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1.
J Clin Anesth ; 84: 110990, 2022 Nov 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2105292

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: A high prevalence of burnout, depression and suicidal ideation has been reported among anesthesiology trainees. Over the last decade, there has been a significant emphasis on the development of wellness programs in academic departments to mitigate the prevalence and effects of burnout during anesthesiology training. Therefore, we aimed to reevaluate the prevalence of burnout and depression in anesthesiology trainees in the United States. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Anesthesiology Department. PATIENTS: A nationally representative sample of 1000 anesthesiology trainees in the United States. MEASUREMENTS: A 33-item questionnaire consisting of 1) burnout, 2) depression, 3) job satisfaction, 4) family support, 5) work characteristics, 6) demographic factors, 7) self-reported errors, and 8) impact of COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: We received 384 responses. Twenty-four percent (91/384) of the respondents met the criteria for high burnout risk and 58/384 (15%) of the respondents screened positive for depression. Multivariable analysis revealed that: (1) hours per week > 70, (odds ratio [OR; 95% confidence interval {CI}] = 3.1 [1.4-6.8], P=0.005 and (2) overnight calls per month > 7 (OR [95% CI] = 2.5 [1.0- 6.0], P=0.03 were independent factors for increased odds of burnout whereas the presence of (3) married/domestic partnership (OR [95% CI} = 0.52 [0.32-0.85], P=0.01 was associated with lower odds of burnout and/or depression. Ten percent (4/40) of high burnout/depression residents reported that they often times fall short in the quality of care provided to patients compared to 0.36% (1/275) residents with low burnout/depression scores, P < 0.001. Similarly, 22% (9/40) of high burnout/depression residents reported that they often times did not have enough attention to their patients compared to 4% (11/275) residents with low burnout/depression scores, P < 0.001. CONCLUSIONS: We report a still concerning but significantly lower rate of burnout and depression in anesthesiology trainees than previously reported a decade ago. This suggests that efforts on wellness implemented by academic programs have positively impacted the work experience of anesthesia trainees.

3.
Environmental and Sustainability Indicators ; JOUR: 100209,
Article in English | ScienceDirect | ID: covidwho-2083186

ABSTRACT

In recent years, it became clear that the human unsustainable behaviours’ impact on the environment. Environment protected behavior is especially relevant in the context of the current epidemiological situation ushered by the COVID-19. Environmental awareness is becoming a part of everyday life. The time has come when it is necessary to sacrifice the comfort for the future of the planet. This study primarily focuses on the attitudes of residents of a typical Russian industrial city towards environmental issues and the use of the Energy-Saving Behavior Index (ESBI) as an environmental indicator of sustainable behavior. Our work investigates ESBI and the factors which are associated with domestic energy-saving behavior. We surveyed 599 people in Chelyabinsk, Russia. We studied (1) the socio-demographic factors of residents and their households, (2) mental health and subjective well-being (SWB), and (3) physical health. The study showed that the overwhelming majority of residents of a typical Russian city are extremely dissatisfied with the state of the environment (more than 80% of respondents) and 70% of them believe that they can contribute to improving the situation. However, Russians are still wasteful in household energy consumption. It has been shown that unstable behavior is due to psychological factors and has a compensatory mechanism that is connected with the “feelings-emotions-behavior” sequence.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071431

ABSTRACT

Many studies have investigated the state of the health of healthcare workers during the acute period of the pandemic. Yet, few studies have assessed the health of such professionals after the pandemic and in a less dramatic period. This study involved a particular sample represented by residents in anaesthesia-resuscitation and psychiatry at a university in northern Italy particularly affected by the pandemic. The objectives were to investigate some indicators of health and well-being and compare the two groups of trainees. Using Google Forms, the following tests were proposed: the General Health Questionnaire, Maslach Burnout Inventory, Subjective Happiness Scale, Satisfaction with Life Scale, Coping Inventory for Stressful Situations, Brief Resilience Scale, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, as well as an ad hoc questionnaire. A qualifying element of the work was the discussion of the results with the trainees. Various strengths have emerged, such as high values of resilience and job satisfaction; a positive assessment of the support received from the work team; an articulate use of coping strategies; and good levels of happiness and satisfaction with life, in both specialities. However, a widespread anxiety also emerged, which appears to be more attributable to concerns about professional evaluation, rather than the pandemic itself. In summary, the trainees seem to have found a fair amount of personal balance, whereas the relationship with the patient seems to be more compromised. In the comparison between specialities, the only significant differences are the levels of depersonalisation and resilience, both of which are higher in anaesthetists.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cities , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Pandemics , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Medical Science ; 26(126), 2022.
Article in English | Web of Science | ID: covidwho-2072569

ABSTRACT

It has been recommended to implement physically active lifestyles against the negative consequences of the COVID-19 pandemic. During the pandemic process, many healthcare professionals had to lead a stressful life due to long hours of intensive healthcare. This situation directly affected the burnout levels of physicians as well as indirectly affected patients seeking treatment. The goal of this study was to look into the effects of physicians' levels of participation in sports, their attitudes toward sporting recreational activities, and the effects of COVID-19 phobias on burnout. 272 physicians participated in the study. The Health Belief Scale Regarding Sports Recreational Activities (HBSSRA), Maslach Burnout Scale (MBI), and COVID-19 Phobia Scale (C19P-S) were used during data collection. Spearman correlation coefficient was used for correlation analysis, Kruskal-Wallis test was used to compare groups, and logistic regression analysis was used to establish a model. MBI total and emotional exhaustion scores were significantly different according to the physicians' participation levels in sportive activities (P=0.740, P=0.136). Statistically significant correlation was found between HBSSRA and MBI total scores (r=-0.313, P=0.009). The probability of emotional exhaustion was 1.45 times higher in physicians with low level of participation in sports activities. The increase in HBSSRA scores had a protective effect on emotional burnout (P=0.028, OR: 0.72). We are hopeful that the findings obtained from physicians will highlight the importance of sports and recreational activities, paving the way for improvement strategies that will benefit those who are most affected by the COVID-19 crisis.

6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066055

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: When the global COVID-19 epidemic continues to spread, residents pay more attention to their health. This paper studies the relationship between the equity of government health expenditure and the health level of residents. METHODS: The Theil index and a principal component analysis were used to measure the equity of government health expenditure and the health level of residents in the Chengdu-Chongqing economic circle. Then, an empirical study on the relationship between the equity of government health expenditure and the health level of residents in this region was conducted with the System GMM model. RESULTS: 1. The Theil index rose from 0.0115 in 2015 to 0.0231 in 2017 and gradually decreased to 0.0106 in 2020. 2. The overall health level of residents showed an upward trend, rising from 1.95 in 2015 to 2.33 in 2017, then remained high and fluctuated slightly. 3. There was a positive correlation between the Theil index and the health level of residents at a significance level of 1% (ß = 0.903, p < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: 1. The Theil index was close to 0, indicating that the equity of government health expenditure in the Chengdu-Chongqing economic circle was generally good. 2. The health level of residents in the Chengdu-Chongqing economic circle had improved compared to before. 3. The fairer the government's health expenditure, the higher the residents' health level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Equity , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Government , Health Expenditures , Health Status , Humans
7.
Sustainability (Switzerland) ; 14(18), 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2066368

ABSTRACT

Organising the 2020 European Football Championship was fraught with the uncertainties of the pandemic period. Budapest hosted its four allocated matches during the postponed event without stadium capacity restrictions. Drawing on both social exchange theory (SET) and social representation theory (SRT), the study aimed to investigate how the level of fear of COVID-19 before the start of Euro 2020 influenced the perception of the tournament among residents of Budapest. Data were collected by telephone interview during the five days preceding the event based on a representative sample of Budapest residents (n = 1003, adult population aged 18 years and over), accounting for gender, age and place of residence. Cluster analysis identified three groups of residents based on fear of coronavirus: concerned, neutral and unconcerned. Although our study only investigated the opinions of residents in one host city, the relevance of the research appears compelling in that it highlights the crucial role of COVID-19 in influencing responses to the expected impact of Euro 2020. Examining the views of local residents and understanding the factors that influence their opinions play a key role in more successful and sustainable delivery of sporting events. © 2022 by the authors.

8.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; : 1-23, 2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062079

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: COVID-19 has spread worldwide due to high infectivity. The social sexual environment in rural areas of China and the weak basic medical facilities, may affect the treatment and transmission of the disease. The aim of this study was to understand the knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) related to COVID-19 among residents in rural areas experiencing the epidemic and the factors, to provide a basis for further epidemic prevention and control. METHODS: The COVID-19 KAP of rural residents in Hebei Province was collected by the snowball sampling method. The COVID-19 KAP questionnaire was distributed on social platforms such as WeChat and QQ through a network questionnaire. RESULTS: The overall level of COVID-19 KAP in rural residents was good, but in terms of knowledge, the correct rate of isolation was 73.2%, the correct rate of two disinfection items were 72.3% and 77.4%, and the correct rate about hand washing was 70.7%. 54.5% residents feel panic. 81.0% disinfected household items, and 84.9% washed hands correctly. Residents still needed to strengthen these aspects. Binary logistic analysis showed that age, education and whether to participated in training were factors affecting the level of COVID-19 KAP. CONCLUSIONS: This study found that rural residents had good levels of COVID-19 KAP, but there were gaps in specific issues that warrant attention. We advocate training on COVID-19 for rural residents.

9.
Journal of Sustainable Tourism ; : 1-19, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2062615

ABSTRACT

Rooted in conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study investigated the effects of perceived threat severity (PTSE) and susceptibility (PTSU) of COVID-19 pandemic on residents’ hospitality toward tourists. The mediating role of COVID-19-caused stress and the moderating role of economic benefits from tourism were addressed. Data were collected from 281 destination residents in Xiamen and analyzed using structural equation modeling. Findings indicate that the negative effect of PTSE on residents’ hospitality toward tourists is stronger than that of PTSU, and both effects are partially mediated by COVID-19-caused stress. Furthermore, economic benefits from tourism significantly moderates the effects of PTSE, PTSU, and COVID-19-caused stress on residents’ hospitality toward tourists, and these effects are insignificant for residents with high economic benefits from tourism. Theoretically, this study advances literature on residents’ attitudes toward tourism by introducing COR theory to build a framework centered on resource loss and replenishment. Practically, useful strategies are proposed to reduce the negative effects of PTSE and PTSU of COVID-19 pandemic and thus foster residents’ hospitality toward tourists. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of Journal of Sustainable Tourism is the property of Taylor & Francis Ltd and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

10.
Ethics & International Affairs ; 36(3):333-351, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2062088

ABSTRACT

What does vaccine justice require at the domestic and global levels? In this essay, using the COVID-19 pandemic as a backdrop, we argue that deliberative-democratic participation is needed to answer this question. To be effective on the ground, principles of vaccine justice need to be further specified through policy. Any vaccination strategy needs to find ways to prioritize conflicting moral claims to vaccine allocation, clarify the grounds on which low-risk people are being asked to vaccinate, and reach a balance between special duties toward countrymen and universal duties toward foreigners. Reasonable moral disagreement on these questions is bound to exist in any community. But such disagreement threatens to undermine vaccine justice insofar as the chosen vaccination strategy (and its proposed specification of vaccine justice) lacks public justification. Inclusive democratic deliberation about vaccine justice is a good mechanism for tackling such moral disagreement. By allowing residents and citizens to participate in the specification of principles of vaccine justice, and their translation into policy, democratic deliberation can enhance the legitimacy of any vaccination strategy and boost compliance with it.

11.
Saudi Endodontic Journal ; 12(3):269-276, 2022.
Article in English | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2055771

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic had a profound impact on dental care and academic education. This survey investigated the prevalence of the COVID-19 pandemic, symptoms, and its impact among endodontic trainees in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional web-based survey targeted all endodontic residents in Saudi Arabia. A 22-item questionnaire was distributed to a total of 197 participants. The questionnaire included questions related to demographic information, COVID-19 impact on endodontic postgraduate training, the incidence of testing positive, symptoms experienced, and infection control measures. Descriptive and analytic statistics (Chi-square or Fisher's exact test) were used for the analysis. The significance level was set at P ≤ 0.05. Results: A total of 125 residents completed the survey. During June and July of 2020, most residents (45% and 50%) were required to perform only urgent endodontic care. Among the 125 residents, 52.8% reported being tested for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. Of these 66 who were tested, 13.6% had positive results. Eight of the nine residents who tested positive were male. Muscle pain, loss of smell and taste, fever, and headache were the most reported symptoms. A nonsurgical root canal treatment was the most common endodontic procedure performed among those surveyed (100%, n = 125), followed by endodontic emergency (84.8%, n = 106), with surgical endodontic treatment being far less frequent (27.2%, n = 34). Enhanced infection prevention and control measures were common practices during the pandemic;almost half of the residents reported using an N95 respirator or equivalent face mask. Residents continued to provide urgent care during the pandemic, and the majority returning gradually to practice as they had before the COVID-19 pandemic by December 2020. Conclusion: This survey showed a relatively low prevalence of COVID-19 among endodontic residents compared with other frontline healthcare workers. More male residents tested positive COVID-19. A more effective protection measurement should be made available and accessible to endodontic residents to ensure their safety and prevent interruptions to their clinical training. © 2022 Saudi Endodontic Journal ;Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow.

12.
Fudan University Journal of Medical Sciences ; 49(4):537-547, 2022.
Article in Chinese | Scopus | ID: covidwho-2055554

ABSTRACT

Objective To understand the status of family services and residents’demands for services in Shanghai in order to construct and improve the key elements of family services in public health events. Methods We used a combining method of individual in-depth interviews and focused group interviews. The informants were domestic and foreign experts in public health, health services, education, safety, etc., community workers and residents. The interview questions were as follow:problems in family services, residents’demands and suggestions for family services, etc. Results We found 7 major family services problems in Shanghai’s response to public health events:The boundary of authorities and responsibilities were not clearly defined between the upper and lower departments. The team construction of public health professions at the community level was flawed. There were miscommunications between upper and lower medical institutions during the epidemic outbreaks. Residents were not aware of the available family services provided by their communities. Unnoticed insanitary spots still existed in public spaces, and the maintenance of residential emergence equipment needs to be strengthened. The public opinion guidance required further strengthening, and the elderly people lack an effective medium for information acquisition. The emergency plan of closed management to solve practical problems after Shanghai’s COVID lockdown was insufficient. The residents’demands included the following 6 aspects:comprehensive family services, supply and guarantee of basic living materials and special materials, professionals providing family services as a means of support, emergency medical services, receiving psychological intervention and understanding knowledge of mental health, security of food and food supply chain security. Conclusion ‘Government led’‘cross-border cooperation’‘clear executive body’and ‘based on the needs of residents’were key factors. Therefore, we suggest family services are included in the normalizing construction of government. © 2022 Fudan University. All rights reserved.

13.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(Supplement_2): S147-S154, 2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051360

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Residents of nursing homes experience disproportionate morbidity and mortality related to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and were prioritized for vaccine introduction. We evaluated COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness (VE) in preventing severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infections among nursing home residents. METHODS: We used a retrospective cohort of 4315 nursing home residents during 14 December 2020-9 November 2021. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to estimate hazard ratios comparing residents with a completed vaccination series with unvaccinated among those with and without prior SARS-CoV-2 infection, by vaccine product, and by time period. RESULTS: Overall adjusted VE was 58% (95% confidence interval [CI], 44% to 69%) among residents without a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection. During the pre-Delta period, the VE within 150 days of receipt of the second dose of Pfizer-BioNTech (67%; 95% CI, 40% to 82%) and Moderna (75%; 95% CI, 32% to 91%) was similar. During the Delta period, VE measured >150 days after the second dose was 33% (95% CI, -2% to 56%) for Pfizer-BioNTech and 77% (95% CI, 48% to 91%) for Moderna. Rates of infection were 78% lower (95% CI, 67% to 85%) among residents with prior SARS-CoV-2 infection and completed vaccination series compared with unvaccinated residents without a history of SARS-CoV-2 infection. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 vaccines were effective in preventing SARS-CoV-2 infections among nursing home residents, and history of prior SARS-CoV-2 infection provided additional protection. Maintaining high coverage of recommended doses of COVID-19 vaccines remains a critical tool for preventing infections in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Nursing Homes , Retrospective Studies , Vaccination
14.
Psychol Health Med ; : 1-8, 2022 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2050949

ABSTRACT

The adverse impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on mental health has been widely concerned, but the research on positive psychological factors is insufficient, this study aims to investigate the prevalence and factors of posttraumatic growth (PTG) among residents in the worst-hit areas of China (Hubei Province). We were conducted in three disaster areas with different severity in Hubei Province three months after the outbreak, and the data were from 575 respondents. Instruments included the simplified Chinese version of the Posttraumatic Growth Inventory (C-PTGI) and the public health emergency psychological questionnaire. Nonparametric tests, Spearman correlation analyses, and multiple linear regression equations were used to analyze the data. The results showed that three months after the outbreak of COVID-19, the PTG of Hubei residents was at a low level, and their sense of fear was the most prominent, with a positive detection rate of 82.09%. According to the results of this study, high PTG levels were associated with high levels of fear, married and healthcare providers, while low levels of PTG were associated with serious chronic diseases, males, good economic status, and poor prevention and control measures. Government departments should strengthen social support for residents, carry out necessary stress management training to help them correctly deal with negative emotions and promote their personal growth.

15.
Social Policy and Administration ; 56(6):867-873, 2022.
Article in English | ProQuest Central | ID: covidwho-2052936

ABSTRACT

China as a welfare system is not yet well understood in social policy circles, despite being a well‐studied case in public administration and political science. Would this party‐state care to commit for its citizens' welfare? For many, associating the idea of a welfare state with China is still something to be frowned upon. Most available literature, especially in the English language, describes social policies in China as residual, unequally distributed, strongly dependent on local finances, prone to social dumping—especially for rural residents and migrant workers—paternalistic, disregarding social needs and so on. Yet, we believe that the social dumping practices of the 1980s and 1990s are now a thing of the past. As the government has taken a decidedly pro‐welfare stance since the 2000s, it could be more reasonable to identify different historical phases through which the welfare system took shape in China. We identify and discuss three stages in particular: the ‘iron rice bowl’ phase of socialist China (1949–1978), the welfare shedding resulting from China's opening up to the market (1979–2002), and the ‘social policy era’ characterised by major welfare expansion (2002–2020).

16.
Syst Rev ; 11(1): 203, 2022 09 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043140

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Long-term care facilities (LTCFs) have been severely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic with serious consequences for the residents. Some LTCFs performed better than others, experiencing lower case and death rates due to COVID-19. A comprehensive understanding of the factors that have affected the transmission of COVID-19 in LTCFs is lacking, as no published studies have applied a multidimensional conceptual framework to evaluate the performance of LTCFs during the pandemic. Much research has focused on infection prevention and control strategies or specific disease outcomes (e.g., death rates). To address these gaps, our scoping review will identify and analyze the performance factors that have influenced the management of COVID-19 in LTCFs by adopting a multidimensional conceptual framework. METHODS: We will query the CINAHL, MEDLINE (Ovid), CAIRN, Science Direct, and Web of Science databases for peer-reviewed articles written in English or French and published between January 1, 2020 and December 31, 2021. We will include articles that focus on the specified context (COVID-19), population (LTCFs), interest (facilitators and barriers to performance of LTCFs), and outcomes (dimensions of performance according to a modified version of the Ministère de la santé et des services sociaux du Québec conceptual framework). Each article will be screened by at least two co-authors independently followed by data extraction of the included articles by one co-author and a review by the principal investigator. RESULTS: We will present the results both narratively and with visual aids (e.g., flowcharts, tables, conceptual maps). DISCUSSION: Our scoping review will provide a comprehensive understanding of the factors that have affected the performance of LTCFs during the COVID-19 pandemic. This knowledge can help inform the development of more effective infection prevention and control measures for future pandemics and outbreaks. The results of our review may lead to improvements in the care and safety of LTCF residents and staff. SCOPING REVIEW REGISTRATION: Research Registry researchregistry7026.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Facilities , Humans , Long-Term Care/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Review Literature as Topic , Skilled Nursing Facilities
17.
International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics ; 114(3):e499-e499, 2022.
Article in English | Academic Search Complete | ID: covidwho-2036127

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study is to assess the knowledge base of primary care residents in the state of Oklahoma regarding radiation oncology. For this study, primary care resident physicians were defined as those training in Family Medicine or Internal Medicine. Primary Care residency programs within the state of Oklahoma were identified through the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) website. Residency programs were in both urban and rural communities. Program directors were contacted to set up a didactic session. A 1-hour lecture covering introductory topics in radiation oncology as well as case-based learning topics pertaining to radiation oncology in the primary care setting was delivered. Residents were given a pre- and post-lecture survey. Ten residency programs, with a total of 281 residents, extended an invitation for didactics. Given the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, some programs requested that the lecture be delivered virtually. A total of 122 residents completed the pre-lecture survey;51.6% were female, 41.7% were interns, 39.2% were second year residents, and 17.5% were third year residents. A total of 50.8% of respondents attended medical school in Oklahoma and 30.3% attended an allopathic medical school. Over half of trainees stated that they had no exposure to didactics covering radiation oncology during the pre-clinical years of medical school (66.1%). A similar number of residents (65.5%) stated that there were no structured radiation oncology rotations in medical school during clinical years. An overwhelming majority of residents felt that the pre-clinical curriculum did not adequately cover radiation oncology (95.9%). Residents reported that most training facilities had radiation oncology services at their disposal (73.3%);however, only 60.3% of residents had previously interacted with a radiation oncologist. When asked about their level of confidence in consulting a radiation oncologist, 63.6% of residents stated that they did not feel confident while 24% felt neutral, 12.4% felt somewhat confident, but none of the residents surveyed felt confident. Following the lecture, 63.3% of responding residents felt confident or somewhat confident consulting radiation oncology, while only 8.8% felt not confident. Additionally, 98.5% of respondents felt this lecture was beneficial to their resident education. The majority of respondents felt medical school curriculum does not adequately cover radiation oncology. Nobody in the pre-lecture survey felt confident consulting a radiation oncologist. Most trainees felt this lecture was beneficial to their training. This study highlights a gap in medical knowledge and identifies areas of collaboration between radiation oncologists and primary care physicians regarding patient co-management. [ FROM AUTHOR] Copyright of International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics is the property of Pergamon Press - An Imprint of Elsevier Science and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder's express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full . (Copyright applies to all s.)

18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032951

ABSTRACT

The likelihood of a mega-earthquake, the COVID-19 pandemic, and the threat of other disasters in the Tokyo Metropolitan area have necessitated collective responsibilities to take all possible actions to reduce their impacts. The experiences from past disasters have, however, highlighted the plight of foreign residents in coping with disasters and have reinvigorated calls for rigorous counteractions. As the population of foreign residents continues to increase in the metropolis, this research examines their awareness of risks and the obstacles that hinder disaster preparedness in the wake of future disasters. An Extended Parallel Process Model is utilized to analyze both secondary and primary data sources, and the results reveal that 65% perceive the severity of disaster as a threat and believe in a likelihood of occurrence in the city; however, the confidence to undertake some recommended countermeasures are lacking (with low efficacy of 70%). This is causing many to control their fear by not actively seeking further risk information or participating in disaster prevention activities. In consideration of these instances, the study recommends a collective approach built upon the merits of stakeholder engagements to provide vicarious experiences, verbal persuasions, and mastery experiences to boost the response capacities of foreign residents for disaster preparedness. This will be relevant for city authorities to enhance risk communication and foster foreigner-Japanese community integration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disaster Planning , Disasters , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Japan , Pandemics/prevention & control , Tokyo
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032924

ABSTRACT

The satisfaction of highly educated citizens with community services for COVID-19 represents the attitude of the middle class and plays an important role in both the social and political stability of a country. The aim of this paper was to determine which factors influence public satisfaction with COVID-19 services in a highly educated community. Through a literature review and using the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI) model, this paper constructed a public satisfaction model of community services for COVID-19 and proposed relevant research hypotheses. A community with many highly educated residents in Beijing was selected as the case study, where 450 official questionnaires were distributed based on the age ratio of residents, with 372 valid questionnaires being collected from May 2021 to July 2021. The study results obtained by a structural equation model (SEM) show that: (1) public satisfaction is significantly and positively influenced by quality perception (0.305 **), public demand (0.295 **), and service maturity (0.465 ***); (2) public satisfaction has a significantly positive effect on service image (0.346 ***) and public trust (0.232 **), and service image significantly affects public trust (0.140 *); (3) service maturity is positively influenced by public demand (0.460 ***) and quality perception (0.323 *); and (4) public demand is positively influenced by quality perception (0.693 ***) (* p < 0.05; ** p < 0.01; *** p < 0.00). The conclusions of the study can provide suggestions and recommendations to improve the satisfaction of highly educated residents with community healthcare services during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Personal Satisfaction , Beijing/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Social Welfare
20.
Curr Oncol ; 29(9): 6485-6495, 2022 09 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032871

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Family physicians have low knowledge and preparedness to manage patients with cancer. A breast oncology clinical rotation was developed for family medicine residents to address this gap in medical education. OBJECTIVES AND METHODS: A breast oncology rotation for family residents was evaluated using a pre-post knowledge questionnaire and semi-structured interviews comparing rotation (RRs) versus non-rotation (NRRs) residents. Quantitative and qualitative data were collected via a pre-post knowledge questionnaire and semi-structured interviews, respectively. ANALYSIS: Quantitative data were analysed using descriptive statistics and paired t-tests to compare pre-post-rotation knowledge and preparedness. Qualitative data were coded inductively, analysed, and grouped into categories and themes. Data sets were integrated. RESULTS: The study was terminated early due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Six RRs completed the study; 19 and 2 NRRs completed the quantitative and qualitative portions, respectively. RRs' knowledge scores did not improve, but there was a non-significant increase in preparedness (5.3 to 8.4, p = 0.17) post-rotation. RRs described important rotation outcomes: knowledge of the patient work-up, referral process, and patient treatment trajectory; skills in risk assessment, clinical examination, and empathy, and comfort in counseling. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: Important educational outcomes were obtained despite no change in knowledge scores. This rotation can be adapted to other training programs including an oncology primer to enable trainee integration of new information.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Family Practice/education , Humans , Medical Oncology , Pandemics
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