Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 165
Filter
1.
Ethics Med Public Health ; 25: 100853, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2095618
2.
Prävention und Gesundheitsförderung ; JOUR
Article in German | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2082626

ABSTRACT

Background The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and the necessary measures to contain the spread of the disease shaped the living and working situation of many people in 2020/2021. Universities also had to implement measures to protect employees from infection in order to continue research and teaching. These had positive and negative effects on the subjective health and everyday working situation of employees. In order to avoid possible risks in the future in similarly challenging situations or in the continuation of measures, knowledge about health effects is important. Methods Using a mixed-methods approach, academic professionals and experts of equality, inclusion, health management, and counseling were surveyed using an online questionnaire on the impact of professional support measures in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic on the subjective health and well-being of university employees. Results A total of 117 experts participated in the quantitative survey. The dissolution of boundaries between private and professional life (71%) and the health behavior of employees (55%) were perceived critically. Most (81%) perceive the collegial interaction as positive. At the same time, the experts see a deterioration in social relations (78%). According to their assessment, the work situation under COVID-19 conditions is mostly manageable (55%), understandable (71%), and reasonable (64%) for the employees. Conclusion The experts convey a differentiated picture of the situation. There is evidence that the situation is proving to be significantly more challenging for specific groups of employees in higher education than for others. If online teaching and telecommuting are to become established at universities, attention will have to be paid to aspects of social health and dissolution of boundaries between work and private life.

3.
Sustainability ; 14(19):12867, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2066473

ABSTRACT

The aim of this research was to address the issues in virtual-reality technologies and gamification within the context of immersive technologies. The author drew together, in a hybrid methodology, the principles of virtual touring and online training, as these need to be understood by destination and tourism professionals. The emphasis was on the utility of innovative multimedia and multimodal technological tools for modern content creation, which led to an online training process for travel agents, the role of gamification and how a virtual platform could be developed to promote a tourism destination during the COVID-19 pandemic. The author based the research on a case study of an immersive platform of a Greek destination and on the degree of the user response to the virtual technology and content. The study also included a comparison between two platforms: one using conventional content and one using multimedia content. The author methodologically used VAR models to describe the cogeneration process of multiple variables over time to investigate the relationships between these variables. The results led to a preference for immersive platforms, which can be a guide for corresponding platforms that are concerned with the promotion of destinations.

4.
Sociological Research Online ; 27(3):587-603, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2064624

ABSTRACT

This contribution draws on the voices and reflections from young people as co-researchers in the Growing-Up Under Covid-19 project – a longitudinal ethnographic action research project to document, share, and respond to impacts of the pandemic on different spheres of young people’s lives. The research was conducted entirely online over 18 months in seven countries and has involved youth-led approaches to research, including video diaries and the use of artefacts and visual material to convey their experiences and support reflection and dialogue across research groups and with external stakeholders. In this contribution, the young co-researchers reflect on their rationale for using different visual media and why this was important for them. They also reflect on the significance of the representations in the visual images and how these images communicate how young people’s understanding of COVID and its impact on young people has changed (or given new meaning to) and how this in turn has given rise to particular responses and opportunities for young people. The article draws on examples of different visual forms selected by young people in Singapore, Italy, Lebanon, and the UK nations, including video, drawing, photography, and crafts. These different media and links to videos were included in the accompanying document. The contribution explores the different narratives and meanings behind the visuals, using the words of young people themselves, interspersed with narration from the adult researchers.

5.
Human Organization ; 81(3):271-279, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2045706

ABSTRACT

Developing a deeper understanding of the human dimensions of coral reef restoration and monitoring is imperative in efforts to sustain and restore the world's coral reefs, which are experiencing catastrophic declines. This article reports on the methodologies used to conduct interdisciplinary fieldwork that began in June 2020, investigating how coral restoration practitioners navigated the ecological and societal changes impacting reef restoration and monitoring strategies for the Florida Reef Tract. The necessity to limit face-to-face contact due to the COVID-19 pandemic resulted in shifts in the way the researchers communicated with stakeholders regarding environmental management practices. The research team utilized digital ethnographic methodologies to investigate the challenges in testing and implementing monitoring methods used for coral reef restoration. This paper discusses the impact of conducting interdisciplinary team-based research and community engagement during a pandemic. The challenges and opportunities in conducting virtual ethnographic interviews from multi-leveled stakeholder groups through online communication platforms are explored. This work found that the COVID-19 pandemic restructured the way research can be conducted to reach stakeholders who would be unavailable using traditional in-person data collection strategies.

6.
Theory and Practice in Language Studies ; 12(9):1838-1847, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2040516

ABSTRACT

-Reading through mobile phones is increasingly popularized worldwide, particularly among young adults. However, few researchers investigate EFL learners' attitudes towards smartphone-based reading. The present research conducted a questionnaire survey to explore EFL learners' perceptions and beliefs by integrating the reading attitude model with the technology acceptance model UTAUT2. One hundred ninety-two participants responded to the questionnaire. The statistical data analysis, including t-tests and analysis of variance (ANOVA), indicated that Chinese EFL learners were generally positive in smartphone-based reading. Although they did not show keen feelings about it or form a habit of using the smartphone for EFL reading, they could perceive its usefulness and ease of use and positively believed in its future use in EFL reading. Additionally, gender differences did not impact EFL learners' overall attitudes. Still, participants' interest in English and experiences in mobile reading did suggest positive influences on their attitudes towards reading through the phone. Finally, the implications of the results and pedagogical practice of smartphone use in EFL reading are discussed.

7.
J Dent Educ ; 2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2034817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Historical evidence shows a gender-based disproportionate effect of pandemics across different populations. In 2020, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic began spreading its devastating effects worldwide. The goal of the present study was to investigate the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on research productivity, work-life arrangements, and mental health of dental professionals worldwide with focus on gender differences. METHODS: A 38-item survey, concerning demographics, career stage, employer support, family structure, mental health, and relationships, was distributed to 7692 active members of the International Association for Dental Research. Bivariate associations between independent variables and the primary outcome variable were tested using Spearman's correlation test. A logistic regression model was used to assess the simultaneous, independent associations between each variable and researcher productivity. RESULTS: A total of 722 responses were obtained, indicating a 9.4% response rate. Higher productivity was reported by male respondents (p = 0.021), and by those in senior career stages (p = 0.001). Institutional support was associated with higher productivity (p < 0.0001). Lower productivity was reported by younger researchers (p = 0.003). Remote work negatively affected productivity (p < 0.0001) and female respondents reported working more hours, regardless of work location (p = 0.004). Poor mental health was associated with low productivity (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that the COVID-19 pandemic significantly affected dental professionals' perceived productivity and mental health around the globe. Younger individuals and women were disproportionally affected, and institutional support had a significant influence to mitigate effects of the pandemic for dental researchers.

8.
TEM Journal ; 11(3):1047-1054, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2030428

ABSTRACT

The arrival of COVID-19 meant a drastic change in the way of teaching and research. This paper explores the effect that the measures taken to contain the COVID-19 spreads have had on the research activities of teachers about variables such as area of knowledge, educational level, and role in projects or gender. To this end, an online survey was designed to collect data, requesting information about time lost in research, the number of papers proposed for publication in scientific journals, difficulties in managing research projects, guarantees in project funding or the capacity to reformulate research activities. Two hundred seventy-one teachers and researchers were asked to participate. Among the main results, most respondents agree on the difficulties in managing their projects;they have been forced to reformulate their research, although they claim that the time lost in research has been limited. The results will help to make decisions on the measures to be taken to alleviate the low performance of research by teacher-researchers during this period and to prepare contingency plans to reduce the impact. © 2022, Iris Betzaida Pérez-Almeida et al;published by UIKTEN. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 4.0 License.

9.
The Qualitative Report ; 27(9):1827-1829, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2026765

ABSTRACT

Technology has become an increasingly valuable tool to the field of research. However, researchers must be provided with training to conduct ethically sound qualitative research in online settings. Jennifer Dale and Susan Abbott provide such preparation in their book, Qual-Online the Essential Guide: What Every Researcher Needs to Know about Conducting and Moderating Interviews via the Web. This guidebook explains the purpose, process, and resources associated with conducting and moderating online interviews, and provides novice to experienced qualitative researchers with practical examples and tips for implementation.

10.
Przeglad Socjologii Jakosciowej ; 18(3):6-9, 2022.
Article in Polish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2025988

ABSTRACT

The article is an introduction to the volume concerning young sociology researchers’ areas of interest. The first part of the text attempts to define who “young researchers” are. The second part of the introduction presents the topics covered in research by representatives of the group of young researchers. The texts included in this volume are devoted to issues from the field of disability research in the cultural and social perspectives, to a methodological reflection on changing research techniques in response to the COVID-19 pandemic situation, as well as to drug policies and unusual surnames. © by the author, licensee University of Lodz, Poland.

11.
Eurasian Journal of Business and Management ; 10(2):137-152, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2025814

ABSTRACT

Transfer pricing manipulation by multinational enterprises is a big problem in developing countries, considering the increased levels of tax avoidance and evasion in these countries. The revenue lost through evasion and avoidance schemes as well as through aggressive tax planning robs developing countries of the much-needed domestic revenues to fund public expenditure. The repercussions of revenue inadequacies are evident in developing countries' governments to adequately invest in education, tax administration, health and security, infrastructural development, and economic development. Most developing countries having enacted transfer pricing regulation, with the arm's length principle are at the core of these regulations. This principle has been criticized in literature for its inefficiency and ineffectiveness in regulating transfer pricing in evolving economic times, while some researchers continue to maintain its relevance. In view of the conflicting views on the cogency of the arm's length principle in developing countries, this paper sought to unpack this debate through an evaluative review to show the areas of disagreement and agreement among scholars. The review was motivated by the continued concern and discussions of tax evasion and avoidance by multinational enterprises through aggressive transfer pricing in developing countries. Through a critical literature review, this article assesses the applicability and relevance of the principle in developing countries. Findings reveal controversies in the availability of comparable data, continued abuse of transfer pricing as well as the difficulty in applying the principle in digital transactions and intangibles.

12.
Sustainability ; 14(17):10541, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024177

ABSTRACT

Understanding the co-movement and lag–lead relations among indices is integral to financial decision making. These parameters show the reactiveness of the market towards new information. Understanding them helps to minimize risk and facilitates optimal portfolio diversification. By employing the wavelet coherence econometric model, the authors of this study analyzed the intricate relations among the Bond and Ṣukūk indices using global data belonging to the United States (US), the United Kingdom (UK), Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries. The findings indicated the presence of strong but similar implications of the initial shock of COVID-19 deaths on both Islamic and conventional markets’ volatilities, especially in long-term investment bands (64–128 days). The results oppose the general belief that Islamic finance is more sustainable and less volatile to crises than its traditional counterparts. Moreover, the authors of this study report diverse relationships among bond and Ṣukūk indices throughout the sample periods. We consistently found low correlations in short-term investment bands (4–16), leading to optimal diversification opportunities. However, high correlations were reported due to COVID-19 in the long-term investment bands (128–256), leading to low diversification opportunities for long-term investors.

13.
Sustainability ; 14(16):10150, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2024140

ABSTRACT

The application of business model innovation (BMI) generally creates more competent and flexible enterprises in changeable markets and helps to achieve competitive advantages. Especially in a post-pandemic age, BMI has a particular significance. As such, in this study, based on the resource-based view theory, we aimed to explore how Chinese publicly traded film companies apply BMI from the perspective of the interplay of external and internal knowledge acquisition. Our focus was examining the influence of the search for external knowledge and the creation of internal knowledge on the BMI of Chinese film companies. On the basis of interviews and field observation, we selected environmental volatility and management attention as the independent variables in the study model. We analyzed the data collected from 36 Chinese publicly traded film companies by correlation and regression. The results showed that external knowledge search and internal knowledge creation substantially influenced the BMI of Chinese film companies. In addition, environmental volatility and management attention positively influenced BMI. The findings provide practical information motivating Chinese publicly traded film companies to apply BMI in the post-pandemic era.

14.
Applied Sciences ; 12(16):8038, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2023095

ABSTRACT

This research measured consumers’ emotions and change in emotion to the specific sensory taste properties and attitudes of chocolate-based biscuits. The sample size involved 216 respondents from South Africa (n = 106) and Switzerland (n = 110). Respondents tasted chocolate-based biscuits and completed an online questionnaire. The increase in consumers’ levels of guilt after chocolate-based biscuit consumption and the contribution of a chocolate taste and craving attitude to consumers’ subsequent positive emotions and change in positive emotions could help food and consumer scientists to understand the link between emotions and the sensory descriptors of chocolate-based biscuits. Investigating the association between the emotional responses and sensory attributes of sweet baked products could benefit product developers when formulating food products for specific target markets and aid in the understanding of the emotional profile of food products.

15.
Profesional de la Informacion ; 31(4):1-22, 2022.
Article in Spanish | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2022548

ABSTRACT

After two-years of repeat interviewing around 170 early career science/social science researchers from China, France, Malaysia, Poland, Russia, Spain, UK and US about their work life and scholarly communications in pandemic-times, the Harbingers project is now in possession of a mountain of data on what constitutes a very important academic topic. The purpose of the paper is to share the early highlights of the data, with a focus on the main and lasting impacts of the pandemic. The data presented comes from the national interviewers, who had conducted 3 rounds of interviews with their 20 or so early career researchers (ECRs) over two years and, thus, knew them well. They were asked to provide an ‘aerial view’ by identifying the most important impacts they had detected while things were still fresh in their minds. The main findings are that: 1) ECRs, the research workhorses, have generally proved to be resilient and perseverant and some have prospered;2) the pandemic has fast-tracked researchers to a virtual and remote scholarly world, with all the advantages and disadvantages that comes with it. The data, however, is nuanced, with significant differences occurring between countries, especially China and France. The paper also updates a literature review on the topic previously published in this journal. © 2022, El Profesional de la Informacion. All rights reserved.

16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(16)2022 08 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2023658

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Improving food and nutrition literacy is fundamental to tackling the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region's enormous challenges, including malnutrition and food insecurity. To direct initiatives, it is crucial to assess the region's food and nutrition literacy. Thus, we aimed to review studies on food/nutrition literacy status in the MENA countries and illuminate the region's research gaps in these areas, in terms of assessment, policy, and program implementation. METHODS: PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched between 18 December and 8 May 2022, to identify relevant articles published up to 2022 in the MENA region. RESULTS: Twelve studies were included in this review. Lebanon, Palestine, and Iran are the only three MENA countries where nutrition and/or food literacy were assessed. People in these countries mostly had inadequate food and/or nutrition literacy levels, especially in the skills rather than the cognitive domain. Food and/or nutrition literacy showed associations with food habits, food-label use, food-consumption patterns, school performance, food security, dietary diversity, and nutrient adequacy. The MENA countries developed no policies or programs to address food and nutrition literacy. CONCLUSION: This review is a wake-up call for researchers and policymakers to develop a robust approach to combat food and nutrition literacy concerns in the MENA region.


Subject(s)
Literacy , Nutritional Status , Administrative Personnel , Africa, Northern , Humans , Lebanon
17.
Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal ; 13(5):1033-1059, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2018575

ABSTRACT

Purpose>The purpose of this study is to provide insights into how accounting and accountability systems can contribute to transforming metrics used thus far in research performance evaluation. New metrics are needed to increase research impact on the challenges addressed by science. In particular, we document and reflect on accounting transformations towards responsible research and innovation (RRI).Design/methodology/approach>The study draws on the European H2020 MULTI-ACT research project that focuses on the development of a collective research impact framework in the area of health research. We document, analyse and report our engagement in this project, which also included research funders, patient organizations, health researchers, accounting practitioners and health care providers. Drawing on RRI, Mode 2 knowledge production and accounting performativity, we inquire into the potential of accounting technologies to foster knowledge production and increase research impact.Findings>The study shows how the engagement of accounting with other disciplines enables the development of new and relevant forms of research impact assessment. We document how accounting can be mobilised for the development of new forms of research impact assessment (i.e. indicators that evaluate key accountability dimensions to promote RRI) and how it helps to overcome the difficulties that can emerge during this process. We also show how the design of multiple accountabilities’ indicators, although chronically partial, produced a generative interrogation and discussion about how to translate RRI to research assessment in a workable setting, and the pivotal role of certain circumstances (e.g. the presence of authoritative actors) that appear during the knowledge production process for creating these generative opportunities.Practical implications>This study illustrates the key role of accounts in the generation of knowledge. It also shows the value of considering the stakes of all affected actors in devising fruitful accounting approaches. This collective perspective is timely in the accounting discipline and could foster the connection between academics and practice which is so far under-reported. This perspective should be useful for policymakers such as the European Union and managers in the design of new policies, initiatives and practices.Social implications>Discussing and devising appropriate research assessment frameworks is strategic for the maximization of the social impact of research results. Accounting has a key role to play in optimizing a sustainable return on investment in research.Originality/value>How to assess research impact in a more balanced way is in an early stage of development. The study provides empirical and practical material to advance further work and develop its potential to broaden the conceptualization of accountability.

18.
BMJ Evidence - Based Medicine ; 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2020010

ABSTRACT

Dissemination has been defined as ‘the targeted distribution of information and intervention materials to a specific public health or clinical practice audience’,1 and as being ‘simply about getting the findings of your research to the people who can make use of them, to maximise the benefit of the research without delay’.2 Ethics guidelines concur that research stakeholders have ethical obligations to disseminate positive, inconclusive or negative results,3 in an accurate, comprehensive and transparent way4—even more so during public health emergencies.5

19.
Nature ; 609(7926):S25-S27, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2016637

ABSTRACT

Five researchers offer advice on how to recruit and retain talented students and colleagues, based on their own experiences of being hired, and of hiring colleagues to join their research groups. LARA URBAN BE FAIR AND CONSIDER USING SOCIAL MEDIA I began my own research group at Helmholtz Munich, the German Research Center for Environmental Health, in June 2022. [...]I make use of social media, especially Twitter, to share research openings. Lara Urban is a conservation genomics researcher and principal investigator at the Helmholtz Pioneer Campus and Helmholtz AI in Munich, Germany, and at the Technical University of Munich School of Life Sciences in Freising, Germany.

20.
Nature ; 608(7924):S52-S53, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2016622

ABSTRACT

Participants were placed into low, medium and high cardiac risk groups on the basis of factors such as their cholesterol levels, blood pressure, diabetes status and smoking habits. Heartdisease risk and depressed mood, the researchers state, might be linked because some of the same physical processes that cause heart disease, such as inflammation, blood vessel deterioration and reduced insulin sensitivity, are also thought to contribute to the onset of depression. PLoS ONE 17, e0265079 (2022) Inflammation tied to genetic depression People who have genes that increase their risk of depression also tend to have higher counts of white blood cells, indicating some level of inflammation in the body. Members of the genetic high-risk group turned out to have higher levels of white blood cells overall, as well as high levels of specific immune cells, such as monocytes and neutrophils.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL