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1.
Disabil Rehabil ; : 1-10, 2022 Nov 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106941

ABSTRACT

Purpose: For working age adults, return to work (RTW) after severe COVID-19 can be an essential component of rehabilitation. We explored the expectations and experiences related to RTW in a group of workers recovering from severe COVID-19 in Slovenia.Materials and methods: Four focus groups were conducted between May 2021 and August 2021. Fifteen men and three women, aged between 39 and 65 years, participated. We analysed data using reflexive thematic analysis.Results: Four main themes were developed in the analysis, pertaining to (1) work identity, (2) challenges to work re-entry, (3) personal strengths and support systems, and (4) possible adaptations at work. The disruption of work triggered sentiments about its role in identity. Workers' personal agency and self-advocacy helped participants cope with various barriers that were beyond their control, such as physical limitations and lack of systematic routines to address RTW. Workers recovering from severe COVID-19 were at risk of developing negative expectations regarding their work re-entry.Conclusions: RTW after severe COVID-19 involves different personal, organizational and systemic dimensions that need to be considered and carefully aligned. Due to the individuality of the process, the worker should be involved as a key partner in the RTW process.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONLack of clinical pathways can negatively impact return to work (RTW) after severe COVID-19.RTW processes should start early but timely and include individual follow up.Patients expect the interdisciplinary team of experts to work together and involve them in all phases of decision-making regarding their rehabilitation and RTW process.Positive expectations regarding work re-entry are essential for the RTW process.

2.
Disabil Rehabil ; : 1-8, 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106940

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate experiences and reflections on challenges in everyday life of people living with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and chronic pain in order to improve rehabilitation services. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The design for this study was qualitative using the Interpretive Description methodology and the salutogenic theory of Sense of Coherence as the theoretical framework. Four semi-structured focus group interviews were conducted with 19 adults with LGMD from April to May 2021. The interviews were conducted online due to COVID-19. RESULTS: Living with chronic pain and LGMD affected everyday life in terms of the participants' overall Sense of Coherence. Beneficial or unfavorable coping strategies were identified within four interrelated categorical themes: pain management, normality comprehension, affected emotional sentiment and altered identity. CONCLUSION: Healthcare professionals should acknowledge possible chronic pain secondary to LGMD. Chronic pain appears to be a prevalent problem in people with LGMD with negative impact on everyday life, yet patients with LGMD did not receive sufficient information and necessary tools from health professionals to cope with chronic pain. Thus, adequate pain management appeared to be a difficult and self-taught process. Educating health professionals on how to support patients with LGMD and chronic pain is needed.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONHealth professionals should acknowledge and address the possibility of chronic pain secondary to limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) and educate patients in pain management.Physiotherapy, energy management and engagement in meaningful activities may help patients gain some control of pain and limit the consequences of pain on everyday life.Supporting patients to accept pain and to shift focus towards their current capabilities may potentially improve pain management.Educating health professionals on how to support patients with LGMD and chronic pain is needed.

3.
Disabil Rehabil ; : 1-10, 2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106939

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study explored the experiences of patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and health service leaders of compassion in the care of people hospitalized with COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study is a secondary analysis of qualitative data deriving from primary research data on recommendations for healthcare organizations providing care to people hospitalized with COVID-19. Participants comprised patients with COVID-19 (n = 10), family caregivers (n = 5) and HCPs in COVID-19 units (n = 12). Primary research data were analyzed deductively under the "lens" of compassion, as defined by Goetz. RESULTS: Four interacting themes were found: (1) COVID-19 - to care or not to care? The importance of feeling safe, (2) A lonely illness - suffering in isolation with COVID-19, (3) Compassionate care for people with COVID-19 across the hospital continuum, and (4) Sustaining compassionate care for people hospitalized with COVID-19 - healthcare provider compassion fatigue and burnout. CONCLUSIONS: Compassionate care is not a given for people hospitalized with COVID-19. Healthcare providers must feel safe to provide care before responding compassionately. People hospitalized with COVID-19 experience additional suffering through isolation. Compassionate care for people hospitalized with COVID-19 is more readily identifiable in the rehabilitation setting. However, compassion fatigue and burnout in this context threaten healthcare sustainability.IMPLICATIONS FOR REHABILITATIONHealthcare providers need to feel physically and psychologically safe to provide compassionate care for people hospitalized with COVID-19.People hospitalized with COVID-19 infection experience added suffering through the socially isolating effects of physical distancing.Compassion and virtuous behaviours displayed by healthcare providers are expected and valued by patients and caregivers, including during the COVID-19 pandemic.High levels of compassion fatigue and burnout threaten the sustainability of hospital-based care for people with COVID-19.

4.
Scand J Prim Health Care ; : 1-11, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2106867

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: When the COVID-19 pandemic reached Norway, primary health care had to reorganize to ensure safe patient treatment and maintain infection control. General practitioners (GPs) are key health care providers in the municipalities. Our aim was to explore the experiences and management strategies of Norwegian GPs during the COVID-19 pandemic - over time, and in the context of a sudden organizational change. DESIGN: Longitudinal qualitative interview study with two interview rounds. The first round of interviews was conducted from September-December 2020, the second round from January-April 2021. In the first interview round, we performed eight semi-structured interviews with GPs from eight municipalities in Norway. In the second round, five of the GPs were re-interviewed. Consecutive interviews were performed 2-4 months apart. To analyze the data, we used thematic analysis. RESULTS: The COVID-19 pandemic required GPs to balance several concerns, such as continuity of care and their own professional efforts. Several GPs experienced challenges in the collaboration with the municipality and in relation to defining their own professional position. Guided by The Norwegian Association of General practitioners, The Norwegian College of General Practice and collegial support, they found viable solutions and ended up with a feeling of having adapted to a new normal. CONCLUSIONS: Although our study demonstrates that the GPs adapted to the changing conditions, the current municipal health care models are not ideal. There is a need for clarification of responsibilities between GPs and the municipality to facilitate a more coordinated future pandemic response.Key PointsFacing the COVID-19 pandemic, the primary health care service in Norway had to reorganize to ensure safe patient treatment and maintain infection control.Several GPs experienced challenges in collaboration with the municipalities.There is a need for clarification of responsibilities between GPs and the municipality.

5.
Front Digit Health ; 4: 944860, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099119

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The start of the COVID-19 pandemic led the Los Angeles safety net health system to dramatically reduce in-person visits and transition abruptly to telehealth/telemedicine services to deliver clinical care (remote telephone and video visits). However, safety net patients and the settings that serve them face a "digital divide" that could impact effective implementation of such digital care. The study objective was to examine attitudes and perspectives of leadership and frontline staff regarding telehealth integration in the Los Angeles safety net, with a focus on telemedicine video visits. Methods: This qualitative study took place in the Los Angeles County Department of Health Services (LAC DHS), the second-largest safety net health system in the US. This system disproportionately serves the uninsured, Medicaid, racial/ethnic minority, low-income, and Limited English Proficient (LEP) patient populations of Los Angeles County. Staff and leadership personnel from each of the five major LAC DHS hospital center clinics, and community-based clinics from the LAC DHS Ambulatory Care Network (ACN) were individually interviewed (video or phone calls), and discussions were recorded. Interview guides were based on the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), and included questions about the video visit technology platform and its usability, staff resources, clinic needs, and facilitators and barriers to general telehealth implementation and use. Interviews were analyzed for summary of major themes. Results: Twenty semi-structured interviews were conducted in August to October 2020. Participants included LAC DHS physicians, nurses, medical assistants, and physical therapists with clinical and/or administrative roles. Narrative themes surrounding telehealth implementation, with video visits as the case study, were identified and then categorized at the patient, clinic (including provider), and health system levels. Conclusions: Patient, clinic, and health system level factors must be considered when disseminating telehealth services across the safety net. Participant discussions illustrated how multilevel facilitators and barriers influenced the feasibility of video visits and other telehealth encounters. Future research should explore proposed solutions from frontline stakeholders as testable interventions towards advancing equity in telehealth implementation: from patient training and support, to standardized workflows that leverage the expertise of multidisciplinary teams.

6.
Health Technol Assess ; 26(41): 1-118, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Corticosteroids are a mainstay of the treatment of moderately severe relapses of ulcerative colitis, yet almost 50% of patients do not respond fully to these and risk prolonged steroid use and side effects. There is a lack of clarity about the definitions of steroid resistance, the optimum choice of treatment, and patient and health-care professional treatment preferences. OBJECTIVES: The overall aim of this research was to understand how steroid-resistant ulcerative colitis is managed in adult secondary care and how current practice compares with patient and health-care professional preferences. DESIGN: A mixed-methods study, including an online survey, qualitative interviews and discrete choice experiments. SETTING: NHS inflammatory bowel disease services in the UK. PARTICIPANTS: Adults with ulcerative colitis and health-care professionals treating inflammatory bowel disease. RESULTS: We carried out a survey of health-care professionals (n = 168), qualitative interviews with health-care professionals (n = 20) and patients (n = 33), discrete choice experiments with health-care professionals (n = 116) and patients (n = 115), and a multistakeholder workshop (n = 9). The interviews with and survey of health-care professionals showed that most health-care professionals define steroid resistance as an incomplete response to 40 mg per day of prednisolone after 2 weeks. The survey also found that anti-tumour necrosis factor drugs (particularly infliximab) are the most frequently offered drugs across most steroid-resistant (and steroid-dependent) patient scenarios, but they are less frequently offered to thiopurine-naive patients. Patient interviews identified several factors influencing their treatment choices, including effectiveness of treatment, recommendations from health-care professionals, route of administration and side effects. Over time, depending on the severity and duration of symptoms and, crucially, as medical treatment options become exhausted, patients are willing to try alternative treatments and, eventually, to undergo surgery. The discrete choice experiments found that the probability of remission and of side effects strongly influences the treatment choices of both patients and health-care professionals. Patients are less likely to choose a treatment that takes longer to improve symptoms. Health-care professionals are willing to make difficult compromises by tolerating greater safety risks in exchange for therapeutic benefits. The treatments ranked most positively by patients were infliximab and tofacitinib (each preferred by 38% of patients), and the predicted probability of uptake by health-care professionals was greatest for infliximab (62%). LIMITATIONS: The survey and the discrete choice experiments with patients and health-care professionals are limited by their relatively small sample sizes. The qualitative studies are subject to selection bias. The timing of the different substudies, both before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, is a potential limitation. CONCLUSIONS: We have identified factors influencing treatment decisions for steroid-resistant ulcerative colitis and the characteristics to consider when choosing treatments to evaluate in future randomised controlled trials. The findings may be used to improve discussions between patients and health-care professionals when they review treatment options for steroid-resistant ulcerative colitis. FUTURE WORK: This research highlights the need for consensus work to establish an agreed definition of steroid resistance in ulcerative colitis and a greater understanding of the optimal use of tofacitinib and surgery for this patient group. A randomised controlled trial comparing infliximab with tofacitinib is also recommended. FUNDING: This project was funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Health Technology Assessment programme and will be published in full in Health Technology Assessment; Vol. 26, No. 41. See the NIHR Journals Library website for further project information.


Steroids are one of the main treatments for ulcerative colitis; however, steroids work well for only about 50% of people who take them. There are many other treatments that can be given when steroids do not work, but evidence is limited about how these treatments are best used. To carry out better research about the best treatment options and to improve clinical practice in the future, this study aimed to find out how adults with steroid-resistant ulcerative colitis are managed in hospital and why patients and health-care professionals prefer different treatments. The study combined various methods of research, including an online survey of health-care professionals (n = 168), interviews with health-care professionals (n = 20) and patients (n = 33), a survey of health-care professionals (n = 116) and patients (n = 115) to ask them about treatment preferences, and a multistakeholder workshop (n = 9). The interviews with and survey of health-care professionals found that most health-care professionals define steroid resistance as an incomplete response to 40 mg per day of prednisolone after 2 weeks. The survey also found that the most frequently offered drugs are anti-tumour necrosis factor drugs (particularly infliximab). Patient interviews found that several factors influenced treatment choices, including effectiveness of treament, guidance from health-care professionals, route of administration and side effects. Patients were willing to try alternative treatments and surgery over time. The survey found that a higher level of remission and a lower chance of side effects strongly influenced treatment choices. Patients are less likely to choose a treatment that takes longer to improve symptoms. Health-care professionals are willing to make difficult compromises by tolerating greater safety risks in exchange for therapeutic benefits. Infliximab and tofacitinib were ranked most positively by patients, and the predicted uptake by health-care professionals was greatest for infliximab. The results of this study help improve understanding of why people choose certain treatments, improve decision-making in partnership and inform the design of future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colitis, Ulcerative , Adult , Humans , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Colitis, Ulcerative/surgery , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Patient Preference , Pandemics , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
7.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(11): e38862, 2022 Nov 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic and the confinement that was implemented in Argentina generated a need to implement innovative tools for the strengthening of diabetes care. Diabetes self-management education (DSME) is a core element of diabetes care; however, because of COVID-19 restrictions, in-person diabetes educational activities were suspended. Social networks have played an instrumental role in this context to provide DSME in 2 cities of Argentina and help persons with diabetes in their daily self-management. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to evaluate 2 diabetes education modalities (synchronous and asynchronous) using the social media platform Facebook through the content of posts on diabetes educational sessions in 2 cities of Argentina during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In this qualitative study, we explored 2 modalities of e-learning (synchronous and asynchronous) for diabetes education that used the Facebook pages of public health institutions in Chaco and La Rioja, Argentina, in the context of confinement. Social media metrics and the content of the messages posted by users were analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 332 messages were analyzed. We found that in the asynchronous modality, there was a higher number of visualizations, while in the synchronous modality, there were more posts and interactions between educators and users. We also observed that the number of views increased when primary care clinics were incorporated as disseminators, sharing educational videos from the sessions via social media. Positive aspects were observed in the posts, consisting of messages of thanks and, to a lesser extent, reaffirmations, reflections or personal experiences, and consultations related to the subject treated. Another relevant finding was that the educator/moderator role had a greater presence in the synchronous modality, where posts were based on motivation for participation, help to resolve connectivity problems, and answers to specific user queries. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings show positive contributions of an educational intervention for diabetes care using the social media platform Facebook in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Although each modality (synchronous vs asynchronous) could have differential and particular advantages, we believe that these strategies have potential to be replicated and adapted to other contexts. However, more documented experiences are needed to explore their sustainability and long-term impact from the users' perspective.

8.
Palliat Med ; : 2692163221123966, 2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to rapid adaptations among palliative care services, but it is unclear how these adaptations vary in relation to their unique organizational contexts. AIM: Understand how the pandemic impacted the implementation of new and existing palliative care programs in diverse hospital systems using the Dynamic Sustainability Framework. DESIGN: Twelve in-depth interviews with 15 key informants representing palliative care programs from seven hospital systems between April and June 2020. SETTING: Public, not-for-profit private, community, and academic teaching hospitals in the San Francisco Bay Area with existing palliative care programs that were expanding services to new clinical areas (e.g. new outpatient clinic or community-based care). RESULTS: Six themes characterized how palliative care programs were impacted and adapted during the early stages of the COVID-19 pandemic: palliative care involvement in preparing for surge, increased emphasis on advance care planning, advocating for visitors for dying patients, providing emotional support to clinicians, adopting virtual approaches to care, and gaps in chaplaincy support. There was variation in how new and existing programs were able to adapt to early pandemic stresses; systems with new outpatient programs struggled to utilize their programs effectively during the crisis onset. CONCLUSIONS: The fit between palliative care programs and practice setting was critical to program resiliency during the early stages of the pandemic. Reconceptualizing the Dynamic Sustainability Framework to reflect a bidirectional relationship between ecological system, practice setting, and intervention levels might better guide implementers and researchers in understanding how ecological/macro changes can influence interventions on the ground.

9.
West J Nurs Res ; : 1939459221129944, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098185

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this phenomenological study was to describe the experience of frontline nurses working during the COVID-19 pandemic. The first author conducted two individual audiotaped interviews with 23 qualified staff nurses. All the authors analyzed the professionally transcribed data according to hermeneutic principles. The researchers identified five major themes: (a) we are family; (b) heroes work here; (c) fear of contagion; (d) mental health and well-being; and (e) new reality. Given the uncertainties of working during the COVID-19 pandemic, findings revealed the value of supportive collegial relationships and the need to support the mental health and well-being needs of frontline nurses during the pandemic. Nurses need supportive environments to help ease the challenges associated with serving on the frontline during times of crisis. Findings have implications for future public health preparedness and response efforts.

10.
Revista Colombiana de Psiquiatría ; JOUR
Article in Spanish | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2095946

ABSTRACT

Resumen Objetivo El presente estudio tiene por objetivo analizar las percepciones del duelo de los adultos que han perdido a un familiar durante la situación de pandemia en Lima Metropolitana. Métodos Se realizó una investigación cualitativa con un diseño de análisis temático reflexivo. Participaron 10 adultos de ambos sexos, de 23 a 54 años, que habían perdido a un familiar producto de la COVID-19 durante el periodo de pandemia, a quienes se aplicó una entrevista semiestructurada. Resultados Los resultados evidenciaron que los adultos en duelo a causa de la pérdida de un familiar en la pandemia perciben su duelo en distintos momentos. En primer lugar, perciben la imposibilidad de ver al ser querido debido a las medidas de bioseguridad que impiden acercarse a su familiar. Ello implica un momento de shock e incredulidad;luego se da la liberación de emociones reprimidas, en la que se dan los pensamientos y las emociones disfuncionales;más adelante se tiene la negociación de la carga emocional, periodo en el cual se da una reconciliación con las emociones desbocadas;a continuación, se encuentra el sentimiento de desesperanza, en el cual la persona experimenta tristeza profunda y falta de sentido de la vida;por último, se encuentra una adaptación ante la pérdida. Conclusiones Se concluye que la percepción del duelo de los adultos que perdieron a un familiar en la pandemia conforma un ciclo de percepción del duelo ajustado al contexto de pandemia. Objective The aim of this study was to analyse the perceptions of grief in adults who have lost a family member during the pandemic situation in Metropolitan Lima. Methods Qualitative research with a reflexive thematic analysis design was carried out. Ten adults of both sexes, between 23 and 54 years old, who had lost a family member as a result of COVID-19, during the pandemic period, participated in the study. A semi-structured interview was administered to them. Results The results showed that adults experiencing bereavement due to the loss of a family member in the pandemic scenario perceive their grief at different times. First, there is the impossibility of seeing their loved one due to the biosecurity measures that prevent them from being with their relative, which entails a moment of shock and disbelief;then there is the release of repressed emotions, where dysfunctional thoughts and emotions occur. Later, there is the negotiation of the emotional burden, a period in which there is a reconciliation with the unbridled emotions;followed by the feeling of hopelessness, in which the person experiences deep sadness and lack of meaning in life. Finally, there is an adaptation to the loss. Conclusions It is concluded that the perception of grief in adults who lost a family member in the pandemic forms a cycle of grief perception adjusted to the pandemic context.

11.
J Adv Nurs ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088240

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore pre-nursing students' experiences and identify factors influencing their well-being as learners during COVID-19. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive design was used. METHODS: Short answer study data (n = 289) were collected in Fall 2020 as part of a larger IRB-approved survey-based study focused on pre-nursing students. Participants were presented with three short answer questions designed to elicit a description of their experiences as a pre-nursing student. NVivo and reflexive thematic analysis were used to analyse participant responses. RESULTS: Six themes related to learner well-being emerged from the data. Learner well-being was supported by achieving academic goals, experiencing positive feelings about current course content, creating connections with peers and envisioning themselves as nurses in the future. Negative contributors to pre-nursing student well-being included managing fears of program rejection and juggling multiple roles and demands. Online learning necessitated by COVID-19 created opportunities for loneliness and isolation from peers, technological difficulties and additional psychological stress, which also contributed negatively to learner well-being. CONCLUSION: These findings illustrate pre-nursing students' experiences and provide support for the influence of the learning environment and factors within the individual on the well-being of learners. IMPACT: Students preparing to apply to nursing programs are an understudied population and little is known about their well-being as learners. Survey-based open-ended short answer questions can be utilized to gain rich insight into their experiences. The study themes and sub-themes can be utilized for discussion and reflection in courses with pre-nursing students and as a starting point for additional conversations between pre-nursing students and educators regarding improving the support of well-being in learners. Additional research and evidence-based interventions that promote learner well-being in pre-nursing students are needed as they prepare for nursing program admission and to support their academic progression. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Members of the public were not involved in the design or conduct of the study, analysis, or interpretation of the data, or in the preparation of the manuscript because the study focus is on gaining an understanding the experiences of pre-nursing students and their well-being.

12.
Asia Pac J Clin Oncol ; 2022 Oct 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088108

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This qualitative study aimed to understand the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic from March to November 2020 on healthcare delivery and clinical trials for genitourinary (GU) cancers in Australia. METHODS: Annually a pre-conference workshop is hosted by the Australian New Zealand Urogenital and Prostate Cancer Trials Group for supportive care health professionals. In November 2020, those that selected to attend were invited to participate in a focus group. Workshop and focus group discussions were recorded and transcripts were analyzed thematically. RESULTS: Seventy-two individuals involved in GU cancer care and clinical trials took part. Participants described negative changes to GU cancer care and clinical trials from the pandemic due to reduced clinical services and increased wait times. Trial recruitment was paused temporarily during lockdowns, and standard treatment protocols were used to limit hospital visits. Trial process changes included electronic capture of informed consent, home delivery of oral medications, and delegations of assessments. These changes increased administrative activity for clinical trial teams and Human Research Ethics Committees. A transition to telehealth enabled continuity of service delivery and trials but reduced the opportunity for face-to-face patient consultations with increasing concern about the failure to detect supportive care needs. CONCLUSION: The pandemic has prompted a critical review of service delivery and clinical trials for people with GU cancers.

13.
Int J Clin Pharm ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085474

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Timely access and attachment to a primary healthcare provider is associated with better population health outcomes. In Canada, community pharmacists are highly accessible and patients struggling to access a family physician or nurse practitioner (i.e., "unattached") may seek care from a community pharmacist. Community pharmacists took on additional roles during the COVID-19 pandemic; however, little is known about how community pharmacists managed the needs of attached and unattached patients before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. AIM: To describe Nova Scotian community pharmacists' roles in caring for unattached patients before and during the COVID-19 pandemic and identifying barriers and facilitators to optimizing patient access. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews with community pharmacists (n = 11) across the province of Nova Scotia (Canada) were conducted. RESULTS: Five key themes were noted: (1) rising pressure on pharmacists to meet unique health needs of attached and unattached patients; (2) what pharmacists have to offer (e.g., accessibility, trustworthiness); (3) positioning pharmacists in the system (e.g., how pharmacists can address gaps in primary healthcare); (4) pharmacist wellbeing; and, (5) recommendations for practice post-pandemic (e.g., maintain some policy changes made during the COVID-19 pandemic). CONCLUSION: Before and during the pandemic, community pharmacists played a significant and increasing role providing care to patients, especially unattached patients. With growing numbers of unattached patients, it is vital that community pharmacists are supported to provide services to care for the health needs of patients.

14.
Early Child Educ J ; : 1-12, 2022 Oct 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085441

ABSTRACT

The negative impacts of COVID 19 on children's holistic development have been reported by researchers around the world. This qualitative study explored teachers' and parents' perspectives on the impact of physical/social distancing and school closure policies on children's socioemotional development. The study was conducted in fall 2020. The sample included four U.S. Preschools teachers (for 4-year-olds), four international preschool teachers (for 4, 5-year-olds), three U.S. Kindergarten teaches (for 5-year-olds), and 4 U.S. parents of 4 and 5-year-olds. Interviews were conducted over Zoom. Participants shared that the social deprivation experienced by children such as lack of friendships, absence of peer learning and peer communication, loss of play time, and lack of socialization impacted their children's socialization skills, higher order thinking development, mental health, and activity levels. Participants also shared that their children exhibited externalizing behaviors such as acting out, throwing tantrums, seeking negative attention, aggressiveness, lying, and showing disrespect. Participants reported children's life skills acquisition issues such as their over reliance on parents and difficulty in performing routine tasks. Participating teachers who taught 5-years-olds reported lower levels of fine motor skills among their students. The findings of the study suggest that although children have experienced severe academic learning loss during the pandemic, the post-pandemic ECE curriculum must keep a strong socio-emotional and practical life skills focus which contributes to children's overall well-being. Future studies may adopt a mixed method design in multi-country contexts to evaluate the impact of interventions implemented by early childhood programs on children's socioemotional health.

15.
Nurs Open ; 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2085116

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe how Swedish emergency nurses experience the preconditions of providing safe care during the COVID-19 pandemic when collecting blood culture in the emergency department. DESIGN: A qualitative exploratory design using content analysis with a manifest approach. METHOD: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 13 emergency nurses working in the emergency department. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in one main category: unprecedented preconditions create extraordinary stress and jeopardize safe care when collecting blood culture. This main category includes four additional categories: organizational changes, challenges in the isolation room, heavy workload creates great stress, and continuous learning. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 outbreak has made the emergency department a workplace where constant changes of routines combined with new information and reorganization risk jeopardize safe care during blood culture sampling. Accordingly, high workload and stress have been identified as a reason for emergency nurses not following guidelines. It is therefore necessary to optimize the preconditions during blood culture sampling and identify situations where there are shortcomings.

16.
Adv Health Sci Educ Theory Pract ; 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084370

ABSTRACT

Craft specialties such as surgery endured widespread disruption to postgraduate education and training during the pandemic. Despite the expansive literature on rapid adaptations and innovations, generalisability of these descriptions is limited by scarce use of theory-driven methods. In this research, we explored UK surgical trainees' (n = 46) and consultant surgeons' (trainers, n = 25) perceptions of how learning in clinical environments changed during a time of extreme uncertainty (2020/2021). Our ultimate goal was to identify new ideas that could shape post-pandemic surgical training. We conducted semi-structured virtual interviews with participants from a range of working/training environments across thirteen Health Boards in Scotland. Initial analysis of interview transcripts was inductive. Dynamic capabilities theory (how effectively an organisation uses its resources to respond to environmental changes) and its micro-foundations (sensing, seizing, reconfiguring) were used for subsequent theory-driven analysis. Findings demonstrate that surgical training responded dynamically and adapted to external and internal environmental uncertainty. Sensing threats and opportunities in the clinical environment prompted trainers' institutions to seize new ways of working. Learners gained from reconfigured training opportunities (e.g., splitting operative cases between trainees), pan-surgical working (e.g., broader surgical exposure), redeployment (e.g., to medical specialties), collaborative working (working with new colleagues and in new ways) and supervision (shifting to online supervision). Our data foreground the human resource and structural reconfigurations, and technological innovations that effectively maintained surgical training during the pandemic, albeit in different ways. These adaptations and innovations could provide the foundations for enhancing surgical education and training in the post-pandemic era.

17.
Climacteric ; : 1-13, 2022 Oct 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082051

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to explore women's and clinician's experiences and acceptability of telehealth use within a specialized multidisciplinary menopause service during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In-depth qualitative semi-structured interviews were analyzed via thematic inductive approaches. Telehealth acceptability was guided by the Nonadoption, Abandonment, and Challenges to the Scale-Up, Spread, and Sustainability of Health and Care Technologies (NASSS) framework. RESULTS: A heterogeneous group of 18 women who had attended the menopause service and six clinicians (gynecologists and endocrinologists) were interviewed. The majority of women and clinicians perceived telehealth as an acceptable way to deliver menopause care. Benefits of telehealth delivery were identified; themes centered around convenience, greater access to care and improved safety. Telehealth challenges included perceived impacts on personalized quality of care, patient-related logistical issues and system/organizational-related issues. A hybrid flexible delivery model combining telehealth and face-to-face care was recommended, following the easing of COVID-19 restrictions. Improvements to support embedding and adaptation of telehealth into routine care were described. CONCLUSION: In this study, telehealth was viewed as acceptable, supporting the ongoing delivery of a hybrid service model of telehealth and face-to-face menopause care. The findings provide valuable information to improve the menopause service to meet the needs of women during the ongoing current pandemic and beyond.

18.
JMIR Form Res ; 6(11): e38794, 2022 Nov 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079985

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Misinformation is often disseminated through social media, where information is spread rapidly and easily. Misinformation affects many patients' decisions to follow a treatment prescribed by health professionals (HPs). For example, chronic patients (eg, those with diabetes) may not follow their prescribed treatment plans. During the recent pandemic, misinformed people rejected COVID-19 vaccines and public health measures, such as masking and physical distancing, and used unproven treatments. OBJECTIVE: This study investigated the impact of health-threatening misinformation on the practices of health care professionals in the United Kingdom, especially during the outbreaks of diseases where a great amount of health-threatening misinformation is produced and released. The study examined the misinformation surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak to determine how it may have impacted practitioners' perceptions of misinformation and how that may have influenced their practice. In particular, this study explored the answers to the following questions: How do HPs react when they learn that a patient has been misinformed? What misinformation do they believe has the greatest impact on medical practice? What aspects of change and intervention in HPs' practice are in response to misinformation? METHODS: This research followed a qualitative approach to collect rich data from a smaller subset of health care practitioners working in the United Kingdom. Data were collected through 1-to-1 online interviews with 13 health practitioners, including junior and senior physicians and nurses in the United Kingdom. RESULTS: Research findings indicated that HPs view misinformation in different ways according to the scenario in which it occurs. Some HPs consider it to be an acute incident exacerbated by the pandemic, while others see it as an ongoing phenomenon (always present) and address it as part of their daily work. HPs are developing pathways for dealing with misinformation. Two main pathways were identified: first, to educate the patient through coaching, advising, or patronizing and, second, to devote resources, such as time and effort, to facilitate 2-way communication between the patient and the health care provider through listening and talking to them. CONCLUSIONS: HPs do not receive the confidence they deserve from patients. The lack of trust in health care practitioners has been attributed to several factors, including (1) trusting alternative sources of information (eg, social media) (2) patients' doubts about HPs' experience (eg, a junior doctor with limited experience), and (3) limited time and availability for patients, especially during the pandemic. There are 2 dimensions of trust: patient-HP trust and patient-information trust. There are 2 necessary actions to address the issue of lack of trust in these dimensions: (1) building trust and (2) maintaining trust. The main recommendations of the HPs are to listen to patients, give them more time, and seek evidence-based resources.

19.
Clin Nurs Res ; : 10547738221129711, 2022 Oct 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079297

ABSTRACT

Hospitalized patients and their families may be reluctant to express safety concerns. We aimed to describe safety and quality concerns experienced by hospitalized patients and families and factors and outcomes surrounding decisions about voicing concerns, including those related to the COVID-19 pandemic. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 discharged inpatients or family members in a qualitative descriptive design. Some participants reported concern about staff competency or knowledge, communication and coordination, potential treatment errors, or care environment. Factors influencing feeling safe included healthcare team member characteristics, communication and coordination, and safe care expectations. Reasoning for voicing concerns often included personal characteristics. Reasons for not voicing concerns included feeling no action was needed or the concern was low priority. Outcomes for voicing a concern were categorized as resolved, disregarded, and unknown. These findings support the vital importance of open safety communication and trustworthy response to patients and family members who voice concerns.

20.
BMJ Open ; 12(10): e061413, 2022 10 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2078980

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Safety and welfare are critical as pandemic-related demands on the healthcare workforce continue. Access to personal protective equipment (PPE) has been a central concern of healthcare workers throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Against the backdrop of an already strained healthcare system, our study aimed to explore the experiences of healthcare workers with PPE during the first COVID-19 surge (February-June 2020) in Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ). We also aimed to use these findings to present a strengths-based framework for supporting healthcare workers moving forward. DESIGN: Web-based, anonymous survey including qualitative open-text questions. Questions were both closed and open text, and recruitment was multimodal. We undertook inductive thematic analysis of the dataset as a whole to explore prominent values related to healthcare workers' experiences. SETTING: October-November 2020 in New Zealand. PARTICIPANTS: 1411 healthcare workers who used PPE during surge one of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: We identified four interactive values as central to healthcare workers' experiences: transparency, trust, safety and respect. When healthcare workers cited positive experiences, trust and safety were perceived as present, with a sense of inclusion in the process of stock allocation and effective communication with managers. When trust was low, with concerns over personal safety, poor communication and lack of transparency resulted in perceived lack of respect and distress among respondents. Our proposed framework presents key recommendations to support the health workforce in terms of communication relating to PPE supply and distribution built on those four values. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare worker experiences with PPE access has been likened to 'the canary in the coalmine' for existing health system challenges that have been exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. The four key values identified could be used to improve healthcare worker experience in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Protective Equipment , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Humans , New Zealand/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control
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