms;and 3) reflected on their discoveries, challenges and interim solutions throughout the journey. The study found (based on literature and data) that the pandemic provided higher education institutions and practitioners with an opportunity for directed change. Central to the collective strategies remained student centredness and pedagogical alignment. Although certain aspects of the Applied Drama and Theatre pedagogy have undeniably been compromised online, the study demonstrated that with increased efforts to bridge the digital divide, the strategies can be navigated continually with a carefully negotiated balance.

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