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1.
J Am Coll Health ; : 1-6, 2021 Jun 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238141

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate COVID-19's impact on college student health behaviors. PARTICIPANTS: 189 college students. METHODS: Participants completed an online survey on behaviors relating to sleep, sedentary activities, and physical activity before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Comparisons utilized Students' dependent t-test or Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. RESULTS: There was an increase in time to fall asleep (before: 23.4 ± 18.0 vs. during: 42.8 ± 44.3 min·day-1, p < 0.001), time spent in bed (before: 7.8 ± 1.5 vs. during: 8.5 ± 1.5 hr·day-1, p < 0.001), as well as shifts in later bed and awake time (p < 0.001). Total sedentary time increased during the pandemic (before: 9.0 ± 3.8 vs. during: 9.9 ± 4.1 hr·day-1, p = 0.016); and time spent using a TV, computer, or phone (before: 3.1 ± 1.9 vs. during: 4.2 ± 2.3 hr·day-1, p < 0.001). There was a significant decrease in moderate-vigorous activity (before: 123.8 ± 96.0 vs. during: 108.9 ± 75.5 min·week-1, p = 0.028) and resistance training days (before: 2.4 ± 2.1 vs. during: 1.7 ± 2.1 days·week-1, p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 negatively influenced health behaviors in college students.

2.
Rev. bras. epidemiol ; 26(supl.1): e230011, 2023. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-20235424

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To analyze time trends and prevalence of physical activity and sedentary behavior among adults of Brazilian capitals between 2006 and 2021, including the pandemic period. Methods: This is a time-series of cross-sectional surveys based on the National Surveillance System for Risk and Protective Factors for Chronic Diseases by Telephone Survey. Trends of sufficient leisure-time physical activity, sufficient physical activity while commuting, insufficient practice of physical activity, and total screen time were estimated by using Prais-Winsten regression. Annual prevalences and time trends were estimated for each indicator by sex, age group and education. Results: For total population, significant time trends were found for leisure-time physical activity (β=0.614) and total screen time (β=1.319). As for prevalence, leisure-time physical activity increased from 29% in 2009 to 39% in 2019, followed by a reduction of 2.3% between 2020 and 2021. Total screen time prevalence increased considerably between 2019 and 2020 (4.7%). Though physical inactivity tended to reduce along the series, its prevalence increased by 3.4% between 2019 and 2021, as well as physical activity while commuting decreased by 3,7% in the same time period. Conclusion: Whereas leisure-time physical activity increased over the years, it is uncertain whether this trend will be the same in the years following COVID-19. Not only did people alter their leisure-time habits, but also there was an increasing dominance of screen time due to the change in work and social patterns. More strategies need to be addressed to tackle physical inactivity and sedentary behavior, and to review the post-pandemic national targets.


RESUMO Objetivo: Analisar as tendências temporais e a prevalência dos indicadores de atividade física e comportamento sedentário em adultos das capitais brasileiras entre 2006 e 2021, incluindo o período de pandemia. Métodos: Trata-se de estudo de série temporal de inquéritos transversais baseado no Sistema de Vigilância Telefônica de Doenças Crônicas. As tendências de atividade física suficiente no lazer, atividade física suficiente no deslocamento, prática insuficiente de atividade física e tempo total de tela foram estimadas por meio da regressão de Prais-Winsten. As tendências temporais e as prevalências anuais foram calculadas por sexo, faixa etária e escolaridade. Resultados: Na população total, foram encontradas tendências temporais significativas para atividade física suficiente no lazer (β=0,614) e tempo total de tela (β=1,319). Quanto à prevalência, a atividade física suficiente no lazer aumentou de 29% em 2009 para 39% em 2019, seguida de redução de 2,3% entre 2020 e 2021. A prevalência do tempo total de tela aumentou consideravelmente entre 2019 e 2020 (4,7%). Embora a inatividade física tendesse a diminuir ao longo da série, sua prevalência aumentou 3,4% entre 2019 e 2021, assim como a atividade física no deslocamento diminuiu 3,7% no mesmo período. Conclusão: Enquanto a atividade física suficiente no lazer aumentou ao longo dos anos, é incerto se essa tendência se manterá nos anos seguintes à COVID-19. Não apenas as pessoas alteraram seus hábitos de lazer, mas também há um domínio crescente do tempo de tela em razão da mudança nos padrões sociais e de trabalho. Mais estratégias precisam ser abordadas para o enfrentamento da inatividade física, do comportamento sedentário e para a revisão das metas nacionais pós-pandemia.

3.
Heliyon ; 9(4): e14332, 2023 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237857

ABSTRACT

Unexpected changes brought about by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have affected humans worldwide. This review attempts to address major parental concerns about the development of preschool-aged children during the pandemic from the perspectives of neuropsychology, consultation, and motor development for preschoolers aged 2-5 years. Methods: A total of 273 articles including original data, review articles, national and regional perspectives, government websites, and commentaries were considered in this review, of which 117 manuscripts were excluded because they were unrelated to children, adolescents, or COVID -19 pandemic/upper respiratory infections. A total of 156 manuscripts were included after reading the abstract and entire article. Results: Telehealth could be an effective tool for addressing cognitive and emotional challenges that arise during the pandemic. Online consultations are highlighted for nutritional guidelines and to overcome problems that parents face when caring for children in difficult times. Outdoor activities using sanitisers, proper cleanliness, and following standard operating procedures are recommended. Parental preoccupation with media should be avoided. Interpretation: Many preschoolers show delays in reaching their developmental milestones, and the pandemic has increased parents' concerns, as access to practitioners is limited. Therefore, parents should be encouraged to undergo neuropsychological consultations whenever necessary. This study emphasises important strategies to ensure that children's development is minimally affected while staying in the confined environment of their homes. This study serves as a new guide for parents, as they raise young children in the new normal. Parents should undergo basic yearly physical, neuropsychological, nutritional, and speech checkups.

4.
J Phys Ther Sci ; 35(6): 447-454, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237733

ABSTRACT

[Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the factors associated with decreased physical activity levels among community residents over a long-term observation period during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. [Participants and Methods] We conducted a cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire and daily steps as an indicator of physical activity levels. The study population consisted of 704 community-dwelling residents aged 40 years and older who participated in the health program from 2019 to 2020. We compared the daily steps from March-December 2019 to March-December 2020 and performed multivariate analysis to identify the factors associated with decreased daily steps. [Results] Of all participants, 447 (63.5%) returned the questionnaire and 309 (43.9%) were included in the analysis. During the COVID-19 pandemic, 133 (43.0%) respondents had decreased physical activity levels. The multivariate analysis showed that working (odds ratio, 2.08; 95% confidence interval, 1.10-3.94) was significantly associated with decreased daily steps during the COVID-19 pandemic. [Conclusion] There was a significant association between decreased physical activity levels and working during the COVID-19 pandemic. When restrictive measures such as teleworking are implemented, it may be necessary to take measures to prevent a decline in physical activity levels.

5.
J Prev (2022) ; 44(3): 291-307, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237511

ABSTRACT

Screen time shows higher health risks compared to other types of sedentary behaviors. A lockdown may simultaneously increase screen time, reduce physical activity (PA), and change time perception. Our goal was to compare self-reported against objectively measured smartphone screen time (SST) in a sample of active and inactive Portuguese adults before and during a social lockdown. This study was a cross-sectional analysis with 211 Portuguese adults (57.8% males), aged 25.2 ± 8.5 years, from two cohorts, one before the social lockdown and the other during the lockdown. SST was self-reported (SR-SST) and objectively measured using a smartphone (OM-SST). PA was self-reported. Linear regressions were performed to determine the association between SR-SST and OM-SST. A Bland and Altman analysis was used to assess agreement. Independent T-tests were performed for comparisons between cohorts and paired sample T-tests for comparisons within each cohort. The cohort assessed during the lockdown showed a higher SST than the cohort assessed before the lockdown (OM-SST; p < 0.001 and SR-SST; p = 0.009). Before the lockdown, there was no difference between SR-SST and OM-SST (p = 0.100). However, during the social lockdown, although the agreement between SR-SST and OM-SST was good (ICC = 0.72), participants systematically underestimated their SST by ~ 71 min/day (p < 0.001), and this underestimation was higher in inactive participants (~ 85 min/day) than in active individuals (~ 49 min/day). The general population needs to be aware of the benefits of limiting screen time, especially during periods of societal modifications, such as a generalized lockdown. There was a tendency to underestimate SST, meaning a lack of awareness of the actual time spent in this potentially deleterious behavior. This underestimation was more pronounced during the lockdown period and for the inactive participants, thus posing a greater health risk. The findings from this investigation entail relevant information for policy makers to delineate strategies for reducing population screen time from a preventive health perspective.


Subject(s)
Screen Time , Smartphone , Male , Adult , Humans , Female , Self Report , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise
6.
BMC Geriatr ; 23(1): 343, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity improves physical health and mental well-being and reduces the risk of falling in older adults. The randomized controlled "Prevention by lay-assisted Outdoor-Walking in the Elderly at Risk" POWER-study investigates whether volunteer-supported outdoor-walking improves physical function and quality of life in older people living independently or in nursing homes. This sub-study explores the experiences of older participants and volunteers in relation to their physical and psychosocial well-being as well as the challenges faced by both groups. A further aim was to explore volunteers' experience with people living in nursing homes during the first pandemic lockdown (spring 2020). METHODS: The sub-study was designed as mixed-methods approach consisting of 11 individual semi-structured guide-based interviews (nursing home residents), two focus group interviews (volunteers), and a cross-sectional questionnaire survey (volunteers). The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by content analysis as described by Kuckartz. Topics addressed in the interviews were triangulated by means of a questionnaire. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Participants' evaluation of the intervention was generally positive. Nursing home residents appreciated the social interaction associated with the assisted walking, which motivated them to take part regularly, provided a sense of safety, and caused pleasure on both sides. The impact on physical health status of the nursing home residents of this sub-study varied to a large degree as reported in interviews: in some cases, an improvement in physical performance, a decrease in physical complaints, and an improvement in gait or independence was reported. If not, reference was made to previous or sudden illnesses and the advanced age of the participants. Despite the COVID-19-lockdown and the associated restrictions, about 60% of contacts were still possible and participants planned to continue the assisted walks after the lockdown. CONCLUSION: Volunteers have a positive effect on the quality of life, mobility, and general health of nursing home residents. Even more than the improvement of physical performance, social interaction was seen as helpful. Despite their advanced age, the nursing home residents were curious and open to new contacts. When removing the identified barriers, it might be possible to integrate this program into the long-term everyday life of nursing homes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: DRKS-ID: DRKS00015188, date of registration: 31.08.2018.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Nursing Homes , Walking
7.
Digit Health ; 9: 20552076231178410, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244600

ABSTRACT

Objective: In response to COVID-19, the fall prevention program (FPP) at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre was modified to be delivered virtually. We compared patient populations assessed for the FPP virtually versus in-person to explore equitable accessibility. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed. All patients assessed virtually from the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic until the end of abstraction (April 25, 2022) were compared to a historic sample of patients assessed in-person beginning in January 2019. Demographics, measures of frailty, co-morbidity, and cognition were abstracted. Wilcoxon Rank Sum tests and Fisher's Exact tests were used for continuous and categorical variables, respectively. Results: Thirty patients were assessed virtually and compared to 30 in-person historic controls. Median age was 80 years (interquartile range 75-85), 82% were female, 70% were university educated, the median Clinical Frailty Score was 5 out of 9, and 87% used >5 medications. Once normalized, frailty scores showed no difference (p = 0.446). The virtual cohort showed significantly higher outdoor walking aid use (p = 0.015), reduced accuracy with clock drawing (p = 0.020), and nonsignificant trends toward using >10 medications, requiring assistance with >3 instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs), and higher treatment attendance. No significant differences were seen for time-to-treat (p = 0.423). Conclusion: Patients assessed virtually were similarly frail as the in-person controls but had increased use of walking aids, medications, IADL assistance, and cognitive impairment. In a Canadian context, frail and high socioeconomic status older adults continued to access treatment through virtual FPP assessments during the COVID-19 pandemic highlighting both the benefits of virtual care and potential inequity.

8.
Cardiol Res ; 14(3): 240-242, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243513

ABSTRACT

Background: Sedentary behavior is thought to contribute to worsening heart failure syndromes. Here, we examined whether the shelter-in-place order during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic changed daily activity duration, which was monitored by an implantable cardiac device-based multisensor index and alert algorithm called HeartLogic. Methods: We performed a retrospective review of the HeartLogic data from patients with heart failure managed at our clinic and compared the individual daily activity duration 90 days prior to vs. after implementation of the shelter-in-place order. The activity data were prepared by Boston Scientific. Demographic data were extracted from our electronic medical record. Results: In total, 29 patients were included in the analysis. Among them, 14 patients did not have any significant changes in daily activity duration compared to their baseline before the shelter-in-place order (108.62 ± 45 min vs. 107.71 ± 48.6 min, P = 0.723). Among the rest 15 patients with significant changes, seven patients had a significant reduction in activity duration; meanwhile, eight patients had a significant increase in activity duration. Overall, the mean daily activity duration 90 days before and after the shelter-in-place order are 98.21 ± 60.83 min, and 100.03 ± 68.18 min (P = 0.753). Conclusions: No significant changes in terms of activity duration were observed in our patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.

9.
BMC Public Health ; 23(1): 1116, 2023 06 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239650

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We aimed to evaluate the association of sedentary behavior (SB) and moderate to vigorous leisure-time physical activity (MVPA) with sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Cross-sectional, population-based study in adults, conducted from October to December 2020 in the Iron Quadrangle region, Brazil. The outcome was sleep quality, evaluated with the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index. SB was assessed by self-report of total sitting time, before and during the pandemic. Individuals with ≥ 9 h of total sitting time were classified as SB. In addition, the ratio of time spent in MVPA to time in SB was analyzed. A contrasted directed acyclic graph (DAG) model was constructed to adjust logistic regression models. RESULTS: A total of 1629 individuals were evaluated, the prevalence of SB before the pandemic was 11.3% (95%CI: 8.6-14.8), and during the pandemic 15.2% (95%CI: 12.1-18.9). In multivariate analysis, the chance of poor sleep quality was 77% higher in subjects with SB ≥ 9 h per day (OR: 1.77; 95% CI: 1.02-2.97). Furthermore, a one-hour increase in SB during the pandemic, increased the chance of poor sleep quality by 8% (OR: 1.08; 95%CI 1.01-1.15). In the analysis of the ratio of MVPA per SB in individuals with SB ≥ 9 h, practicing 1 min of MVPA per hour of SB reduces the chance of poor sleep quality by 19% (OR: 0.84; 95%CI: 0.73-0.98). CONCLUSION: SB during the pandemic was a factor associated with poor sleep quality, and the practice of MVPA can reduce the effects of SB.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Sedentary Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Sleep Quality , Exercise
10.
Nutrients ; 15(11)2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) have higher weight gain and psychological distress compared to those without PCOS. While COVID-19 restrictions led to population level adverse changes in lifestyle, weight gain and psychological distress, their impact on people with PCOS is unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact the 2020 COVID-19 restrictions had on weight, physical activity, diet and psychological distress for Australians with PCOS. METHODS: Australian reproductive-aged women participated in an online survey with assessment of weight, physical activity, diet and psychological distress. Multivariable logistic and linear regression were used to examine associations between PCOS and residential location with health outcomes. RESULTS: On adjusted analysis, those with PCOS gained more weight (2.9%; 95% CI; 0.027-3.020; p = 0.046), were less likely to meet physical activity recommendations (OR 0.50; 95% CI; 0.32-0.79; p = 0.003) and had higher sugar-sweetened beverage intake (OR 1.74; 95% CI 1.10-2.75; p = 0.019) but no differences in psychological distress compared to women without PCOS. CONCLUSIONS: People with PCOS were more adversely affected by COVID-19 restrictions, which may worsen their clinical features and disease burden. Additional health care support may be necessary to assist people with PCOS to meet dietary and physical activity recommendations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome , Psychological Distress , Sedentary Behavior , Humans , Female , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Weight Gain , Exercise , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/epidemiology , Polycystic Ovary Syndrome/psychology , Diet , Australia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Pandemics
11.
SSM Popul Health ; 23: 101454, 2023 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239485

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected children's lifestyle behaviours and mental health and wellbeing, and concerns have been raised that COVID-19 has also increased health inequalities. No study to date has quantified the impact of COVID-19 on health inequalities among children. We compared pre-pandemic vs. post-lockdown inequalities in lifestyle behaviours and mental health and wellbeing among children living in rural and remote northern communities. Methods: We surveyed 473 grade 4-6 students (9-12 years of age) from 11 schools in rural and remote communities in northern Canada in 2018 (pre-pandemic), and 443 grade 4-6 students from the same schools in 2020 (post-lockdown). The surveys included questions on sedentary behaviours, physical activity, dietary intake, and mental health and wellbeing. We measured inequality in these behaviors using the Gini coefficient, a unitless measure ranging from 0 to 1 with a higher value indicating greater inequality. We used temporal changes (2020 vs. 2018) in Gini coefficients to assess the impact of COVID-19 on inequalities in lifestyle behaviours and mental health and wellbeing separately among girls and boys. Results: Inequalities in all examined lifestyle behaviours increased between 2018 and 2020. Inequalities in watching TV, playing video games, and using a cell phone increased among girls, while inequalities in playing video games, using computers and tablets, and consumption of sugar, salt, saturated fat and total fat increased among boys. Changes in inequalities in mental health and wellbeing were small and not statistically significant. Conclusion: The findings suggest that the COVID-19 pandemic has exacerbated inequalities in lifestyle behaviours among children living in rural and remote northern communities. If not addressed, these differences may translate into exacerbated inequalities in future health. The findings further suggest that school health programs can help mitigate the negative impact of the pandemic on lifestyle behaviours and mental health and wellbeing.

12.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 11(11)2023 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: When the first cases of COVID-19 (caused by SARS-CoV-2 virus infection) were discovered, exceptional norms to fight the spread of the virus were established by applying movement restrictions (lockdown) in many countries. These unprecedented norms led to sedentary behaviours and less healthy diets which could persist for much longer after lockdown. The aim of this study was to analyse the physical activity, eating habits, self-perceived well-being, and toxic habits, as well as the perceived changes of these habits with respect to the pre-pandemic period, in a population of university students in the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A single-centre, cross-sectional study was conducted in a population of university students of healthcare degrees. A total of 961 students (639 (66.5%) women and 322 (33.5%) men) signed the informed consent and completed the questionnaire. The study was conducted through an anonymous survey, which was voluntarily self-completed by the students on an online platform. The questionnaire was based on the Spanish Health Survey and it was divided into six main parts: demographic and anthropometric characteristics, physical activity, eating habits, well-being measures (sleeping habits, health state, and stress), toxic habits, and perception of the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on the variables described. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: The results showed that, during the second year of the pandemic, statistically significant dependence was identified for those students that showed higher levels of physical activity with greater perceived physical activity (p < 0.05), healthier eating habits (p < 0.05), and a better self-perceived health state (p < 0.05), with respect to the 12 months before the COVID-19 pandemic. On the other hand, there was a negative correlation between the sedentary students and greater perceived physical activity (p < 0.05). With regard to toxic habits and physical activity, a significant correlation was only detected between sedentary behaviour and cocaine consumption (p < 0.05). Analysing eating habits, it was observed that the students who smoked, consumed alcohol, and binge drank had low adherence to the Mediterranean diet (p < 0.05). In addition, those students with high stress levels slept less than 7 h (p < 0.05).

13.
Nutrients ; 15(10)2023 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238451

ABSTRACT

Treatment adherence (TA) is a critical issue and is under-investigated in hemodialysis patients. A multi-center study was conducted from July 2020 to March 2021 on 972 hemodialysis patients in eight hospitals in Vietnam to explore the factors associated with TA during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data were collected, including socio-demographics, an End-Stage Renal Disease Adherence Questionnaire (ESRD-AQ), 12-item short-form health literacy questionnaire (HLS-SF12), 4-item digital healthy diet literacy scale (DDL), 10-item hemodialysis dietary knowledge scale (HDK), 7-item fear of COVID-19 scale (FCoV-19S), and suspected COVID-19 symptoms (S-COVID19-S). Bivariate and multivariate linear regression models were used to explore the associations. Higher DDL scores were associated with higher TA scores (regression coefficient, B, 1.35; 95% confidence interval, 95%CI, 0.59, 2.12; p = 0.001). Higher FCoV-19S scores were associated with lower TA scores (B, -1.78; 95%CI, -3.33, -0.24; p = 0.023). In addition, patients aged 60-85 (B, 24.85; 95%CI, 6.61, 43.11; p = 0.008) with "very or fairly easy" medication payment ability (B, 27.92; 95%CI, 5.89, 44.95; p = 0.013) had higher TA scores. Patients who underwent hemodialysis for ≥5 years had a lower TA score than those who received <5 years of hemodialysis (B, -52.87; 95%CI, -70.46, -35.28; p < 0.001). These findings suggested that DDL and FCoV-19S, among other factors, should be considered in future interventions to improve TA in hemodialysis patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Literacy , Humans , COVID-19/therapy , Diet, Healthy , Pandemics , Renal Dialysis , Treatment Adherence and Compliance , Fear
14.
J Phys Ther Sci ; 35(6): 483-487, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237137

ABSTRACT

[Purpose] Behavioral restrictions during the corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic may have affected the physical activity levels of college students. We aimed to characterize the body composition and physical activity of college students during these behavioral restrictions. [Participants and Methods] The body composition (height, weight, body mass index, body fat mass, body fat percentage, total body muscle mass, free-fat muscle index [FFMI], and fat mass index [FMI]), physical activity, amount the of walking, amount of daily activity, and the number of steps were measured in 52 university students. [Results] For both male and females, the number of steps taken was lower than the average steps reported by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. In males, FFMI had a strong positive correlation with physical activity, amount of walking, and the number of steps taken. In females, FFMI had a strong positive correlation with physical activity and the amount of walking, as well as a moderate positive correlation with the amount of daily activity. [Conclusion] Since physical activity and walking of university students during COVID-19 affect FFMI, it is necessary to develop an exercise program that considers behavioral patterns.

15.
Curr Oncol ; 30(5): 4427-4436, 2023 04 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20237023

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the corona pandemic, all courses on physical activity for cancer patients were canceled. The aim of our study was to evaluate the feasibility of switching dancing classes for patients and their partners to online classes. METHODS: Patients and partners from courses at four different locations who consented to the online course offer were asked to fill in a pseudonymous questionnaire on access to the training, technical challenges, acceptance and well-being (1-item visual analog scale from 1 to 10) before and after the training. RESULTS: Sixty-five participants returned the questionnaire (39 patients and 23 partners). Fifty-eight (89.2%) had danced before, and forty-eight (73.8%) had visited at least one course of ballroom dancing for cancer patients before. The first access to the online platform was difficult for 39 participants (60%). Most participants (57; 87.7%) enjoyed the online classes, but 53 (81.5%) rated them as less fun than the real classes as direct contact was missing. Well-being increased significantly after the lesson and remained improved for several days. CONCLUSION: Transforming a dancing class is feasible for participants with digital experience and goes along with technical difficulties. It is a substitute for real classes if mandatory and improves well-being.


Subject(s)
Dancing , Neoplasms , Humans , Pandemics , Exercise , Neoplasms/therapy , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Life (Basel) ; 13(5)2023 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20236394

ABSTRACT

In this retrospective study, we used data from the hospital information system (HIS) to evaluate the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on rehabilitation care at the University Hospital of Ostrava (UHO). From March 2020 to December 2021, 5173 COVID-19 cases were hospitalized at UHO. Cases within individual groups and categories are shown in a flowchart. The average patient age was 64.9 ± 16.9 years. The mean BMI value was 30.6 ± 6.8 in the rehabilitated group, which was significantly higher compared to that among the non-rehabilitated cases 29.1 ± 6.9 (p < 0.001). Among the admitted patients, 16.6% required artificial pulmonary ventilation (APV), 1.8% extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and 11.9% high-flow oxygenation (HF). The days of rehabilitation ranged from 1-102 days. Among all rehabilitated patients, 92.0% (n = 1302) had a hospitalization duration ranging from 1-15 days and 8.0% (n = 114) longer than 15 days. Overall, rehabilitation care plays an important role in providing exercise, mobilization, and rehabilitation interventions to survivors of critical illness associated with COVID-19, enabling the early and functional return to home, and it must, therefore, be integrated into the clinical care of patients with COVID-19.

17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235964

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led many countries to apply lockdown measures that could prevent children from achieving the physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep levels suggested for their psychophysical health. The current study tested changes in physical activity, sedentary behavior, and sleep length of children and the incidence of achieving the 24 h movement standards through the limitations of COVID-19. A total of 490 Arab Israeli parents were surveyed. An electronic cross-sectional survey was performed, including questions addressing engagement in physical activities, use of screens, and sleep duration. Throughout the COVID-19 outbreak, time spent participating in physical activity was reduced, sedentary behavior and sleep duration were increased, and the percentage of the sample who met the physical activity and sedentary behavior suggestions lessened. The percentage of participants who attained the overall 24 h movement recommendations was very low during the pandemic; school children met the guideline recommendations for physical activity and sleep duration more than preschool children, and girls spent more time in physical activity. These findings highlight the need for strategies to enhance physical activity and decrease sedentary behavior in children to prevent long-term effects of limitations imposed by COVID-19. Efforts to perceive and encourage healthy routines in Arab Israeli children in the case of pandemic limitations are expected to serve as a precedence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Child , COVID-19/epidemiology , Sleep Duration , Arabs , Sedentary Behavior , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Israel/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Exercise , Sleep
18.
Public Health ; 220: 148-154, 2023 Jun 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235525

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The study investigated the longitudinal association between physical activity and the risk of long COVID in patients who recovered from COVID-19 infection. STUDY DESIGN: We analyzed longitudinal data of the Prospective Study About Mental and Physical Health cohort, a prospective cohort study with adults living in Southern Brazil. METHODS: Participants responded to an online, self-administered questionnaire in June 2020 (wave 1) and June 2022 (wave 4). Only participants who self-reported a positive test for COVID-19 were included. Physical activity was assessed before (wave 1, retrospectively) and during the pandemic (wave 1). Long COVID was assessed in wave 4 and defined as any post-COVID-19 symptoms that persisted for at least 3 months after infection. RESULTS: A total of 237 participants (75.1% women; mean age [standard deviation]: 37.1 [12.3]) were included in this study. The prevalence of physical inactivity in baseline was 71.7%, whereas 76.4% were classified with long COVID in wave 4. In the multivariate analysis, physical activity during the pandemic was associated with a reduced likelihood of long COVID (prevalence ratio [PR]: 0.83; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.69-0.99) and a reduced duration of long COVID symptoms (odds ratio: 0.44; 95% CI: 0.26-0.75). Participants who remained physically active from before to during the pandemic were less likely to report long COVID (PR: 0.74; 95% CI: 0.58-0.95), fatigue (PR: 0.49; 95% CI: 0.32-0.76), neurological complications (PR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.27-0.80), cough (PR: 0.40; 95% CI: 0.22-0.71), and loss of sense of smell or taste (PR: 0.43; 95% CI: 0.21-0.87) as symptom-specific long COVID. CONCLUSION: Physical activity practice was associated with reduced risk of long COVID in adults.

19.
J R Coll Physicians Edinb ; 53(2): 88-89, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235339
20.
Transl Pediatr ; 12(5): 977-990, 2023 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20234981

ABSTRACT

Background: The significant lifestyle changes that occurred during the lockdown period associated with the COVID-19 pandemic may have had many potential adverse effects on children, in particular, sedentary screen exposure among children, including those with developmental disorders. We conducted a cross-sectional study to investigate and compare the screen time and outdoor activity time of children with typically development (TD) and those with developmental disorders during and before the emergence of COVID-19, and identified the risk factors related to screen time during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A total of 496 children were surveyed via online questionnaires. Parents or/and children filled in the online questionnaire, including basic characteristics, screen time, outdoor activity time, and other related factors. The Statistical Product and Service Solutions software was used to analyze all data. Results: Children spent less time outdoors (t=14.774, P<0.001) and more time on electronic screens (t=-14.069, P<0.001) during the lockdown period of COVID-19, compared to the periods before COVID-19. Age (P=0.037), pre-COVID-19 screen time (P=0.005), screen time used for learning/education (P<0.001), screen time of siblings (P=0.007), and use of screen devices as electronic babysitters (P=0.005) were risk factors for screen time during the COVID-19 pandemic, while restrictive use of electronic devices by parents (P<0.05) was a protective factor. The screen time of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was significantly longer than children with TD before COVID-19 pandemic, but there is no statistical difference during the COVID-19 pandemic. Conclusions: During the COVID-19 pandemic, children's screen exposure time increased, and outdoor activities decreased significantly. This represents a significant challenge, and we should focus our efforts on managing children's screen time and promoting healthier lifestyles, including children with typical development, as well as those with developmental disorders.

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