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1.
International Journal of Social Economics ; 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2018486

ABSTRACT

Purpose - COVID-19 pandemic has shattered the economic systems all around the world while creating numerous problems which were faced by all, especially international migrants. The present study offers a qualitative and quantitative perspective on the distress of international migrants and their repatriation intention during the pandemic period. Design/methodology/approach - In-depth semi-structured interviews of 30 respondents belonging to five host nations, Australia, the USA, the UK, New Zealand and Canada, revealed diverse issues. Based on qualitative study findings and past literature, 22 purposeful statements about six constructs - financial issues, social issues, mobility constraints, psychological problems, healthcare issues, and repatriation intentions - were developed. These statements were measured on a seven-point Likert scale and shared online with international migrants from India residing in the host nations. Data collected from 496 international migrants from October 2020 to July 2021 were used to analyze the influence of various determinants on the repatriation intentions by partial least square-structural equation modeling using SmartPLS software. Findings - The analysis results revealed that the role of financial, social, mobility, psychological and healthcare issues was significant in strengthening the repatriation intentions of the migrants. There is a need to create job opportunities, retrain laid-off workers and formulate migrant inclusive policies. Originality/value - Although some studies have highlighted a few problems faced by international migrants, their impact on repatriation intentions has not been studied yet. The present study fills this gap and analyzes the repatriation intention of international migrants in light of different problems they faced during the pandemic.

2.
Health Education ; 121(3):265-274, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1958390

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This paper aimed to examine the psycho-social aspects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Pakistan. The study was conducted in Pakistan by using an online survey technique. The rationale to opt for this method was mainly based on the country's lock-down situations, social distancing and for the care of respondents. Design/methodology/approach: A total of 1,536 individuals participated from different parts of the country. An attitudinal scale was administered consisting of statements to measure (dis)agreement of the individuals facing the current situations of COVID-19. The ethical considerations and confidentiality of the respondents were opted by describing the purpose of research on the first page of the questionnaire. Findings: The study findings showed that the cost of personal protective equipment (PPE), social isolation and loss of intimacy have favourable positive effects on the psychological problems of individuals through the mediation of fake news and misinformation during COVID-19. Furthermore, the study findings were interpreted as per the effects of current situations of epidemic, i.e. COVID-19 on the psycho-social life of individuals. Research limitations/implications: This paper is purely limited to the quantitative approach including variables, i.e. COVID-19, risk of infection, social distancing, cost of PPE, social isolation, fake news and psychological problems. Practical implications: The present research will enhance the awareness and knowledge regarding psychological problems faced by the individuals during COVID-19. It will be a significant addition to the existing body of knowledge in the field of health and well-being. It will also provide guidelines to students, research scholars, policymakers and academicians to develop policies in future to improve the health of people during epidemics such as COVID-19 and similar nature of outbreak in the future. Originality/value: This paper focused on an important gap in the research on COVID-19 in the country in the context of COVID-19, risk of infection, social distancing, cost of PPE, social isolation, fake news and psychological problems. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

3.
J Clin Med ; 11(11)2022 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1953594

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to investigate the mediatory role of emotional control with respect to the control of anger, depression, and anxiety in the relationship between positive orientation and tiredness/fatigue occurring in a group of Polish nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study included 894 nursing students from six universities in Poland. A diagnostic survey was applied as the research method, and the data were collected using the Fatigue Severity Scale (FSS), the Courtauld Emotional Control Scale (CECS) and the Positive Orientation Scale (SOP). The mean participant age was 20.73 years (SD = 1.81). More than half of the students in the study showed a low level of positive orientation. Correlational analyses revealed a significant negative correlation between positive orientation and tiredness/fatigue experienced by the students participating in the study (r = -0.336; p < 0.001), and correlation between positive orientation and the overall emotional control index (r = -0.317; p < 0.001), and the indices of control of anger (r = -0.154; p < 0.01), depression (r = -0.376; p < 0.001), and anxiety (r = -0.236; p < 0.01). Analysis of the results also revealed the occurrence of significant, positive links between the controlled emotions and their components and the tiredness/fatigue experienced by nursing students. It is important to take action associated with the prevention of tiredness/fatigue among students and to reinforce a positive orientation and the capacity to control emotions to effectively minimize the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing students.

4.
Management Revue ; 32(4):297-301, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1835553

ABSTRACT

[...]articles from the special issue are assigned to three categories: (1) New Organization, (2) New Leadership, and (3) New Learning. [...]studies have shown that such arrangements do not necessarily benefit all groups of workers equally (Kossek & Lautsch, 2017) and may come with new challenges like blurring work-life boundaries or protecting leisure time and psychological detachment. [...]New Work arrangements may require new forms of leadership (Banks et al., 2019;Sheninger, 2019). Ute Rademacher, Ulrike Weber, and Cassandra Zinn focus on informal rules and social practices that are established in the work-related use of smartphones. Since professional use of the smartphone can significantly blur the line between work and leisure, communication rules are important to ensure psychological detachment after working hours. Future work may be dedicated to studying these technological developments, which have the potential to spur profound transformations in a wide range of HR and organization processes. [...]the COVID-19 pandemic has provided an unintended global 'field experiment', and new unforeseen issues have emerged, such as the phenomenon of 'Zoom-fatigue', or the prevalence of psychological problems related to social isolation in virtual settings (Brunsbach, Kattenbach & Weber, 2021).

5.
Infect Dis Health ; 27(4): 184-190, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1821252

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has a substantial impact on the physical and mental health status of patients with COVID-19. This study's objective was to evaluate the factors associated with mental health in patients isolated with COVID-19. METHODS: It is a retrospective, cross-sectional study. One hundred and two patients discharged from COVID-19 hospitalization in Korea were analyzed. The primary outcome was the correlation between psychological problems such as anxiety, depression, and fear of stigma and physical symptoms such as respiratory symptoms, gastrointestinal symptoms, headache, and fever. Mental and physical symptoms were ascertained using closed and multiple-choice questions. The secondary outcome was the correlation between mental issues, demographic factors, and disease severity. Hypoxia and the need for oxygen therapy, a need for remdesivir antiviral treatment, and indications of pneumonia progression on chest x-ray were confirmed through a review of medical records and used to measure disease severity. RESULTS: Patients with COVID-19 indicated feelings of depression (48.1%), anxiety (49.1%), and fear of stigma (60.45%), and some continued to experience physical symptoms even after discharge. Logistic regression revealed that gastrointestinal symptoms positively correlated with depression (p < .05) and headache positively correlated with fear of stigma (p < .05), while the other factors were not statistically significant (p > .05). CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that psychological symptoms persisted even after discharge. Gastrointestinal symptoms and headache were influential factors in predicting depression and fear of stigma. Based on this, dedicated COVID-19 hospitals should provide mental health support and preventive management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Retrospective Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Headache , Health Status
6.
Studies in Psychology ; 42(3):593-614, 2021.
Article in English | APA PsycInfo | ID: covidwho-1805840

ABSTRACT

Given the situation of lockdown implemented because of the COVID-19 virus, there is a need to study the sociodemographic variables and risk factors associated with psychological problems and greater difficulty with adapting to the situation, which could in turn help in the development of psychological treatment offered during and after isolation. The objective of this study is to analyse whether age and sex are related to the concerns and reactions experienced by the population. Fifteen days after the official lockdown order, we sent out an online survey comprising 23 questions. A sample of 1,711 was collected, which included participants' sociodemographic data, previous personal traits, psychological reactions, health habits, concerns and health activities. The results of the analyses showed a statistically significant association between age and feeling overwhelmed or claustrophobic, tiredness, concern that a family member becomes infected with the disease, irritability, fear and sadness, and between sex and concern that a family member becomes infected with the disease, sadness and fear. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved) (Spanish) Ante la situacion de confinamiento provocada por el virus COVID-19, surge la necesidad de conocer cuales son las variables sociodemograficas y los factores de riesgo que se relacionan con problemas psicologicos y con una menor adaptacion a la situacion, lo que puede ayudar en el tratamiento psicologico que se puede ofrecer durante y despues del aislamiento. El objetivo del trabajo es estudiar si la edad y el genero se relacionan con las preocupaciones y las reacciones experimentadas por la poblacion. A los quince dias del decreto oficial de confinamiento se realizo una encuesta telematica de 23 preguntas a poblacion espanola. Se reunio una muestra de 1,711 sujetos, se recogieron datos sociodemograficos, rasgos personales previos, reacciones psicologicas, habitos de salud, preocupaciones y actividades de salud realizadas. Los resultados de los analisis indican una asociacion positiva entre la edad y sentimientos de agobio o claustrofobia, cansancio, preocupacion porque un familiar contraiga la enfermedad, irritabilidad, miedo y tristeza, asi como entre el genero y preocupacion porque un familiar contraiga la enfermedad, tristeza y miedo. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2022 APA, all rights reserved)

7.
Gender & Behaviour ; 19(1):17565-17578, 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1787442

ABSTRACT

The study examined the literature on Psychological and Social Impacts of COVID-19 Pandemic and Vaccine Nationalism: Implications for Psychological Services in Sub-Saharan Africa. The researchers used secondary data and mixed method of data collection for the study. On line searching tools, including: African Journals Online, PsycINFO, African Index Medicus, Eastern Mediterranean Index Medicus, PubMed, and Web of Knowledge were used to search for the data used for the study. The results indicated that, the most exposed and vulnerable groups, including: children, college students, health workers, and other frontline professionals, are more likely to develop psychological symptoms, including: post-traumatic stress disorders, anxiety, depression, and other symptoms of distress. Furthermore, the results showed that, the pharmacological and non-pharmacological protocols, put in place to checkmate the Covid-19 pandemic, including: physical and social distancing, travel restrictions, hand washing and sanitizer, wearing of face mask, coughing under a curved elbow and other security measures have impacted people's psychological well-being and interpersonal relationships, as well as their perception of empathy toward others. Also, covid19 and vaccine nationalism have implications on how psychologists and other health care workers manage the pandemic. Psychologists and other frontline health workers have shifted from more traditional-conventional methods of interventions to unconventional methods, using technologies. In doing so, telepsychology and other technological devices assume very important roles in combatting psychological and social impacts of covid-19 pandemic and vaccine nationalism. Findings indicates that, the use of technologies have proved to be very effective, because both clients and health professionals can still participates in scheduled therapeutic sessions unhindered using online technological tools. In doing so, technologies have improve the professionals' psychological interventions and social support skills during the pandemic. Also, technologies have made it possible for psychologists and other health professionals to meet clients' needs working from home or from the workplace, thereby saving money and time and maintaining the interpersonal relationship between therapists and clients. Therefore, it was concluded that, the use of technologies by health professionals should continue even after the pandemic.

8.
Migration Letters ; 19(2):171, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1754270

ABSTRACT

Cindik-Herbruggen and Demirkol focus on the psychological impact of COVID-19 pandemic among Turkish immigrants. The pandemic has already triggered a variety of psychological problems including fear, depression, anxiety, and suicidal attempts. The authors aim to investigate Turkish immigrants' psychological conditions and top concerns in Germany during the COVID-19 pandemic. Demographics and current psychological conditions of participants were collected and analyzed by means of a structured survey. The results demonstrated that Turkish immigrants with low income and education level as well as an unemployment status were worried more during the Pandemic. Moreover, the risk of elderly people getting infected by COVID-19 was one of the top concerns of participants.

9.
Journal of Mental Health and Human Behaviour ; 26(2):117-121, 2021.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1689972

ABSTRACT

Background: The psychological impact of the general public during a pandemic is complex and incompletely understood. There is a dearth of studies reporting the psychological problems in the general public during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis in India, including a comparison as per demographic profile. Materials and Methods: An online survey was conducted from April 17, to May 1, 2020 using the principles of the snowball recruiting technique. The psychological problems of the potential study subjects were evaluated using the Hindi version of the Patient Health Questionnaire-4 (PHQ-4) scale. There were a total of 1826 responses, out of which 391 were excluded from the analysis. Results: The mean age of the subjects was 41.95 years (Median = 50, SD = 19.05, range: 18-86 years) and around 45% of respondents were with an age range of 18-39 years. The mean and standard deviation of the PHQ-4 was 1.81 (2.34), and the overall prevalence of psychological problems was 30% as per the cutoff of PHQ-4. The estimates of anxiety and depression among study subjects were 11% (158/1435) and 16.1% (232/1435), respectively. Younger age, female gender, unmarried, and rural residential status were significantly associated with increased psychological problems in this setting. Conclusion: The psychological response to the COVID-19 varies with sociodemographic status, and about one-third of the people reported having psychological problems in the early phase of the COVID-19 pandemic in this setting. There is a need to expand the mental health services to each stratum of the society with a focus to provide personalized care as per the sociodemographic profile.

10.
National Journal of Community Medicine ; 13(1):32-36, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1675101

ABSTRACT

Introduction: SARS-CoV-2 has affected not only physical health but also devastated mental wellbeing. The government of India ordered a nationwide lockdown limiting movement of the entire 1.3 billion populations. The impact of the pandemic on depression, anxiety and self-care behaviour among the general population was investigated. Methods: An online cross-sectional survey was carried out with an anonymous questionnaire using validated instruments. Multivariable linear regression analysis was carried out to find the role of each variable in determining the relevant scores. Result: The mean age of the 1052 participants was 30.52 (SD ± 13.42) years. The mean score of depression and anxiety was 5.96 and 5.27 respectively. Moderate to severe depression was noted among 18.68% and moderate to severe anxiety was noted among 16.1% of the respondents. Gender was a significant predictor of all three (depression, anxiety, and coping) scores, while the civil status predicted both depression and anxiety scores and age predicted only the depression score. Conclusion: A considerable proportion of the surveyed population in our setting has manifested symptoms of anxiety and depression. Gender, civil status and age predicted various scores. © The Journal retains the copyrights of this article.

11.
Asian J Psychiatr ; 64: 102812, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1356114

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Following the declaration of Coronavirus disease-2019 as a pandemic, a nation-wide lockdown was announced in India. This led to increase in psychological problems, especially in women. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of psychological problems and domestic violence (DV) in married women during the pandemic and lockdown in a panchayat in Southern India and to study the association of socio-demographic and clinical variables with psychological problems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A cross-sectional study was undertaken in 209 married women of 18-55 years residing in a village panchayat of northern Kerala, India. Socio-demographic variables and clinical variables, like depressive symptoms, anxiety symptoms, perceived stress and DV, among others, were evaluated. The participants were interviewed by trained community health workers in the post-lockdown period. RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive symptoms was found to be 10.0 %, anxiety symptoms 7.2 % and perceived stress 66.0 %. Severe DV was reported by 6.2 %; but at least one form of DV was experienced by 25.8 % of the women. Significant positive correlation was observed for DV with depression and anxiety. DV was also found to be a significant predictor of depression (adjusted OR [aOR] = 4.26, P = 0.006) and anxiety (aOR=4.34, P=0.02). Being a homemaker (aOR=4.51, P = 0.03) and having past history of mental illness (aOR=5.39, P = 0.03) were also found to increase the risk for depression significantly. CONCLUSION: There is a high prevalence of psychological problems in married women during the pandemic and lockdown. DV was found to be a significant predictor of depression and anxiety in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Domestic Violence , Anxiety/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological
12.
Ind Psychiatry J ; 30(1): 84-89, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302639

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Caregivers of children with comorbidities suffer from various psychological problems. We envisage more such complications during this COVID-19 pandemic. METHODOLOGY: A cross-sectional study to assess psychological issues in caregivers of children with kidney diseases, admitted during lockdown period in India was done. Psychological tools including Peritraumatic Distress Inventory (PDI), Insomnia Severity Index, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale (DASS II), Positive and Negative Affect Schedule (PANAS) and a new "COVID Stress Survey Questionnaire" were used. Standard statistical analysis using SPSS Statistic 23 (IBM SPSS Statistics, New York, United States) was done. RESULTS: Forty-seven caregivers (33 mothers; 14 fathers) were included. Of these, 33 (70.2%) experienced psychological distress. On PANAS, 45 (95.7%) scored below cut off on a positive affect and 42 (89.4%) scored above cut off on a negative effect. The DASS II score revealed that 38 (80.9%) reported mild stress, 23 (48.9%) severe anxiety, and 37 (78.7%) had moderate depression. Upper middle socioeconomic status caregivers reported more insomnia. Further, parents of children with acute kidney injury (AKI) or prolonged hospital stay scored higher on subjective distress and aversive feelings. CONCLUSION: We observed an alarming level of distress, insomnia, and anxiety among caregivers, more so in upper middle socioeconomic status, children with AKI and prolonged hospital stay. We suggest due counseling should be done.

13.
J Affect Disord ; 292: 172-188, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253104

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate the psychological problems on people infected with SARS-CoV-2 during the pandemic. METHODS: In this living systematic review and meta-analyses, we searched seven electronic databases for cross-sectional studies and longitudinal studies on psychological problems on COVID-19 patients from Jan 1, 2020 to Oct 7, 2020. The primary outcome was prevalence of various psychological problems such as anxiety, depression, stress, insomnia, somatization, and fear. We pooled data for prevalence with their 95% confidence interval (CI) using random effect models and assessed the study quality based on the 11-item checklist recommended by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. RESULTS: Fourty-four studies, including studies from China(35), Italy(2), Iran(2), India(1), Korea(1), Ecuador(1), Switzerland(1), Germany(1), were identified by comprising a total of 8587 completed questionnaires and 38 studies for meta-analyses. The prevalence of anxiety, depression, post-traumatic stress disorder(PTSD), insomnia, somatization, and fear in patients with COVID-19 was 16.6% (10.1%-23.1%), 37.7% (29.3%-46.2%), 41.5% (9.3%-73.7%), 68.3% (48.6%-88.0%), 36.5% (20.2%-52.8%), 47.6% (9.4%-85.7%), respectively. The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia in severe COVID-19 patients (intensive care unit inpatients) was higher than mild or clinically stable COVID-19 patients. LIMITATIONS: A significant degree of heterogeneity in terms of populations, sampling methods, scales was noted across studies. CONCLUSIONS: There existed high proportions of COVID-19 patients with psychological problem. The prevalence of psychological problems was closely related to the patients themselves, their surroundings and social support. It is imperative to provide ontime psychological care service for COVID-19 patients and to follow-up them for a longer period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mental Health , Stress, Psychological , Anxiety , COVID-19/psychology , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Germany , Humans , India , Iran , Italy , Prevalence , Republic of Korea , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
14.
Front Psychol ; 12: 614964, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238881

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 is creating panic among people around the world and is causing a huge public mental health crisis. Large numbers of observational studies focused on the prevalence of psychological problems during the COVID-19 pandemic were published. It is essential to conduct a meta-analysis of the prevalence of different psychological statuses to insight the psychological reactions of general population during the COVID-19 epidemic in China. Sixty six observational studies about the psychological statuses of people during the COVID-19 were included, searching up to 1 December 2020. Strengthening the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) was used to evaluate the quality of the included studies. OpenMeta[Analyst] was used for the data analysis. High prevalence of acute stress and fear symptoms were observed in the early period of the epidemic. Additionally, anxiety and depression symptoms continued at a high prevalence rate during the epidemic. It should alert the lasting mental health problems and the risk of post-traumatic stress disorder and other mental disorders. Systematic Review Registration: PROSPERO CRD 42020171485.

15.
Med Educ Online ; 26(1): 1913785, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1182935

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has brought unprecedented challenges to medical education systems and medical students. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of COVID-19 pandemic on medical career and specialty choices among medical students. An online cross-sectional survey of Chinese medical students was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic from February to April 2020. The students' willingness to be a doctor before and after the COVID-19 pandemic and changed willingness to specialize in respiratory medicine and infectious diseases were investigated. Multiple linear regression and binary logistic regression was used to explore factors that were associated with changes of willingness. A total of 1,837 medical students, including 1,227 females (66.8%), with a median age of 21.0 years, were recruited. Of the participants, 10.6% and 6.9% showed increased and decreased willingness to be a doctor after the COVID-19 outbreak, respectively. Moreover, 11.7% showed increased willingness and 9.5% showed decreased willingness to major in respiratory medicine and infectious diseases. Students with younger age, lower household income, fewer depressive symptoms, less exposure to negative pandemic information and more satisfaction with their own major after the pandemic were associated with increased willingness to be a doctor. Students who engaged in regular exercise, were males and undergraduate level, were interested in medicine, paid more attention to positive information, were satisfied with their majors, and had increased willingness to be a doctor after the pandemic were more likely to choose to specialize in respiratory medicine and infectious disease. However, the severity of anxiety symptoms was associated with decreased willingness to work in the specialties of respiratory medicine and infectious diseases. Psychological problems and professional satisfaction appear to be independent factors that affect medial career and specialty choices. The impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical students require further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Career Choice , Specialization , Students, Medical , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students, Medical/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Front Pediatr ; 8: 628072, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1069742

ABSTRACT

Background: Previous studies have shown that during COVID-19 pandemic, mainly due to the imposed lockdown, significant psychological problems had emerged in a significant part of the population, including older children and adolescents. School closure, leading to significant social isolation, was considered one of the most important reasons for pediatric mental health problems. However, how knowledge of COVID-19 related problems, modification of lifestyle and age, gender and severity of COVID-19 pandemic had influenced psychological problems of older children and adolescents has not been detailed. To evaluate these variables, a survey was carried out in Italy. Methods: This cross-sectional survey was carried out by means of an anonymous online questionnaire administered to 2,996 students of secondary and high schools living in Italian Regions with different COVID-19 epidemiology. Results: A total of 2,064 adolescent students (62.8% females; mean age, 15.4 ± 2.1 years), completed and returned the questionnaire. Most of enrolled students showed good knowledge of COVID-19-related problems. School closure was associated with significant modifications of lifestyle and the development of substantial psychological problems in all the study groups, including students living in Regions with lower COVID-19 incidence. However, in some cases, some differences, were evidenced. Sadness was significantly more frequent in females (84%) than males (68.2%; p < 0.001) and in the 14-19-year-old age group than the 11-13-year-old age group (79.2% vs. 70.2%; p < 0.001). Missing the school community was a significantly more common cause of sadness in girls (26.5% vs. 16.8%; p < 0.001), in southern Italy (26.45% vs. 20.2%; p < 0.01) and in the 14-19-year-old group (24.2% vs. 14.7%; p < 0.001). The multivariate regression analysis showed that male gender was a protective factor against negative feelings (p < 0.01), leading to a decrease of 0.63 points in the total negative feelings index. Having a family member or an acquaintance with COVID-19 increased the negative feelings index by 0.1 points (p < 0.05). Conclusions: This study shows that school closures because of the COVID-19 pandemic outbreak was associated with significant lifestyle changes in all the students, regardless of age and gender. Despite some differences in some subgroups, the study confirms that school closure can cause relevant mental health problems in older children and adolescents. This must be considered as a reason for the maintenance of all school activities, although in full compliance with the measures to contain the spread of the pandemic.

17.
J Cogn Psychother ; 34(4): 275-279, 2020 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999901

ABSTRACT

This invited commentary is the personal experience of a psychiatrist who assisted in Wuhan, China during the pandemic. From the personal perspective, it explains why psychiatrists need to go to Wuhan, discusses the psychological problems faced by the front-line medical staff and confirmed COVID-19 patients and the corresponding psychological interventions provided to them, describes the particularity and coping methods of psychological issues related to COVID-19 epidemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Physician's Role/psychology , Psychiatry/methods , Psychotherapy/methods , Adult , COVID-19/therapy , China , Humans
18.
Air Qual Atmos Health ; 14(3): 381-387, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-778065

ABSTRACT

Turkish people are facing several problems because of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19), as the pandemic has brought about drastic changes to their daily routines. This study mainly investigates the impact of this pandemic on the daily routines of Turkish. It also unveils how COVID-19 affects the air environment. The adopted methods for data collection are based on open-ended questions and Facebook interviews as per recommended by QSR-International (2012). The sample of this study comprises of Turkish students as well as professional workers. The findings of the research show that there are eighteen different results of COVID-19 that have been identified according to the Turkish people's daily routines. Results reveal that increasing unemployment, decrease in air contamination, high stress and depression, a slowdown in the economic growth, and the tourism industry are profoundly affected due to the COVID-19 in Turkey. Furthermore, on the one hand, the consequences of the pandemic are segregated into social problems and psychological issues in daily routines. On the other hand, they have shown a positive impact on the air environment. This study concludes that, amid the COVID-19 pandemic, the lives of the people in Turkey are subject to deterioration, while the air environment of Turkey is gradually improving.

19.
Med J Islam Repub Iran ; 34: 52, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-771108

ABSTRACT

Background: The worldwide emergence and rapid expansion of COVID-19 emphasizes the need to assess the knowledge gap and to predict the disease-related behaviors and reactions during this epidemic. Methods and design: COVID19 Population Survey of Iran (COPSIR) is a repeated cross sectional survey that will be conducted in 8 waves. In each wave, 515 Iranian adults aged 18 years or older will be randomly selected and interviewed by phone. The study waves will be performed at approximately weekly intervals. The survey tool is adapted from COSMO (COVID-19 Snapshot MOnitoring) study. This study will provide information on trends of knowledge, risk perception, preventive behaviors, psychological problems, essential needs, and public trust among Iranian adults during COVID-19 epidemic. Discussion: The key findings of each wave will be immediately reported to the National Headquarters for Coronavirus Control to set better policies for disease control and prevention. Moreover, if a message is extracted from the results of this study that needs to be communicated to the public, it will be done through the mass media.

20.
Nurs Outlook ; 68(6): 830-837, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726809

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To explore the relationship between psychosocial support related factors and the mental health of COVID-19 positive patients. METHODS: This exploratory study of 35 COVID-19 positive patients were enrolled between February 1 to March 1, 2020. Sleep quality, depression, anxiety, and social support were measured and social support related data of participants were collected. Psychological intervention was administered and patients were followed two weeks post intervention. Linear regression was performed to explore the relationship between psychosocial risk factors and improvement of psychological symptoms. FINDINGS: Thirty-two individuals exhibited sleep, depressive and anxiety symptoms which improved post support intervention. At baseline, symptoms were associated with gender, severity of pneumonia, social support. Better social support at follow-up and improvement from COVID-19 predicted improvement in their psychological symptoms. DISCUSSION: This initial evidence from China may stress the importance of administering psychosocial intervention during the treatment of COVID-19 for better patient outcomes in other countries.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Patients/psychology , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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