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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110054

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study will evaluate the association that the COVID-19 pandemic has had with health-care workers and identify the factors that influenced the female gender being more affected. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in two hospitals in Arequipa (a Peruvian city). The participants were health-care workers. We applied a questionnaire with sociodemographic information and three scales: the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Primary Care Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screen for DSM-5. The main outcomes were anxiety, depression, and PTSD scores. The exposure of interest was gender. The scores of the scales were estimated by medians and percentiles 25-75 (p25-p75), and we used linear regression to estimate the crude and adjusted coefficients and their respective confidence intervals at 95% (CI 95%). RESULTS: There were 109 participants, and 43.1% were women. The anxiety, depression, and PTSD median (p25-p75) scores in the study population were 6 (2-11), 6 (2-10), and 1 (0-3), respectively. The adjusted analysis showed that the female sex had 4.48 (CI 95% 2.95-6.00), 4.50 (CI 95% 2.39-6.62), and 1.13 (CI 95% 0.50-1.76) higher points on average for the scales of anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms in comparison to males, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Female health-care workers showed increased scores of mental health issues in comparison to male health-care workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
2.
Psychol Res Behav Manag ; 15: 3069-3080, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089573

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The duties related to COVID-19 control and prevention may have caused psychological stress for the individuals in charge (eg, frontline government workers) and have reportedly led to mental health issues, such as insomnia and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However, the prevalence of these COVID-19-related disorders and their associated factors remain unclear. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the prevalence rates of insomnia, PTSD, COVID-19-related self-stigma, and smartphone addiction, along with the identification of risk factors and protective factors for Taiwan frontline government workers with COVID-19 pandemic control duties. Methods: The survey was carried out with 151 participants between September and October 2021. All participants completed the Fear of COVID-19 Scale (assessing fear of COVID-19), Self-Stigma Scale (assessing self-stigma during the COVID-19 pandemic), Smartphone Application-Based Addiction Scale (assessing the risk of smartphone addiction), Insomnia Severity Index (assessing insomnia), Impacts of Event Scale-6 (assessing PTSD), and a self-designed set of questions assessing trait resilience. Results: The results showed that the prevalence rate was 31.1% for insomnia and 33.8% for PTSD. Furthermore, service duration (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 0.93; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.86, 0.999) and trait resilience (AOR = 0.19; 95% CI = 0.08, 0.46) were protective factors and fear of COVID-19 (AOR = 1.91; 95% CI = 1.02, 3.57) was a risk factor for insomnia. Fear of COVID-19 (AOR = 2.63; 95% CI = 1.35, 5.14), self-stigma (AOR = 3.62; 95% CI = 1.19, 11.02), and smartphone addiction (AOR = 1.09, 95% CI = 1.001, 1.19) were risk factors, and trait resilience was a protective factor (AOR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.29, 1.17) for PTSD. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated a high prevalence of insomnia and PTSD. Risk-reducing strategies and protective factor promotion strategies are recommended to help reduce the symptoms of insomnia and PTSD among Taiwan frontline government workers.

3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082300

ABSTRACT

Military personnel represent a frontline group exposed to multiple stressors. These factors have increased during the COVID-19 pandemic, predisposing to the development of suicidal risk (SR). Given the few studies conducted in this population, we evaluated the prevalence of SR and its associated factors during the health emergency. A cross-sectional survey study was conducted in person among 514 participants in Lambayeque, Peru in 2021. The outcome was SR, and the exposures were depression (PHQ-9), anxiety (GAD-7), PTSD (PCL-C), and other sociodemographic variables. The prevalence of SR was 14.0% (95% CI: 11.12-17.31%) and was significantly higher in people with a family history of mental health (PR: 2.16; 95% CI: 1.13-4.15) and in those with moderate clinical insomnia (PR: 2.21; 95% CI: 1.19-4.12). Military personnel with high resilience had a lower prevalence of SR (PR: 0.54, CI: 0.31-0.95). Anxiety was associated with a higher prevalence of SR (PR: 3.27; 95% CI: 1.76-6.10). Our findings show that at least 1 out of 10 military personnel are at risk of suicide. Special attention should be paid to the associated factors to develop interventions and reverse their consequences. These results may be useful in policy implementation and general statistics of SR in the local and regional context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Military Personnel , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Suicide , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Military Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2081973

ABSTRACT

Highly stressful situations, such as the current COVID-19 pandemic, induce constant changes in the mental state of people who experience them. In the present study, we analyzed the prevalence of some psychological symptoms and their determinants in four different categories of healthcare workers during the second year of the pandemic. A total of 265 physicians, 176 nurses, 184 other healthcare professionals, and 48 administrative employees, working in different Italian healthcare contexts, answered a questionnaire including variables about their mental status and experience with the pandemic. The mean scores for anxiety and depressive symptoms measured more than one year after the onset of the pandemic did not reach the pathological threshold. In contrast, post-traumatic and burnout symptoms tended toward the critical threshold, especially in physicians. The main determinant of psychological distress was perceived stress, followed by job satisfaction, the impact of COVID-19 on daily work, and a lack of recreational activities. These results increase the knowledge of which determinants of mental distress would be important to act on when particularly stressful conditions exist in the workplace that persist over time. If well-implemented, specific interventions focused on these determinants could lead to an improvement in employee well-being and in the quality of care provided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Prevalence , Health Personnel/psychology
5.
J Psychiatr Res ; 156: 349-360, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2076455

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 was primarily considered a pulmonary disease with extrapulmonary manifestations. As the pandemic spread, there has been growing evidence that the disease affects various organs/systems, including the central and peripheral nervous systems. Accumulation of clinical data demonstrates that in a large population of survivors impairments in the function of one or more organs may persist for a long time, a phenomenon commonly known as post COVID or long COVID. Fatigue and cognitive dysfunction, such as concentration problems, short-term memory deficits, general memory loss, a specific decline in attention, language and praxis abilities, encoding and verbal fluency, impairment of executive functions, and psychomotor coordination, are amongst the most common and debilitating features of neuropsychatric symptoms of post COVID syndrome. Several patients also suffer from compromised sleep, depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder. Patients with long COVID may demonstrate brain hypometabolism, hypoperfusion of the cerebral cortex and changes in the brain structure and functional connectivity. Children and adolescents represent a minority of COVID-19 cases, so not surprisingly data on the long-term sequelae after SARS-CoV-2 infections in these age groups are scarce. Although the pathogenesis, clinical characteristics, epidemiology, and risk factors of the acute phase of COVID-19 have been largely explained, these areas are yet to be explored in long COVID. This review aims to provide an update on what is currently known about long COVID effects on mental health.

6.
Int J Occup Med Environ Health ; 2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067272

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused unseen pressure on healthcare systems in many countries, jeopardizing the mental well-being of healthcare workers. The authors aimed to assess the mental well-being of Finnish healthcare workers from 2 hospital districts (Helsinki University Hospital [HUS] and Social and Health Services in Kymenlaakso [Kymsote]) with differing COVID-19 incidence rates during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in spring 2020. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total number of 996 healthcare workers (HUS N = 862, Kymsote N = 134) participated in this prospectively conducted survey study during summer 2020. Symptom criteria of self-reported mental health symptoms followed ICD-10 classification, excluding duration criteria. Participants were divided into symptom categories "often/sometimes", and "rarely/never". These groups were compared to sociodemographic factors and factors related to work, workload, and well-being. RESULTS: The degree of mental health symptoms did not differ between the 2 healthcare districts despite differing COVID-19 incidences (p = 1). The authors observed a significant relationship between self-reported diagnostic mental health symptoms and experiences of insufficient instructions for protection against COVID-19 (in HUS cohort p < 0.001), insufficient recovery from work (p < 0.001), and subjective increased workload (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The authors' results show the importance of well-planned and sufficient instructions for protection from SARS-CoV-2 for healthcare workers, indicating their need to feel safe and protected at work. The workload of healthcare workers should be carefully monitored to keep it moderate and ensure sufficient recovery. Sufficient control of the epidemic to keep the burden of the healthcare system low is vital for healthcare workers' well-being.

7.
Psych J ; 2022 Oct 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2059589

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic threatens health-care workers' (HCW) mental health and well-being. Although traumatic life events may result in psychiatric disorders, occasionally they give rise to positive changes, such as post-traumatic growth. Accordingly, the present study evaluated the traumatic stress, anxiety, and depression levels of HCWs and their post-traumatic growth levels during the pandemic. In addition, the study aimed to assess the changes in psychological outcomes during the pandemic. For this aim, the data were collected in two different periods. The first data-collection period was between May and July 2020, and the second period started in November 2020 and ended in January 2021. The sociodemographic data form, Impact of Events Scale-Revised (IES-R), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), and Post-traumatic Growth Inventory (PTGI) were used to collect data. Sixty-six HCWs participated in the study. No significant differences appeared between the baseline scores and 6-month follow-up in the depression, anxiety, and traumatic stress levels of HCWs. Furthermore, the PTGI scores decreased significantly over time. Although the change in the psychological distress scores was not statistically significant, the depression and post-traumatic stress scores increased over time. Previous research specified an inverse-parabolic relationship between traumatic stress and PTGI. Our results support previous research; as the exposure to the stressors continues, individual traumatic stress levels increase, psychiatric disorders become frequent, and affirmative changes (like post-traumatic growth) decline.

8.
International Journal of Caring Sciences ; 15(2):1202-1210, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2058285

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study was conducted to determine the relationship between traumatic stress symptoms and psychological resilience in nurses working during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: The sample of this descriptive and correlational study consisted of 202 nurses working in a state hospital in Turkey. The data were collected using the Personal Information Form, the Traumatic Stress Symptom Checklist and the Brief Resilience Scale. Results: Post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms were found in 14.9% of nurses, and comorbid depressive symptoms were found in 17.3%. A moderate negative correlation was found between the Brief Resilience Scale scores and post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms (r = -0.542;p = 0.000) and between the Brief Resilience Scale scores and comorbid depressive symptoms (r = -0.487;p = 0.000). In multiple regression analysis, perception of health, perception of psychological status and working hours of nurses were factors affecting post-traumatic stress symptoms (R = 0.242;R2 = 0.210;F = 7.691;p = 0.000) and comorbid depressive symptoms (R = 0.241;R2 = 0.210;F = 7.676;p = 0.000). Conclusion: There are post-traumatic stress and comorbid depressive symptoms in nurses working during the COVID-19 pandemic. Post-traumatic stress disorder and depressive symptoms increased as psychological resilience levels decreased.

9.
AANA Journal ; 90(5):359-365, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2058151

ABSTRACT

Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a common psychological condition identified in combat veterans and individuals who have experienced natural or manmade disasters or other traumatic experiences. PTSD is known to increase a patient's risk of emergence delirium after undergoing general anesthesia. While this is well known by certified registered nurse anesthetists in practice, particularly those in military hospitals, recommendations for anesthetic management of patients with PTSD is notably lacking. The aim of this article is to provide anesthesia considerations synthesized from available literature. At the conclusion of this article, the reader will be able to incorporate evidence-based practice guidelines to care for patients from the preoperative period through the postanesthesia care unit stay.

10.
BJPsych Bull ; 45(4): 256, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054002
11.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 532, 2022 08 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053880

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a mental illness that develops in some people after they have experienced a stunning, scary, or dangerous incident. Due to major disasters like as the Economic Crisis and the Beirut Blast, Lebanese people are struggling with a variety of mental health issues. The study objectives were to find the rate of PTSD and its association with stress, anxiety, depression, financial well-being and coping strategies among university students in Lebanon. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study, conducted between May and August 2021, which enrolled 419 university students from all districts of Lebanon. The PTSD Checklist-Specific Version (PCL-S) was used to evaluate manifestation of PSTD. RESULTS: The results showed that 132 (31.5%), 109 (26.0%) and 169 (40.3%) had PTSD from COVID, Beirut blast and economic crisis respectively. More avoidant coping (Beta = 0.52) and more anxiety (Beta = 0.62) were significantly associated with more PTSD from the Beirut Blast. More avoidant coping (Beta = 0.56), depression (Beta = 0.40) and anxiety (Beta = 0.49) were significantly associated with more PTSD from the economic crisis, whereas more financial wellbeing (Beta = - 0.31) was significantly associated with less PTSD from the economic crisis. CONCLUSION: Significant rates of PTSD were found in our sample of Lebanese university students, whether from the Beirut blast, or from the current economic crisis. Significant correlations of these PTSD rates were found with factors such as avoidant coping, depression, anxiety and financial wellbeing. Such findings must raise the attention to serious mental and psychosocial alteration endured by Lebanese youth that are still under fatal cumulative traumatic events, that were and even may be, intergenerationally and unintentionally transmissible, therefore, affecting not only the present, but also the future of a whole nation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adolescent , Cross-Sectional Studies , Economic Recession , Humans , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Students/psychology , Universities
12.
Clin Child Psychol Psychiatry ; : 13591045221131671, 2022 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053718

ABSTRACT

This article briefly describes the development of a novel narrative therapy-based photography workshop group for children following acute hospital admission for Paediatric Inflammatory Multisystem Syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS). The workshop was a collaboration between the psychology team, an artist and the medical multi-disciplinary team (MDT) to develop a group during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aims were to reduce isolation and promote resilience and psychological recovery post discharge from hospital. Nine children aged 8-11 years joined the photography group. Parents (n = 8) and children (n = 8) provided feedback on the group through semi-structured telephone interviews. Thematic analysis of the interviews identified three narrative themes for parents: reducing isolation through shared experience, creative activity as a different experience of hospital, and the positive sharing of experiences after the day. The resulting narrative themes for the children included that the workshop was a fun and interactive day and an opportunity to share in hospital experience with peers.

13.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; : 103313, 2022 Aug 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2049263

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the impact of the second surge of the COVID-19 pandemic (October 2020 to June 2021) on mental well-being of intensive care unit nurses and factors associated with mental health outcomes. METHODS: An online survey was available for Dutch intensive care unit nurses in October 2021, measuring mental health symptoms; anxiety, depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and post-traumatic stress disorder (Impact of Event Scale-6). Additionally, work-related fatigue was measured using the Need For Recovery-11 questionnaire. Previous data from the first surge (March until June 2020) were used to study mental well-being longitudinally in a subgroup of intensive care unit nurses. Logistic regression analyses were performed to determine factors associated with mental health symptoms. RESULTS: In total, 589 nurses (mean age 44.8 [SD, 11.9], 430 [73.8 %] females) participated, of whom 164 also completed the questionnaire in 2020. After the second surge, 225/589 (38.2 %) nurses experienced one or more mental health symptoms and 294/589 (49.9 %) experienced work-related fatigue. Compared to the first measurement, the occurrence of mental health symptoms remained high (55/164 [33.5 %] vs 63/164 [38.4 %], p = 0.36) and work-related fatigue was significantly higher (66/164 [40.2 %] vs 83/164 [50.6 %], p = 0.02). Granted holidays as requested (aOR, 0.54; 95 % CI, 0.37-0.79), being more confident about the future (aOR, 0.59; 95 % CI, 0.37-0.93) and a better perceived work-life balance (aOR, 0.42; 95 % CI, 0.27-0.65) were significantly associated with less symptoms. CONCLUSION: The second surge of the COVID-19 pandemic further drained the mental reserves of intensive care unit nurses, resulting in more work-related fatigue.

14.
The Yale Journal of Biology and Medicine ; 95(1):1-2, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2046496

ABSTRACT

[...]in addition to the direct biological consequences of SARS-CoV2 infection on the brain, chronic stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic impacts similar neuronal signaling pathways in the CNS and PNS that hamper normal physiological function. Davis et al. examine how increased reactive oxygen species in the embryonic brain generated due to prenatal stress affect the morphology and activity of neuronal cells during development and in mature brains. Available from:https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/stress/2020/report-october World Health Organization. .2013..Who releases guidance on mental health care after trauma..

15.
American Journal of Public Health ; 112:S262-S264, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045679

ABSTRACT

Public health nurses have served valiantly on the front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic for the past two years, saving lives through contact tracing, educating people about selfisolation and quarantining, vaccinating communities, and interpreting for their communities vacillating guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). "Underfunding limits the ability of school and public health nurses to extend health care services and create a bridge between health care and community health," the report notes6(p176) The Biden administration has taken an important step in committing significant resources to buttress the public health nursing workforce.8 Similarly, the report calls on the government to rapidly increase the number of public and community health nurses. In addition to the infusion of federal funds to support public health nursing, the report calls on federal, tribal, state, local, and private payers and public health agencies to explicitly value nurses' contributions to care by reforming payment systems to pay for services that address the social determinants of health and advance health equity.

16.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(10)2022 Sep 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043674

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Several instruments are currently used to assess Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) -induced psychological distress, including the 22-item Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). The IES-R is a self-administered scale used to assess post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The current study aimed to examine the construct validity of the IES-R, based on the Rasch model, with COVID-19-related data, as well as to test the multilevel construct validity of the IES-R within and among countries during the pandemic crisis. METHODS: A multi-country web-based cross-sectional survey was conducted utilizing the 22-item IES-R. A total of 1020 participants enrolled in our survey, of whom 999 were included in the analyses. Data were analyzed using Rasch modeling and multilevel confirmatory factor analysis (MCFA). RESULTS: The Rasch modeling results of the IES-R demonstrated that the IES-R is a satisfactory instrument with the five-point Likert scale, asserting that its 22 items are significant contributors to assessing PTSD as a unidimensional construct covered by the items of the IES-R. The MCFA confirmed that the 22-item IES-R, with its three factors, including intrusion, avoidance, and hyperarousal, demonstrates adequate construct validity at the within- and among-country levels. However, the results of the Akaike information criterion (AIC) model determined that the 16-item IES-R is better than the 22-item IES-R. CONCLUSION: The results suggested that the 22-item IES-R is a reliable screening instrument for measuring PTSD related to the COVID-19 pandemic, and can be utilized to provide timely psychological health support, when needed, based on the screening results.

17.
J Affect Disord ; 319: 638-645, 2022 Dec 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041886

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is considered as a prevalent outcome of the COVID-19 pandemic. This study aimed to present a global picture of the prevalence of PTSD in high-risk groups for COVID-19 (HRGs-COVID19) and determine its risk factors. METHODS: Cross-sectional studies published between March 11, 2020, and October 11, 2021, in English, were searched in seven databases on the prevalence of PTSD in HRGs-COVID19. After screening the retrieved records, their quality was assessed, and the required data were extracted. R-4.1.3 software and random effect model with 95 % confidence interval (CI) were used to synthesize and analyze the data. RESULTS: The pooled prevalence of PTSD in HRGs-COVID19 was 30 % (95 % CI: 21-39 %). The pooled prevalence of PTSD was significantly different in terms of the variables of data collection during the lockdown, gender, and data collection season (P < 0.05). Subgroup analyses could not identify sources of heterogeneity. LIMITATIONS: The included studies did not cover all HRGs-COVID19 such as smokers and the elderly. CONCLUSION: Considering the higher pooled prevalence of PTSD in HRGs-COVID19 than the general population, COVID-19 patients, and health care workers, prioritizing this subgroup for prevention and treatment of psychological outcomes is highly recommended. Predicting and implementing psychological interventions early in the pandemic is more critical when applying restrictive measures and among HRGs-COVID19 women.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Humans , Female , Aged , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Communicable Disease Control , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , Prevalence
18.
Aten Primaria ; 54(10): 102460, 2022 10.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2035767

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of post-COVID-19 patients in primary care. DESIGN: Cross-sectional, multicenter, random probability sampling study. LOCATION: Primary care centers in Ica-Peru. PARTICIPANTS: Six hundred and thirty-six patients with previous diagnosis of COVID-19. MAIN MEASURES: The variable PTSD symptoms was measured with the COVID-19-PTSD questionnaire and HRQOL with the EuroQol scale (EQ-5D). Sociodemographic and health factors including post-COVID-19 syndrome were analyzed. A descriptive analysis was performed and crude and adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) were calculated using generalized linear models of the Poisson family to search for associations between variables. RESULTS: Of the participants, 21.4% presented symptoms of PTSD; 33.6% symptoms of dysphoric and anxious arousal; 22.3% intrusion, avoidance and negative affect; 22.6% anhedonia; and 23.6% externalizing behavior. 50.3% revealed at least one component of HRQoL affected; 35.5% problems linked to anxiety/depression; 34.9% pain/discomfort; 11% daily activity; 10.7% mobility and 6.6% self-care. The presence of PTSD symptoms was associated with the HRQoL affected (PR=2.46: 95% CI: 2.19-2.78). Also, certain sociodemographic and health variables were associated with PTSD symptoms and affected HRQoL. CONCLUSIONS: PTSD symptoms, increase the probability of affecting the patient's HRQoL post COVID-19. There are potentially modifiable sociodemographic and health variables that could decrease PTSD symptoms and improve HRQoL.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Primary Health Care , Quality of Life , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
19.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 10(9)2022 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032903

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to examine the prevalence and risk factors of depression among patients with rheumatic diseases (RDs) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. This study adopted a cross-sectional design, and 160 outpatients with RDs in one university hospital in South Korea were sampled using the convenience sampling method. Data were collected from May to July 2021 using a structured questionnaire. The risk factors of depression were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analyses. The prevalence rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), insomnia, and depression were 37.5%, 20.0%, and 24.4%, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses confirmed that employment status, monthly income, perceived health, PTSD, and insomnia were significant risk factors of depression. The findings highlight the urgent need to assist patients with RDs who are at risk of depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, especially individuals who are unemployed or have low incomes and poor perceived health, individuals with high PTSD, and individuals with severe insomnia. There is a need to provide disease-specific interventions to effectively alleviate depression among these individuals during the COVID-19 pandemic.

20.
Psychiatriki ; 2022 Aug 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2026240

ABSTRACT

Given the aggravation on the general population's quality of life due to covid-19 and the vulnerability of People Who Use Drugs (PWUD) to acute stress, the aim of the current study was to better comprehend the impact of covid-19 on quality of life and mental health of PWUD as well as their drug use patterns. Another study had been conducted prior to the covid-19 outbreak, which assessed quality of life, indicative PTSD symptoms, and drug use patterns of people who were attending an Opioid Substitution Treatment (OST), in Athens, Greece. As a continuation of the aforementioned study, the same variables were assessed in May and June 2020, after the first lockdown measures. 104 patients agreed to participate. The World Health Organization Quality of Life Questionnaire (WHOQOL) and the Post-Traumatic Stress Scale (PCL-C) were used as well as toxicology tests. The only statistically significant outcome was a reduction regarding the dimension referring to the relationship between the individual and their environment. People with low quality of life were found to experience more severe Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) symptoms after lockdown comparing to those with high quality of life. There was also a statistically non-significant increase in PTSD scores before and after lockdown measures. Regarding drug use patterns, the present research reveals an overall decline in drug use during quarantine. There was a statistically significant decrease in opioid (22.3%) and in benzodiazepine (35%) use after lockdown. Also, a statistically significant increase in mean scores of indicative PTSD symptoms of people who decreased opioid use during and after lockdown measures was found. In regards to amphetamine use, research findings underline a non-significant increase in use (8.7%). The pandemic's impact on the life of people on opioid substitution treatment should be taken into consideration and further studies need to be conducted in order to protect this populations' quality of life and maximize the potential benefits such as reduced access to illicit substances.

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