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1.
The Canadian Geographer / Le Géographe canadien ; 66(3):e18-e19, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2029292

ABSTRACT

Rose has extensive expertise in the field of psychiatry, including the publication of earlier books on this topic;the scientific contributions of this book, therefore, are credible. One of the least visible aspects of health in society, but as important as all the others, is mental health. , the author presents "the empire of psychiatry" in all its complexity, including the fact that "psychiatry is intensely political" (p. 14). [Extracted from the article] Copyright of Canadian Geographer is the property of Wiley-Blackwell and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

2.
J Affect Disord Rep ; 3: 100066, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2028155

ABSTRACT

Background: To investigate youth mental health changes over the course of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) using a national probability sample and longitudinal design. Methods: A representative sample of 4918 Chinese college students were surveyed during the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic for the first wave and after the new cases steadily declined for the second wave. Mental health was measured by the ten-question Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K-10). Logistic regression model was fitted to compare changes in psychological distress before and after the peak of the pandemic. Results: Of the respondents of both waves, 45.04% reported psychological distress during the initial outbreak of the pandemic and 26.49% reported it when new COVID-19 cases steadily declined. Psychological distress significantly reduced after the peak of the pandemic but persisted in some students. Limitations: The study measured psychological distress once after the initial control of the COVID-19. More psychiatric disorders need to be traced as the pandemic continues to evolve. Conclusions: Although effective control of COVID-19 benefited young people's mental health, psychiatric disorders continued to be prevalent. Future research public health policies should target the speedy recovery of the high-risk cases with persistent mental health problems.

3.
SSRN; 2022.
Preprint in English | SSRN | ID: ppcovidwho-343273

ABSTRACT

Due to the results of the COVID-19 epidemic on mental health, some studies have highlighted the positive effects of nature exposure. Nevertheless, this beneficial role has not yet been explored over time of the pandemic. The current study examines the temporal changes in (a) social isolation, (b) psychological distress, (c) intensity of the effect of social isolation on psychological distress, and (d) moderating effect of nature exposure on the relation between perceived interior crowding, social isolation, and psychological distress. Focusing on six mid-rise housing developments in Mashhad, data were collected from 718 middle-aged women (Mage = 49.63, SD = 12.39) in two waves during the pandemic (wave1 in June 2020 and wave2 in September 2021, before nationwide vaccination). A paired-sample t-test showed increased social isolation and psychological distress after one year of the pandemic. Also, using structural equation modeling and multi-group analysis (wave 1 vs. wave 2) revealed that social isolation has an increasing influence on psychological distress over time. Exposure to nature moderates the effect of perceived interior crowding on psychological distress. However, this moderating role is time-dependent and nature exposure during the time did not necessarily assist in reducing the negative impact of perceived interior crowding. Finally, at any given time, nature exposure mitigated the effect of social isolation on psychological distress.

4.
Suma psicol ; 29(1): 59-68, jan.-jun. 2022. tab
Article in Spanish | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2025675

ABSTRACT

Resumen Introducción: el presente estudio analiza el estrés percibido, las estrategias de afrontamiento, su regulación emocional, impacto y malestar psicológico, durante la cuarentena por la pandemia de COVID-19 en la población colombiana. Método: muestra no probabilística de 356 adultos que respondieron un cuestionario en línea. Resultados: se encontraron puntuaciones medias y altas en estrategias de afrontamiento y regulación emocional activas y puntuaciones bajas en estrés, malestar psicológico e impacto de la cuarentena. El 38.76 % presentó puntuaciones que indican riesgo de trastorno por estrés postraumático. Las mujeres, los menores de 35 años, los bachilleres, los estudiantes y las personas que viven solas presentan mayores afectaciones. Se encontraron relaciones estadísticamente significativas de estrés con todas las variables, excepto con apoyo social y convivientes durante la cuarentena. Por último, se encontró asociación positiva del estrés con desahogo, supresión expresiva, impacto de la cuarentena y malestar psicológico; y asociación negativa con planificación, aceptación, revaluación cognitiva y edad mayor de 25 años. Conclusiones: los resultados contribuyen a comprender las respuestas ante la cuarentena e identificar factores de vulnerabilidad para diseñar programas de prevención e intervención.


Abstract Introduction: The aim of this study was to analyze the perceived stress, coping strategies, emotional regulation, impact of the event, and psychological distress during quarantine due to COVID-19 pandemic in the Colombian population. Method: Non-probabilistic sample made up of 356 adults who answered an online questionnaire. Results: It was found medium and high scores in active coping strategies and emotional regulation, and low scores in stress, psychological distress and impact of quarantine. The 38.76 % presented scores that indicate risk of post-traumatic stress disorder. Women, people under 35 years of age, high school graduates, students, and living alone during the quarantine showed higher affectation. Statistically significant correlations of stress with all variables except with social support and cohabitants during quarantine were found. Finally, it was found a positive association of stress with venting, expressive suppression, the impact of quarantine, and psychological distress, and negative association with planning, acceptance, cognitive reappraisal, and age over 25 years. Conclusions: These results contribute to understanding responses to quarantine and to identify vulnerability factors to design prevention and intervention programs.

5.
Canadian Social Work Review ; 39(1):63-80, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025304

ABSTRACT

This study explores urban social workers’ experiences working the front lines during COVID-19’s first wave. It aims to uncover social workers’ shifts in roles and responsibilities across the health and social service network, to illuminate how these shifts impacted them, and ultimately to derive meaning from these experiences to inform future directions for the profession. Eight social workers from a range of contexts were interviewed. Our analyses revealed that, while all participants described some negatives of front-line pandemic work, the frequency and intensity of these moments were exacerbated by organizational and policy responses. When social workers were expected to work outside of their scope of practice, when their skills were overlooked or underutilized, and when their organizational contexts focused on individual distress rather than collective support, they reported intensified periods of distress. If we hope to retain the health and wellbeing of our workforce and preserve the value of the profession, systemic preventative responses must take priority. Building opportunities for collective on-going peer support and debriefing, leveraging the expertise of social workers to address psychosocial issues, and including the voices of front-line workers in the development of solutions to pandemic-related hardships may help reduce social work distress and improve front-line workers’ responses to social issues.Alternate :Cette étude explore les expériences des travailleuses sociales et des travailleurs sociaux de première ligne en milieu urbain durant la première vague de COVID-19. Elle vise à mettre en lumière les changements de rôles et de responsabilités dans le réseau de la santé et des services sociaux, afin de montrer comment ces changements les ont affectés et prendre en compte ces expériences pour les orientations futures de la profession. Huit travailleuses sociales et travailleurs sociaux de différents milieux ont été interviewés. Nos analyses suggèrent que bien que tous les participants aient vécu des expériences négatives dans le cadre du travail de première ligne durant la pandémie, la fréquence et l’intensité de ces expériences ont été exacerbées par les politiques et le contexte organisationnel. Les travailleuses sociales et les travailleurs sociaux ont signalé des périodes de détresse plus importantes lorsqu’ils devaient oeuvrer en dehors de leur champ de pratique, que leurs compétences n’étaient pas prises en compte ou qu’elles étaient sous-utilisées et que les contextes organisationnels priorisaient la détresse individuelle plutôt que le soutien collectif. Si nous voulons maintenir la santé et le bien-être de nos travailleuses et travailleurs, et préserver la valeur de notre profession, il importe d’interventir de manière systémique et préventive. Des strategies telles que le soutien collectif par les pairs, le debriefing, la mobilisation de l’expertise des travailleuses sociales et des travailleurs sociaux pour intervenir au plan psychosocial, et l’inclusion des voix des travailleuses et travailleurs de première ligne dans le développement de solutions pour répondre aux difficultés reliées à la pandémie pourraient aider à réduire la détresse et améliorer leur réponse aux problèmes sociaux.

6.
Dve Domovini = Two Homelands ; - (56):169, 2022.
Article in Slovenian | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024438

ABSTRACT

V prispevku predstavljamo rezultate raziskave o učinkovitih prilagoditvah pouka na daljavo za učence s priseljenskim ozadjem v drugem valu epidemije v Sloveniji. Odgovori majhnih vzorcev učiteljev (N = 29) na spletno anketo nakazujejo upad težav z opremo IKT v primerjavi s prvim valom, medtem ko so se še vedno prisotne težave, povezane z učenjem in učnim jezikom ter posledicami socialne izolacije. Učitelji so individualizirali način poučevanja in učne pomoči glede na zaznane jezikovne in učne težave ter osebne stiske. Raznojezični pristopi so se izkazali za učinkovite pri zagotavljanju inkluzivnega poučevanja v večkulturnih okoljih in bi jih veljalo krepiti tudi pri pouku v šoli.Alternate :The paper presents a study on the effective adaptation of distance learning for students with an immigrant background in the second wave of the COVID-19 epidemic in Slovenia. The online survey of a small sample of teachers indicates a decline in ICT equipment-related problems compared to the first wave, while learning and language problems and the social isolation effects persisted. Teachers adapted the teaching approaches and learning assistance individually to the perceived language and learning problems and personal distress of students. Plurilingual approaches prove to be effective in enabling an inclusive multicultural learning environment and should be strengthened also in the school classes.

7.
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health ; 19(16):10381, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023674

ABSTRACT

Despite the vast annual number of international visitors to the tropics, surprisingly little data are available on the psychological well-being associated with the travels or with travelers’ diarrhoea (TD). We herein recruited participants of a vaccination trial, OEV-123, before their 12-day holiday in Benin, West Africa. We assessed the travelers’ psychological distress with a general health questionnaire (GHQ-12) and retrieved data on TD from the trial database. The GHQ-12 was completed before (wave 0), at return (wave 1), and 1-month after (wave 2) the trip. Of the 174 participants, 73% were women, with a mean age 40 years. Moreover, 24% reported psychological distress before traveling, 10% immediately after, and 16% 1-month after the trip (GHQ-12, 3 or more;0–12 scoring). The findings showed that psychological well-being increased after the tropical holiday. The GHQ-12 middle wave sum score differed from the wave 0 (p < 0.001) and wave 2 (p = 0.008) sum scores, with travelers reporting highest levels of well-being on their return, with evidence of a lasting improvement. TD was experienced by 71%, and it had a negative impact on psychological well-being only if experienced after travel.

8.
Int J Public Health ; 67:1604979, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2023043

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The study aimed at analyzing the prevalence of five psychological outcomes (depression, anxiety, stress, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and suicidal ideation) among Chinese healthcare workers (HCWs), and measured the total possible negative psychological impact 1 year after the COVID-19 initial outbreak. Methods: A cross-sectional nationwide multi-center study was performed between November 2020 and March 2021 in China. A self-report questionnaire was applied, and three psychological scales were used. Binary logistic regression was performed to analyze the risk factors associated with each psychological outcome. Results: The findings demonstrated that the COVID-19 pandemic had a negative psychological impact on HCWs, which was still evident 1 year after the initial outbreak. Nurses showed higher depression and anxiety than other HCWs. Female gender, passive coping, long working hours, having a chronic disease, and experiencing violence, among other factors, were all risk factors for psychological impairment. Conclusion: Developing and promoting programs to improve mental health among HCWs, and identifying those who might need psychological support is still relevant 1 year after the initial outbreak.

9.
Front Public Health ; 10:976443, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2023002

ABSTRACT

While the relationship between loneliness and psychological distress is well documented, the mechanisms underlying this relationship are less clear. One factor known to be related to loneliness as well as psychological distress, is social support, with some studies suggesting that support-both received and provided-can serve as a mechanism to reduce the distress associated with loneliness. In this paper we examine the mediating role of both aspects of support in the relationship between loneliness and psychological distress in the COVID-19 context. We used a multi-country dataset collected at two timepoints during the pandemic;the first during the early stages (N = 6,842, 11 countries) and the second collected for a subset of countries (N = 1,299, 3 countries) 3 months later. Across all eleven countries, results revealed significant positive associations between loneliness and distress. Furthermore, using longitudinal data, we investigated the directionality of this relationship and found that increased loneliness over time was associated with increased psychological distress. The data also showed that both feeling unsupported and feeling unable to provide support to others mediated this relationship. These findings point to the need to facilitate people's ability to draw effective social support and help others-particularly at times when social connectedness is threatened-as a way of alleviating the psychological distress that commonly presents with loneliness.

10.
Frontiers in Public Health ; 10, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2022922

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) was declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO) on March 11th, 2020. It has had unprecedented adverse effects on healthcare systems, economies, and societies globally. SARS-CoV-2 is not only a threat to physical health but has also been shown to have a severe impact on neuropsychiatric health. Many studies and case reports across countries have demonstrated insomnia, depressed mood, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and cognitive change in COVID-19 patients during the acute phase of the infection, as well as in apparently recovered COVID-19 patients. The goal of this narrative review is to synthesize and summarize the emerging literature detailing the neuropsychiatric manifestations of COVID-19 with special emphasis on the long-term implications of COVID-19.

11.
PLoS ONE [Electronic Resource] ; 17(8):e0273339, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021914

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on the mental health of people globally. Significant concerns about health and access to services among women of reproductive age considering pregnancy may cause psychological distress, and in turn increase health risks during and after pregnancy for mothers and offspring. OBJECTIVES: To examine the association between pregnancy intention and psychological distress during the COVID-19 pandemic in Australia, and explore if this association differed based on local viral transmission rates and corresponding levels of pandemic restrictions. METHODS: A nationwide online survey was completed by 849 non-pregnant women aged 18-50 years between 15 October and 7 November 2020. Women were asked about their intention to become pregnant, and psychological distress was assessed using the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (K10). Multivariable regression analysis examined associations between pregnancy intention and psychological distress. An interaction term was added to the model to examine differences in associations by level of viral transmission rates and lockdown restrictions which was determined based on postcode. RESULTS: Pregnancy intention was not associated with experiencing (very) high psychological distress in the overall study population (odds ratio (OR) 1.42, 95% CI 0.94, 2.11). The interaction term (p = 0.09) suggested potential differences by level of restrictions and viral transmission rates. In stratified analysis among women living in a location with strict lockdown restrictions and high viral transmission rates leading up to and during the study, those planning to become pregnant were more likely to experience (very) high psychological distress (OR 3.39, 2.04, 5.65) compared with women not planning to become pregnant. Pregnancy intention was not associated with psychological distress among women exposed to lower levels of pandemic restrictions and viral transmission rates (OR 1.17, 0.74, 1.85). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings highlight the need to identify and support women planning pregnancy during a public health crisis to mitigate potential short- and long-term intergenerational negative health outcomes associated with psychological distress.

12.
Oncology Times ; 44(16):15-15, 2022.
Article in English | CINAHL | ID: covidwho-2018115
13.
Innovation in Aging ; 6(5), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2017925

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives This study aimed to examine the associations between multimorbidity at the COVID-19 pandemic onset and subsequent longitudinal trajectories of depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, and loneliness in middle-aged and older adults over a 12-month follow-up. Research Design and Methods Data were from monthly online questionnaires in the COVID-19 Coping Study of U.S. adults aged >= 55 from April/May 2020 through April/May 2021 (N = 4,024). Multimorbidity was defined as having >= 2 versus <2 chronic conditions at baseline. Mental health outcomes were assessed monthly as depressive symptoms (8-item Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale), anxiety symptoms (5-item Beck Anxiety Inventory), and loneliness (3-item UCLA Loneliness Scale). We used multivariable-adjusted population- and attrition-weighted mixed-effects linear models to examine the longitudinal associations between multimorbidity and mental health symptoms. Results Multimorbidity at the pandemic onset was associated with elevated depressive (b = 0.37;95% CI: 0.16-0.59) and anxiety (b = 0.39;95% CI: 0.15-0.62) symptoms at baseline. Changes in symptoms for all three mental health outcomes were nonlinear over time, with worsening symptoms over the first 6 months of the pandemic (April/May to September/October 2020), followed by improvement in symptoms over the subsequent 6 months (September/October 2020 to April/May 2021). Middle-aged and older adults with multimorbidity experienced faster rates of change in anxiety symptoms and loneliness than those without multimorbidity, with persistently elevated mental health symptomatology throughout the follow-up. Discussion and Implications Results highlight the unique and persistent mental health risks experienced by middle-aged and older adults with multimorbidity during the COVID-19 pandemic. The observed improvements in symptoms underscore the mental resilience of these individuals, indicating their adaptation to the ongoing pandemic.

14.
Medicine Today ; 22(4):14-20, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2011436

ABSTRACT

GPs can play a pivotal role in the identification and management of alcohol problems at any time, and their role is even more important during the COVID-19 pandemic as more and more patients are resorting to alcohol to manage the stress and anxiety created by the pandemic. © 2021 Medicine Today Pty Ltd. All rights reserved.

15.
Psykhe: Revista de la Escuela de Psicologia ; 31(1):1-24, 2022.
Article in Spanish | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-2011031

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic left more than three-quarters of the world's children and young people unable to physically attend school. The crisis is putting pressure on educators and teachers to change the way they give lessons, which might be creating more stressful situations for teachers. Based on an online questionnaire administered nationwide to 6,064 Chilean teachers-enrolled through a non-probability sampling strategy during the pandemic in 2020-, exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses and linear regressions were performed, using structural equation modeling, to determine the participants' psychological distress level and how it relates to resources and demands of their educational environment as well as to sociodemographic and contextual factors. Overall, results show that the toll on psychological well-being has been heavier for female teachers, those who take care of minors and adults, and those who work in non-subsidized private schools. In addition, having more time to plan lessons and being able to balance work and home duties was found to reduce teachers' psychological distress index. Contrary to expectations, having more resources to facilitate remote work is associated with an increase in teacher psychological distress. These findings lead to reflection on the need for interventions and policies focused on teacher well-being within the context of the ongoing pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) (Spanish) La pandemia por COVID-19 dejo a mas de tres cuartas partes de los ninos y jovenes en el mundo sin poder asistir presencialmente a las escuelas durante el ano 2020. La crisis esta presionando a los educadores y docentes para que cambien su forma de hacer clases, lo que podria estar generando situaciones de mayor estres para los profesores. Utilizando un cuestionario aplicado online a 6.064 profesores a nivel nacional, por medio de una muestra no probabilistica realizada en contexto de pandemia en 2020, se realizaron analisis factoriales exploratorios y confirmatorios y regresiones lineales, usando modelos de ecuaciones estructurales, para analizar el nivel de angustia psicologica de los docentes y su relacion con recursos y demandas del entorno del trabajo y factores sociodemograficos y contextuales. Los resultados muestran que principalmente las docentes mujeres, los docentes que estan a cargo del cuidado de menores y adultos y los que trabajan en establecimientos particulares pagados son los que se han visto mas afectados en su bienestar psicologico. Ademas, se observa que tener mas tiempo disponible para preparar las clases y el poder compatibilizar los tiempos de trabajo y el hogar mejoran el indice de angustia psicologica. Contrario a lo esperado, el contar con mas recursos que permita el trabajo a distancia se asocia a un aumento en la angustia psicologica de los docentes. Esto lleva a reflexionar acerca de la necesidad de contar con intervenciones y politicas que se enfoquen en el bienestar docente en el contexto de pandemia que se esta viviendo. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

16.
Annals of the Rheumatic Diseases ; 81:923, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2008793

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic represents a challenge to the care of patients with rheumatic and musculoskeletal diseases (RMDs). Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the impact of the pandemic on the care of RMD patients, their health and wellbeing. Methods: This cross-sectional study involved 120 RMDs patients at the rheumatology department at Suez Canal University Hospital in Ismailia, Egypt. Patients were interviewed for sociodemographic and disease-related history. Further assessments were performed using Kessler 6-items (1), Fear of COVID-19 scale (2), and COVID-19-Impact on Quality-of-Life scale (3). Results: Patients with rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus made up most of our sample (72.5%, 19.2% respectively). About 50% of patients were experiencing limitation in the access to rheumatologic care, and a similar percentage had changed or discontinued their medications. DMARDs shortage and concerns about the increased risk of COVID-19 infection because of immu-nosuppressive drugs were the most frequently reported reasons for non-adherence to medication. The percentage of patients with uncontrolled disease had signifcantly increased from 8.3% prior to the COVID-19 pandemic to 20% during the pandemic. Patients perceived their overall quality of life as average (4.93 on a rating scale from 0 to 10). The Fear of COVID-19 score ranged from 7 to 35 with a mean of 26 (±7.6), while the COV19-Impact on Quality of Life score ranged from 6 to 30 points with a mean of 22.6 (±6.7). About 60% of patients reported a high level of psychological distress. Conclusion: The pandemic negatively influenced the mental health, quality of life, adherence to medications, access to rheumatology care, and disease control of RMDs patients.

17.
Middle East Current Psychiatry-Mecpsych ; 29(1), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2005618

ABSTRACT

Background Amid the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic and its global health and socioeconomic aftereffects, the enduring state of crisis is increasingly impacting the coping capacity of the populations. In this study, we aimed to characterize the levels of psychological distress after the lifting of COVID-19 lockdown. Results The Impact of Event Scale (IES-R) and Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scales-21 items (DASS-21) were used to screen for post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD), depression, anxiety, and stress. The prevalence of PTSD was 41.6% and was associated with severe or extremely severe stress (27.8%), anxiety (31.4%), and depression (39.0%). All disorders were strongly correlated with one another. The risk of developing PTSD was independently associated with residence in high COVID-19 prevalence region (OR = 2.25, p = 0.004), poor (OR = 3.98, p = 0.002), or moderate (OR = 1.63, p = 0.048) self-assessed overall physical health, psychiatric comorbidity (OR = 1.87, p = 0.036), number of COVID-19-like symptoms (OR = 1.94, p = 0.039), and severe COVID-19 morbidity in the acquaintances (OR = 1.54, p = 0.026). Four theories were proposed to explain these high figures, with a discussion of their practical implications. Conclusions The lifting of lockdown measures was associated with a substantial increase in psychological distress among the Saudi population, referring to figures reported during the lockdown. This may indicate a decline in the overall population's coping capacity with the enduring crisis.

18.
Psychosomatic Medicine ; 84(5):A4-A5, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2003278

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, governments around the world imposed confinement and physical distancing directives for all citizens. Although essential to reduce the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, these measures may have collateral consequences for older adults, such as increased psychological distress. Research suggests, as a population, older adults have been experiencing less psychological distress than younger adults during COVID-19. However, most of these studies examine mean levels of psychological distress and do not capture the heterogeneity of outcomes, like subgroups who may experience increased psychological distress. The goal of this longitudinal study was to use group-based trajectory modelling (GBTM) to identify meaningful subgroups that follow different trajectories of psychological distress among 645 older adults with a mean age of 78.69 (SD = 5.67). Participants were recruited from two research cohorts and newspaper ads. Telephone-based assessments were conducted across four time periods: T1-Spring 2020-first confinement, T2-Summer 2020-first deconfinement, T3-Fall 2020-second confinement, and T4-Winter/Spring 2021-continued confinement. Participants completed the Kessler 6-item Psychological Distress Scale (K6) to assess psychological distress at each time point and provided information on socioeconomic, medical, and psychosocial factors. Results indicated that the average psychological distress level was stable across the first three time points but slightly increased at the fourth assessment (Fig. 1). Using GBTM, three groups emerged to best characterize the different trajectories of psychological distress: resilient (50.5%), fluctuating (34.9%), and elevated (14.6%) distress groups (Fig. 1). Those in the fluctuating and elevated groups were more likely to have chronic mental health problems, mobility issues, insomnia symptoms, loneliness, COVID-19 related acute stress and general health anxiety than those in the resilient group. Those who lived in poverty, who could not use technology, and who took psychotropic medication had uniquely increased odds of being in the elevated group. These findings identify subgroups of older adults at greater risk of psychological distress with potential intervention targets to alleviate distress during and after the pandemic.

19.
Health Rep ; 33(8):19-30, 2022.
Article in English | PubMed | ID: covidwho-2002831

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health among Canadians has worsened since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of this study was to identify profiles of mental health difficulties and to quantify the relationships between mental health profiles, negative impacts related to the pandemic and suicidal ideation. DATA AND METHODS: Participants were 22,721 adults (18 years and older) from the 2020 and 2021 Survey on COVID-19 and Mental Health. Latent profile analysis was used to identify patterns of anxiety, depression and psychological distress. The relationships between mental health profiles, negative impacts and suicidal ideation were examined using logistic regression models. RESULTS: Three mental health profiles were identified. Individuals were classified as having no mental health difficulties (Profile 1, 65.70%), low-to-moderate mental health difficulties (Profile 2, 25.52%) and severe mental health difficulties (Profile 3, 8.78%). Individuals in Profiles 2 and 3 were at greater odds than individuals in Profile 1 of experiencing emotional distress;the death of a family member, friend or colleague;difficulty in meeting financial obligations or essential needs;the loss of a job or income;feelings of loneliness or isolation;physical health problems;challenges in personal relationships with household members;and other impacts. Individuals in Profile 2 (4.27%, odds ratio (OR) = 24.30) and Profile 3 (19.09%, odds ratio (OR) = 115.75) were considerably more likely to have contemplated suicide since the onset of the pandemic compared with those in Profile 1 (0.16%). INTERPRETATION: Individuals who experienced high levels of anxiety, depression and psychological distress were most vulnerable to negative impacts related to the pandemic and suicidal ideation.

20.
Public Health Reports ; : 1, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2002023

ABSTRACT

Financial hardships, job losses, and social isolation during the COVID-19 pandemic have increased food insecurity. We examined associations between food insecurity–related interventions and mental health among US adults aged ≥18 years from April 2020 through August 2021.We pooled data from the Household Pulse Survey from April 2020 through August 2021 (N = 2 253 567 adults). To estimate associations between mental health and food insecurity, we examined the following interventions: the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), Economic Impact Payments (stimulus funds), unemployment insurance, and free meals. We calculated psychological distress index (PDI) scores (Cronbach α = 0.91) through principal components analysis using 4 mental health variables: depression, anxiety, worry, and lack of interest (with a standardized mean score [SD] = 100 [20]). We conducted multivariable linear regression to estimate the interactive effects of the intervention and food insecurity on psychological distress, controlling for sociodemographic characteristics.During the study period, adults with food insecurity had higher mean PDI scores than adults without food insecurity. Food insecurity was associated with increased PDI scores after controlling for sociodemographic characteristics. In stratified models, negative associations between food insecurity and mental health (as shown by reductions in PDI scores) were mitigated by SNAP (−4.5), stimulus fund (−4.1), unemployment insurance (−4.4), and free meal (−4.4) interventions. The mitigation effects of interventions on PDI were greater for non-Hispanic White adults than for non-Hispanic Black or Asian adults.Future research on food insecurity and mental health should include investigations on programs and policies that could be of most benefit to racial and ethnic minority groups. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Public Health Reports is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

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