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1.
Sustainability ; 15(11):9005, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20243137

ABSTRACT

Population growth and urbanization increasingly put pressure on our planet's availability of areas needed for food production. The dependencies on domestically produced food are increasingly judged favourable, following the consequences of the Ukrainian war, with escalating fuel and grain prices and less accessibilities to low-income groups. It is, however, unclear whether land is domestically available. Applying a food system approach, the main aim of this article is to investigate spatial foodsheds and theoretical self-sufficiency for food production needed to supply increasing future populations in a selection of cities, including estimates for Dhaka in Bangladesh, Nairobi in Kenya and Kampala in Uganda. The projected foodshed scenario areas for the years 2020 and 2050 are estimated for the production of three core products currently extensively produced and consumed in the three countries. They show that it is not possible to feed an ever-increasing urban population based on domestic production alone. International trade, new technological developments and new consumer demands for less area-intensive food production systems may give solutions to the immense challenge of feeding the world's population with nutritious food in 2050. However, to ensure fair and inclusive transition pathways for low-income groups: (1) affordability and accessibility of trade opportunities, technologies and products, (2) a common vision aiming for the SDGs, including SDG2: Zero hunger and SDG11: Sustainable Cities and Communities as well as (3) best practices in co-creation and cooperation with the most vulnerable urban and rural populations, are highly needed.

2.
Daedalus ; 152(2):13, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-20239754

ABSTRACT

Two hundred seventy-four million people-one in thirty people on the planet-are in humanitarian need as of September 2022.1 More than one hundred million of these individuals are displaced, usually as a result of crisis: conflict, political upheaval, economic meltdown, or climate shocks.2 In a humanitarian crisis, health is the most urgent and paramount need. But today the system for preventing and addressing humanitarian crisis is failing, and with it, the health needs of millions of vulnerable people are under threat. From treating childhood acute malnutrition to delivering COVID-19 vaccines to ensuring access to sexual, reproductive, maternal, and newborn health, health care in humanitarian contexts requires a dramatic rethink amid growing challenges to access and service delivery.

3.
Sustainability ; 15(8):6633, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2293602

ABSTRACT

Corporations and small/medium enterprises (SMEs) are subject to a variety of external and internal pressures that often lead to changes in their corporate governance structures and accounting/reporting systems. The environment in which these organizations are collocated has undergone a deep process of change, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, climate change, the blockchain, and the energy industry crisis. Business activities represent a critical and a vital component of human existence across the globe—one that is not restricted to a financial standpoint—and their impact on societal, environmental and animal conditions is now undisputed. However, these activities are frequently coupled with allegations of their being the actual causes of those disruptions and collapses that persist in escaping the scrutiny of international governments. For the effective delivery of sustainable business activities, the concepts of governance and accountability are crucial, and the future of the inhabitants of planet Earth is arguably dependent on the ability of corporations (through their entire value chain) to govern themselves well and to demonstrate accountability to their many stakeholders. This should be achieved through the adoption of good governance standards which are well accepted, and that are globally harmonised with ‘Environmental, Social and Governance' (ESG) reporting tools that are able to strategically assess and evaluate risk exposure and provide forward-looking information. In this critical context, few studies have actually examined these issues thoroughly, and, because the findings of those studies have been contradictory, there is still no definitive understanding of the causes of weak accounting and reporting tools for ESG dynamics under conditions of disruption. A systematic literature network analysis (SLNA) is used in this study to examine the evolution of the ESG reporting research domain based on existing relationships (e.g., aggregation, cross-citations and isolation) among authors contributing to the field. The findings demonstrate the current state of the art, disclosing interesting and timely future research directions. Furthermore, this study employs a novel approach known as SLNA to conduct the analyses, confirming its efficacy as a tool for dynamic analysis also within the field of sustainability accounting research.

4.
Occupational and Environmental Medicine ; 80(Suppl 1):A1-A2, 2023.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2267239

ABSTRACT

This presentation will explore the essential role of occupational epidemiology in global health. Our field provides critical perspectives – relevant not only for the identification of health hazards at work but in global health more broadly – on the identification of risk factors for disease in populations, the weighing of evidence for causality, and the design and implementation of public health interventions. This presentation is informed by analyses of recent health crises including the COVID-19 pandemic, the epidemic of ‘deaths of despair' in the U.S. and the increasing toll of heat illnesses on a warming planet.In addition to study design and data analytic methods, occupational epidemiologists are trained to understand the physical and social environments in which work is conducted as well as the biological processes that link exposure to disease, and how all this impact population health. This multi-disciplinary training enables occupational epidemiologists to identify hazards and interventions that may be overlooked by other disciplines. Occupational epidemiologists learn that economic and political forces have powerful effects on the work environment, and this shapes their perspective on how evidence is weighed in public health decision-making. Rather than using rigid evidence to decision frameworks inspired by randomized controlled trials, evaluating evidence for action uses triangulation among diverse types and qualities of evidence to guide prevention. In occupational epidemiology, the precautionary principle can be understood as one aspect of the fundamental perspective that there is no pre-defined level of certainty that is needed before taking preventive action;instead, there are different amounts and qualities of evidence that are sufficient for each specific proposed intervention.A continuing supply of occupational epidemiologists is needed to respond to future global health challenges. Professional training programs are needed to ensure this workforce;training which includes epidemiology and biostatistics, physiology, occupational hygiene, engineering and the social and economic aspects of work and health. Occupational epidemiology should be core training in global health programs.

5.
Revista Española de Investigaciones Sociologicas ; - (181):154-157, 2023.
Article in Spanish | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2169031

ABSTRACT

The article presents the discussion on entire planet having an impact on individual lives and experiences. Topics include fear, disbelief, and resignation prevailed during the months of harsh confinement;and ignorance of the virus and the absence of a remedy beyond applied in the Middle Ages with the plague.

6.
Physics Teacher ; 60(2):150-151, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-1673331

ABSTRACT

Thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic, virtually all in-person instruction was shut down across the country in 2020 and beyond. This posed special problems for laboratory-based science courses, as those are defined by the conducting of experiments in person and often with specialized equipment unavailable outside of the classroom. Here I discuss a semester-long project for introductory astronomy that can be performed at home with very basic and inexpensive equipment. And, thanks to the vagaries of the orbits of the planets, variations of this activity can be carried out in many future semesters. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Physics Teacher is the property of American Institute of Physics and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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