Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.578
Filter
Add filters

Year range
1.
Neurologia ; 2022 Aug 03.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966964

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Patients with post-COVID-19 syndrome may present cognitive and emotional symptomatology. This study aims to analyse the results of an outpatient neuropsychological intervention program for post-COVID-19 syndrome. METHOD: In June 2020 Institut Guttmann started an outpatient post-COVID-19 neurorehabilitation program, including respiratory therapy, physiotherapy, and neuropsychological rehabilitation. Before and after the program, the cognitive-emotional state of all participants is assessed. Six months after treatment, a follow-up assessment is administered (which includes a collection of information on various aspects of daily life). RESULTS: The sample analysed consisted of 123 patients (mean age: 51 years, SD: 12.41). Seventy-four per cent (n=91) had cognitive impairment and underwent cognitive treatment (experimental group); the remaining 26% (n=32) constituted the control group. After the intervention, the experimental group improved in working memory, verbal memory (learning, recall and recognition), verbal fluency and anxious-depressive symptomatology. The control group showed changes in immediate memory, verbal memory (learning and recognition) and depressive symptomatology, although the effect size in the latter two was smaller than in the experimental group. Six months after treatment, 44.9% of the patients were unable to perform their pre-COVID-19 work activity, and 81.2% reported difficulties in their activities of daily living. CONCLUSIONS: Neuropsychological rehabilitation is an effective tool to treat the cognitive-emotional deficits present in post-COVID-19 syndrome. However, months after the end of treatment, not all patients recover their pre-COVID-19 functional level.

2.
Hum Mov Sci ; 85: 102977, 2022 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966610

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Impairments of upper limb (UL) sensory-motor functions are common in Parkinson's disease (PD). Virtual reality exercises may improve sensory-motor functions in a safe environment and can be used in tele-rehabilitation. This study aimed to investigate the effects of supervised and non-supervised UL virtual reality exercises (ULVRE) on UL sensory-motor functions in patients with idiopathic PD. METHODS: In this clinical trial study, 45 patients with idiopathic PD (29 male) by mean ± SD age of 58.64 ± 8.69 years were randomly allocated to either the control group (conventional rehabilitation exercises), supervised ULVRE or non-supervised ULVRE. Interventions were 24 sessions, 3 sessions/week. Before/after of interventions and follow-up period all assessment was done. Hand Active Sensation Test and Wrist Position Sense Test were used for assessing UL sensory function. Gross and fine manual dexterity were assessed by Box-Block Test and Nine-Hole Peg Test, respectively. Grip and pinch strength were evaluated by a dynamometer and pinch gauge, respectively. RESULTS: The results showed significant improvement in discriminative sensory function (HAST-weight and HAST-total), wrist proprioception, gross manual dexterity and grip strength of both less and more affected hands as well as fine manual dexterity of the more affected hand in the three groups in patients with idiopathic PD (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: The results of this study indicated that both supervised and non-supervised ULVRE using the Kinect device might potentially improve some aspects of UL sensory-motor functions in patients with PD. Therefore, ULVRE using the Kinect device can be used in tele-rehabilitation, especially in the current limitations induced by the COVID-19 pandemic, for improving UL functions in patients with PD.

3.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 2022 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966342

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the function of patients with COVID-19 admitted to an acute care hospital early in the pandemic and to characterize change in function among those admitted to intensive care units (ICU) and to non-critical care services. DESIGN: This descriptive, retrospective cohort study examined patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 admitted to a tertiary care medical center during the first wave of the pandemic in 2020. Included patients were stratified into four cohorts based on whether or not they received therapy during their hospitalization and whether or not their hospitalization included time in the intensive care unit (ICU). Data on demographics, functional impairments, medical interventions, and functional outcomes were collected. SETTING: Hospital PARTICIPANTS: : 432 adult patients were included in this study. RESULTS: ICU patients receiving therapy were more likely to have impaired cognition, impaired strength, and impaired sensation than non-ICU patients receiving therapy. Patients made improvements from evaluation to discharge on the Functional Status Score for the ICU, AM-PAC Daily Activity, and AM-PAC Basic Mobility Short Forms. CONCLUSION: Patients admitted with COVID-19 experienced significant functional impairments, but also demonstrated improvement during the course of their hospitalizations. This study can facilitate healthcare provider awareness of the detrimental functional impacts of COVID-19 and the potential role of rehabilitation services for these patients.

4.
Arch Phys Med Rehabil ; 2022 Jul 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966341

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To qualitatively synthesize and quantitatively evaluate the effect of pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) on dyspnea, lung functions, fatigue, exercise capacity, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with COVID-19. DATA SOURCES: PubMed, Web of Science, and Cochrane databases were searched from January 2020 to April 2022. DATA SELECTION: Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) assessing the effect of PR on dyspnea, lung functions, fatigue, exercise capacity, and QoL in patients with COVID-19. DATA EXTRACTION: The mean difference (MD) and a 95% CI were estimated for all the outcome measures using random effect models. The following data were extracted by two independent reviewers: 1) first author; 2) publication year; 3) nationality; 4) number of patients included 5) comorbidities; 6) ventilatory support; 7) length of inpatient stay; 8) type of PR; 9) outcome measures; and 10) main findings. The risk of bias was evaluated using the cochrane risk of bias tool. DATA SYNTHESIS: A total of 8 RCTs involving 449 participants were included in the review. PR was found to be significantly effective in improving dyspnea (5 studies, SMD -2.11 [95% CI, -2.96 to -1.27; p<0.001]) and exercise capacity (MD 65.85 m [95% CI, 42.86 to 88.83; p<0.001]) in patients with both acute and chronic COVID-19 with mild to severe symptoms whereas, fatigue (MD -2.42 [95%CI, -2.72 to -2.11, p<0.05]) and lung functions (MD 0.26 L [95%CI, 0.04 to 0.48, p<0.05]) were significantly improved in acute COVID-19 patients with mild symptoms. The effect of PR on QoL was inconsistent across studies. PR was found to be safe and feasible for patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Evidence from studies indicates that PR program is superior to no intervention in improving dyspnea, exercise capacity, lung functions, and fatigue in patients with COVID-19. PR appears to be safe and beneficial for both acute and chronic COVID-19 patients.

5.
Intern Emerg Med ; 2022 Jul 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966173

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between physical fitness, cardiopulmonary function and patient-reported severity of symptoms in people with post-COVID-19 condition. We examined ambulatory patients (n = 72) with post-COVID-19 condition who had a chronic symptomatic phase lasting > 12 weeks from the onset of symptoms, but had not been hospitalized for acute COVID-19. A comprehensive medical screening was conducted, including clinical history, symptomatology, comorbidities, body composition and physical activity levels. We then identified the relationship between physical fitness (cardiorespiratory fitness and muscular strength), cardiopulmonary function (echocardiographic and spirometry parameters) and patient-reported severity of symptoms (fatigue, dyspnea, health-related quality of life, anxiety, and depression). Age, body mass index, sex, number of comorbidities and duration of symptoms were included as potential confounders. Results showed that greater physical fitness and cardiopulmonary function were associated with lower severity of symptoms in people with post-COVID-19 condition. Cardiorespiratory fitness, lower-limb muscle strength, maximal voluntary ventilation and left ventricular ejection fraction account for reducing fatigue and dyspnea. Greater physical activity levels were associated with fewer symptoms and less-severe fatigue and dyspnea. In conclusion, preserving better cardiopulmonary health and physical condition during the course of the disease-even in mild cases-was related to a lower intensity of symptoms in non-hospitalized people with post-COVID-19 condition. It is probable that exercise and physical conditioning are valuable pre- and post-COVID-19 countermeasures that could help decrease the severity, not only of acute infection, but of post-COVID-19 persistent symptoms and prognosis.

6.
J Ultrasound Med ; 2022 Jul 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1966063

ABSTRACT

Lung ultrasound has the potential to enable standardized follow-up without radiation exposure and with lower associated costs in comparison to CT scans. It is a valuable tool to follow up on patients after a COVID-19 infection and evaluate if there is pulmonary fibrosis developing. Echocardiography, including strain imaging, is a proven tool to assess various causes of dyspnea and adds valuable information in the context of long COVID care. Including two-dimensional (2D) strain imaging, a better comprehension of myocardial damage in post-COVID syndrome can be made. Especially 2D strain imaging (left and the right ventricular strain) can provide information about prognosis.

7.
Sleep Medicine ; 100:S185, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1967127

ABSTRACT

Introduction:Mental health conditions such as anxiety represent a growing health concern for students in institutions of higher education. Postsecondary students are a vulnerable population that is increasingly recognized to be at risk for both mental health problems and significant sleep problems. While it has been hypothesized that poor sleep quality may be a risk factor for developing anxiety, little is known about the frequency and severity of sleep problems and their association with anxiety within the postsecondary student population. The aim of this systematic review was to synthesize the best evidence on the association between sleep quality and anxiety in postsecondary students. Materials and Methods: An experienced librarian developed systematic search strategies in four databases: MEDLINE, Embase, APA PsycInfo (through Ovid Technologies Inc.) and CINAHL, Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (through EBSCOhost). Databases were searched from inception to September 2020. Random pairs of independent reviewers screened titles and s for eligibility and critically appraised all eligible studies. We assessed the quality of studies using the Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN) criteria for cohort studies, and the Hoy tool for cross-sectional studies. One author extracted and synthesized the results from all of the low and moderate risk of bias studies. We synthesized our results by study design and population. Results: Once duplicates were removed, a total of 3203 unique citations were screened. Fifty-one articles were eligible and critically appraised. Studies with low and moderate risk of bias were included in our final synthesis of which 24 were cross-sectional studies and four were cohort studies. With the exception of one study, all cross-sectional studies reported a statistically significant association between poor sleep quality and anxiety. All four of the cohort studies found that students who reported poor sleep quality were more likely to develop future anxiety and students with anxiety were more likely to develop future poor sleep quality. Conclusions: Poor sleep quality is associated with anxiety in postsecondary students. Due to the cross-sectional nature of most studies, we cannot determine the direction of this association. Future studies should focus on developing high-quality prospective cohort or longitudinal studies to help understand the impact and direction that this association has in postsecondary populations. This research has the potential to inform the development and design of mental health policies and programs that are created by postsecondary institutions to address the increasing rates of student mental health issues. Acknowledgements: Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) Operating Grant: Knowledge synthesis: COVID-19 in Mental Health & Substance Use;University of Ontario Institute of Technology;Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research.

8.
Journal of the Academy of Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry ; 63:S7, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1966658

ABSTRACT

Background: The University of Colorado (UCH) Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry (CLP) service and Psychiatric Consultation for the Medically Complex clinic (PCMC) are developing a brain health outreach program for those hospitalized with COVID. Patients with COVID have increased risk of cognitive and psychiatric sequelae due to intrinsic viral properties, hyperinflammatory state, and increased disposition to ICU level care (Inoue, 2019;Cothran, 2020). Development of a post COVID brain health program has become paramount and UCH is not alone in creation of new clinic protocols to meet the needs of this population (Rovere Querini, 2020;O'Brien, 2020). Hospitals around the globe are developing new screeners to identify patients at higher risk of neuropsychiatric sequelae and refer them to appropriate resources. Methods: The program makes use of two arms: The first assesses those discharged from the hospital using a screener developed by the UCH post-COVID hospitalization program. The second screens patients currently admitted to the hospital with COVID using psychiatric and neurocognitive screeners. Both allow patients to be referred to PCMC for evaluation and treatment. Evaluation includes psychiatric interview and additional screeners including: Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and PTSD Checklist for DSM-5 (PCL-5). Additional neuropsychiatric evaluation via Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS), and cognitive rehabilitation referral, are available. Clinic treatment includes pharmaceuticals, individual therapy referral, or referral to the PCMC COVID Survivorship Support Group. Results: To date, 100 patients have been screened in arm 1 (outpatient outreach) and arm 2 (inpatient outreach). In arm 2, about 54% of the population identifies as female, 46% as male, 61% identified as white, and 86% spoke English. Of those in arm 2 that agreed to full participation, 26% agreed to future check-ins and 6% were seen in the clinic. There was a difference in those who did and didn't fully participate based on ethnicity, language, and insurance status;though not of statistical significance. HADs scores demonstrated different trends based on these same demographic factors, though also not statistically significant. Discussion: By using this two-armed approach, the service has been able to more effectively outreach patients and refer them to appropriate care. Though data is not complete, referral needs seem to differ based on demographic data. Conclusions: As data continues to be collected, the clinic model is expanding to outreach high risk patients for neuropsychiatric sequelae. This will strengthen our existing system, with risk of reoccurrence of similar events, and inform a new standard of care for COVID survivors. 1. Cothran, T. P., Tam, J. W.;et.al. (2020). A brewing storm: The neuropsychological sequelae of hyperinflammation due to COVID-19. Brain Behav Immun, 88, 957-958. 2. Inoue, S., Nishida, O, et.al. (2019). Post-intensive care syndrome: its pathophysiology, prevention, and future directions. Acute Med Surg, 6(3), 233-246. 3. O'Brien, H., Hurley, K., et.al. (2020). An integrated multidisciplinary model of COVID-19 recovery care. Ir J Med Sci, 1-8. 4. Rovere Querini, P., Ciceri, F., et.al. (2020). Post-COVID-19 follow-up clinic: depicting chronicity of a new disease. Acta Biomed, 91(9-s), 22-28.

9.
Annals of Oncology ; 33:S425, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1966330

ABSTRACT

Exercise guidelines for cancer survivors issued by multiple international organizations (Campbell KL et al, 2019) updated the recommendations that aerobic, combined aerobic plus resistance training, and/or resistance training could improve common cancer-related health outcomes (eg, anxiety, depression, fatigue, physical function, and health-related quality of life). Despite these guidelines, the majority of cancer survivors are not regularly physically active. A lack of awareness regarding available effective program to help facilitate exercise in cancer survivors was suggested to be a one of barriers to clinicians referring them to exercise. Furthermore, given that the COVID-19 pandemic has made getting sufficient exercise difficult, there is an urgent need for developing a home-based exercise program and its effectiveness among cancer survivors. Systematic review revealed that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) is a time-efficient method for increasing cardiovascular function in breast cancer survivors (Tsuji K et al, 2021), while all previous HIIT studies were lab-based supervised intervention. Recently, we originally developed 12-week home-based smartphone-supported HIIT program (habit-B program) and examined its effect on cardiorespiratory fitness among breast cancer survivors in Japan. Our single-blind single-center randomized controlled trial involved 50 sedentary women with stage I-IIa breast cancer. The results showed that home-based HIIT intervention can lead to improve cardiorespiratory fitness and muscle strength (Ochi E et al, 2021). Based on the pilot study, we are proceeding a multi-center RCT in stage I-III breast cancer survivors. Mobile health such as habit-B might become a solution, but we need more collaboration and care coordination with appropriate professionals as well as change in the behaviors of clinicians, cancer survivors, and those who deliver the rehabilitation and exercise program.

10.
Arts in Psychotherapy ; 80, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1966275
11.
Fundamental and Clinical Pharmacology ; 36, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1965247

ABSTRACT

The proceedings contain 286 papers. The topics discussed include: is there still a place for methotrexate in severe psoriatic arthritis?;Improving availability of naloxone: an emergency;national pharmacovigilance surveillance of Astrazeneca Covid-19 vaccine (ChAdOx1-S vaccine);recommendations of the French Society of Rheumatology and the French Society of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation on the non-pharmacological management of knee osteoarthritis;management of drug?drug interactions with nirmatrelvir/ritonavir in patients treated for Covid-19: guidelines from the French Society of Pharmacology and Therapeutics (SFPT);adverse events associated with JAK inhibitors;impact of the new CFTR modulators treatment on the respiratory epithelium;pharmacokinetics study showed increased brain delivery of anti-PD-1 after ultrasound-mediated blood-brain barrier in glioblastoma mouse models;and modulation of HCN channel activity in oxaliplatin-induced peripheral neuropathy.

12.
Pediatric Pulmonology ; 57, 2022.
Article in English | EMBASE | ID: covidwho-1965244

ABSTRACT

The proceedings contain 150 papers. The topics discussed include: machine learning in asthma research and clinical practice;the effect of climate change on pediatric respiratory health;lung involvement in systemic diseases;COVID-19: challenges, opportunities and lessons;biologicals in severe asthma: evidence and clinical practice;long-term non-invasive ventilation in children - state of the art;transition to adult care: what adults should know about pediatric respiratory diseases;pulmonology in the future;obesity and asthma in children;asthma diagnosis: new European Respiratory Society (ERS) guidelines;the impact of asthma exacerbations and prevention in LMIC;and long COVID in children - pulmonary manifestations and rehabilitation.

13.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 58(6)2022 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964024

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: To estimate the association between admission functional outcomes and exposure to physiotherapy interventions with mortality rate in intensive care unit (ICU) inpatients with cardiovascular diseases and new coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Materials and Methods: Retrospective cohort including 100 ICU inpatients (mean (standard deviation), age 75 (16) years) split into COVID-19+ or COVID-19-. The association of in-ICU death with admission functional outcomes and physiotherapy interventions was investigated using univariable and multivariable regression models. Results: In total, 42 (42%) patients tested positive for COVID-19. In-ICU mortality rate was 37%, being higher for the COVID-19+ group (odds ratio, OR (95% CI): 3.15 (1.37-7.47), p = 0.008). In-ICU death was associated with lower admission ICU Mobility Scale score (0.81 (0.71-0.91), p = 0.001). Restricted mobility (24.90 (6.77-161.94), p < 0.001) and passive kinesiotherapy (30.67 (9.49-139.52), p < 0.001) were associated with in-ICU death, whereas active kinesiotherapy (0.13 (0.05-0.32), p < 0.001), standing (0.12 (0.05-0.30), p < 0.001), or walking (0.10 (0.03-0.27), p < 0.001) were associated with in-ICU discharge. Conclusions: In-ICU mortality was higher for inpatients with cardiovascular diseases who had COVID-19+, were exposed to invasive mechanical ventilation, or presented with low admission mobility scores. Restricted mobility or passive kinesiotherapy were associated with in-ICU death, whereas active mobilizations (kinesiotherapy, standing, or walking) were associated with in-ICU discharge in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases , Aged , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units , Physical Therapy Modalities , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(12)2022 06 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963967

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This review examined the effectiveness of behavioral interventions for adults with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) triggered by physical injury or medical trauma. It discusses implications in support of rehabilitation management for COVID-19 survivors diagnosed with PTSD. METHODS: This study adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines and the Interim Guidance from the Cochrane Rapid Reviews Methods Group. The authors searched for randomized control trials in PubMed, Embase, and CENTRAL databases up to 31 March 2021. RESULTS: Five studies (n = 459) met the inclusion criteria. Each study measured a different comparison of interventions. The certainty of the evidence was judged to be very low for all outcomes. Post-traumatic stress disorder symptom reduction was found to be in favor of trauma-focused cognitive-behavioral therapy, cognitive therapy, and cognitive-behavioral therapy. Cognitive function improvements were observed in favor of the cognitive processing therapy control intervention. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, there is uncertainty about whether behavioral interventions are effective in reducing PTSD symptoms and improving functioning and quality of life when the disorder is triggered by a physical or medical trauma rather than a psychological trauma. Further research should investigate their efficacy in the context of rehabilitation management and gather evidence on this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Behavior Therapy , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Humans , Quality of Life , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
15.
Biosensors (Basel) ; 12(7)2022 Jun 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1963722

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we present ARMIA: a sensorized arm wearable that includes a combination of inertial and sEMG sensors to interact with serious games in telerehabilitation setups. This device reduces the cost of robotic assistance technologies to be affordable for end-users at home and at rehabilitation centers. Hardware and acquisition software specifications are described together with potential applications of ARMIA in real-life rehabilitation scenarios. A detailed comparison with similar medical technologies is provided, with a specific focus on wearable devices and virtual and augmented reality approaches. The potential advantages of the proposed device are also described showing that ARMIA could provide similar, if not better, the effectivity of physical therapy as well as giving the possibility of home-based rehabilitation.


Subject(s)
Robotics , Wearable Electronic Devices , Computers , Software
16.
International Journal of Health Sciences ; 6(2):1001-1012, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1965219

ABSTRACT

This article is based narrative review of digital therapy in mental health services in Indonesia. It's because the demands of the order of life that are developing so fast make people be able to adjust themselves well. Some people can survive well and win in life's fierce competition, while others do not survive, then become stressed, traumatized, depressed, and then in turn experience mental disorders. Many strategies to handle mental problems such as using technology. Digital therapy in mental health services has recently become increasingly prominent, related to efforts to reach more people who are in need but do not have access to more practical breakthroughs. Digital therapy is considered a more practical breakthrough because anyone who needs it can access it. On the other hand, mental health issues are not very familiar in the community. Stigma and judgment are still high in people with mental health disorders or people who do not understand whether they have experienced mental health problems, what are the signs, what to do when experiencing mental health disorders, and what are the impacts if left unchecked. © 2022. This is an open access article under the CC BY-NC-ND license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/).

17.
Medico-Biological and Socio-Psychological Issues of Safety in Emergency Situations ; - (1):12-19, 2022.
Article in Russian | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1964986

ABSTRACT

Relevance. In the context of the ongoing pandemic of new coronavirus infection, the development and implementation of new methods for medical (pulmonary) rehabilitation of patients is an urgent scientific and practical task. Intention. To assess the effectiveness and substantiate the possibility of using a new physiotherapeutic technology based on bioacoustic stimulation of the respiratory system with high-intensity low-frequency sounds in the comprehensive medical rehabilitation of patients with coronavirus pneumonia. Methodology. A randomized controlled open parallel clinical trial of 28 patients was conducted to assess effectiveness of medical rehabilitation after coronavirus pneumonia. Results and Discussion. Changes in external respiration indicators, psychological status and severity of post-traumatic stress disorders statistically significantly differed in the intervention and control groups before and after the course of rehabilitation. Therefore, bioacoustic stimulation of the respiratory system as part of comprehensive medical rehabilitation program after coronavirus pneumonia significantly increases its effectiveness. Conclusion. Bioacoustic stimulation of the respiratory system with high-intensity low-frequency sounds can be recommended as an effective physical method for inclusion in the comprehensive medical rehabilitation program for patients recovered from coronavirus pneumonia. © 2022 Nikiforov Russian Center of Emergency and Radiation Medicine, EMERCOM of Russia

18.
The Open Journal of Occupational Therapy ; 10(3):1-12, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-1964775

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a health care emergency in Europe since the first wave in 2020. Several challenges have arisen for occupational therapists, as well as all the health care professionals. The aim of this study was to determine what occupational therapists have changed to adapt their therapeutic processes for this catastrophic situation. Method: An online survey was developed and sent in conjunction with the Council of Occupational Therapy for European Countries (COTEC) to European national associations of occupational therapists. Results: The study was based on a sample of 65 occupational therapists who worked with people with COVID-19. More than half of the occupational therapists (54.8%) had changed departments. The main needs patients expressed (n = 136) during hospitalization were to have social contacts (30.9%), and the main clinical complaints (n = 144) were motor impairment and fatigue (35.4%) and depression (25.7%). The most frequently reported goal (n = 141) was recovery of physical performance and fatigue management (32.6%). Among the emotions mentioned by occupational therapists, negative emotions (76%) were the most common. Conclusion: European occupational therapists demonstrated flexibility and resilience to deal with clinical and organizational challenges during the COVID-19 emergency.

19.
12th International Conference on Biomedical Engineering and Technology, ICBET 2022 ; : 191-196, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-1962432

ABSTRACT

This study presents the recovery patterns of COVID-19 patients in the Philippines using survival analysis in the multiple decrement setting. A total of 152,203 patients during the period January to December 2021 were included in the study. Data processing using Python and exploratory data analysis were employed. Probabilities were obtained using basic actuarial principles on two decrements: recovery and death. Kaplan-Meier estimation was then applied to obtain estimates of the survival function. The average length of treatment before recovery and death was also obtained. Results showed that older patients have higher risk of dying from COVID-19 compared to younger patients. While infection is higher among female population, the risk of death is higher among male patients. Based on the survival rates, the probabilities of recovery are highest during the 3rd week from onset of symptoms and the average length of treatment before recovery is determined to be 6 days. © 2022 ACM.

20.
Trials ; 23(1): 522, 2022 Jun 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1962887

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Treatment of acute myocardial infarction has been the subject of studies over the past years. However, the initial months after myocardial infarction are crucial from the perspective of the patient's prognosis. It is extremely important to take care of all cardiovascular risk factors and undergo a full rehabilitation program. Telemedical solutions are becoming more and more relevant in everyday practice. We describe a protocol of a study evaluating the use of the mobile application "afterAMI" in patients after myocardial infarction. The app offers an educational mode, calendar, vital signs diary, medication reminders, medical history card, and healthcare professional contact panel. It offers several solutions, which individually proved to be effective and improve a patient's prognosis. Despite general promising results from previous studies regarding telemedical tools, there is a paucity of evidence when it comes to prospective randomized trials. Our aim was to perform a comprehensive evaluation of a newly developed mobile application in the clinical setting. METHODS: A group of 100 patients with myocardial infarction on admission at the 1st Chair and Department of Cardiology, Medical University of Warsaw, will be recruited into the study. The project aims to assess the impact of the application-supported model of care in comparison with standard rehabilitation. At the end of the study, cardiovascular risk factors will be analyzed, along with rehospitalizations, the patients' knowledge regarding cardiovascular risk factors, returning to work, and quality of life. In this prospective, open-label, randomized, single-center study, all 100 patients will be observed for 6 months after discharge from the hospital. Endpoints will be assessed during control visits 1 and 6 months after inclusion into the study. DISCUSSION: This project is an example of a telemedical solution application embracing everyday clinical practices, conforming with multiple international cardiac societies' guidelines. Cardiac rehabilitation process enhancements are required to improve patients' prognosis. The evidence regarding the use of the mobile application in the described group of patients is limited and usually covers a small number of participants. The described study aims to discuss whether telemedicine use in this context is beneficial for the patients. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT04793425 . Registered on 11 March 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mobile Applications , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Myocardial Infarction/diagnosis , Myocardial Infarction/therapy , Prospective Studies , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL