Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 13 de 13
Filter
1.
Epidemiologie et Sante Animale ; 78:1-131, 2020.
Article in French | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904311

ABSTRACT

This special issue contains 14 papers from the AEEMA Meeting focusing on the theme entitled "What changes for the management of animals' health crises". Topics of papers include: the management of animals' health crises and introduction to the meeting;evolution of societies perception and social acceptability of sanitary control measures;evolution of the health governance: to adapt the French health system to the new challenge;new challenges for risk management of animal health;evolution of preparedness for the management of animal disease crisis;feedback from the fipronil crisis;towards bovine tuberculosis eradication in Republic of Ireland, including European badgers' vaccination (a review);management of foot-and-mouth disease in Mauritius and Rodrigues: a vaccine strategy for eradication;health and biodiversity during anthropocene;Covid-19 and wild animals;Covid-19 and companion animals;Covid-19 and farmed animals;Covid-19 and laboratory animals;and Preventing SARS-CoV-2 transmission from animals to human beings.

2.
Pakistan Journal of Zoology ; 54(4):1899-1904, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1904009

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus consists of single-stranded, enveloped and RNA virus, largest genome among all RNA viruses and has 4 proteins i.e. envelope, spike, nucleocapsid and membrane. Coronaviruses are classified into 4 genera: Alphacoronavirus, Betacoronavirus, Gammacoronavirus and Deltacoronavirus. Betacoronavirus most probably originated from bats and the virus may have jumped to avian species and evolved as Deltacoronavirus group. The avian coronaviruses jumped among other avian species, giving rise to Gammacoronavirus from Deltacoronavirus, while Betacoronavirus may have given rise to Alphacoronavirus. It is known that SARS-CoV-2 belongs to Betacoronavirus. This most similar virus is verified in bat and Malayan Pangolin. Analysis showed that SARS-CoV-2 most probably originated by recombination of both bat and pangolin viruses. Viral protein seroconversion and viral specific nucleotide positive documented in all COVID-19 patients tested provides confirmation of a link between the presence of this virus and the disease.

3.
Veterinarski Zurnal Republike Srpske ; 21(1/2):94-106, 2021.
Article in English, Serbian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1903815

ABSTRACT

Today, pets are the source of numerous infectious diseases that can be transmitted to humans, as a result of their increasingly frequent contact. The most important viruses with zoonotic potential include rabies and influenza viruses as well as rotaviruses and noroviruses. However, the importance of individual viruses varies depending on the climate and infectious disease control systems in certain countries. Dogs, cats, and other increasingly popular types of pets can transmit bacterial zoonotic agents to humans in various ways. In addition to known pathogens such as the bacteria causing leptospirosis, salmonellosis, campylobacteriosis, or brucellosis, the bacteria Pasteurella multocida and Bartonella henselae transmitted by bites or scratches are also significant in human pathology. There has been a significant increase in the prevalence of methicillin-resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus in isolates originating from pets and the transmission of these strains between humans and animals requires special attention. Furthermore, fungi causing diseases such as sporotrichosis or dermatophytosis are linked to long-term and persistent infections in humans. The epidemiological situation caused by SARS-CoV-2, and the assumption of an interspecies jump of this virus from animals to humans, including its documented presence in domestic cats, dogs, tigers, and martens, have raised the question of the possibility of virus transmission from pets to humans. However, the current pandemic is caused exclusively by SARS-CoV-2 transmission in the human population, and these animals are not a source of infection for humans. A significant number of zoonoses originating from pets is a threat to public health, thus requiring the "One Health" approach through close cooperation between human and veterinary medicine to develop and implement effective health measures for both humans and animals. As part of responsible ownership, pet owners must be informed by veterinarians about measures to prevent infectious diseases and certain risks that are related to keeping certain species of animals.

4.
Veterinarski Zurnal Republike Srpske ; 21(1/2):5-20, 2021.
Article in English, Serbian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1903814

ABSTRACT

Due to the modern way of life, the global exchange of goods, more frequent contacts, and the closer life with pets, domestic and exotic animal species, different species are also more often exposed to various coronaviruses (CoVs). Most CoVs are species-specific and are not transmitted between different species. Many CoVs have been found to spread very rapidly after introduction into the susceptible population and have remained endemic despite vaccination attempts and other measures to prevent their spread. The majority of animal CoV are present in susceptible population and can cause from mild to a severe clinical picture of the disease, including high mortality. Very rarely strains of animal CoVs are transmitted to humans and then spread rapidly among humans like severe acute respiratory syndrome CoV-2 (SARS CoV-2). The epizootiological characteristics of coronavirus infections are a consequence of their unique characteristics that can be classified into three basic epizootiological determinants. First of all, the virus itself has its own characteristics in terms of genetic characteristics and sustainability in the environment. In relation to the second epizootiological determinant, the macro-organism, it is necessary to emphasize that coronaviruses, more often than other families of viruses, adapt to primary species o even to a new species of animal in nature. This, so-called "jumping" the species barriers, is primarily conditioned by the biology of the virus, which often changes the antigenic composition and thus not only avoids the host's immune response but also finds new species in nature for its maintenance. For thousands of years, the environment greatly contributes to the fact that coronaviruses are a companion of populations of many animal species since there are certain characteristics of the environment (third epizootiological determinant) as sharing the same ecological niche by different species of animals (and humans).

5.
Surveillance ; 48(4):10-24, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1887621

ABSTRACT

Exotic pest and disease investigations are managed and reported by the Ministry for Primary Industries' (MPI's) Diagnostic and Surveillance Directorate. This article presents a summary of investigations of suspect exotic and emerging pests and diseases in New Zealand during the period from July to September 2021.

6.
Livestock and Animal Research ; 20(1):83-90, 2022.
Article in Indonesian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1865689

ABSTRACT

Objective: To obtain information about the presence of coronavirus in bats to find potential of new disease reservoir as well as not yet reported disease reservoir in Lamongan District. This research can be used by the government as a basis for planning and evaluating disease control programs and for researchers it can be used for vaccine and drug design, viral phylogenetic, analysis of viral distribution, and viral databases.

7.
Veterinar ; 59(1):14-23, 2021.
Article in Croatian | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1837993

ABSTRACT

The first cases of human disease from COVID-19 were recorded in December 2019 in China, from where it spread rapidly around the world. COVID-19, the third emerging coronavirus infection in humans, is caused by the new SARS-CoV-2 virus, which can cause a severe acute respiratory syndrome in some infected individuals. Previous research has revealed the possible animal origin of SARS-CoV-2, with bats considered as natural reservoirs and pangolins as intermediate hosts. To better understand COVID-19 and more successfully control the spread, domestic and wild animals have been infected in experimental conditions. On the other hand, in some species, infections have been recorded in field conditions. Natural infections have been reported in dogs, cats, tigers, lions, and minks, who have been in contact with SARS-CoV-2 positive humans. The reverse transmission of the pathogen, from infected animals to humans, has only been recorded on intensive mink farms. To better understand the pathogenesis of this disease's causative agent, drugs and vaccine trials, some experimental infections were performed on animal models, of which ferrets, rhesus macaques, and hamsters proved to be the most suitable. This article aimed to consolidate known data on the potential origin of SARS-CoV-2, its transmission to humans, infections in animals, and their significance in the epidemiology of COVID-19.

8.
Journal of Veterinary Epidemiology ; 24(2):55-74, 2020.
Article in Japanese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1790957

ABSTRACT

This proceedings contains 10 papers on risk management policy of the ministry of health, labour and welfare for ensuring safe wild game meat, prospective of application of food safety risk assessment for game meat, coronavirus disease (COVID-19) for animal owners, shelter medicine and COVID-19, the characteristics of bats as natural reservoirs of the novel coronavirus, chalkbrood in honey bees and its control measures, the economic impact of classical swine fever in Japan, benzalkonium chloride resistance in Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Japan, COVID-19 outbreak and epidemiological research in Japan and the amendment of the act on domestic animal infectious diseases control.

9.
Chinese Journal of Zoonoses ; 38(1):42-47, 2022.
Article in Chinese | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1789499

ABSTRACT

Since the end of December 2019, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has posed a serious threat to global public health security. Many coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2, are of animal origin. Therefore, monitoring of animal coronavirus must be strengthened. Herein, the common sample types, cell types used for viral isolation and culture, viral molecular detection methods, and immunological detection of animal coronaviruses are reviewed to provide a reference for follow-up studies of animal coronaviruses.

10.
Journal of Medical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases ; 10(1):1-9, 2022.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1787279

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV- 2) spilled over to humans via wild mammals, entering the host cell using angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) as receptor through Spike (S) protein binding. While SARS-CoV-2 became fully adapted to humans and globally spread, some mammal species were infected back. The present study evaluated the potential risk of mammals becoming hosts for SARS-CoV-2 through bioinformatics prediction based on ACE2 receptors.

11.
Uttar Pradesh Journal of Zoology ; 42(19):69-72, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1652250

ABSTRACT

The growing awareness that biodiversity is a precious global asset to present and future generation and that species's survival and the integrity of habitats and ecosystems are at serious risk, has increased significantly the importance of biodiversity related research. Biodiversity can be defined as the variability among living organism from all sources, including terrestrial, marine and other aquatic ecosystem and the ecological complexes of which they are part;this includes diversity within species between species and of ecosystems. The diversity of life on earth is nearly unimaginable. There is such a wealth of organism that it's a continuous need to keep trace of the diversity and there is always a provision for the discovery of new ones as it is a well-known fact that changing environmental conditions, habitat food and other ecological factors are more than enough to bring out certain definite changes and the accumulation of small changes give rise to a new species. With covid-19 we have seen the damage the diseases can do not only to human health but also to the global economy.By protecting biodiversity in Earth's ecosystem, countries could save lives and money while helping to prevent future pandemics. The present findings add one new species of an acanthocephalan parasite i.e. Raosentis cavasii from fresh water fish Mystus cavasius. It differs from R.thapari in presence of 20 rows of trunk spines instead of 9 rows, in having unequal lemnisci instead of being equal and in their extension upto proboscis receptacle and in the number of hypodermic nuclei 2-3 pairs dorsal and 1 ventral instead of 3 pairs on both sides.

12.
Analecta Veterinaria ; 41(2), 2021.
Article in Spanish | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1609021

ABSTRACT

A 120 nm viral particle has completely modified what happens in a 12,000 km diameter planet. The first epidemics caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus and the Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) coronaviruses, alerted to the potential for inter-species transmission. However, it was not until coronaviruses' third big leap with the new SARS-CoV-2 pandemic that the the entire scientific community focused on them. There are several interspecies jumps reported in veterinary medicine that are nothing more than different coronaviruses attempts to perfect their transmission and potentially reach more than 7 billion hosts in which they can replicate. This article describes morphological and genetic characteristics of coronaviruses, their particular replication mechanism and how it influences their dissemination. In addition, clinical signs, lesions, antigenic variants and vaccination control of the main coronaviruses associated with different animal species are described, with a special emphasis on reports in Latin America.

13.
Biodiversity ; 22(1/2):35-40, 2021.
Article in English | CAB Abstracts | ID: covidwho-1575248

ABSTRACT

Changes in human activities caused by the COVID-19 pandemic can have multiple effects on biodiversity but there is limited knowledge of how this can impact invasive alien species (IAS). Societal measures against the spread of COVID-19 can have both short-term and long-term consequences on IAS. In the short-term, reduced human disturbance on natural habitats can increase the activity of IAS and accelerate their spread. Furthermore, management agencies have reduced control activities, sometimes allowing IAS to thrive, and ongoing monitoring programs have been interrupted, hindering rapid identification and management of biological invasions. Long-term impacts could include global modifications to wildlife trade and increased releases of captive-bred species because of the fear of zoonotic diseases and also greater public awareness of the risks of pathogens being spread among animal populations. Long-term collection and sharing of data are crucial to modulate IAS management during and after the lockdowns.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL