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1.
British Journal of Special Education ; n/a(n/a), 2022.
Article in English | Wiley | ID: covidwho-1819863

ABSTRACT

Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the start of the academic year in September 2020 was a unique time for those transitioning to a new school. This study aimed to explore the experiences of parents who supported autistic children making a range of different school transitions in 2020. Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 13 parents of autistic children in the UK, and data were analyzed with reflexive thematic analysis. For some parents, the Covid-19 pandemic negatively impacted on aspects of school transitions. However, other parents expressed the view that these same circumstances created opportunities to approach the school transition in a unique, improved manner. This article sheds light on the heterogeneity of experiences and perceptions of parents of autistic children, and highlights the need to examine the impact of Covid-19 on school transitions, including practices that it may be advantageous to retain.

2.
Journal of Organizational Ethnography ; 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1746137

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The tourism sector’s fragility lends significance to mental health and wellbeing, especially amongst workers in the hotel and tourism sectors. However, stakeholders’ subjective wellbeing and mental health in these sectors due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic remain under-researched, especially for destinations with unique selling propositions (USPs). Thus, this study investigates the effects of the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic on various stakeholders in Kerala, India. In particular, the authors assess the mental health and welfare of those involved in the tourism sector with an eye on how the COVID-19 pandemic has influenced the field’s psychological and technical developments. Design/methodology/approach: This study employs an ethnographic approach to understanding the idiosyncratic experiences of stakeholders using in-depth interviews (n = 68), focus group interviews (n = 3) and participant observation for 14 months. Reflexive thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings: The findings reveal the shifting perceptions in the tourism sector’s workforce by detailing various societal, technical and physical transformations, especially amongst the younger generations. The resultant psychological mapping generates a framework of the emotional perspectives of stakeholders during each stage of the pandemic. This study also highlights the urgency of crisis-management training for the workforce. Originality/value: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected all spheres of global business, resulting in unprecedented challenges in both personal and professional life. The sector’s fragility lends significance to mental health and wellbeing, especially amongst workers in the hotel and tourism sectors. However, the subjective wellbeing and mental health of stakeholders in these sectors due to the COVID-19 pandemic remain under-researched, especially for the developing destinations with USPs. © 2022, Emerald Publishing Limited.

3.
International Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Systems ; 14:10-14, 2021.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1609927

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created enormous pressure on the tourism and hospitality industries. In the post-COVID-19 era, destinations ought to attain the right balance between public security and economic recovery. Many destinations are trying to achieve this equilibrium by limiting international tourism and, instead, by targeting domestic tourists. Given that the future of tourism relies on the survival of the safest and smartest destinations, it is essential to work together on the recent advances in the sector. To this end, this research examines the current trends and practise by applying an explorative qualitative study design incorporated with data triangulation. The study findings point out two prevailing schools of thought, viz. the new normal and back to normal. The technological innovations support the ‘new normal’ waves, call for sustainability, rebuild current tourism to create a more sustainable form, and regenerate domestic and special interest tourism such as solo tourism. At the same time, the ‘back to normal’ philosophies are fuelled by the past global crises and the exceptional bouncy characteristics of the tourism sector to recover. However, both of these viewpoints are further direct towards the growing body of uncertainties, which can be unique to the COVID-19 pandemic, where predictions were found to be off beam. © 2021 Publishing India Group. All rights reserved.

4.
Int J Equity Health ; 20(1): 215, 2021 09 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496181

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lack of control over life situations is an important social determinant that may negatively affect parental and child health. This study took place in an area of Stockholm, Sweden with high indications of socioeconomic disadvantage, a large part of the population with foreign background, as well as higher levels of poor health than the county average. It investigated staff perceptions of pathways from situations of low control, potentially leading to health inequities, affecting families enrolled in an early childhood home visiting programme during the Covid-19 pandemic. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were carried out with 23 child health care nurses and parental advisors working in a home visiting programme. The data was analysed using Reflexive Thematic Analysis. RESULTS: The analysis resulted in five pathways on two explanatory levels, affecting parents' health and parenting capacity and children's health and well-being, potentially damaging health and leading to health inequities. The first four pathways related to control at the personal explanatory level: Families facing instability and insecurity; Caring for children in crowded and poor housing conditions; Experiencing restricted access to resources; and Parenting with limited social support. The fifth pathway, Living in a segregated society, covered the collective experience of lack of control on community level. The Covid-19 pandemic was observed to negatively affect all pathways and thus potentially aggravate health inequities for this population. The pandemic has also limited the delivery of home visits to the families which creates further barriers in families' access to resources and increases isolation for parents with already limited social support. CONCLUSIONS: The diversity of pathways connected to health inequities presented in this study highlights the importance of considering this variety of influences when designing interventions for socioeconomically disadvantaged areas. The additional negative consequences of Covid-19 indicate the need for sustainable preventive early childhood interventions for families in such areas. The study also emphasizes the need for further research as well as policy action on possible long-term effects of changing behaviours during the Covid-19 period on child health and health equity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The study was retrospectively registered (11 August 2016) in the ISRCTN registry ( ISRCTN11832097 ).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Family , Health Status Disparities , Pandemics , Poverty Areas , COVID-19/epidemiology , House Calls , Humans , Observation , Qualitative Research , Sweden/epidemiology
5.
Front Psychol ; 12: 624023, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1332134

ABSTRACT

Countries all over the globe have implemented mandatory social distancing measures in an attempt to suppress and control the spread of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). This enforced period of isolation, disruption to normal training routines and competition cancellation, could be having an adverse effect on the mental health and wellbeing of athletes. This study sought to explore the perceived impact of the COVID-19 social distancing measures on athlete wellbeing. Fourteen elite athletes who were unable to train or compete due to government imposed lockdown measures were recruited to participate in this qualitative study. Utilising the photo elicitation method, participants were asked to take a series of photographs that represented their experiences as athletes living in lockdown. These photographs were used to guide discussions in follow up unstructured interviews. Reflexive inductive thematic analysis identified three main themes that captured athletes' experience of social distancing measures and the implications for their wellbeing: (1) threats to wellbeing; (2) adapting routines and maintaining motivation; and (3) reflecting on participation in competitive elite sport. The initial sudden loss of sport in the athlete's lives posed a threat to their wellbeing, but over the duration of the lockdown period the athletes developed numerous strategies to protect their wellbeing. Furthermore, their time away from sport encouraged them to reflect on their athletic identity and to make life changes that would protect their wellbeing during the rest of the lockdown period and when they returned to sport. A number of immediate practical recommendations are offered for athlete support personnel working with athletes during the crisis, these include developing self-care strategies and social networks, adapting routines, setting new goals and encouraging the pursuit of dual-careers. Future research is encouraged to investigate how practitioners can deliver effective psychological support through tele-consulting, and to consider whether their support is best focused on therapeutic counselling or mental skills training during the pandemic.

6.
J Genet Couns ; 30(4): 1024-1037, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258077

ABSTRACT

The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has rendered in-person provision of genetic counseling impossible for prolonged periods in many countries, mandating a sudden shift to remote delivery. We used qualitative thematic analysis to explore Italian genetics professionals' experience with remote genetic counseling. Fourteen group and four individual interviews were conducted after participants had delivered one or more remote sessions via videoconference or on the telephone. Data were coded and grouped under themes. Three main themes were identified as follows: (a) technical and logistical issues, (b) communication issues, and (c) clinical content and outcome of the session. The participants acknowledged that not having to travel to the clinic saves consultands time and expense. They also highlighted that not sharing a physical space with consultands and having to rely on technology can negatively impact on effective communication, building trusting relationships, and performing accurate psychosocial assessments. Regarding the clinical content of sessions, remote genetic counseling was perceived to favor greater focus and succinct, to the point communication. However, participants also felt uncomfortable not being able to use visual aids to support the explanation of complex concepts. Moreover, demographics and the socio-cultural status of consultands emerged as factors influencing the outcome of remote genetic counseling sessions. Finally, participants reported feeling that more experience with this novel approach would improve their confidence and their ability to adapt their counseling skills as appropriate. Based on these findings, we suggest that effective, equitable provision of remote genetic counseling will require an infrastructure that is able to support video counseling, sharing of clinical documents and visual aids, and connect with a wide range of devices. Moreover, the structure of sessions should be tailored to the specific requirements of remote genetic counseling and suitable training efforts should be promoted to enhance professionals' communication skills.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Genetic Counseling/organization & administration , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
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