Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 330
Filter
1.
Journal of Policy & Practice in Intellectual Disabilities ; : 1, 2023.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2192926

ABSTRACT

It is increasingly recognised that many people with intellectual disabilities suffer from post‐traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Eye‐movement desensitisation and reprocessing (EMDR) has been proposed as a potentially helpful intervention that is less reliant on verbal skills than other effective treatments for PTSD and therefore could be more effective than verbal interventions for people with intellectual disabilities. The Trauma‐AID project is a randomised clinical trial (RCT) evaluating the effectiveness of a bespoke EMDR protocol for adults with intellectual disability and PTSD, which incorporates a prolonged phase of Psycho‐Education and Stabilisation (PES) prior to the trauma confrontation phase of EMDR. The COVID‐19 pandemic struck during the feasibility phase of the Trauma‐AID project, necessitating a second feasibility study to evaluate the acceptability and feasibility of remote or hybrid delivery of the PES + EMDR protocol. To this end, we conducted two online surveys of therapists followed by interviews with clients, carers and senior therapists. The surveys were analysed descriptively. Content analysis was used for client and carer interviews, and framework analysis for therapist interviews. All stakeholders reported positive experiences of EMDR;however, some challenges were identified. The majority of clients, carers and therapists interviewed reported that the intervention, whether PES alone or the full PES‐EMDR package, had improved symptoms of PTSD and psychological well‐being, and carers also reported decreases in challenging behaviour. A full account of the data is provided in four Supplementary Digital files. PES‐EMDR therapy appears both feasible and acceptable for clients with intellectual disabilities and therapists, whether delivered face‐to‐face or in a remote or hybrid mode, though remote working appears easier for the PES phase than the EMDR phase of the intervention. [ FROM AUTHOR]

2.
Neuropsychopharmacology ; 47(Supplement 1):161-162, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2185749

ABSTRACT

Background: Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and alcohol use disorder (AUD) commonly co-occur. This comorbidity is associated with worse symptom severity and treatment outcomes for each disorder. Black/African American (B/AA) individuals are more likely than other racial groups to be exposed to traumatic events, experience more severe symptoms of PTSD, and face worse consequences from alcohol consumption. Because they have been historically excluded from treatment trials, treatments for PTSD and AUD that are effective for B/AA individuals are sorely needed. The anticonvulsant pregabalin, via its affinity for the alpha-2-delta auxiliary site of voltage gated calcium channels, may help restore balance to the dysregulated glutamate and GABA systems that appear to similarly underlie both PTSD and AUD. Pregabalin has shown preliminary efficacy in treating AUD, generalized anxiety disorder, and PTSD. The goal of this randomized, controlled trial was to test whether pregabalin, vs. placebo, reduces alcohol consumption and improves PTSD symptoms in B/AA individuals with co-occurring PTSD and AUD. Additionally, a personalized medicine approach was employed to examine whether variation of SLC6A1, i.e. the gene encoding the GABA transporter GAT-1, affected response to pregabalin. There is evidence that GAT-1 is downregulated in AUD and upregulated by pregabalin administration. In B/AA, variants at the SLC6A1 gene promoter region insertion (i.e., non-insertion/ insertion or insertion/insertion (NI/I or I/I) compared with those of Non-insertion/Non-insertion (NI/NI) type have significantly higher levels of GAT-1 promoter activity Methods: This study (NCT02884908) was a double-blind, placebo-controlled, and prospectively genotyped 12-week clinical trial to test the efficacy of pregabalin vs. placebo in reducing both alcohol consumption and PTSD symptoms. Participants were randomized to receive pregabalin 450 mg/day or placebo for 12 weeks in a 1:1 scheme with each medication group also stratified by SLC6A1 genotype (NI/I/II vs. NI/NI). Because of a low allelic frequency, individuals with the double copy insertion were combined into one group with those with the single copy (i.e., NI/ I/II). At each of the 12 weekly visits, participants received standardized, guided interviews to enhance medication compliance and completed measures to assess alcohol consumption and PTSD symptoms. Primary outcomes were number of heavy drinking days (HDD) assessed by Timeline Followback Interview (TLFB) and severity of PTSD cluster B and E symptoms assessed by the PTSD Symptom Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Secondary outcomes were number of days abstinent and drinks per drinking day assessed by TLFB and PTSD total symptom severity as assessed by the PCL-5 and Clinician-Administered PTSD Scale for DSM-5 (CAPS-5). The study was actively recruiting from 07/2017 to 11/2021 with enrollment ceased for roughly one year (03/2020 - 02/2021) due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Power analyses indicated a need to enroll n = 307 and randomize n = 203 in order to detect a medium sized medication effect. In actuality, this study enrolled n = 149 and randomized n = 54 B/AA participants. A modified intent to treat analysis was performed which included n = 44 B/AA individuals who received at least one dose of medication (n = 26 pregabalin;n = 18 placebo). Repeated measures mixed effects models, adjusted for a pre-baseline assessment of the respective PTSD or drinking outcome, were used to compare change over the twelve weekly assessments between the two medication conditions. To test whether medication response differed by genotype, models were rerun with SLC6A1 genotype added as a main effect and interaction term. Result(s): Participants reported a significant reduction in alcohol use (HDD, days abstinent, and drinks per drinking day) and PTSD symptoms (B and E clusters and total PTSD symptom severity) over the 12-week trial. However, there was no difference between medication condition nor was there a pharmacogenetic effect on any of the primary or secondary outcome . Conclusion(s): Pregabalin did not reduce alcohol use or improve PTSD symptoms in B/AA individuals with comorbid AUD and PTSD, and genetic variation in GAT-1 activity was not associated with treatment outcomes or medication efficacy. However, this study was severely underpowered, and these results, particularly the pharmacogenetic findings, should be viewed with caution given the small sample size. Further studies are needed to identify novel and targeted pharmacological treatments for B/AA with AUD and/or PTSD.

3.
Current Psychology ; 2023.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2175058

ABSTRACT

Almost one year since the COVID-19 was declared a global pandemic, mental distress remains elevated with high prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Yet studies suggest these challenging circumstances might be conducive of post-traumatic growth (PTG). This study aims to investigate the factors associated with growth after the original trauma. A sample of 252 Lebanese adults filled an online survey to determine levels of PTG, PTSD and gratitude using validated self-rating scales. Participants also subjectively evaluated the sources of their distress such as the COVID-19 pandemic, the Beirut port explosion and/or their deteriorating financials. The PTGi-SF evaluated dimensions of growth while the IES-R_22 measured the degree of distress post-trauma. The GQ-6 was used to measure the proneness to experience gratitude daily. Results indicated 41% of participants scored above the cutoff for PTSD symptomatology. Yet, PTSD was positively correlated, alongside gratitude and accumulated subjective distress, with higher levels of PTG. A forward linear regression taking PTG scores as the dependent variable further showed that more gratitude (Beta = 0.57), a higher impact of events (Beta = 0.16), and knowing anyone who died from COVID-19 (Beta = 3.93) were significantly associated with more growth. The study highlights elevated levels of PTSD symptoms in a context of a global pandemic worsened by financial and socio-political instabilities. It mostly identifies personal factors, including high initial symptomatology post-trauma and gratitude, related to the capacity for growth in spite of these accumulating hardships. As such, it advocates the need to investigate and bolster silver linings amidst unprecedented traumas. © 2022, The Author(s), under exclusive licence to Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature.

4.
Annali dell'Istituto Superiore di Sanita ; 58(3):154-161, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2169404

ABSTRACT

Background. The whole hospital system was stressed and at risk in the first phase of the pandemic. This study examined the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in all hospital staff, medical and non-medical, within two months of the pandemic declaration. Survey concerned staff 4510 health workers of Italian Highly Specialized Research Hospitals. Method. Subjects were asked to complete an on-line self-reported questionnaire, the PTSD Checklist 5 (PCL-5) and subjective perception of safety related to personal protective equipment (PPE). Results. The sample included staff working in hospitals with or without COVID-19 patient admissions. Overall, 11.56% of the hospitals staff met the symptoms criteria for probable PTSD. The sample included 80.63% (3467) medical staff workers and 19.37% (833) non-medical staff workers. The 31.91% of participants worked in COVID-19 hospitals/wards. The prevalence of positive screening for PTSD symptoms in medical staff was 12.42% (426) and in non-medical staff, 8.59% (70). Among medical staff, anesthesiologists had a significant prevalence of PTSD (22.35%), followed by health care assistants/technicians (15.38%) and physicians (10.11%). Among non-medical staff, personnel involved in cleaning, catering, maintenance, security, and transportation, the symptoms of PTSD reached a rate of 12.24% and in administrative staff 8.47%. Risk factors associated with PTSD included working as an anesthesiologist, perceiving PPE as inadequate, and working in COVID-19 hospitals/wards. Conclusions. In the present study, as in other studies, the prevalence of PTSD symptoms among hospital workers was significatively higher than the lifetime prevalence of PTSD in the general population, showing the pandemic's incredible impact.

5.
The Journal of Hospital Ethics ; 8(2):61-63, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2168067

ABSTRACT

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI/ nami.org) Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) may be a seriously underdiagnosed mental illness. Given it appears we might be living with periods of calm interrupted by periods of sharply rising COVID infection rates, disseminating these good strategies is sure to be helpful to others. [...]this work helps assure that when others face this problem, whether COVID related or no, they have an ethically sound model to emulate, avoiding having to start from scratch. Since the pandemic, many hospitals and hospital systems have designed plans to one degree of completeness or another.

6.
Avicenna Journal of Nursing and Midwifery Care ; 29(4):340-348, 2021.
Article in Persian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2205699

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Due to the growing prevalence of COVID-19 in the world and the increasing workload of health care providers, health workers face many problems such as long working hours, being away from family, and worrying about themselves and their families, which can affect their health and consequently challenge their job performance. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) following the COVID-19 epidemic in health workers of Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Iran. Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 228 Shahroud University of Medical Sciences health workers were studied from July 22 to August 22, 2020. Participants included nursing, medical, radiology, and laboratory personnel. The Demographic Information Questionnaire and PTSD Checklist - Civilian version (PCL-C) was completed online. Descriptive statistics and the multivariate linear regression model were used to analyze the data. Results: Based on the results, 85.5% of people were experienced PTSD. The regression determination coefficient (R2) was 15.1, so that men experienced 4.88 units of lower posttraumatic stress than women. People whose relatives died of COVID-19 experienced 7/04 unit higher PTSD than others. Conclusion: Given that a significant proportion of health workers experienced PTSD, senior treatment center managers must include more supportive measures to reduce PTSD in their work schedule. © 2021 by the Author(s).

7.
Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar ; 14:110-120, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2204689

ABSTRACT

Bu araştirmanin amaci yeni koronavirüs hastaliǧini (Covid-19) yenmiş bireylerde travma sonrasi büyümede travma sonrasi stres belirtileri, psikolojik saǧlamlik ve umudun rolünü incelemektir. Araştirmanin çalişma grubunu yaşlari 18 ve 72 arasinda deǧişmekte olan 454 katilimci oluşturmuştur. Katilimcilarin ortalama yaşi 32.91, standart sapmasi 11.18 olarak bulunmuştur. Katilimcilar demografik bilgi formunu, Travma Sonrasi Büyüme Envanterini, Sürekli Umut Ölçeǧini, Travma Sonrasi Stres Tani Ölçeǧini ve Yetişkinler için Psikolojik Dayaniklilik Ölçeǧini cevaplamiştir. Araştirma sonucunda cinsiyete göre kadinlarin travma sonrasi büyüme düzeylerinin erkeklerin travma sonrasi büyüme düzeylerinden anlamli bir şekilde yüksek olduǧu bulunmuştur. Hastaliǧi geçirme düzeyine göre hastaliǧi aǧir atlatanlarin travma sonrasi büyüme düzeyleri hastaliǧi hafif ve orta atlatanlarin travma sonrasi büyüme düzeylerinden daha yüksek olduǧu sonucuna ulaşilmiştir. Hastaliktan iyileşme süresine göre ise hastaliǧi uzun sürede atlatanlarin travma sonrasi büyüme düzeyleri kisa sürede atlatanlarin travma sonrasi büyüme düzeylerinden daha yüksek olduǧu belirlenmiştir. Son olarak araştirma sonuçlari travma sonrasi stres belirtileri, psikolojik saǧlamlik ve umut deǧişkenlerinin travma sonrasi büyümenin olumlu yönde ve anlamli bir yordayicisi olduǧunu göstermiştir. Salgin hastalik döneminde ruh saǧliǧi uzmanlari ve saǧlik çalişanlari tarafindan yapilacak olan travma sonrasi stres belirtileri, psikolojik saǧlamlik ve umut odakli psikososyal müdahaleler insanlarin bilinmeyen bir hastaliǧa dayanmalarina ve bu hastaliǧin hayatlarinda oluşturduǧu travmayla başa çikmalarina yardimci olarak travma sonrasi büyüme düzeylerini artirmaya olanak saǧlayabilir.Alternate :The aim of this research is to examine the role of post-traumatic stress symptoms, resilience and hope in post-traumatic growth in individuals who have overcome the novel coronavirus disease (Covid-19). The study group of the research consisted of 454 participants aged between 18 and 72. The mean age of the participants was 32.91, and the standard deviation was 11.18. Participants answered the demographic information form, Post Traumatic Growth Inventory, Trait Hope Scale, Post Traumatic Stress Diagnostic Scale, and Adult Resilience Scale. The results showed that posttraumatic growth levels of women were significantly higher than men's posttraumatic growth levels. Moreover the posttraumatic growth levels of those who had the disease severely were higher than the post-traumatic growth levels of those who had the disease mildly and moderately. According to the recovery time from the disease, the post-traumatic growth levels of those who had the disease for a long time were found to be higher than the post-traumatic growth levels of those who had the disease in a short time. Post-traumatic stress symptoms, resilience and hope were found to be positive and significant predictors of post-traumatic growth. Post-traumatic stress symptoms, psychological resilience and hope-focused psychosocial interventions by mental health professionals and healthcare professionals during the epidemic may help people to endure an unknown disease and cope with the trauma that this disease has created in their lives, thus increasing their post-traumatic growth levels.

8.
BRAIN: Broad Research in Artificial Intelligence & Neuroscience ; 13(4):227-241, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2204632

ABSTRACT

The article reflects theoretical, methodological and methodical bases of psychological aid to victims of unexpected crisis-military situations on the background of coronovirus pandemics spreading. The essence of psychological self-help as a factor of stress-resistance and internal psychological potential of resisting psychological traumas in the conditions of war and viral pandemics with the propositions of effective methodological means of its conducting is revealed. In providing psychological aid, the cognitive-behavioral approach was deemed effective as the basic one, and it was suggested that integrative psychotherapeutic and comprehensive psychological approaches to crisis counseling in conditions of military conflict be applied, depending on the specifics of survivors' experience of acute emotional reactions and the complexity of the course of posttraumatic stress disorders of resistance to the action of a psychotraumatic factor. Neuropsychological correction deserves special attention in providing psychological aid in conditions of military conflict and pandemics, which allows a combination of an integrated bodyoriented psychological approach with neuro-psycho-correctional techniques and psychotherapeutic methods for effective restoration of the tone of the nervous system and stabilization of the psycho-emotional state. The main provisions of practical psychology that in conditions of war and pandemic COVID-19 the adaptive potential of psychological health of each person and psychological self-help is love, faith and hope. Psychological recommendations of educational character for the formation of basic skills to ensure psychological health in conditions of war and pandemic COVID-19 have been developed. [ FROM AUTHOR]

9.
Journal of the Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing ; 29(4):484-494, 2022.
Article in Korean | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2203245

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze the influence of risk for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD risk), social stigma, and social support on the quality of life of COVID-19 survivors. Methods: Data were collected from 180 survivors who were discharged from hospital for COVID-19 from September 1 to December 31, 2021. Structured questionnaires were used to assess variables. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS/WIN 27.0, with independent t-test, one way analysis of variance, Pearson's correlation, and hierarchial multiple regression. Results: Subjects' quality of life was correlated with PTSD risk (r=-.52, p<.001), social stigma (r=-.16, p=.029), and social support (r=.26, p=.001). The Factors influencing the quality of life were gender (β=.26, p=.001), occupation (β=-.24, p=.001), PTSD risk (β=-.48, p<.001), social support (β=.19, p=.004), and explanatory power were approximately 37% (F=14.03, p<.001). Conclusion: This study found that PTSD risk in COVID-19 survivors lowered their quality of life, and social support increased their quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to develop various intervention programs to improve the quality of life of COVID-19 survivors by reducing PTSD risk and provide a social support system. © 2022 Korean Academy of Fundamentals of Nursing.

10.
Non-conventional in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2157945

ABSTRACT

This book underlines how COVID-19 is a multisystem inflammatory disease and how its pathophysiology can predispose to an increased risk of neurological issues. Several scientific pieces of evidence showes the mechanisms underlying the neuroinvasive capacity of the SARS-CoV-2 through direct viral damage and indirect processes entering the CNS by different routes including the vasculature, the olfactory and trigeminal nerves, the cerebrospinal fluid, and the lymphatic system inducing a direct neurotoxicity. Furthermore, the pro-inflammatory cytokine storm and oxidative stress can induce microglial activation and damage to the blood-brain barrier, culminating in widespread neuroinflammatory process. This acute neurotoxicity is clinically expressed as anosmia and ageusia, headache, nausea and vomiting, but other neurologic manifestations such as acute cerebrovascular diseases, consciousness impairment due to encephalitis, and meningitis are also described. The PNS can also be affected by infectious damage and clinical manifestations including Guillain-Barre syndrome, polyneuritis cranialis, and Miller Fisher Syndrome. A special issue concerns the neurocognitive dysfunction and altered consciousness manifested as delirium, agitation and confusion. Non-specific symptoms such as dizziness, seizures can accompany clinical pictures. Regardless of the admission diagnosis, a high percentage of patients discharged from ICUs develop disabilities affecting physical, cognitive and psychological activities. The symptoms such as asthenia, memory disturbances, depression, sleep disturbances, anxiety, and Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), configure the so-called Post-intensive Care Syndrome (PICS). Multimodal management during the ICU stay and implementation of follow-up programs at patient discharge can reduce the incidence of this syndrome, improving the quality of life of surviving patients. In this complex scenario, a careful clinical approach through reliable diagnostic tools, and epidemiological studies aimed at evaluating the dimensions of the problem also in economic terms, is urgently needed. This book represents a valuable aid for all those healthcare professionals (intensivists, neurologist and psychiatrists, as well) involved in the management of these critically ill patients. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

11.
TPM: Testing, Psychometrics, Methodology in Applied Psychology ; 29(4):495-507, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2155631

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic poses a significant threat to health workers (HW) in terms of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and disorder (PTSD). Over the years, alternative PTSD structures have been proposed (DSM-5, Dysphoria, Dysphoric Arousal, Anhedonia, Externalizing Behaviors, Hybrid) and tested. To date, no studies have addressed this issue focusing on HW during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study investigated the fit of alternative PTSD structures in two Italian samples: HW during the COVID-19 pandemic, and university students in a pre-pandemic context. A total of 580 HW and 451 students completed the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5) assessing PTSS. Confirmatory factor analysis investigated the best PTSD structure in each sample;measurement invariance was also inspected. The Anhedonia structure performed best in both samples;this model showed configural, metric, variances and covariances invariance. Results pave the way to the use of the PCL-5 to tailor intervention supporting HW during the pandemic. [ FROM AUTHOR]

12.
Middle East Current Psychiatry ; 29(1), 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2153739

ABSTRACT

[...]the authors of the current meta-analysis have correctly pointed out that children and adolescents may be more reliable as informants of self-experience compared to parents or others. The present and past pandemic disasters have demonstrated that socioeconomic and environmental impacts of large-scale infection outbreaks and subsequent medical and public health responses may produce a stressful state of mental health that families and children find traumatic. [...]prompt identification of early pointers to psychological distress and provision of mental health services and clinical interventions to help remediate their symptoms need prioritization. The impact of the initial COVID-19 outbreak on young adults’ mental health: a longitudinal study of risk and resilience factors.

13.
Biomedical Reports ; 18(1) (no pagination), 2023.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2163770

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) started spreading at the end of 2019 and despite the immediate actions of various governments with strict control, more and more individuals became infected daily. Due to the uncertainty and insecurity that still exists around this pandemic, there is an acute need for information and knowledge of what severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection entails. Respiratory and other physical symptoms received most of the medical attention, however, infected patients were also at risk for developing psychiatric and mental health disorders, such as depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances. Available research reports a so-called 'post-COVID-19 syndrome', which refers to new and/or persistent signs and symptoms for over 12 weeks, following SARS. The aim of the present review was to provide a general overview of the psychiatric symptoms developed during SARS-CoV-2 infection and their long-term outcome, highlighting that, through follow-up with surviving patients it was revealed that some of the psychiatric symptoms of COVID-19 persisted for a long time after discharge and were also associated with negative effects on global functioning and lower quality of life. Copyright © 2023, Spandidos Publications. All rights reserved.

14.
Iranian Journal of Psychiatry ; 17(4):436-445, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2145799

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study aimed to determine the level of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among nurses and its relationship with occupational burnout. Method(s): This online cross-sectional survey was conducted from late November to early January 2020 in six hospitals in Iran. 309 frontline nurses in COVID-19 wards were selected via stratified random sampling and asked to complete a sociodemographic questionnaire, the Impact of Event Scale-revised version (IES-R), and the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) in an anonymous online survey. Data management and analysis were performed in SPSS 25.0 using descriptive and inferential statistics, including Pearson's correlation coefficient, independent samples t-test, ANOVA, and linear regression. Result(s): The majority of the participants were women (81.6%) with a mean +/- SD age of 31.56 +/- 6.42 years. The mean +/- SD of the total PTSD score was 39.2 +/- 16.44 years, indicating severe PTSD among nurses. The mean +/- SD of the total occupational burnout score was 82.77 +/- 19.38, expressing moderate burnout. The findings also demonstrated a significant moderate correlation between PTSD and occupational burnout (r = 0.363, P < 0.001). Univariate analysis revealed a significant relationship of occupational burnout with PTSD, work experience, number of night shifts per month, and employment status (P < 0.05). However, in multivariate analysis, only PTSD had a positive and significant relationship with occupational burnout (P < 0.001;R2 = 160;beta = 0.339) and was a predicting factor for it. Conclusion(s): We found that both PTSD and burnout are common among nurses. Given the role of PTSD especially as a predictor of burnout and the significant impact of these disorders on occupational and non-occupational activities, immediate and appropriate measures are necessary to monitor and reduce their effects on the nurses who are at the forefront of fighting the pandemic. Copyright © 2022 Tehran University of Medical Sciences. All rights reserved.

15.
Istanbul Medical Journal ; 23(4):310-315, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2144345

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) associated pneumonia that emerged in Wuhan, China in December 2019 and was later declared by the World Health Organization to be a pandemic has called coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). Our study aims to determine the anxiety levels, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms levels and psychiatric symptoms of healthcare workers working at pandemic hospital and effects of these symptoms on psychological adjustment to healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey. Methods: This study was cross-sectional survey study and conducted between March 2020-June 2020 with 973 consenting participants working at the pandemic hospital. For the study, we used an online questionnaire, which consisted of three parts: an online-informed consent, basic sociodemographic information and a set of online questions. The data were collected by the researchers. All procedures were approved by our hospital's Ethics Committee. Traumatic Stress Symptom Scale (TSSS) was used for the study. Results: Nine hundred and seventy-three persons participated in the study. Among the three groups, nurses also had the highest fear of dying during the COVID-19 pandemic (p<0.001);the highest feelings of hopelessness about the future during the COVID-19 pandemic (p<0.001);the highest increase in level of anxiety (p<0.001), and the highest experience of recent sleep disturbances (p<0.001). Women had a statistically significantly higher mean TSSS score and mean TSSS score of participants with doctors or medical specialization was lower than participants with other levels of education (p<0.001). Conclusion: Although the rate of PTSD was significantly higher in nurses in our study, PTSD was also seen in the other two groups. Indeed, it was much higher in people working in environments at high risk for COVID-19 than in the other groups. This may be the consequence of nurses' having greater exposure to COVID19-infected patients. This situation may be related to long working hours, inadequate rest and burnout. We recommend that healthcare workers work in the shift. [ FROM AUTHOR]

16.
Frontiers in Virtual Reality ; 3, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2142373

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Among the different psychological sequelae of post-COVID syndrome are symptoms related to emotional impairment, mostly depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Objective: To describe and compare the prevalence and severity of PTSD, anxiety, depression, and fear of COVID-19 in survivors 3 months after discharge from the hospital. Methods: A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted, a total of 227 survivors of COVID-19 participated;they were assessed 3 months after being discharged from the hospital. A psychological evaluation focused on anxiety, depression, PTSD, and fear was conducted. Statistical analysis through the t-test for independent samples was performed. Results: Of the patients, 64.5% were men, 60.9% required invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) during hospitalization, and the average age was about 48.23 ± 14.33 years. Also, 40% showed symptoms associated with PTSD, 38.4% exhibited anxiety, 36.6% depression, and 36.12% exhibited fear of COVID-19. There were statistically significant differences between men and women, in PTSD (t = -3.414, df = 224, p = 0.001, x̅m = 5.10, x̅w = 6.32), depression (t = -4.680, df = 225, p = 0.000, x̅m = 3.64, x̅w = 7.18), anxiety (t = -3.427, df = 152.53, p = 0.001, x̅m = 3.78, x̅w = 6.20), and fear of COVID-19 (t = -3.400, df = 224, p = 0.001, x̅m = 11.88, x̅w = 15.19). Furthermore, there were also statistically significant differences between the type of treatment during hospitalization (IMV vs. without IMV), in PTSD (t = 2.482, df = 223, p = 0.014, x̅IMV = 5.21, x̅WIMV = 6.08) and anxiety (t = -2.006, df = 223, p = 0.046, x̅IMV = 4.05, x̅WIMV = 5.44). Conclusion: Survivors of COVID-19 experience a high prevalence of PTSD, anxiety, depression, and fear, even 3 months after discharge from the hospital. Females and patients who did not require IMV during hospitalization are the most affected population, presenting more severe symptoms of these psychological alterations. More research is required to know and observe the long-term evolution of these psychological alterations in this population. Copyright © 2022 Luna-Rodríguez, Peláez-Hernández, Orea-Tejeda, Ledesma-Ruíz, Casarín-López, Rosas-Trujillo, Domínguez-Trejo and Tepepa-Flores.

18.
Global Mental Health ; 9:508-520, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2121465

ABSTRACT

Background. Yazidis in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq have been exposed to recurrent traumatic experiences associated with genocide and gender-based violence (GBV). In 2014, ISIS perpetrated another genocide against the Yazidi community of Sinjar. Women and girls were held captive, raped and beaten. Many have been forced into displacement. Rates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and suicide are high. Limited research has evaluated interventions delivered to this population. Methods. This review explores how the global evidence on psychosocial interventions for female survivors of conflict-related sexual violence applies to the context of the female Yazidi population. We used a realist review to explore mechanisms underpinning complex psychosocial interventions delivered to internally displaced, conflict-affected females. Findings were cross-referenced with eight realist, semi-structured interviews with stakeholders who deliver interventions to female Yazidis in the Kurdistan Region of Iraq. Interviews also allowed us to explore the impact of COVID-19 on effectiveness of interventions. Results. Seven mechanisms underpinned positive mental health outcomes (reduced PTSD, depression, anxiety, suicidal ideation): safe spaces, a strong therapeutic relationship, social connection, mental health literacy, cultural-competency, gender-matching and empowerment. Interviews confirmed relevance and applicability of mechanisms to the displaced female Yazidi population. Interviews also reported increased PTSD, depression, suicide and flashbacks since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, with significant disruptions to interventions. Conclusion. COVID-19 is just one of many challenges in the implementation and delivery of interventions. Responding to the mental health needs of female Yazidis exposed to chronic collective violence requires recognition of their sociocultural context and everyday experiences.

19.
Emergency Nurse ; 30(6):10-11, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2113231

ABSTRACT

In April 2022, I was a paediatric NHS nurse and in a bad place emotionally. I was extremely anxious, felt unable to cope and was having nightmares. I was also experiencing what I now know are flashbacks. A series of traumatic events had led me to this point, then an incident with a young patient tipped me over the edge and I realised I needed help. [ FROM AUTHOR]

20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110054

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The current study will evaluate the association that the COVID-19 pandemic has had with health-care workers and identify the factors that influenced the female gender being more affected. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study conducted in two hospitals in Arequipa (a Peruvian city). The participants were health-care workers. We applied a questionnaire with sociodemographic information and three scales: the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, and the Primary Care Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) Screen for DSM-5. The main outcomes were anxiety, depression, and PTSD scores. The exposure of interest was gender. The scores of the scales were estimated by medians and percentiles 25-75 (p25-p75), and we used linear regression to estimate the crude and adjusted coefficients and their respective confidence intervals at 95% (CI 95%). RESULTS: There were 109 participants, and 43.1% were women. The anxiety, depression, and PTSD median (p25-p75) scores in the study population were 6 (2-11), 6 (2-10), and 1 (0-3), respectively. The adjusted analysis showed that the female sex had 4.48 (CI 95% 2.95-6.00), 4.50 (CI 95% 2.39-6.62), and 1.13 (CI 95% 0.50-1.76) higher points on average for the scales of anxiety, depression, and PTSD symptoms in comparison to males, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Female health-care workers showed increased scores of mental health issues in comparison to male health-care workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL