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1.
Mayo Clin Proc Innov Qual Outcomes ; 2022 Aug 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2031554

ABSTRACT

Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients with COVID-19 are at higher risk of morbidity and mortality. This study describes the risks and outcome of CVD patients with COVID-19 attending primary health care corporation (PHCC) settings in Qatar. Aim/Objectives: To report whether CVD increase the risk for hospitalization and further complications in COVID-19 patients. Methods: Retrospective cohort study. Results: A total of 10,178 CVD patients' data who tested COVID-19 positive were extracted from electronic medical records based on the inclusion criteria and analysed during the period of February-December 2020 (11 months). Among these 64% (n=6527) were men and 36%(n=3651) were women, 23% (n=2299) were Qatari and 77%(n=7879) were non-Qatari. Among the selected age group of > 25 years and < 75 years, the median age was 50.83. More than half of the patients had diabetes (69.62%; n=7086) followed by hypertension (68.43%; n=6965) and dyslipidemia (45.1%; n= 4590). Other comorbidities are obesity (18.29%; n=1862) and kidney disease (6.5%; n=659), hematological problems (4.18%; n=425), liver disorders (1.4; n=142), rhematic heart disease (1.3%; n=131) and neurological complaints (1.26%; n=128). Multivariate analysis for factor associated with in patient admission in last 28 days for Cardiovascular patients shows that patients with age >70 years are 2.79 (1.86-4.18) times more likely to have the risk of hospital admission compared with the age 25-30 years. Conclusion: The pre-existing CVD with age and other comorbidities predict risk for hospitalization and further complications in COVID 19 patients. Further studies are needed to investigate the data from primary and secondary care about the long-term cardiovascular outcomes of patients who have survived COVID-19.

2.
Journal of Business Strategy Finance and Management ; 4(1):52-65, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025617

ABSTRACT

The year 2020 has turned the world upside down with the outbreak of the disease COVID 19. It forced the companies to shift their work focus from office to work from home. Every sector of the economy got affected by the pandemic and a financial crisis was faced by almost every firm. To deal with the financial crisis, many firms have altered their compensation packages. The world of The Middle East is nowhere left behind. The firms of GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) countries known for their attractive pay packages were forced to make modifications, adjustments, and variations to their compensation. The current paper analyzes various amendments made by firms in the Gulf Countries like Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, UAE, Qatar, Oman, and Bahrain to their compensation management system to cope with the challenges of the pandemic. It also highlights the remittances provided by the governments of these countries to tackle the situation. Analysis was done based on secondary data which includes the Gulf Health Council Report, International Labor Organization reports, Mercer Consultant Report, publication of Arab Reform Initiative, OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) publication on MENA countries, and World Bank report (2018). The findings highlighted the turbulence experienced by employees working in gulf, as majority of GCC countries lacked in providing pay protection and job protection. It also describes to what extent the remittances provided by the government in these countries were helpful to the expatriates.

3.
QScience Connect ; 2022(3):1-2, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2025135

ABSTRACT

Engaging in the arts has been demonstrated scientifically to enhance brain function. Creativity can modify a person's perspective and experience of the world. Changes in cerebrum waves impact changes in the nervous system which can raise serotonin levels. This can affect emotions positively by regulating moods and improving brain function which influences both psychological and physiological wellbeing. Creativity is part of our natural development and should be a part of our healing as a community. Art Therapy (AT) is a mental health profession which carries out innovative adaptations as it is recognized as a stand-alone clinical intervention and through community engagement and social justice. Art Therapists are collaborating within diverse fields of clinical and non-clinical practice such as neuroscience and virtual reality. Three papers explore the development of Art Therapy as a profession in Qatar and how AT is an accessible and underutilised or often misjudged profession. Paper one introduces ways that AT is practiced as a clinical, social action and community-based profession. AT might address the shame connected with psychological wellness by connecting with communities, sharing experiences of AT with the general public and by clinical professionals to support their careers, prompting less burnout. Dr. Hadi Mohamad Abu Rasheed shares the Qatar Cancer Society's experience of using Art in psychosocial support for children living with cancer. The western trained Art Therapist's awareness of cultural competence when working in the context of non-western cultural approaches to mental health is imperative to complement the heritage, creativity and community values of the local culture. Intersectional frameworks will inform ethical professional values to be upheld. Paper two develops how AT offers context to reduce the stigma of mental health in Qatar. The first Museum and Gallery AT visit in Qatar, with patients attending a substance misuse program, saw outcomes that included increased engagement in clinical sessions and an art exhibition that was held in the hospital and at conferences within Qatar and globally. Paper three discusses the global alterations in the AT workplace following the Covid-19 epidemic;online AT;and how AT has adapted to employing technology before and after the pandemic. The technology employed in AT is not new. Art Therapists are now using Virtual Reality, where the client becomes part of the world they have created, interacting in it, with the art therapist present. The Emotion Sensing Recognition (ESRA) app is being developed by Dr. Mowafa and Dr. Jens with the consultation of an Art Therapist Trish, to ensure the ethics of working with images. This app can increase positive parent-child attachment and increase the ability to recognise and talk about feelings for parent and child. AT is a cost-effective adaptive treatment and is being prescribed by General Practitioners in the UK and USA alongside visits to museums, choirs etc. How will Qatar embrace this adaptable, unique profession and will ensure it is ethically practiced by trained licensed Art Therapists? Collaborative research and training within different fields should be encouraged. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of QScience Connect is the property of Hamad bin Khalifa University Press (HBKU Press) and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

4.
Qatar Medical Journal ; 2022(3), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2006443

ABSTRACT

Background: Elite professional sports events involving mass gatherings carry a high risk of viral transmission during the coronavirus disease of 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We describe the potential impact of resuming professional football leagues involving international participants adhering to a strict Biosecure bubble protocol and investigate the consequences of spectators/fan attendance at such mass events during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic in Qatar. Methods: We conducted a descriptive cohort study involving football players, referees, match officials, local organizing committee (LOC) members, hotel and security staff working in close coordination, and over 10,000 spectators from the Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Champions League (East) and the final match. The study covered almost four weeks of the event (November 19 to December 19, 2020) under a robust Bio-secure bubble protocol. It included extensive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) RT-PCR (reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction) every 3-6 days and clinical symptom monitoring on and off the field. Target variables included positive RT-PCR results and clinical symptom monitoring among participants, and rapid antigen testing for fan attendance to examine their safe return to the stadiums. Results: A total of 12,250 RT-PCR tests involving 3158 individuals in the Bio-secure bubble were done over one month for all the AFC (East) matches, including the final match. Overall, 44 matches involving 16 teams were played. During the championship, only five individuals (three LOC members and two match officials) returned positive for COVID-19 infections. Four individuals (three team staff/officials and one person outside the Bio-secure bubble) had reactive results. None of the players tested positive for COVID-19 infection. All individuals testing positive were asymptomatic or had mild symptoms, with no one requiring hospitalization other than symptomatic treatment. The overall positivity rate was 0.15% for the entire duration of the AFC (East) Champions League. For the final match, a total of 10,320 rapid antigen tests were done for spectators, of which only one test was positive for COVID-19. Conclusions: This report shows a very low incidence rate of COVID-19 infections during mass gathering events at the international level. For the resumption of football with spectators, careful mitigation strategies should be considered to reduce the risk of transmission to a sufficiently safe level. This may require proper coordination and measures (i.e., physical distancing, testing, entry, and exit routes in the stadium, and seating arrangement inside the stadium with limited attendance). Based on this, during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the supervised and controlled resumption of football matches with spectators can be done safely provided that a strict Bio-secure bubble protocol has been implemented.

5.
IDCases ; 30, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-2004125

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 vaccines are generally proven safe in all population and are highly recommended. However, rare adverse events have been reported. We hereby present a case of an 18-year-old man who presented to emergency department with fever, meningitis like symptoms, shortness of breath, chest pain, skin rash, and extreme fatigue. He had cardiac manifestations including hypotension, elevated troponin, and reduced ejection fraction. High inflammatory markers were also noted. He was initially worked up for and treated as a possible infectious etiology, but the microbiological studies were negative and there was no response to treatment. Since he had recently received booster dose of Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination three weeks prior to onset of symptoms, a possibility of Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) was made. His presentation fulfilled all the diagnostic criteria. The possibility for MIS-C being related to vaccination was proposed after relevant serological tests showed that the antibodies, he had were due to COVID-19 vaccine, not to a prior infection. After he received appropriate immunomodulatory treatment (IVIG and methylprednisolone) as per the guideline, he showed marked clinical improvement. Our case report highlights the need to consider MIS-C as a potential differential in young patients who present with unexplained multisystem illness with increased inflammatory markers and negative microbiologic work-up. MIS-C can be secondary to COVID-19 vaccination as well as to prior COVID-19 infection

6.
The European Journal of Psychiatry ; 2022.
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2004040

ABSTRACT

Background and objectives Perceived stigma related to infectious diseases is of public health importance and can adversely impact patients' physical and mental health. This study aims to identify the level of perceived stigma among COVID-19 survivors in Qatar and investigate its predictors. Methods An analytical cross-sectional design was employed. Four hundred and four participants who had a positive COVID-19 PCR test were randomly selected from medical records. The selected participants were interviewed to collect sociodemographic and health-related information. Perceived stigma was assessed using the COVID-19 perceived stigma scale-22 (CPSS-22) that was developed by the researchers. A descriptive analysis followed by a bivariate analysis investigated possible associations between the perceived stigma levels and independent variables. A multivariable analysis was performed using logistic regression to identify any significant associations with perceived stigma. The validity and reliability of the developed tool were also tested. Results The prevalence of COVID-19 perceived stigma was twenty-six percent (n=107, 26.4%) at 95% CI [22.4-30.4]. Factors associated with higher COVID-19 perceived stigma were male gender, being a manual worker, non-Arabic ethnicity, low educational level, living alone, and being isolated outside the home. However, only occupation, ethnicity, and low educational level predicted COVID-19 perceived stigma in multivariable analysis. The CPSS-22 showed excellent reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.92). Conclusion Perceived stigma was relatively common among participants. Designing programs and interventions targeting male manual workers and those of low-educational levels may assist policymakers in mitigating the stigma related to COVID-19.

7.
SciDev.net ; 2021.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1998385

ABSTRACT

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), conflicts in the region have left around 17 million refugees. How could the WHO approve the vaccine when clinical trials didn’t target a significant number of people and when, according to a document published by Reuters, some WHO experts were sceptical? There have also been some trials on people above 60 years old but on a smaller number, so it is hard to measure the efficacy for this group. [...]WHO recommends that countries using the vaccine should monitor its safety and efficacy.

8.
New England Journal of Medicine ; 386(13):1288-1290, 2022.
Article in English | GIM | ID: covidwho-1998324

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to assess the effectiveness of previous SARS-CoV-2 infection in preventing hospitalization or death caused by reinfection from the study population broadly representative of the total population of Qatar. Results showed that The effectiveness of previous infection in preventing reinfection was estimated to be 90.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 60.2 to 97.6) against the alpha variant, 85.7% (95% CI, 75.8 to 91.7) against the beta variant, 92.0% (95% CI, 87.9 to 94.7) against the delta variant, and 56.0% (95% CI, 50.6 to 60.9) against the omicron variant. Sensitivity analyses confirmed the study results, as expected for this study design, which is robust regardless of the approach that is used to control for vaccine-induced immunity. Reinfected patients with alpha, beta, delta, and omicron variants progressed to severe COVID-19. None of the reinfections developed COVID-19. Effectiveness against severe, critical, or deadly COVID-19 was 69.4% against the alpha variant, 88.0% against the beta variant, 100% against the delta variant, and 87.8% against the omicron variant. This national database analysis in Qatar showed that past infection effectively prevented reinfection with SARS-CoV-2 alpha, beta, and delta variants, confirming earlier estimates. Protection against reinfection with the omicron version was reduced but remained considerable. In addition, past infection seems to protect against hospitalization or mortality from reinfection, independent of variant.

9.
Sustainability ; 14(15):9715, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1994199

ABSTRACT

Land-use transition is one of the most profound human-induced alterations of the Earth’s system. It can support better land management and decision-making for increasing the yield of food production to fulfill the food needs in a specific area. However, modeling land-use change involves the complexity of human drivers and natural or environmental constraints. This study develops an agent-based model (ABM) for land use transitions using critical indicators that contribute to food deserts. The model’s performance was evaluated using Guilford County, North Carolina, as a case study. The modeling inputs include land covers, climate variability (rainfall and temperature), soil quality, land-use-related policies, and population growth. Studying the interrelationships between these factors can improve the development of effective land-use policies and help responsible agencies and policymakers plan accordingly to improve food security. The agent-based model illustrates how and when individuals or communities could make specific land-cover transitions to fulfill the community’s food needs. The results indicate that the agent-based model could effectively monitor land use and environmental changes to visualize potential risks over time and help the affected communities plan accordingly.

10.
Sci Med Footb ; 2022 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1984986

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We sought to assess the risk of COVID-19 and seasonal flu including respiratory syncytial (RSV) and influenza viruses during the FIFA Arab Cup 2021 in Qatar with full capacity of spectators. We also, evaluated the post-event attitude toward the resumption of mass football events. METHODS: this was a cross-sectional study in which spectators (age ≥ 18 years) were invited for reverse-transcription PCR testing for COVID-19 and seasonal flu. At the same time, between 7 and 14 days after the event, the participants completed a self-administered questionnaire regarding their concerns during the tournament. RESULTS: the tournament included 16 international football teams from the Arab countries. As per the study protocol, 10,000 spectators were approached and 6,475 participated. Among the participants, 4,195 (65.1%), 2,253 (34.9%) and 27 (0.4%) were vaccinated with 2 doses, vaccinated with 3 doses, and recovered from SARS-Cov-2 infection, respectively. There were 61 (0.9%), 41(0.6%) and11(0.2%) participants who tested positive for COVID-19, RSV and influenza (A/B), respectively. The average cycle threshold (Ct) value for COVID-19 positive cases was 26.1±7.3. Among those who were electronically approached, 6,102 completed the survey whereas 373 had incomplete survey. Overall, 2069 (33.9%) participants reported symptoms that theoretically could be related to COVID-19, of them 39 had positive PCR test (1.9%). Most spectators (94.3%) were optimistic about returning sports to the pre-pandemic status. CONCLUSIONS: There was no significant increase in the daily COVID-19 cases during the FIFA Arab Cup with full capacity of vaccinated spectators. Therefore, upcoming mass football events can be held safely.

11.
Nature ; 608(7921):13, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1984368

ABSTRACT

The work feeds into broader research on "how different immunities combine with each other", says study co-author Laith Abu-Raddad, an infectiousdisease epidemiologist at Weill Cornell Medicine-Qatar in Doha. DISCO-BALL SATELLITE WILL PUT EINSTEIN'S THEORY TO ITS TOUGHEST TEST YET A newly launched satellite aims to measure how Earth's rotation drags the fabric of space-time around itself - an effect of Einstein's general theory of relativity - ten times more accurately than ever before. The Laser Relativity Satellite 2 (LARES-2) was built by the Italian Space Agency and launched from the European Space Agency spaceport in Kourou, French Guiana, on 13 July on the maiden flight of an upgraded version of the European Vega rocket, called Vega C. LARES-2's structure is disarmingly simple: it is a metal sphere covered with 303 reflectors, with no on-board electronics or navigation control.

12.
Neurosciences ; 27(3):164-174, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1979781

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess and compare the admission rates of medical complications (MC) after Bariatric and metabolic surgery (BMS) over a period of 6 years prior to and during the pandemic. Bariatric and metabolic surgery could be associated with MC, including malnutrition and neuromuscular complications (NC). Methods: Retrospective study of all patients admitted to Hamad General Hospital, Qatar, with post-BMS MC before (n=12, January 2014-December 2019) and  during  the  pandemic  (n=36, January 2020-31 May 2021). We assessed 17 nutrients, nerve conduction/electromyography diagnosed NC, and we explored whether patients had clustering of gastrointestinal symptoms, barium meal findings, excess weight loss percentage (EWL%), or non-compliance with post-BMS clinic visits and multivitamin supplements. Results: The sample comprised 95.8% sleeve gastrectomies, mean age was 26.62 years, and 54.2% were women. Admissions increased from pre-pandemic 0.29 per 100 BMS to 11.04 during the pandemic (p<0.0001), despite no significant differences in patients' demographic/surgical profiles, nutrient deficiencies, or MC characteristics. Across the sample, the most frequent neuropathies were mixed sensory/motor/axonal;albumin and total protein deficiencies were observed in 54.2% and 29.2% of patients, respectively (no pre-pandemic/ pandemic differences). Most frequent micronutrient and trace element deficiencies were potassium, vitamin D, and zinc (no pre-pandemic/pandemic differences). Admitted patients had high non-compliance with multivitamins supplementation (87.5%), high post-BMS nausea/vomiting (66.7%, 62.6%, respectively), high EWL% (mean=74.19±27.84%), no post-BMS outpatient follow up (75% during pre-pandemic, 88.9% during pandemic) (no pre-pandemic/pandemic differences for all), and gastroesophageal reflux (higher during the pandemic, p=0.016). Conclusion: Despite the reduced number of BMS during the pandemic, hospital admissions of MC significantly increased.

13.
Journal of Emergency Medicine, Trauma and Acute Care ; 2022(4), 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1979556

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has tested the limits of national public health infrastructures to an unprecedented extent. A huge challenge has been regarding how to safely manage large public gatherings and how to efficiently administer vaccines to a large population. Method: We evaluated three case studies in project management implemented by the Primary Healthcare Corporation (PHCC) over the course of 2020 and 2021, including: COVID-19 screening for the HH Amir Cup and Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Finals 2020, the FIFA Club World Cup 2020, and finally Qatar's National COVID-19 Mass Vaccination Project in the Qatar National Convention Centre (QNCC) in 2021. Results: The key themes arising from all the three projects include the importance of developing a strategic plan, project management planning, clarifying and communicating roles and responsibilities, situational decision making, strong leadership, flexibility, result orientation in implementing the project, strong logistical support for providing necessary resources on the ground, and ensuring that staff at all levels are fully supported in performing their duties. In addition, the project management team was successful in building knowledge and experience across events with each successive project benefitting from lessons learned from previous projects. As a result of the strong record of project management established over the course of these experiences, PHCC was able to successfully manage the mass vaccination project with a high level of efficiency in comparison to similar national programs implemented elsewhere, both regionally and globally. Conclusion: The successful implementation of these projects, maintaining a high level of client and staff safety and satisfaction, demonstrates the value of project planning and continuous monitoring in successful implementation even in the context of uncertain conditions such as a global pandemic. Public and community health authorities may benefit by applying similar principles as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold.

14.
Arab Law Quarterly ; 36(3):351-370, 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-1978611

ABSTRACT

This article examines challenges and proposes legal solutions for the enforcement of contracts especially after the transformation of the economy following Covid-19 and related governmental measures that have swept throughout the world since December 2019. Maximising the role of the judge and increasing the contractual parties' involvement in phases of contractual disputes constitute the core of this research. This article argues for strengthening the contractual guarantees by advocating for the use of the two contract doctrines of force majeure that normally lead to termination of contractual obligations, and changed circumstances that may trigger intervention of the judge to lift the economic burden of the debtor and reach a fair solution. This article also argues for adopting a more flexible approach to the application of the doctrine of change of circumstances during the performance of the contract that not necessarily relies on this traditional distinction between force majeure and hardship.

15.
Gastroenterology ; 162(7):S-374, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967301

ABSTRACT

Background: Pancreatic involvement in patients with Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) has been reported in the literature. The pancreatic injury in COVID-19 patients might be a result of the direct cytopathic effect of viral replication or indirectly related to the immune response to the viral infection. Methods:Westudied 183 patients diagnosed with symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 and admitted to COVID-19 facilities in Qatar. We included only the patients with documented positive SARS-COV-2 PCR and measured lipase levels. The cohort was categorized into two groups based on the serum lipase level. The cutoff was the elevation of the serum lipase more than three times the upper limit of normal. Patients with lipase levels below the cutoff were included in the first group, and those with lipase levels above the cutoff were included in the second group. The primary outcome was mortality. The secondary outcomes were disease severity on presentation and markers of disease progression. Markers of disease progression (Table 1) included the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), shock, multi-organ failure, the requirement for ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Results: Our study population had a mean age of 49 and a mean BMI of 28. There was a male predominance in the study sample (more than 91%), reflecting the country's demographics. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in the mean age, BMI, gender distribution, or patients' reported symptoms. There was an increased prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) and hypertension (HTN) in our study population (45.4% and 44.8%). Apart from the increased prevalence of chronic liver disease in the second group, there was no statistically significant difference in the prevalence of comorbidities (e.g., DM, HTN) between the two groups (Table 1). The second group showed a statistically significant increase in mean creatinine, troponin, procalcitonin, ferritin, and amylase compared to the first group. On the other hand, the mean hemoglobin, sodium and albumin were lower (Table 2). Interestingly, more patients in the second group received tocilizumab and oseltamivir (Table 1). The mortality rate in our study population was 15.3%, with a higher mortality rate in the second group (Table 1). Almost 50% of the patients developed ARDS. Multiple markers of disease progression, including the development of ARDS, shock, and multi-organ failure;requirement for ICU, mechanical ventilation, and CRRT were increased in the second group compared to the first group. Also, the mean length of stay was higher in the second group (Table 1). Conclusion: Based on our study, hospitalized patients with COVID-19 who had higher lipase levels had a higher mortality rate and higher risk for disease progression. (Table Presented)

16.
Electronic Journal of e-Learning ; 20(4):360-373, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1965127

ABSTRACT

The sudden and prolonged disruption to learning caused by the COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of traditional higher education and revealed the need for a rapid transformation. Lessons from the pandemic have made it clear that the future of higher education will rely heavily on e-learning and the agility of institutions to seamlessly transition between face-to-face, blended/hybrid, and fully online learning. As institutions begin their post-pandemic planning, the online experiences of different groups of learners during the pandemic offer valuable insight into what is working and what isn’t. Consequently, this study explored the effect of gender and discipline (STEM/non-STEM) on students’ perceptions of (1) course design, (2) assessment, (3) student behavior, (4) instructor behavior, and (5) tools and technologies during forced online learning. Additionally, the researchers investigated the effect of gender and discipline on students’ overall satisfaction with remote learning and explored the influence of students’ perceptions on satisfaction. Study participants were 1, 825 undergraduates at eight universities in Qatar. Using the QLT evaluation rubric, the researchers adapted a 27-item survey to measure students’ perceptions of key aspects of quality online teaching and learning and to gauge overall satisfaction. Using a SEM approach, study results showed that (1) male students had more positive perceptions of instructor behavior, assessment, and tools and technologies compared to females, (2) males were more satisfied overall with their remote learning experiences, (3) students in STEM disciplines had significantly more negative perceptions of all the aspects of online learning explored in the study, (4) students in STEM disciplines were significantly less satisfied overall with remote learning, and (5) students’ perceptions of tools and technologies, assessment, and course design most influenced their overall satisfaction. This study also considers the unique cultural context in Qatar when interpreting results, particularly in regards to women. These findings have important implications for faculty development and post-pandemic planning in higher education in general and the Gulf in particular. © The Authors.

17.
Economies ; 10(7):168, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1963777

ABSTRACT

Faced with food supply disruptions due in part to geopolitics and political instability in its traditional food source markets in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, Qatar—a wealthy, highly import-dependent open economy—plans to identify a set of alternative markets that can assure it of a stable food supply chain and food security. This study develops a set of preferences and import substitution elasticities for the country’s four most important food categories: meats, dairy, vegetables, and cereals. We used quarterly food import data from 2004 to 2017 and the Restricted Source-Differentiated Almost Ideal Demand System (RSDAIDS) to estimate import-substitution elasticities for meats, dairy, vegetables, and cereals imported by Qatar. Based on our findings, India, Australia, and the Netherlands emerged as Qatar’s most competitive sources of food, followed by Brazil, Jordan, and Argentina. Qatar can assure sustained demand for food imports from the aforementioned countries in order to address its food security.

18.
Applied Sciences ; 12(14):7258, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1963689

ABSTRACT

This paper presents the findings of a scoping review that maps exploratory evidence and gaps in research on information and communication technology (ICT) access and use among older persons in the Arab region. This review is part of a larger project that studies ICT access and use and related challenges faced by older adults in Qatar. A search was conducted in eleven scientific databases and search engines covering empirical studies published in English and Arabic between January 2016 and June 2021. Eleven studies were retrieved in the final corpus. A thematic analysis alongside the PRISMA for scoping reviews (PRISMA-ScR) was used to retrieve the findings. Our analysis identifies smartphones and social media applications for communication and information sharing as the most accessed and used technologies by older persons in the region. Moreover, our review highlighted the importance of the sociocultural factors in shaping ICT access and use by older persons in the region. The functional limitations of older persons in interaction with certain technology factors such as usability, functionality, and accessibility were also highlighted as major challenges inhibiting ICT access and use by this population segment. This scoping review provides a comprehensive overview of ICT access and use, and the factors affecting them among older persons in the Arab region. It highlights the scarcity of research on the subject in the region. It also stresses the fact that there is a need for more research on older persons and their caregivers in the context of the Arab world. More culturally appropriate need-based and adapted technologies are also recommended. Our review is a comprehensive source for researchers and technology developers interested in targeting and engaging older adults in the Arab region.

19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 877424, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963611

ABSTRACT

Background: Several studies have investigated how the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic impacted children's lifestyle. To our knowledge, this is the first study that assesses the impact of quarantine on physical activity, screen time, sleep, and diet in children aged 5 to 12 in Qatar. Methods: Cross-sectional data from an online survey distributed in Qatar was analyzed. The survey measured the parents' or caregivers' assessment on the change in the child's physical activity, sleep, screen time, and diet between the two periods (before quarantine and during quarantine). The data was analyzed using frequency distributions, paired t-test and McNemar's test. Results: Data from 144 respondents were analyzed. Due to the quarantine, the total weekly average hours of physical activity significantly decreased with a greatest reduction for the school and after school durations. Only 4.5% of the children were engaging in at least 60 minutes of physical activity per day (in contrast to 25.6% prior to quarantine). The reported barriers for physical activity were screen time for school (52.8%) and leisure (51.4%). There was a significant increase in the total number of main meals per day, with a higher consumption of unhealthy food. The majority of the children had their bedtime and waketime shifted to later because of the quarantine. The parents' or caregivers' satisfaction with the child's lifestyle during quarantine showed that 49.1% were disappointed or very disappointed. Also, 53.8% described their child's mental health as "better before quarantine." Conclusions: Quarantine had a negative impact on the lifestyle of children in Qatar. When implementing restrictions, authorities should consider some interventions to counterpart such impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Exercise , Humans , Life Style , Qatar/epidemiology , Quarantine/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Infect Drug Resist ; 15: 3871-3879, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963198

ABSTRACT

Objective: To determine the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 virus infection among female workers who were restricted to working from home compared with those who continued to attend in-person work. Methods: As part of national surveillance program, serum samples for SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing and nasopharyngeal swabs for SARS-CoV-2 PCR were obtained on 1636 female school staff and salon/spa workers who were restricted to work remotely (restricted group) and 1190 female health-care workers who continued in-person work (unrestricted group). Results: Seropositivity rate was 5.1% among the restricted and 22.7% among the unrestricted group (P < 0.0001). Presence of symptoms at baseline (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 2.88; 95% CI 2.09-3.97), contact with a confirmed case (aOR 2.34; 95% CI 1.37-3.98), and unrestricted work type (aOR 4.71; 95% CI 3.24-6.86) were associated with a higher risk of infection, while increasing age was associated with a lower risk of infection. Conclusion: Prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection as determined by seropositivity was higher among women who were not subject to workplace restrictions.

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